Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 1, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on the initialfindings. it was important the sue gray report was published in full, the way many people have been calling for, and it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues _ so many people are worried about issues such— so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which _ issues such as their energy bills, which are — issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the _ which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending
9:01 am
all of— and the prime minister is spending all of this— and the prime minister is spending all of this time saving his own skih~ — is the "sorry" from the pm enough for you now? how are you left feeling after sue gray�*s initial findings into pa rtygate? do let me know — it's @vicderbyshire on twitter and instagram. meanwhile, borisjohnson makes his way to ukraine this morning to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. the rate of pick—up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest in a decade. the new york times purchases popular word game wordle for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the publisher says it will remain free to use, for now.
9:02 am
downing street has promised to publish an updated report on lockdown gatherings in number 10 once police have finished their inquiries. the prime minister apologised yesterday after the initial findings led by the civil servant sue gray identified failures of leadership concerning more than a dozen events. however, the full report has not been published while the police investigate alleged covid rule breaking. borisjohnson met with tory mps last night to reassure them and promise a shake—up of how number 10 is run. our political correspondent, ben wright reports. i'd hoping some of the pressure on his premiership might have eased. for now at least. but with the police are now investigating 12
9:03 am
separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. in the commons the prime minister was contrite and defined.— was contrite and defined. firstly, i want to say _ was contrite and defined. firstly, i want to say sorry _ was contrite and defined. firstly, i want to say sorry sorry _ was contrite and defined. firstly, i want to say sorry sorry we - was contrite and defined. firstly, i want to say sorry sorry we simplyl want to say sorry sorry we simply did not get right saying that this or that it is no use saying that people were working hard, this pandemic was hard for everyone. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. bi; labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame.— a man with no shame. by routinely breakin: a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the _ a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules _ a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he _ a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he said, - a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he said, the - breaking the rules he said, the prime — breaking the rules he said, the prime minister took us all for full. he held _ prime minister took us all for full. he held people's sacrifice and
9:04 am
contempt, he showed himself unfit for office — contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. it contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. ., , contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. . , ., for office. it was the former british prime _ for office. it was the former british prime minister- for office. it was the former british prime minister who l for office. it was the former - british prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this. , ., ., ., , this. either my right honourable friend had not _ this. either my right honourable friend had not read _ this. either my right honourable friend had not read the - this. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, . this. either my right honourable| friend had not read the rules, or did not understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number ten. didn't think the rules applied to number ten-— didn't think the rules applied to number ten. ~ . �* ., number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister— number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed - number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the - cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories�* own site. critical voices on the tories' own site. , ., , ., site. the people who were criticising _ site. the people who were criticising this _ site. the people who were criticising this afternoon . site. the people who were i criticising this afternoon in site. the people who were - criticising this afternoon in the chamber— criticising this afternoon in the chamber where the people criticising him before _ chamber where the people criticising him before he was elected as the leader— him before he was elected as the ieader of— him before he was elected as the leader of the party. he has been criticised — leader of the party. he has been criticised ever since.— leader of the party. he has been criticised ever since. number ten sue gray's _ criticised ever since. number ten sue gray's full— criticised ever since. number ten sue gray's full report _ criticised ever since. number ten sue gray's full report will - criticised ever since. number ten sue gray's full report will be - sue gray's full report will be published when the police has finished their investigation. but some tories. it is clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the boris johnson among his own party has taken a hit.— has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that _ has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he _ has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended - has taken a hit. the rules were l broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and he attended parliament and acted as if
9:05 am
he was outraged at finding out the rules were broken and we subsequently found out he already knew the parties were taking place because he was at at least one of them and entered a's report may have been at three, including one in his own flat. ., , ~ , , been at three, including one in his ownflat. .,, ~ , , , own flat. tory mps will be listening carefull at own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully at what _ own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully at what the _ own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully at what the voters - own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully at what the voters have i own flat. tory mps will be listening i carefully at what the voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. . ., , ., ., ., ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would _ ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not _ ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not have _ ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not have happened| i'm sure it would not have happened under— i'm sure it would not have happened under previous prime ministers. | under previous prime ministers. would like under previous prime ministers. i would like to believe he was sorry, but until— would like to believe he was sorry, but until the — would like to believe he was sorry, but until the next _ would like to believe he was sorry, but until the next time. _ would like to believe he was sorry, but until the next time.— but until the next time. while they wait for the _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police to _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide - but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if - but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if any | wait for the police to decide if any laws have been broken, one conservative mp said the prime minister remains on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. well, as you heard in ben wright's report there, the government has committed to publishing the full sue gray report when they get it. here's the deputy prime minister dominic raab. well, look, there's two separate investigations going on, - the police and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report
9:06 am
subject to the individual - claims that have gone - to the police to investigate. that has been published in full. and the pm's been clear that i if sue gray comes back with any further findings that she reports to him, he will publish it in full. | we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, - sue gray's and the met police, i we can't control what they give ito us, but he's been clear that anyl further report from sue gray will be published in full, as indeed the interim report was. - well, the labour leader sir keir starmer says there is no need for all this waiting because those involved could just be honest about what was happening. the metropolitan police asked that the full report not be published at the moment. but the idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day, is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box being asked, were you at this party on the 13th of
9:07 am
november in your own flat? and he says, i can't answer that because of the investigation. he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he's taking us for fools. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is here with me now. how safe is the prime minister in hisjob this morning. he how safe is the prime minister in his job this morning.— his job this morning. he seems re his job this morning. he seems pretty secure — his job this morning. he seems pretty secure for _ his job this morning. he seems pretty secure for a _ his job this morning. he seems pretty secure for a number- his job this morning. he seems pretty secure for a number of. pretty secure for a number of reasons. he had that meeting last night with backbench conservative mps and it seems to have gone better than his public appearance in the house of commons. i think they were reassured that when the government said they would publish sue gray's report in full, the prime minister was also helped by the fact that the blame was spread between number ten, the cabinet office, she did not name the cabinet office, she did not name the prime minister specifically, so the prime minister specifically, so the blame was diffused, keeping an eye on who is arriving whilst we are here. also 30, sue gray gave the
9:08 am
prime minister something to do, which is to upgrade and overhaul the operation at number 10 downing street. it is not alljust about saying sorry or answering activations and defending himself, he has got a practical thing he can do that we can all talk and speculate about. what is he going to do? he has talked about setting up this office of the prime minister and to people that might seem bizarre. the fact is, every prime minister has a very ad hoc arrangement around them that is very informal and it is not clear who does what and who is responsible for what and it changes year by year from person to person. we will get a much more formalised system. one of the criticisms in sue gray's report yesterday that has not got a lot of attention isjunior yesterday that has not got a lot of attention is junior members yesterday that has not got a lot of attention isjunior members of yesterday that has not got a lot of attention is junior members of staff in that building were really worried about what was going on and they felt they could not speak to their superiors. borisjohnson will have to do something to address that. maybe a whistle—blowing process or a
9:09 am
grievance process, like you would expect to see in most big companies. is the prime minister himself going to change? is the prime minister himself going to chance? , to change? does he need to? he talked about _ to change? does he need to? he talked about looking _ to change? does he need to? he talked about looking in _ to change? does he need to? he talked about looking in the - to change? does he need to? he| talked about looking in the mirror yesterday and a lot of his new opponents on his own backbenchers would say, yes, he does need to change and the first thing he can do is take a bit more responsibility. there was not a lot of that in his statement yesterday. but the prime minister's focus at the moment will be on changing the team around him. we don't know if that means anyone will resign or be fired. i suspect he is waiting for the police investigation, like we all are. there are two things developing this morning as we talk, victoria. yesterday, when the prime minister was responding to keir starmer, he made this claim that when keir starmer was director of public prosecutions he failed to prosecute jimmy savile and that raised a few eyebrows amongst mps who are not happy with that. it is not true. the former chief whip has gone on twitter saying that is a smear and
9:10 am
it should be withdrawn. that challenge to borisjohnson from someone on his own side saying that behaviour is not on. the someone on his own side saying that behaviour is not on.— behaviour is not on. the deputy prime minister _ behaviour is not on. the deputy prime minister declined - behaviour is not on. the deputy prime minister declined to - behaviour is not on. the deputy i prime minister declined to repeat behaviour is not on. the deputy - prime minister declined to repeat it on the radio this morning, when there is no parliamentary privilege. that is what triggered julian smith, he was watching to see how dominic raab was behaving this morning on the radio. another thing is the intense amount of speculation about the chief whip mark spencer, who was possible for party discipline. from jufian possible for party discipline. from julian smith- _ dominic raab are saying to radio four, to nick robinson, saying it was part of the cut and thrust, but declined to repeat it.— declined to repeat it. julian smith
9:11 am
is not 'ust declined to repeat it. julian smith is notjust worried _ declined to repeat it. julian smith is not just worried about - declined to repeat it. julian smith is not just worried about that - is not just worried about that statement or whether it looks bad, he is worried about the fact that thatis he is worried about the fact that that is having an effect on our parliamentary system. that reflects a lot of use from people from the theresa may era, they think something is going wrong with the system and the people that are making it go wrong are the people who are in government now. the other thing is the future of the current chief whip, mark spencer. he is the man in charge of party discipline. he has been getting a lot of grief from conservative mps, he does not listen to them or communicate their feelings accurately to 10 downing street and there is speculation about whether he will still be imposed maybe by the end of the day and when he arrives at the cabinet meeting this morning, i asked will you be sticking around? his response was i hope so. not exactly a ringing endorsement of himself, is it? thank ou for endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your — endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your messages _ endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your messages as _ endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your messages as well. - endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your messages as well. i - endorsement of himself, is it? thank you for your messages as well. i was | you for your messages as well. i was asking you is a sorry enough for you now? is it time to move on? how are
9:12 am
you feeling about the party gate findings the morning after the afternoon before. joe dixon says i cannot understand why anyone would defend this man. if you speak to people up and down the country you get the general mood of utter despair and disgust. john says on twitter, oh, my word, the bbc is getting boring, the same story for 24 getting boring, the same story for 2h hours. liam says i had 2a hours. liam says i had to take the dog for a walk and breathe because what i witnessed in our house of democracy was deeply upsetting. what upset me was a complete disregard of the people of this country and a celebration of a man not fit for office. one more, i am still waiting for the unbiased results of the investigation. no hanging before a trial in my house. no hanging before a trial in my house. let's speak now with sir roger gale, conservative mp for north thanet since 1983. he has never been a fan of the prime minister. you have already sent in a letter to the chairman of the committee that can trigger a leadership contest. but there are
9:13 am
not enough of you. the prime minister is safe in hisjob for not enough of you. the prime minister is safe in his job for now. i am not sure that is true, it remains to be seen, but it will happen in the next couple of days as members get feedback from their constituencies. what is absolutely the case quoted and there has been a campaign in the party in the country votes, and we are facing an international crisis. the prime minister of behaviour yes, i think we got to have a new conservative leader. we are not short of talent in the conservative party. once the contest is open i suspect there will be
9:14 am
people throwing their hats in the ring and they are all good. that is not the problem. the problem is the process takes time.— process takes time. yes, and it would be. _ process takes time. yes, and it would be, would _ process takes time. yes, and it would be, would it— process takes time. yes, and it would be, would it not, - process takes time. yes, and it - would be, would it not, completely self indulgent of the conservative party, utterly naval gazing, when a lot of people can't afford to pay their electricity bill at the moment. i their electricity bill at the moment-— their electricity bill at the moment. . ., , , their electricity bill at the moment. . ., i, , moment. i said again yesterday very clearly indeed _ moment. i said again yesterday very clearly indeed that _ moment. i said again yesterday very clearly indeed that there _ moment. i said again yesterday very clearly indeed that there is - moment. i said again yesterday very clearly indeed that there is an - clearly indeed that there is an international crisis, there is also a domestic crisis in terms of fuel bills and the cost of living. and we can't afford the luxury of allowing anything to interfere with the solutions to that. but government goes on, government is notjust the prime minister. sorry it is the phone ringing and i can't answer. the government goes on with or without the prime minister. so sorry. i without the prime minister. so sor . ., �* . without the prime minister. so sor. ., ., ., sorry. i don't have control of it. it is sorry. i don't have control of it. it is fine- _ sorry. i don't have control of it. it is fine. on _ sorry. i don't have control of it. it is fine. on the _ sorry. i don't have control of it. it is fine. on the subject - sorry. i don't have control of it. it is fine. on the subject of - sorry. i don't have control of it. l it is fine. on the subject of sorry, obviously boris johnson it is fine. on the subject of sorry, obviously borisjohnson said sorry,
9:15 am
he said i am sorry, we did not get it right, we didn't handle it correctly. why was that not enough for you? correctly. why was that not enough for ou? ~ , for you? the prime minister said wait for sue _ for you? the prime minister said wait for sue gray _ for you? the prime minister said wait for sue gray four _ for you? the prime minister said wait for sue gray four weeks. - for you? the prime minister said l wait for sue gray four weeks. then yesterday time and again the prime minister said wait for the metropolitan police. the prime minister is kicking the can down the road, and he is running out of road. at the end there is a roadblock. we have got to have a change and the question is not if but when. i am afraid i am so sorry about this, i cannot control my phone. the question is not if but when. we have to sort this out and we have to sort this out as fast as we sensibly can. but with respect, adam fleming was not in the meeting last night, i was. there were certainly a lot of knock—about comedy and the prime minister is very good at that and there was therefore quite a lot of
9:16 am
laughter and cheering and clapping. i accept that entirely. but there was also an undercurrent of very real concern and i suspect were my colleagues come back from their constituencies and when they have looked at their mailboxes this morning, the tone may be different. i am not wishing that, i am saying thatis i am not wishing that, i am saying that is a fact. i am not wishing that, i am saying that is a fact-— i am not wishing that, i am saying that is a fact. thank you very much for talkin: that is a fact. thank you very much for talking to _ that is a fact. thank you very much for talking to us _ that is a fact. thank you very much for talking to us this _ that is a fact. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. - that is a fact. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. sir. for talking to us this morning. sir roger gale, who is a conservative mp, who has never really been a fan of the prime minister and still is not. let's speak now with mo hussein, former number 10 chief press officer under david cameron's coilition government. we spokejust we spoke just after the macro sue gray report came out. you have had an afternoon and an evening to reflect on it. what do you think about the findings? it is reflect on it. what do you think about the findings? it is damning,
9:17 am
it is not a clean _ about the findings? it is damning, it is not a clean bill— about the findings? it is damning, it is not a clean bill of— about the findings? it is damning, it is not a clean bill of health - about the findings? it is damning, it is not a clean bill of health at i it is not a clean bill of health at all and compounded by the performance of the prime minister yesterday in the house, which did start from a point of contrition but quickly descended into a very defensive and cognitive mode and it mis—read the room and misjudged the sense of feeling across the house, but also on his own backbenchers, particularly from people who have supported him previously and would normally continue to do that. but i think that tide is turning. it normally continue to do that. but i think that tide is turning.— think that tide is turning. if you had been advising _ think that tide is turning. if you had been advising him - think that tide is turning. if you had been advising him would i think that tide is turning. if you i had been advising him would you think that tide is turning. if you had been advising him would you have said it was wise or unwise to bring into proceedings the fake news that keir starmer when he was director of public prosecutions failed to prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is _ prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a _ prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a dead _ prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a dead cat, - prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a dead cat, it - prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a dead cat, it is - prosecute jimmy savile? unwise because it is a dead cat, it is a l because it is a dead cat, it is a way of distracting people and giving people something incredulous to focus on so they stop focusing on
9:18 am
theissues focus on so they stop focusing on the issues at hand. but people are smarter than that, they can see through that, and it feels like a very low blow and it will not have sat well with mps across the house who believe in parliamentary process, believe in accountability, and wanted to see the prime minister do a bit more of that we have got this wrong, we are genuinely sorry, with a bit more openness and more transparency rather than lobbing attacks that are not even related or true to the opposition.— true to the opposition. thank you very much _ true to the opposition. thank you very much for— true to the opposition. thank you very much for talking _ true to the opposition. thank you very much for talking to - true to the opposition. thank you very much for talking to us. - the prime minister will be hoping that he can concentrate on another important issue today — the growing tension between russia and ukraine. this morning, he's flying to the ukrainian capital kyiv for talks with the country's president. at the moment he is having a meeting with his top team, the cabinet, in
9:19 am
number ten. james landale, our diplomatic correspondent, is there. tell us what will happen when the two meet. ~ , , two meet. the prime minister is due here later on — two meet. the prime minister is due here later on this _ two meet. the prime minister is due here later on this afternoon - two meet. the prime minister is due here later on this afternoon and - two meet. the prime minister is due here later on this afternoon and it i here later on this afternoon and it will be a relatively brief visit. he will be a relatively brief visit. he will meet the president of the ukraine and a few other officials. he will have some discussions with them. he will get a briefing on the situation in the east of the country where the frozen conflict has been going on between government forces and pro—russian separatists since 2014. he will hold a brief press conference and he will get back on the plane and head home. it is a brief visit, but it is clearly a symbolically important one because he is the most senior western politician to come here to show support for ukraine. he will be announcing a bit of cash, £88 million to ukraine to two things. try and wean itself off its dependency on russian energy, and
9:20 am
help and improve governance here, which is clearly an issue with corruption and transparency and things like that. he will come with some money and some sense of support but it is a relatively brief visit. i don't know if you have had a chance to talk to any people who live there. i've a feeling that there is going to be an invasion from the russian troops or what? if you look around you there is no sense of life being any different here, other than any sense than normal. if you talk to officials and others they say they are beginning to pick up little bits of concern. one or two people may have bags packed. just thinking about a possible plan b. but there is a gap between the view here in ukraine and the view in washington and london. washington and london and the other five eyes intelligence group have access to a lot more data than the
9:21 am
ukrainian government does. that is the first point. the second point is the first point. the second point is the ukrainian government is in a difficult position. it wants allies from a height but it does not want to work this into more of a crisis thanit to work this into more of a crisis than it is because that is damaging the economy right now. the message you often get from the ukrainian president is don't panic. let's not be too strong in the rhetoric we talk about here because they don't want it to become a self—fulfilling prophecy, so that is why there is a slightly nuanced gap between the rhetoric on both sides.— rhetoric on both sides. thank you very much. _ rhetoric on both sides. thank you very much, james. _ thank you very much, james. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is there now. let us know how you are feeling about those sue gray findings. is the sorry from the prime minister in the sorry from the prime minister in the commons enough, or is it time to move on? the commons enough, or is it time to move on? that's it from me here in downing street, more throughout the morning. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children
9:22 am
starting school in england are at risk of measles because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds that have had both doses of mmr that helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella has dropped to the lowest for a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness. as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade, and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles.
9:23 am
when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one, with a second dose offered at around the age of three and a half,
9:24 am
before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. let's talk to helen bedford, professor of children's health at university college london and great ormond street institute of child health. i , what might ,what might happen , what might happen what is the worst case scenario? brute , what might happen what is the worst case scenario?— , what might happen what is the worst case scenario? we will see outbreaks of _ worst case scenario? we will see outbreaks of measles, _ worst case scenario? we will see outbreaks of measles, there - worst case scenario? we will see outbreaks of measles, there is i worst case scenario? we will see | outbreaks of measles, there is no question. measles is incredibly infectious, considered to be the most infectious take stop it is really concerned. it most infectious take stop it is really concerned.— most infectious take stop it is really concerned. it is surprising, liven we really concerned. it is surprising, given we are _ really concerned. it is surprising, given we are in — really concerned. it is surprising, given we are in the _ really concerned. it is surprising, given we are in the middle - really concerned. it is surprising, given we are in the middle of - really concerned. it is surprising, given we are in the middle of a i given we are in the middle of a pandemic and people are more aware than any other time of the importance of protecting yourself
9:25 am
against infections, viruses, diseases, and yet while people are clearly going and getting their vaccinations against covid, when it comes to vaccinating their children against mmr, that does not seem to be tallying. i against mmr, that does not seem to be tall inc. ~ against mmr, that does not seem to be tall in. ~ ., against mmr, that does not seem to be tall inc. ~ . ., ,, be tallying. i think what happened earl on is be tallying. i think what happened early on is we _ be tallying. i think what happened early on is we went _ be tallying. i think what happened early on is we went into _ be tallying. i think what happened early on is we went into a - be tallying. i think what happened early on is we went into a big - early on is we went into a big lockdown and the message got across really clearly a stay at home. so people did not think that routine vaccination services were open. they might have been afraid to go in case they caught something. so i think it is unsurprising, but the good news is unsurprising, but the good news is that we have not seen many cases of measles since the beginning of the pandemic for that very reason because of a reduction in social mixing and the lockdown is, but it is waiting in the wings. measles will pounce when the vaccine levels fall. we can stop in its tracks. what we need to do now is before we have an outbreak, before we start
9:26 am
seeing cases rising, we need to ensure that our children, young people and even young adults are fully against measles. if people and even young adults are fully against measles.— people and even young adults are fully against measles. if there is a teena . er fully against measles. if there is a teenager who _ fully against measles. if there is a teenager who never _ fully against measles. if there is a teenager who never got _ fully against measles. if there is a teenager who never got their - fully against measles. if there is a i teenager who never got their mmr, fully against measles. if there is a - teenager who never got their mmr, is there a cut—off point at which you have to have the vaccine in order for it to be effective? trio. have to have the vaccine in order for it to be effective?— for it to be effective? no, that is the other good — for it to be effective? no, that is the other good news, _ for it to be effective? no, that is the other good news, there - for it to be effective? no, that is the other good news, there is i for it to be effective? no, that isj the other good news, there is no upper age limit. the teenager that is not vaccinated as a young child can be vaccinated now and the same applies for people in their 20s. it is really important because measles is really important because measles is really important because measles is really nasty in adulthood, as well as being very nasty for young people. well as being very nasty for young --eole. ., . ~ well as being very nasty for young --eole. . , ., well as being very nasty for young n-eole. . , . ., people. helen patrick, festival of children's health _ people. helen patrick, festival of children's health at _ people. helen patrick, festival of children's health at ucl, - people. helen patrick, festival of children's health at ucl, thank. people. helen patrick, festival of. children's health at ucl, thank you very much. two key. the government plans to scrap the requirement for health and social care workers in england to be vaccinated against coronavirus. the health secretary sajid javid told the house of commons he believes it is "no longer
9:27 am
proportionate" to require vaccination given that the delta variant, which was dominant at the time the policy was announced, has now been replaced by the less severe omicron. police have been granted more time to question the manchester united footballer mason greenwood. the 20—year—old was arrested on suspicion of rape and assault on sunday. manchester united have said the player will not return to training or matches until further notice. proposals have been announced to improve schools across england, including help to retain teachers, and create specialist sixth forms. the measures form part of the government's levelling up agenda, but teaching unions have questioned whether they would make up for years of funding cuts. areas identified as having the weakest education outcomes include rochdale, walsall and the isle of wight. whoopi goldberg has apologised after saying on an american talk show that the holocaust "was not about race". the actress and television personality said
9:28 am
on abc's �*the view�* that the nazi genocide of thejews involved "two groups of white people". critics pointed out that hitler himself had vented his hatred of thejews in racial terms. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. though quite apt weather front out and patchy rain with it. it is heading toward the south—west. as it does so, it is brightening up quite nicely. but don't forget the strong winds in the north. it is feeling much milder than yesterday. through the evening and overnight the weather front pushes down towards
9:29 am
the south—west and flips around and pushes northwards at least was, taking the cloud and rain with it. there will be clearing in the sky in wales though temperatures will be lower, but it will be a mild night. tomorrow we start off with a weather front in scotland and eastern parts of england still producing spots of rain. it will brighten up with sunshine across parts of wales, in southern england once again to be another mild day.
9:30 am
this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos. the headlines... the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on the initialfindings. it was important the sue gray report
9:31 am
was published in full, the way many people had been calling for, and it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." the labour leader says the pm is distracted from the issues that really matter to people. so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of this time saving his own skin. meanwhile, borisjohnson makes his way to ukraine this morning, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. the take—up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. still to come this hour... five letters sell for seven figures — the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle. we'll be talking to former countdown contestent, oliver garner, to find out why the game is so popular.
9:32 am
sport and time for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. a lot of money spent in this transfer window — £295 million changed hands before it closed last night. everton doing some good business, including donny van der beek on loan from manchester united and one of the big name moves, delli ali who'lljoin everton from tottenham on a two—and—a—half—year deal for a fee that could reach £40 million. ali has played 37 times for england, but his career has stalled at spurs in recent years, and he's only played for the club six times since antonio conte took over as manager. new everton boss frank lampard is clearly building his team and fans see the signings as a good start to his tenure at goodison.
9:33 am
i hope he's going to be delivering the patience, i think he's going to bring a fairly different style of football to what we've had under benitez. benitez would like to sit back, play defensively, hit on the counter. lampard kind of almost the opposite, likes to play on the front foot, likes to play more of a high pressing game. so from the fans, i think he'll be given patience, from the board, i also hope he'll be given patience because we can'tjust keep having this constant turnover of managers, and there's been constant talk of, we want to get a manager who's going to take us to the new stadium, build more of a long term project. that hasn't materialised so far. but look, he's a young, hungry manager. he's going to want to prove himself as well. barcelona have agreed a deal to sign arsenal striker pierre emerick aubameyang. he wasn't on the greatest of terms with manager mikel arteta and he's only scored four goals in 14 games this season. there's no fee involved, but the transfer will reportedly save arsenal around £25 million a year in wages. one of the surprise moves of the window —
9:34 am
juventus and wales midfielder aaron ramsey has joined scottish premiership champions rangers. he could make his debut tomorrow in the old firm match. he's at ibrox on loan until the end of the season. and manchester city confirmed the £14 million signing of strikerjulian alvarez from river plate. the 22—year—old will remain at the argentine champions until the end ofjuly. after signing a six—month contract with brentford, christian eriksen will become one of the few professional athetes to return to sport after suffering a cardiac arrest. it happened while he was playing for denmark at last year's euros. eriksen's been fitted with an implantable cardio—verter defibrillator device, and has since spent some time training with ajax. medical experts agree it's incredible he's able to play professionally again. it's a real testament to his resilience and the medical team behind him, who have been looking after him for
9:35 am
the last few months. but the safety of knowing he has a defibrillator, which will treat him at any stage, whether he's playing or at home or sedentary, and perhaps the ability to treat him to try to prevent these things happening again are all important to understand when we're looking at him going out on the pitch. for all the transfer deadline day news go to the bbc sport website. the premier league say 85 per cent of players have now been at least partially vaccinated against coronavirus. the league revealed the figures as it announced 11 positive results from its latest weekly round of testing. the figure of 85 per cent is 4 per cent up on october last year of players who've had at least one dose. finally, we're only a few days away from the start of the winter olympics, with the snowboarding competition beginning on saturday. beijing 2022 will be the first games to use almost 100% artificial snow, deploying more than 100 snow generators and 300 snow—cannons working flat out to cover the ski slopes.
9:36 am
the move has attracted some criticism from those concerned over the environmental impact, but some snowboarders from australia and new zealand think the conditions will assist them. the snow is super grippy and super cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, you cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, you slide cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, you slide out cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, you slide out easily. cold, you can hold onto an edge, usually when you get to man—made snow, you slide out easily. but here, it snow, you slide out easily. but here. it is _ snow, you slide out easily. ielt here, it is dreamy snow. snow, you slide out easily. but - here, it is dreamy snow. man-made stuff is amazing. — here, it is dreamy snow. man-made stuff is amazing, because _ here, it is dreamy snow. man-made stuff is amazing, because of - here, it is dreamy snow. man-made stuff is amazing, because of how- stuff is amazing, because of how cold it _ stuff is amazing, because of how cold it is, — stuff is amazing, because of how cold it is, you have to be really aggressive _ cold it is, you have to be really aggressive with how you ride. coverage _ aggressive with how you ride. coverage of the winter olympics is across the bbc. that's all the sport for now. now we can rejoin my colleague
9:37 am
victoria derbyshire on the continuing coverage over in downing street. let's speak now to councillor tom ashton, who's the deputy chairman of the boston and skegness conservative association. how sharp are you by the fact there were 16 gatherings in downing street and across government? i were 16 gatherings in downing street and across government?— were 16 gatherings in downing street and across government? i don't think the reort and across government? i don't think the report we — and across government? i don't think the report we had _ and across government? i don't think the report we had published - the report we had published yesterday told us a great deal more than what we knew or assumed. clearly, the prime minister at... we did not know there were 16 parties. i think i lost count of the amount of parties there had been speculated, it's nice to have a figure to work with. it’s speculated, it's nice to have a figure to work with.— figure to work with. it's not speculation _ figure to work with. it's not speculation any _ figure to work with. it's not speculation any more, - figure to work with. it's not | speculation any more, there figure to work with. it's not - speculation any more, there were 16, how shocked were you? i speculation any more, there were 16, how shocked were you?— how shocked were you? i think the prime minister _ how shocked were you? i think the prime minister has _ how shocked were you? i think the prime minister has been _ how shocked were you? i think the prime minister has been clear- how shocked were you? i think the prime minister has been clear in i how shocked were you? i think the | prime minister has been clear in the apology he's given, this is an opportunity to reset how downing
9:38 am
street works and to get back to talking about the issues that matter to people in this country and delivering on the 2019 manifesto. what do you think he was saying sorry for? what do you think he was saying sor for? ~ , ., , sorry for? the prime minister has been incredibly _ sorry for? the prime minister has been incredibly let _ sorry for? the prime minister has been incredibly let down - sorry for? the prime minister has been incredibly let down by - sorry for? the prime minister has been incredibly let down by the l been incredibly let down by the people working for him, running the operation in downing street and i am sure the culture which appeared to have existed, i am very pleased that he has apologised for everything that he has got wrong, his team has got wrong, the government have got wrong and the way he has handled it. it's a fairly comprehensive apology he has given but more than that i am really grateful and glad he is concentrating on fixing what is going wrong and has gone wrong and getting on with delivering for this country. i’m getting on with delivering for this count . �* ., . ., ., country. i'm not clear what you believe he _ country. i'm not clear what you believe he is _ country. i'm not clear what you believe he is saying _ country. i'm not clear what you believe he is saying sorry - country. i'm not clear what you
9:39 am
believe he is saying sorry for, i country. i'm not clear what you i believe he is saying sorry for, you told us he's been appallingly let down by the people around him and a culture appeared to have existed as though he had nothing to do with that. $5 though he had nothing to do with that. �* , , though he had nothing to do with that. m ~ , that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology — that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology was — that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology was there _ that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology was there for - that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology was there for all - that. as i say, the prime minister 's apology was there for all to - that. as i say, the prime minister| 's apology was there for all to see �*s apology was there for all to see in the house of commons. i am 's apology was there for all to see in the house of commons. i am asking ou what in the house of commons. i am asking you what you — in the house of commons. i am asking you what you think— in the house of commons. i am asking you what you think he _ in the house of commons. i am asking you what you think he was _ you what you think he was apologising for. $5 you what you think he was apologising for.— you what you think he was apologising for. you what you think he was a-uuoloisin for. a . apologising for. as far as i could see he was _ apologising for. as far as i could see he was apologising - apologising for. as far as i could see he was apologising for - see he was apologising for everything that had gone wrong around this issue and on his watch and beyond that i think what people want to hear about is how he will deliver on the 2019 general election manifesto which he was selected to deliver and which has government was elected to deliver and we will be judged as a conservative party at the next general election. is judged as a conservative party at the next general election.- the next general election. is the prime minister _ the next general election. is the prime minister to _ the next general election. is the prime minister to blame? - the next general election. is the prime minister to blame? i- the next general election. is the| prime minister to blame? i think the next general election. is the - prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister _ prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister has _ prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister has already _ prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister has already taken - prime minister to blame? i think the prime minister has already taken hisj prime minister has already taken his share of the blame on all of this.
9:40 am
he spent a considerable amount of time yesterday afternoon taking that on the floor in the house of commons. but i think the point at which we are trying to find blame, point the finger, we have got the report. there are other bits that will shortly follow with the police investigation and someone but i think it's absolutely right that we concentrate on delivering the levelling up agenda which has seen £70 million for lincolnshire, this is really important stuff and i would not want to see it disrupted any more. is would not want to see it disrupted an more. , ~ , ., any more. is the prime minister to blame for any _ any more. is the prime minister to blame for any of — any more. is the prime minister to blame for any of the _ any more. is the prime minister to blame for any of the stuff - any more. is the prime minister to blame for any of the stuff in - any more. is the prime minister to blame for any of the stuff in the i blame for any of the stuff in the sue gray report? figs blame for any of the stuff in the sue gray report?— sue gray report? as i said, the prime minister _ sue gray report? as i said, the prime minister has _ sue gray report? as i said, the prime minister has apologised | sue gray report? as i said, the - prime minister has apologised fairly comprehensively and has taken the blame... , �* , .,., comprehensively and has taken the | blame- - -_ the blame... yes, i'm sorry, go on. the prime minister _ blame... yes, i'm sorry, go on. the prime minister took _ blame... yes, i'm sorry, go on. the prime minister took the _ blame... yes, i'm sorry, go on. the prime minister took the blame - blame... yes, i'm sorry, go on. the prime minister took the blame that l prime minister took the blame that came his way yesterday in the house
9:41 am
of commons. i don't think there's anything to be gained from perpetuating speculation, the conversation around all of this. i think the prime minister wants to move the conversation and its right to do so, keir starmer this morning is accusing the prime minister of spending all his time on this issue and keir starmer has spent the last three prime ministers question is not asking a single question about the cost of living.— the cost of living. thank you for talkin: to the cost of living. thank you for talking to us. _ the cost of living. thank you for talking to us. more _ the cost of living. thank you for talking to us. more from - the cost of living. thank you for. talking to us. more from downing street later, some messages to read out. thank you for getting in touch. kirsty says i lost my dad in the first lockdown, as i live six hours away i stuck to the do not travel rule, i was unable to say goodbye to
9:42 am
my dad, it's made me so angry that borisjohnson feels my dad, it's made me so angry that boris johnson feels it's my dad, it's made me so angry that borisjohnson feels it's ok to have parties, he has no remorse, he is only sorry he got found out. he should do the decent thing and resign. and diane says i am feeling very angry and hurt, in april 2020 my dad passed away. in a care home, he was alone. no one could say goodbye to him, no one could comfort him. i sat outside my mother �*s window in the same care home for months watching her crying for the loss of her husband of 60 years. michael says all you broadcasters need to move on, there is plenty of stuff to critique that is important to everyday living and marilyn says i cannot believe borisjohnson are still hanging on by his fingernails, i cannot believe conservative mps have not sent in 54 letters to the 1922 committee, i cannot believe there are still ministers being wheeled out to support him. if you want to get in touch, i am on
9:43 am
instagram and twitter. now we go back to the studio. victoria, thank you. the family of a 21—year—old woman, who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend, is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill who was sentenced to seven and a half years at a young offenders institute. the attorney general has now agreed to review the sentence. rachel stonehouse has this report. this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend rocco sansome. just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van, here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise...
9:44 am
it's kind of, there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship, and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 2024. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed. angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse. when we think about the context of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked, because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded
9:45 am
in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just — ijust feel reluctant to go out. evenjust in my house, having someone come to check the boiler, erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. rachael stonehouse, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. meanwhile, borisjohnson will make his way to ukraine this morning, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade.
9:46 am
the rate of take up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. it's responsible for launching shows like gavin and stacey, two pints of lager and bad education but bbc three went exclusively to iplayer as part of a cost—cutting exercise six years ago. it's returning as a full tv channel from today as our media and arts correspondent david sillito explains. bbc three is now on tv. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest of bbc3 are going to have a new broadcast home, a tv channel. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background.
9:47 am
and what better channel than bbc three? what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to 34—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? i mean, do they even know where programmes come from that they love? because i've got a little list here of bbc three programmes. what about bbc one, bbc two? no. do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we use like disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people
9:48 am
have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. bbc three? no. and when i started reading out my list of bbc three programmes... drag race? yeah. man like mobeen? have you seen that one? yes. i watch that. around 80% of 16 to 34—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops, and on top of that, the content we make that's really targeted at under 355, we've got to make sure
9:49 am
it's really easy to discover. so by having it on a channel, it's adding to the possibility of them finding it on iplayer. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. have you completed your wordle today? i have. the new york times has bought the popular word game �*wordle' for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. let's look at it, my colleague robert in the gallery is loading it up. we are not going to do the one
9:50 am
today. let's show you this old one. there we go. if you got two correct letters, they are in the wrong place, you know how it works! the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play — for the time being. robert will carry on, take another guess. still only two correct letters, but in the wrong place! anyway, we will come back to that and see how robert is getting on. joining me now is former countdown contestant and a big fan of wordle, oliver garner. why do you think it has captured our attention and become so addictive? i attention and become so addictive? i think the reason why it has become so successful is because it almost
9:51 am
felt like the growth was organic and you would see on your social media account people posting squares of wordle and you'd be intrigued as to what those were and from there, when i played it, every day, do it first thing when i get up in the morning and then once i have done it, there is the community because a lot of other people play it. you can compare and see how you are doing and track your progress and that kind of thing. i think it has fostered a community spirit. brute kind of thing. i think it has fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert _ fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert is _ fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert is getting _ fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert is getting on, - fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert is getting on, he i fostered a community spirit. we can see how robert is getting on, he is| see how robert is getting on, he is slowly improving, three guesses and he still does not have it but i wonder why it has taken off so quickly because things like sudoku, for example, it took a while to capture the imagination. is it because social media makes it easier
9:52 am
for these things to cut through? i think compared to sudoku, and i do like that, you can say, i tried this word, i got this, and you are talking about it with other people and it's a lot easier to say then i had a seven and a five and a three in that position, no one would really know or care. i think because the english language and people love word games, scrabble, most people in this country i think own a scrabble set so there has always been this appetite forward games in this country. words with friends was massive on facebook for a while. let me cut back to the live coverage of the current guessing. i mean... there will be people shouting at the television in frustration, i'm sure. here we go. how is he getting on? badly, very badly! be careful not to
9:53 am
put any rude words, that is the concern! oliver, i look at wordle and i think, is it also reflective of our shorter attention span? because the people were doing crosswords, you are getting lots of words and it's much more involved, it's a time commitment but this, you guess one word. i it's a time commitment but this, you guess one word-— guess one word. i think you could arc ue guess one word. i think you could argue that _ guess one word. i think you could argue that way- — guess one word. i think you could argue that way. but _ guess one word. i think you could argue that way. but i _ guess one word. i think you could argue that way. but i think - guess one word. i think you could argue that way. but i think there | guess one word. i think you could l argue that way. but i think there is absolutely a place for crosswords and that kind of thing but i think there could be as well, rather than instead, i think with wordle, it's a lot more accessible than learning the tricks of the cryptic crossword and i think there's room for both. let me ask you about the buy up by the new york times, they say it will remain free for now but do you have concerns about whether, for example, to get people to spend more time on it, they release several every day rather than just one every day? i
9:54 am
rather thanjust one every day? i think the one a day thing is one of its plus points because it got you coming back for more the next day. so i think, because otherwise, if you have several every day there is more burn—out. it probably would not last as long so i think if i was the new york times, i would not do that. because it's kind of a short—term, long term thing, it will get more tricks in the short—term but long—term, it would be worse. ok. long-term, it would be worse. ok, 'ust long-term, it would be worse. ok, just before — long-term, it would be worse. ok, just before i _ long-term, it would be worse. ok, just before i ask— long—term, it would be worse. 0k, just before i ask you the next question we have that triumph, our viewers will probably have seen it, my colleague has secured a win. i think, the answer was sugar, help many guesses, three, four? the fourth guess. it wasn'tjust robert, i have to say, team effort and still it took that long. that is the beauty of it, we celebrate that we have achieved it but people do not
9:55 am
judge others, or do they? i am quite a competitive _ judge others, or do they? i am quite a competitive person _ judge others, or do they? i am quite a competitive person so _ judge others, or do they? i am quite a competitive person so i _ judge others, or do they? i am quite a competitive person so i always - a competitive person so i always like to see that i am doing at least as well as my friends but it is also as well as my friends but it is also a community spirit and people are happy when other people are improving and getting it in three or better than they did the day before. as a quiz, game show expert is there anything you would change to wordle, that would make it in your opinion even better?— that would make it in your opinion even better? . �* , ., , ., even better? that's a good question. i think it's success _ even better? that's a good question. i think it's success speaks _ even better? that's a good question. i think it's success speaks for - i think its success speaks for itself. i think it's pitched at the right level. the skill involved. and its accessibility means it has become really popular. a nerd like me probably likes six or seven letter words! that might be a bit
9:56 am
extreme! , ., , , . , extreme! oliver, your time is up, as the sa extreme! oliver, your time is up, as they say the — extreme! oliver, your time is up, as they say the game — extreme! oliver, your time is up, as they say the game shows _ extreme! oliver, your time is up, as they say the game shows so - extreme! oliver, your time is up, as they say the game shows so thank i extreme! oliver, your time is up, as l they say the game shows so thank you so much. ., ~ they say the game shows so thank you so much. ., ,, ,, and in around an hour's time we'll be speaking with countdown's suzie dent. let's find out what the weather is doing, is it three letters for letters or a mixture of the two? carroll is here. you are right, we have a bit of everything. it's producing some spots of rain, behind that we see sunshine and showers and as you see from the isobars it is breezy, strongest winds across the north and north—east of scotland. where we have yellow and amber that tells you it is going to be a mild day. we have a weather front drifting towards the south—west, and
9:57 am
it will drag this cloud and spots of rain with it so behind that, we are looking at sunny skies, still some showers across the north—west of scotland, gusty winds, the strongest across northern and north—eastern scotland where we could have gusts up scotland where we could have gusts up to 65 miles an hour, possibly more than that. but it is mild, moderate than yesterday, temperature range 10 degrees up to 14 degrees. this evening and overnight, as the weather front thinks south—west it will flip and start pushing northwards and east taking the cloud and rain with it. there will be some clearance in the sky, some mist and fog and in rural parts of aberdeen shark, temperatures could fall away to two degrees so you may see some frost. here is the weather front continuing to push north—east roots, high pressure to the south of it and all the amber colours meaning it is going to be another mild day so we pick up that weather front, draped
9:58 am
across eastern parts of england and scotland producing thicker cloud and some spots of rain. brightening up across parts of wales, the midlands, the south of england. these are the temperatures, 10 degrees up to 12 degrees. when things start to change during thursday, we have a cold front coming in bringing in rain, going to be winding ahead of that and behind it with gusts of gale force across the north of scotland. then we see colder air filter in with some snow and this will fall increasingly to lower levels across parts of scotland but ahead of that we are looking at a fairly dry picture, some sunshine, we are still in the milderair. picture, some sunshine, we are still in the milder air. as we go through the rest of thursday and into friday that cold front sinks south, eventually taking the rain into southern england, we haven't seen rain here for a while and we are in cold air behind it. first thing friday we had the remnants of the rain, behind that, sunshine and showers, the showers likely to be frequent and wintry in scotland and northern england and feeling colder.
9:59 am
10:00 am
good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending
10:01 am
all of his time saving his own skin. is the "sorry" from the pm enough for you now?

65 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on