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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 1, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending
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all of his time saving his own skin. is the "sorry" from the pm enough for you now? how are you left feeling after sue gray�*s initial findings into pa rtygate? do let me know — it's @vicderbyshire on twitter and instagram. meanwhile, borisjohnson makes his way to ukraine this morning to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. good morning, i'm ben boulos. our other stories this morning... myanmar marks the first anniversary of the military coup with a silent strike. the un says the country is now in a state of civil war. and five letters sell for seven figures. the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle.
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hello, we are live in downing street and in numberten hello, we are live in downing street and in number ten borisjohnson is meeting his top team, the members of his cabinet, who went into the building a little earlier this morning. when they emerge we will try and grab a word with one or two of them if we can. the uk government has promised to publish an updated report on lockdown gatherings at number 10 once police have finished their inquiries. the prime minister, borisjohnson, apologised yesterday after the initial findings led by the civil servant sue gray identified failures of leadership concerning more than a dozen events. however, the full report has not been published while the police investigate alleged covid rule breaking. mrjohnson met with conservative mps last night to reassure them and promise a shake—up of how number ten is run. our political correspondent, ben wright reports. after apologising for lockdown parties that happened under his roof, borisjohnson returned to number ten last hoping ten last night hoping some of the pressure
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on his premiership might have eased. for now, at least. but with the police now investigating 12 separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. sue gray's probe into what happened said there were failures of leadership and judgment. and there were events that should not have been allowed to take place. her verdict was brief but damning. in the commons the prime minister was contrite but defiant. firstly, i want to say sorry, and i'm sorry for the things we simply did not get right and sorry for the way this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, and it is no use saying that people were working hard, this pandemic was hard for everyone. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he set the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice
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in contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. it was a former british prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, or did not understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories�* own side. the people who were criticising him this afternoon particularly in the chamber are the people criticising him before he was elected as the leader of the party. they were criticising him as he was elected prime minister, and have been criticising him ever since. number ten said sue gray's full report will be published when the police have finished their investigation. but some tories want the prime minister to make that promise in the commons as soon as possible. it is clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and he attended parliament and acted
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as if he was outraged at finding out the rules were broken and we subsequently found out he already knew the parties were taking place because he was at at least one of them and according to today's report may have been at three, including one in his own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully to what their voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not have happened under previous prime ministers. i don't think they would have been doing it uner have been doing it under theresa may, put it that way. i would love to believe he was sorry and he would fix it, _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if any laws have been broken, one conservative mp said the prime minister remained on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. well, as you heard in ben wright's report there, the government has committed to publishing the full sue gray report when they get it. here's the deputy prime minister dominic raab. well, look, there's two separate . investigations going on, the police
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and sue gray's. sue gray has given us i the report subject to the individual claims that have gone to the police to investigate. - that has been published in full. and the pm's been clear that if sue gray comes back with any further |findings that she reports to him, i he will publish it in full. we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, - sue gray's and the met police, i we can't control what they give to us, but he's been clear that any further report from sue gray - will be published in full, - as indeed the interim report was. well, the labour leader sir keir starmer says there is no need for all this waiting because those involved could just be honest about what was happening. the metropolitan police asked that the full report not be published at the moment. but the idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day, is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box
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being asked, were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat? and he says, i can't answer that because of the investigation. he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he's taking us for fools. let's speak to our political correspondent helen catt. where are we this morning in terms of the prime minister and his survival? , ., , ., survival? this morning things feel a bit calmer and _ survival? this morning things feel a bit calmer and it _ survival? this morning things feel a bit calmer and it feels _ survival? this morning things feel a bit calmer and it feels like - survival? this morning things feel a bit calmer and it feels like perhapsl bit calmer and it feels like perhaps that sort of imminent threat to the prime ministerfrom his own backbenchers may have subsided. that is because when he met his party last night, he met the members of the parliamentary party in the house of commons last night, and some of those who were there said he had reassured them that the full report would be published. that was something that some of his own mps were calling for yesterday
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afternoon. he sort of reassured them that he had been taking covid seriously and they felt like, for now, it had settled down. that the threat of those 5a letters going in to trigger a leadership contest feels like it has gone away for now. that is where we are this morning. there are still those who are not happy. the former cabinet minister andrew mitchell who was in the house of commons yesterday when boris johnson spoke to mps said he is calling on him to resign. fine johnson spoke to mps said he is calling on him to resign.- johnson spoke to mps said he is calling on him to resign. one of the most interesting _ calling on him to resign. one of the most interesting things _ calling on him to resign. one of the most interesting things the - calling on him to resign. one of the most interesting things the prime l most interesting things the prime minister_ most interesting things the prime minister said yesterday was that we must look_ minister said yesterday was that we must look at ourselves in the mirron — must look at ourselves in the mirror. the truth is of course that it is he _ mirror. the truth is of course that it is he who — mirror. the truth is of course that it is he who needs to look at himself— it is he who needs to look at himself in— it is he who needs to look at himself in the mirror. boris has done _ himself in the mirror. boris has done a — himself in the mirror. boris has done a fantasticjob for the country on getting — done a fantasticjob for the country on getting us through what was effectively a collective, national nervous — effectively a collective, national nervous breakdown over brexit. he achieved _ nervous breakdown over brexit. he achieved what he set out to achieve, he got _ achieved what he set out to achieve, he got us _ achieved what he set out to achieve, he got us through that and we should all be _ he got us through that and we should all be immensely grateful to him. but the _ all be immensely grateful to him. but the problem is that this crisis we are _
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but the problem is that this crisis we are how— but the problem is that this crisis we are now in with the parties and the erosion — we are now in with the parties and the erosion of public trust in the prime _ the erosion of public trust in the prime minister and the erosion of public trust in the prime ministerand in the erosion of public trust in the prime minister and in the conservative party is not going to id conservative party is not going to go away — conservative party is not going to go away. these sort of things never happened _ go away. these sort of things never happened and would never happen under— happened and would never happen under mrs — happened and would never happen under mrs thatcher. can you imagine it happening under theresa may? it is slightly— it happening under theresa may? it is slightly unattractive to slow off responsibility onto the officials. it is responsibility onto the officials. it is not — responsibility onto the officials. it is not going to go away. we have ukraine, _ it is not going to go away. we have ukraine, afghanistan, major crises on our— ukraine, afghanistan, major crises on our doorstep, and this like battery— on our doorstep, and this like battery acid is corroding the fabric of the _ battery acid is corroding the fabric of the conservative party.- of the conservative party. there will be huge _ of the conservative party. there will be huge scrutiny _ of the conservative party. there will be huge scrutiny of- of the conservative party. there will be huge scrutiny of the - of the conservative party. there l will be huge scrutiny of the prime minister in the coming days, seeing what he is going to do. you promised yesterday that he got it, he would fix it, and there will be enormous scrutiny on him as he does that. what we have been told is that there will be a shake—up inside downing street, the way it works, the creation of the new office of the prime minister. we don't have any more detail on that and we expect to get it over the coming days. there
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is speculation over the role of the chief whip mark spencer, speculation he might be replaced. expect a bit of a back room change in the coming days and a lot of focus on what borisjohnson himself does. days and a lot of focus on what boris johnson himself does. thank ou ve boris johnson himself does. thank you very much. — boris johnson himself does. thank you very much, helen. _ boris johnson himself does. thank you very much, helen. the - boris johnson himself does. thank you very much, helen. the prime | you very much, helen. the prime minister meeting his top team, the cabinet, behind me. we will try and grab cabinet, behind me. we will try and gmba cabinet, behind me. we will try and grab a word with one or two of them if possible before the prime minister goes to the ukraine. the labour and co—operative mp florence eshalomi stood up in the chamber yesterday and spoke about a 13—year—old boy in her constituency, ismail mohamed abdulwahab, who was one of the youngest victims of coronavirus. let's hear what she said. mr speaker, one of the hardest things i had to do as an mp is speak to the family of ismail mohamed abdulwahab. he was 13 years old when he died on the 30th of march. he was one of the youngest people to lose his life to covid. i will admit, mr speaker, when i spoke to his mother i broke down on that call.
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ismail�*s family, like so many other constituents up and down in vauxhall, followed the rules. many of them were scared to go out, many of them had to bury their loved ones without being there, many of them walk past the covid memorial wall in my constituency with their hearts showing their loss. does the prime minister now understand and does he not feel ashamed that his actions have brought disrepute to the office that he holds? well, florence eshalomi joins me now. good morning. good morning, victoria. when _ good morning. good morning, victoria. when you _ good morning. good morning, victoria. when you talked - good morning. good morning, | victoria. when you talked about ishmael victoria. when you talked about ishmael it _ victoria. when you talked about ishmael it was _ victoria. when you talked about ishmael it was one _ victoria. when you talked about ishmael it was one of— victoria. when you talked about ishmael it was one of a - victoria. when you talked about ishmael it was one of a number| victoria. when you talked about l ishmael it was one of a number of poignant moments in the commons yesterday, notjust from opposition mps, but also we heard stories recounted by conservative mps as well. you will have heard the prime minister say i get it. do you accept that? . ., ., ., that? victoria, what we saw yesterday — that? victoria, what we saw yesterday was _ that? victoria, what we saw
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yesterday was a _ that? victoria, what we saw yesterday was a prime - that? victoria, what we saw. yesterday was a prime minister refusing to take responsibility. the prime minister actually caught covid as well, he knows how serious this virus was. he knows how deadly it was, but for him to just blatantly disregard everything and still think it is a joke, still thinking that the rules which he set do not apply to him, makes a mockery of all the people who have died including for ishmail and so many others up and down the country. he ishmail and so many others up and down the country.— ishmail and so many others up and down the country. he was not “oking when he said — down the country. he was not “oking when he said ii down the country. he was not “oking when he said i am i down the country. he was not “oking when he said i am sorry, h down the country. he was not “oking when he said i am sorry, was h down the country. he was not joking when he said i am sorry, was he? i when he said i am sorry, was he? victoria, actions speak louder than words. when somebody is sorry their actions afterwards, you will then see whether or not they are sorry. the prime minister in responding to the leader of the opposition's really powerful statement proceeded to just joke really powerful statement proceeded to justjoke and batter away, proceeded to call outjimmy savile, proceeded to call outjimmy savile, proceeded to call outjimmy savile, proceeded to bring it back to
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brexit. those are not issues my constituents have been writing to me about. they have been writing to me about. they have been writing to me about the fact they followed the rules which the prime minister said, they wanted to see our prime minister in a time of national crisis lead by example. frankly, we don't have that.— don't have that. also there are a number of _ don't have that. also there are a number of people _ don't have that. also there are a number of people who _ don't have that. also there are a number of people who are - don't have that. also there are a | number of people who are saying don't have that. also there are a - number of people who are saying we need to move on now. we have had this initialfindings, he said sorry, whether you believe it or not, and there are some really important things coming down the road like energy bills going up, like what is happening on the border with ukraine, and presumably you have got some constituent saying that as well? i have got some constituent saying that as well?— that as well? i have constituents sa that that as well? i have constituents say that every — that as well? i have constituents say that every day _ that as well? i have constituents say that every day and _ that as well? i have constituents say that every day and i - that as well? i have constituents say that every day and i raise - that as well? i have constituentsl say that every day and i raise that whenever possible in the chamber, but when you have the leader leading our government cannot be honest with the rules which he set do not apply to him, how are we going to address
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theissues to him, how are we going to address the issues of cost of living? how will we address the fact there could be a war and the tensions in ukraine? how are we going to address the fact that some of my constituents still have their loved ones in afghanistan? how will we address the fact that the nurses, the care workers, the hard working front line workers up and down in vauxhall and across the country want to see their living standards improve? how will we help the many children who have missed so much of the education when you have a prime minister who will not take this issue seriously? how can he take other issues seriously?— issue seriously? how can he take other issues seriously? thank you very much — other issues seriously? thank you very much for— other issues seriously? thank you very much for talking _ other issues seriously? thank you very much for talking to _ other issues seriously? thank you very much for talking to us. - the north west cambridgeshire mp shailesh vara also spoke yesterday and called on the government to �*address other important matters'. let's stop now. —— let's talk to him
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now. morning. let's stop now. -- let's talk to him now morning-— let's stop now. -- let's talk to him | now. morning._ what now. morning. hello, victoria. what do ou now. morning. hello, victoria. what do you think — now. morning. hello, victoria. what do you think this _ now. morning. hello, victoria. what do you think this prime _ now. morning. hello, victoria. what do you think this prime minister? i on, that there are other issues we need to be dealing with and that is what the prime minister wants to do. what we now need to do is recognise the content of sue gray's report, including recommendations for changes which the prime minister has said he will do. but we need to move on while we wait for the next report, the met police report, on
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other issues. my constituents said i have military bases and i have e—mails from families concerned about the consequences for their loved ones in the military if things escalate on the ukrainian and russian border. parliament, crisis, the cost of living, as well as a whole host of other issues. i would think. armour and florence also saying they want to move on, yet whenever they are given any opportunity they keep coming back to this issue. there is an irony in what they say they want to move onto, but when they are given the they don't. for my part, the way i think it should be done, i think the prime minister is right in dealing with other issues, but let me emphasise in no way does it diminish the importance of what sue gray has
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been looking at and what the met police are looking at as well. some --eole police are looking at as well. some people cannot _ police are looking at as well. some people cannot move _ police are looking at as well. some people cannot move on _ police are looking at as well. some people cannot move on because i police are looking at as well. some people cannot move on because they are so upset, they are so angry that they follow the rules and did not say goodbye to their dying mum or dad in a care home. they absolutely cannot believe that the prime minister allowed and attended parties, up to 16 of them, in this building behind me. they cannot believe it. how did that happen? victoria, ifully believe it. how did that happen? victoria, i fully understand the pain and suffering of people. i lost somebody close to me as well. i fully understand the notion of distant funerals. i think we should also accept the prime minister is being held accountable for everything that is being looked into, including events that happened into, including events that happened in downing street when he was actually in bucks at chequers. that is why it is important...
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no, tell me. people don't understand. yellow mac. he did say it. primark therese coffey, will you talk to us? mr eustace, would you like to talk to us? sorry about that. . , . like to talk to us? sorry about that. ., , ., ., , that. that is all right, i am sorry ou are that. that is all right, i am sorry you are stuck — that. that is all right, i am sorry you are stuck with _ that. that is all right, i am sorry you are stuck with me _ that. that is all right, i am sorry you are stuck with me rather - that. that is all right, i am sorry. you are stuck with me rather than members of the cabinet. lode
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you are stuck with me rather than members of the cabinet.- members of the cabinet. we are crateful members of the cabinet. we are grateful for _ members of the cabinet. we are grateful for your— members of the cabinet. we are grateful for your time. _ members of the cabinet. we are grateful for your time. i - members of the cabinet. we are grateful for your time. i might i grateful for your time. i might interrupt gratefulforyourtime. i might interrupt again. i grateful for your time. i might interrupt again.— grateful for your time. i might interrut aaain. , , ., interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries- _ interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries- i _ interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries. i want _ interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries. i want to _ interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries. i want to ask - interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries. i want to ask you - interrupt again. i fully understand. no worries. i want to ask you one | no worries. i want to ask you one final question. the serious failure in leadership, is that down to the prime minister? i in leadership, is that down to the prime minister?— in leadership, is that down to the prime minister? i think we need to recornise prime minister? i think we need to recognise there _ prime minister? i think we need to recognise there have _ prime minister? i think we need to recognise there have been - prime minister? i think we need to | recognise there have been failings, there have been failings at the top, but that is being addressed. 50 there have been failings at the top, but that is being addressed. so that is a prime minister? _ but that is being addressed. so that is a prime minister? the _ but that is being addressed. so that is a prime minister? the prime - is a prime minister? the prime minister has _ is a prime minister? the prime minister has accepted - minister has accepted responsibility. i am minister has accepted responsibility. iam not minister has accepted responsibility. i am not saying anything except the prime minister has said the buck stops with him, he has said the buck stops with him, he has apologised and has taken full responsibility for all of this and this is something he has said in the house and repeatedly. we are making a story about something that has already been said several weeks ago. he recognises that and what he has also done is he is going to make changes and he is going to make them very soon to make sure there is a proper structure to ensure the way
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downing street has evolved from being simply the prime minister was my office to effectively now being a small government department, and he will put in place proper structures. i am only sorry it has taken all of this to bring about that change, which should have happened otherwise. but i think it is important to recognise that in no way do i or the prime minister minimise the importance of this issue and we fully appreciate, and i have had lots of people writing to me in enormous pain and suffering that has been experienced by so many people. but there is an inquiry going on, the met police inquiry, let's wait for the results and let's deal with other issues which are important. in my constituency there are military families and they want to know what their role, if any, will be if the tension escalates on the ukrainian and russian border. thank you very much. apologies for interrupting our conversation as cabinet ministers are left number
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ten. you probably saw the health secretary a few moments ago. it wasn't worth as asking him to talk to us because i am failing in that task. to us because i am failing in that task. let's talk to jill rutter, senior fellow at uk in a changing europe, an independent resarch organisation. she is also part of the instiute for government and a former a senior civil servant at number ten. in fact, you have worked in number ten and number 11 over many years. is that right? did you ever come across a drinking culture when you worked here? i across a drinking culture when you worked here?— across a drinking culture when you worked here? ., ,, , worked here? i worked in number ten underjohn major _ worked here? i worked in number ten underjohn major and _ worked here? i worked in number ten underjohn major and i _ worked here? i worked in number ten underjohn major and i don't - worked here? i worked in number ten underjohn major and i don't think - underjohn major and i don't think you would characterise it as a drinking culture. we did have a christmas party once a year. we had won a cd, which was abba, so a bit reminiscent of what we have heard in the prime minister's flat. maybe it is the same cd. no, there was not a party atmosphere.
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is the same cd. no, there was not a party atmosphere-— is the same cd. no, there was not a party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can ou party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk — party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to _ party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to us _ party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to us on _ party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to us on bbc— party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to us on bbc news? - party atmosphere. jacob rees mogg, can you talk to us on bbc news? you know you want to. i am so sorry, thatis know you want to. i am so sorry, that is the last time i will interrupt anybody. i thought he might come and talk to us, so i do apologise. that is the rest of the cabinet leaving. at some point the prime minister himself will be leaving because he is going to ukraine a little later. sorry, jill, i apologise. you are talking about having at least one christmas party underjohn major and there was one cd which was abba gold. i underjohn major and there was one cd which was abba gold.— cd which was abba gold. i don't reco . nise cd which was abba gold. i don't recognise this _ cd which was abba gold. i don't recognise this culture _ cd which was abba gold. i don't recognise this culture of- cd which was abba gold. i don't i recognise this culture of drinking. in number ten you work very long hours, but there was not even a culture when i was at number ten of ending work and going to the pub. he might have said this wine a clock culture came from the fact that people would reassemble in the pub and civil servants do that. if you go to those pubs around westminster after hours you will see civil
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servants there, special advisers having a pint or two in some of the local pubs. but when i was at number ten that did not happen either. we were quite long and when home and got ready for the next day. fair enou:h. got ready for the next day. fair enough- what _ got ready for the next day. fair enough. what do you think about the creation of an office for the prime minister? ., , . ., minister? there are structural questions _ minister? there are structural questions about _ minister? there are structural questions about how - minister? there are structural questions about how number| minister? there are structural. questions about how number ten minister? there are structural- questions about how number ten is organised but i don't think you solve those structural questions in a kneejerk reaction to a report. i don't think that the installation of a new permanent secretary at number ten, we have had them before, is necessarily the answer to this without that permanent secretary being empowered by the prime minister to impose a new set of disciplines and a very new culture in number ten because i think at the heart of sue gray's report is the culture of the place had gone very badly wrong rather than the fact it
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was simply a matter of unclear reporting structures. it was people thought it was an environment in which people thought these behaviours were acceptable. it might behaviours were acceptable. it might be that you bring somebody in with the prime minister's authority to stand that on, but the first person that authority needs to be stamped on is the prime minister himself. when you worked here was the culture always set by the prime minister? the tone of number ten is very much set by the prime minister. it was a smaller operation in those days, and one of the things sue gray did point out is number ten has expanded a long way. when i was there it was still a quite small operation. it is a very old blend of the official, the very political, and you are very aware of the political situation in. when i was there the prime minister was bogged down with all the problems of the maastricht treaty and beset by a series of scandals
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affecting his cabinet, though not the prime minister himself at the time. and also the personal, where the prime minister lives. it is a very odd place, but you can tell that from the mood at number ten. if the prime minister is taking a bit of a battering, the mood is very down. if the prime minister has had a good week, then the mood goes up. it is very different to a normal government department, you get that a bit in the private office. i work in the chancellor's private office, but you don't get it affecting the whole department in the same way, there is much more distance between there is much more distance between the top ministers of the servants in other departments.— other departments. thank you very much. the prime minister will be hoping that he can concentrate on another important issue today, the growing tension between russia and ukraine. this morning, he's flying to the ukrainian capital kyiv for talks
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with the country's president. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has the latest. well, the prime minister is due here later on this afternoon. it will be a relatively brief visit. he will meet the president of ukraine, president zelensky, and a few other officials. he will have some discussions with them, he will get a briefing on the situation in donbas in the east of the country where the frozen conflict has been going on between government forces and pro—russian separatists since 2014. he will hold a brief press conference and then he will get back on his plane and head home. so it is a brief visit but it is clearly a symbolically important one because he is the most senior western politician to come here to show support for ukraine. he will be announcing a bit of cash, £88 million, to help ukraine do two things. try and wean itself off its dependency on russian energy and also help it improve governance here, which is clearly an issue with corruption,
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transparency, things like that. so he will come with some money, with some sense of support, but it is a relatively brief visit. i don't know if you have had a chance to talk to any people who actually live there. are they feeling that there is going to be an invasion from those russian troops or what? if you look around you there is no sense of life being any different here in any sense than normal. if you talk to officials and others they say, look, we are beginning to pick up little bits of concern, one or two people may be having bags packed, just thinking about a possible plan b. but there is a gap between the view here in ukraine and the gap in western capitals, particularly london and washington. that is primarily because washington and london and the five eyes group, the intelligent group, they have access to an awful lot more data than the ukrainian government does, so that is
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is the first point. the second point is the ukrainian government is in a difficult position. it wants allies and support from outside, but it also doesn't want to work this into more of a crisis than it is because that is damaging the economy right now. so the message that you quite often get from the ukrainian president is don't panic, let's not be too strong in the rhetoric we talk about here, because they don't want it to become any kind of military action by russia, to become a self—fulfilling prophecy, so that is why there is a slight nuance gap between the rhetoric both sides. james landau reporting from kyiv. that's it from me here in downing street, more throughout the morning. the un's top human rights diplomat has described the situation in myanmar as "catastrophic" and has said the international community has failed to prevent gross violations by the military regime. in an exclusive bbc interview michelle bachelet, the un commissionerfor human rights, admitted that the country is now in a state of civil war that threatens regional stability.
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she was speaking to the bbc world service asia editor rebecca henschke. the international community has to act stronger and regional actors are important there, like india and japan, they need to do more. i am frustrated because we have very few tools, other than speaking out, so for me first of all it is sad. many countries have not recognised the military government, the military gentle, but they also have not recognised either the national unity government two would you like to see them recognising the government? it
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would be useful because it would give them a feeling of support. the thing is mainly the demonstrations have been peaceful but people have been getting fed up as well of being killed. so many of them have gone into the malicious or created a people's defence force. that is why for a long time i have been saying that with the situation in myanmar, if we are not able to do something more strongly, it would echo so much the seriousness of the situation. on that point, looking at similarities with syria for example, attacks on civilian militia, do we have a country in a state of civil war? ~ ., . have a country in a state of civil war? ~ ~ ., ., ., war? we think we are on the verge of a national civil— war? we think we are on the verge of a national civil war _ war? we think we are on the verge of a national civil war because _ war? we think we are on the verge of a national civil war because we - war? we think we are on the verge of a national civil war because we do - a national civil war because we do have on one hand repression and the response of the people who do not want to be killed. so they had been
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organising this militia, of course, probably their force is organising this militia, of course, probably theirforce is not organising this militia, of course, probably their force is not so organising this militia, of course, probably theirforce is not so big so they have been victims of air strikes, drones, killings, massacres of villages but it is the possibility to contemplate civil war. bill possibility to contemplate civil war. �* , ., ., . ., war. all the elements of a civil war orthe war. all the elements of a civil war or they are — war. all the elements of a civil war or they are now. — war. all the elements of a civil war or they are now, the _ war. all the elements of a civil war or they are now, the scale - war. all the elements of a civil war or they are now, the scale of - war. all the elements of a civil war or they are now, the scale of the i or they are now, the scale of the violence, casualties, attacks spread out across the country, is it not time to call this as it is?- out across the country, is it not time to call this as it is? yes, it is, i time to call this as it is? yes, it is. i agree- _ time to call this as it is? yes, it is, i agree. this _ time to call this as it is? yes, it is, i agree. this situation - time to call this as it is? yes, it is, i agree. this situation has i time to call this as it is? yes, it i is, i agree. this situation has been auoin on is, i agree. this situation has been going on for— is, i agree. this situation has been going on for a _ is, i agree. this situation has been going on for a year. _ is, i agree. this situation has been going on for a year. the _ is, i agree. this situation has been going on for a year. the world - is, i agree. this situation has been going on for a year. the world is i going on for a year. the world is watching and what i am hearing from you is there is no clear, concrete action or even an idea of what needs to happen. i action or even an idea of what needs to ha en. ., action or even an idea of what needs to ha en. ~' ., .,, to happen. i think there are ideas, of course- — to happen. i think there are ideas, of course. there _ to happen. i think there are ideas, of course. there is _ to happen. i think there are ideas, of course. there is moratorium i of course. there is moratorium recording and trying to convince
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member states it is indispensable and it is imperative that the international community and actors recognise that as long as the situation prevails here, the situation prevails here, the situation will not improve. people watchinu situation will not improve. people watching this _ situation will not improve. people watching this in _ situation will not improve. people watching this in myanmar- situation will not improve. people watching this in myanmar may - situation will not improve. people | watching this in myanmar may feel once again that they are very much once again that they are very much on their own. what is your message to them? i on their own. what is your message to them? . . on their own. what is your message to them? .., ,, ., ., ,., on their own. what is your message to them? .., ,, ., ., i. ., to them? i care. i know what you are auoin to them? i care. i know what you are going through _ to them? i care. i know what you are going through and — to them? i care. i know what you are going through and as _ to them? i care. i know what you are going through and as much _ to them? i care. i know what you are going through and as much as - to them? i care. i know what you are going through and as much as i - to them? i care. i know what you are going through and as much as i can l going through and as much as i can do tell them that they are not alone. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok,
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i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. meanwhile, borisjohnson makes his way to ukraine this morning, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. myanmar marks the first anniversary of the military coup with a silent strike. the un says the country is now in a state of civil war. and five letters sell for seven figures — the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle. a usjudge has rejected a plea deal between federal prosecutors and two of the three white men convicted of murdering black jogger ahmaud arbery.
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the ruling comes after one of the convicted men admitted for the first time that race was his motivation behind the attack. prosecutors had reached plea agreements with travis and gregory mcmichael — to the shock of mr arbery�*s family. they are trying to do some undercover stuff. me and momma, we don't know nothing about. some plea deal, we did not agree with that. and like i say, ahmaud is a kid you cannot place. he unplaceable. and he was killed. and we want ioo% justice. not no halfjustice. our correspondent peter bowes has the details. during the original trial, the actions of these three men, three white men were characterised by prosecutors as a modern day lynching. they were all found guilty of the murder of ahmaud arbery, a black man who'd been jogging down the street, and they were sentenced to life in prison. they were also due to face a federal
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hate crime trial, which was due to start next week. but it emerged on sunday that prosecutors had reached an agreement with two of the men, gregory and travis mcmichael. and that agreement included an acknowledgement for the first time from these men that they had in part been chasing mr arbery down the street because he was black. and prosecutors said that this was an important step towardsjustice, and as part of this agreement, it was stipulated that they would serve some 30 years in a federal prison before being transferred to a state prison to see out the rest of their life sentence. and the reason that that is both controversial and significant is that federal prisons in this country are generally seen as an easier or softer option than the state prison system. and it outraged the family of mr arbery, who believed that he was... that the prosecutors and the men in reaching this
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agreement had essentially devised a situation where they would get an easier time in prison. well, a judge now has rejected that agreement. it will not go ahead, and it does throw in doubt to some extent what is going to happen at the trial next week. the judge has given the two men until friday of this week to decide whether they want to enter guilty pleas. whoopi goldberg has apologised after saying on an american talk show that the holocaust "was not about race". the actress and television personality said on abc's the view that the nazi genocide of the jews involved "two groups of white people". critics pointed out that hitler himself had vented his hatred of thejews in racial terms. here, health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england are at risk of measles because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five year olds that
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have had both doses of mmr that helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella — has dropped to the lowest for a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness. as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade, and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles. when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease
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to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one, with a second dose offered at around the age of three and a half, before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers
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and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. earlier, i spoke to professor helen bedford from university college london and great ormund street institute of child health. measles is incredibly infectious disease there is and all it takes is a little drop in vaccine uptake like we have right now to see it bouncing back so it's really concerning. it’s back so it's really concerning. it's surprising. _ back so it's really concerning. it's surprising, given that when we are in the middle of a pandemic, people are perhaps more aware than at any other time of the importance of protecting yourself against infections, viruses, diseases and yet, while people are clearly going and getting their vaccinations against covid—i9, when it comes to vaccinating their children against mmr, that doesn't seem to be telling? i mmr, that doesn't seem to be tellin: ? ., . mmr, that doesn't seem to be tellin: ? ~ ., ., , , mmr, that doesn't seem to be tellinu? ~ ., ., , , ., , telling? i think what happened early on was because _
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telling? i think what happened early on was because we _ telling? i think what happened early on was because we went _ telling? i think what happened early on was because we went into - telling? i think what happened early on was because we went into a - telling? i think what happened early on was because we went into a big l on was because we went into a big lockdown and the message got across really clearly, stay at home so people did not think that routine vaccination services and gp services were open. they might have been afraid to actually go in case they caught something so i think it is unsurprising but the good news is that we haven't seen many cases of measles since the beginning of the pandemic for that very reason because of the reduction in social mixing and lockdown but the bad news is that it is waiting in the wings, measles will pounce when the vaccine levels fall. we can stop it in its tracks, what we need to do now is before we have an outbreak, before we start seeing cases rising, we need to ensure that our children, young people and even young adults are fully protected against measles. if there is, i don't know, a teenager who never got their mmr, is there a cut off point at which he must have the mmr vaccine in order
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for it to be effective? ida. must have the mmr vaccine in order for it to be effective?— for it to be effective? no, there is no u- er for it to be effective? no, there is no upper age _ for it to be effective? no, there is no upper age limits _ for it to be effective? no, there is no upper age limits or _ for it to be effective? no, there is no upper age limits or a _ for it to be effective? no, there is no upper age limits or a teenager| no upper age limits or a teenager not vaccinated as a young child can still be vaccinated now, the same applies to people in their 20s, if they had not been vaccinated, it's really important because measles is really important because measles is really nasty in adulthood, as well as being very nasty for young children. vaccination against covid becomes compulsory in austria today, for anyone over 18. several countries have introduced mandates for the elderly or for medical staff, but austria is the first country in europe to introduce such sweeping measures. those who refuse to get the shot will face fines of up to 3600 euros, but won't face prison. bethany bell reports from vienna. lou and her husband, gus, are artists who live south of vienna. neither are vaccinated against covid i9, and they strongly disagree with austria's new vaccine mandate.
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the vaccines haven't really stopped the pandemic yet, and people keep being vaccinated and they still are getting ill of covid i9. maybe not as badly, but they're still getting ill as numbers, current numbers are showing. it's not for any authority to tell me what to put into my body or not. but austria's government says the law is necessary to fight covid i9 and prevent future lockdowns. mandatory vaccination is an interference with human rights, but in this case, this interference can be justified. that's very clear from the law point and from the human rights point of view. we have the need to get out of the pandemic, and we know that vaccination is the only way to get out of it and to get back to a normal life. a vaccination centre has even been set up in vienna's st stephen's cathedral. chatter.
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around 72% of austrians have already had the jab. those who refuse to get the shot will face fines of up to 3,600 euros. the vaccine mandate is set to expire in january 202a. one of austria's top doctors, says the vaccine saves lives. it's clearly shown that the vaccination impedes severe courses of the disease and therefore it reduces icu admissions significantly, and that is really important for the health care system. so if you want to reduce your personal risk significantly and the risk for your loved ones, get vaccinated. but strong resistance to the vaccine and the law remains. demonstrators have been coming out for weeks in protest against the compulsory vaccination law.
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they've come waving their austrian flags and wearing the masks that you have to wear at a protest here. it's a mixed crowd, there are families, some nurses and crucially, a lot of supporters of the far right. austria has gone farther than any of its neighbours with this vaccine mandate. chanting. other european countries will be watching closely. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. the government plans to scrap the requirement for health and social care workers in england to be vaccinated against coronavirus. the health secretary sajid javid told the house of commons he believes it is "no longer proportionate" to require vaccination given that the delta variant, which was dominant at the time the policy was announced, has now been replaced by the less severe omicron. police have been granted more time to question the manchester united footballer mason greenwood.
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the 20—year—old was arrested on suspicion of rape and assault on sunday. manchester united have said the player will not return to training or matches until further notice. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. later, he'll head to ukraine to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. myanmar marks the first anniversary of the military coup with a silent strike. the un says the country is now in a state of civil war. few countries can match mexico for their love of football. but all is not well in the country's most popular sport. the national football federation has introduced new measures to try and curb homophobic chanting as tim allman reports. mexico!
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football is supposed to be a sport for everyone. but that hasn't always been the case at mexico city's azteca stadium. supporters attending this world cup qualifier against costa rica had to go through extra security. new measures to identify each individual, everyone having to be on their best behaviour. translation: we are sick - of the fines, of having suspensions and games without attendance. it's about time we start behaving properly and stop discrimination. all of us, we're mexico and when the team sees the fans and they feel the passion it, it sends out good energy so that the players could give it 100%. it was at this match where mexico played canada in the concacaf gold cup that homophobic chanting led to the game being temporarily suspended. the mexican football authorities have already been fined on several occasions for similar incidents, so they want to take action before sterner punishments are introduced.
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translation: we will have to multiply the resources i we're setting up today. right now, as you can see, we have a surplus that we would need to multiply by 20 as in the case against the united states, which requires a bigger capacity, both in terms of access and in terms of security. mexico! these new measures will be in place for all of mexico's home world cup qualifiers, a chance to show football can be inclusive no matter who you are. tim allman, bbc news. mexico! have you completed your wordle day? i have, i managed it in five cases, not great, not terrible. the reason i mention it... the new york times has bought the popular word game wordle for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. let me show you one from the
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archive. you may be familiar with it, you may not. the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineer josh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming". the new owners said the game would remain free to play for the time being. let's gu ess let's guess at this one from the archive, my colleague robert is in the gallery. there we go. off to a flying start! that has exceeded even the earlier efforts! the bar was not set particularly high then but let me leave robert to carry that on! joining me now is susie dent from a programme here in the uk called countdown. she's a lexicographer and user of the game wordle. what do you think the secret behind the popularity is? it’s what do you think the secret behind the popularity is?— the popularity is? it's a collective code breaking — the popularity is? it's a collective code breaking exercise, - the popularity is? it's a collective code breaking exercise, it's - the popularity is? it's a collective code breaking exercise, it's a - code breaking exercise, its a process of elimination and i think thejoy is in process of elimination and i think the joy is in simplicity, process of elimination and i think thejoy is in simplicity, a bit like thejoy is in simplicity, a bit like the programme can town, once you
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know it, you know the rules, and it is the challenge for everyone, it's the same each day. a community sharing like that, with a word game as opposed to a video game is really rare, you might have crossword players on a low level but this has been spectacular on that score. let's go back to the live coverage of my colleagues attempt and we have one letter, marvellous, in the right place so let's continue to guess the letters. but ijust wonder whether it is a reflection of perhaps are shorter attention span? because in the past, people did crosswords and dutiful, maybe half an hour depending on how good you are but this is getting one word. do you think it appeals to us because you just have to guess one word and that is it, once you have done it, it is complete. i is it, once you have done it, it is complete-— is it, once you have done it, it is comlete. , , ., , , complete. i suppose that is true but there is one — complete. i suppose that is true but there is one challenge _ complete. i suppose that is true but there is one challenge a _ complete. i suppose that is true but there is one challenge a day - complete. i suppose that is true but there is one challenge a day and - complete. i suppose that is true but there is one challenge a day and i i there is one challenge a day and i hope the new york times will keep that because we are so used to apps
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or games that let us play as often as we like to the point you can exhaust it and yourself. whereas this is one a day and i think most of us think i would like to do another one so i'm not sure it's about short attention span, crosswords are doing really well and during lockdown so many of us took out our dusty board games so i like to think in some ways it is coming back, like a sort of version of the solute tv, if you like. ii back, like a sort of version of the solute tv, if you like.— solute tv, if you like. if ever there was — solute tv, if you like. if ever there was a _ solute tv, if you like. if ever there was a queue, - solute tv, if you like. if ever there was a queue, let's - solute tv, if you like. if ever. there was a queue, let's show solute tv, if you like. if ever- there was a queue, let's show you some coverage of slew tv. i should say, in fairness to robert, this is a team effort, notjust robert. among colleagues in the gallery. slow progress, i think, so unsteady, three guesses. the l is correct but in the wrong place, the 0 correct and in the right place, we will continue painful process but i wonder what you think would perhaps change if the new york times does
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something like, and they have not indicated that they will but perhaps makes several available every day? or perhaps makes it six letters instead of five, are there any changes you think would be to its detriment? �* ., changes you think would be to its detriment?— changes you think would be to its detriment? ., ., , detriment? both of those, actually. i think detriment? both of those, actually. ithinkjosh — detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh has _ detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh has found _ detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh has found a _ detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh has found a sweet - detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh has found a sweet spot| i thinkjosh has found a sweet spot for this and i think six letters, maybe, it is lovely that there is no time pressure but also, there is the pressure of getting it in five and i think if you relaxed the rules a little bit that might go and if you had more than one a day you might get this associated with it so i hope the new york times will not put it behind a pay wall but will there be lots of clones, i do not know if you can copyright a game like this, i guess so. i do not blamejosh wordle forgetting a reward for it, i think some people, think, because you had a tipjar, or crowd funded it, could he have done it in a different way but i hope it will
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remain on the web at any way or free for as long as it can. and the fact it will keep going, that would be the best thing. we it will keep going, that would be the best thing.— it will keep going, that would be the best thin. . ., ., ., ., ~' the best thing. we are going to take a final look at _ the best thing. we are going to take a final look at robert _ the best thing. we are going to take a final look at robert and _ the best thing. we are going to take a final look at robert and his - a final look at robert and his efforts, people shouting at the screen because he has put the e back in at the end and on his first guess, it showed him that was not in the word at all! he has written the word full! that is not me being mean to him, that was his guess. we are making progress. do you know, we have lost time on the clock so we are going to have to leave it there but thank you so much.— are going to have to leave it there but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense _ but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense is _ but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense is killing _ but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense is killing me, - but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense is killing me, i - but thank you so much. thank you! the suspense is killing me, i will. the suspense is killing me, i will let you know if we solve that archive wordle. a southern koala has been born at longleat safari park in wiltshire. it's believed to be the first time the subspecies has been successfully bred in europe. longleat established its colony three years ago when it flew five
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koalas in from a park near adelaide. jonah fisher reports. i have got a little bit of news for you. james, a keeper at longleat safari park, is on a zoom with chris... oh, well, let's hear it! ..a koala expert in southern australia. so, i'd like to introduce you to — obviously, you know, violet, one of your lovely adelaide koalas, but she also has a joey. oh, that's fantastic news, james. well done — congratulations, you're an uncle. absolutely brilliant. yeah, it's a little overwhelming. it's been quite a journey to get here. three and a half years ago, violet was a koala pioneer, making the long journey from chris' park in australia, to start england's only koala colony at longleat. when it was first born, violet's joey was the size of a jelly bean, and spent all of its time in its mother's pouch. now, six months on, the park and the koala are going public, and the joey is also starting
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to snack on more than just milk. so what the little joey is eating is called pap. it's recycled koala poo from violet, which means that it's gone through her, which takes the toxin levels out of the leaf, meaning that it's safe for the joey, but it gets used to the leaves that it will eat in its future life. so there are two subspecies of koala — the northern koala and what violet is, which is a southern koala, which is a bit bigger and hairier than its northern cousins. oh, look — it'sjust popping out there. and this little joey, there... ..well, he or she is the first southern koala ever to be born in europe. james was one of the longleat keepers who went out to australia to help out in the aftermath of the bushfires two years ago, when tens of thousands of koalas died. with rising global temperatures, it's likely to be just a matter of time before it happens again.
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koalas are particularly badly affected by fires, because they are up in the trees. they are really, really vulnerable to fires. so climate change could be really bad news for koalas? yeah, i don't think there's much debate about that. it will affect them badly. the question — i mean, they're not going to die out in the next five years, but they are seriously at risk. they're probably the fussiest animal that we have. keeping the koalas happy so far from home is a major undertaking. if they don't like it, they will let you know very, very quickly. they only eat eucalyptus, some of which is grown specially for them on site. i can see why it's good on a business level to have a cute baby koala born here. but is there a really good conservation reason for having a breeding group of koalas here in the uk, so far away from australia? koalas are under threat. they're very complex creatures, and not very well understood. it's only recently that
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research in earnest has begun into the various conditions they face, both in australia and over here. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello. as we go through the next few days, when will be a feature in the weather but it will not be as windy as it has been the last couple of days. you see from the isobars across scotland, we have gusty winds here today but also this with singing south, taking cloud and its patchy light rain with it but where we have the yellow and amber it is telling you it will be mild. here we have the cloud and rain across northern ireland, parts of england and wales, sinking south and towards the south—west are so behind that, it will brighten up, the sun will
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come out, still some showers across the north and north—west of scotland. the black circles represent wind gusts, the strongest today in caithness and orkney, gusts in excess of 65 miles an hour. mild day across the board, roughly speaking io day across the board, roughly speaking 10 degrees up to ia degrees. this evening and overnight the weather front continues to sink towards the south and west, flips and starts to retreat north and east taking cloud and rain with it and in doing so, it's a mild night for most of us, aberdeenshire and rural areas, temperatures could reach 2 degrees so you could see some frost. here's the weather front tomorrow having pushed north—east, high pressure in charge in the south, of the yellow means it will be another mild day. here is a weatherfront ensconced across parts of england and scotland, producing cloud, still some spots of rain but it should brighten up across wales, parts of the midlands, southern england and as you see from the temperatures, going to be another mild day, 10
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degrees up to ia degrees. on thursday, winding around the theory of rain, the weather front sinking south, behind that they are turning colder, increasing wintry showers down to lower levels but ahead of that, milder conditions, drier weather and also some sunshine. later we see the rain getting into the far south of england, we see the progress of that pushing south, gone by friday and then we will all be in the colder air mass and look at the isobars tells you on friday it will be another windy day, especially in the north. friday, lots of sunshine around but frequent wintry showers in scotland and northern england and feeling colder than it is going to in the next couple of days.
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good morning. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that the sue gray report was published in full the way it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. is the "sorry" from the pm enough for you now?
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how are you left feeling after sue gray's initial findings into pa rtygate? do let me know. it's @vicderbyshire on twitter and instagram. borisjohnson will make his way to ukraine today, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. good morning, i'm annita mcveight. our other stories this morning... the take up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade. there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. i,6000 jobs are at risk at tesco as the supermarket giant ends overnight restocking at some stores and converts some petrol sites to pay—at—pump through the night. and five letters sell for seven figures. the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle.
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the government has promised to publish an updated report on lockdown gatherings at number ten once police have finished their inquiries. labour leader — sir keir starmer says borisjohnson is focused on "saving his own skin" rather than key issues, afterfindings into no ten lockdown parties were published. the prime minister borisjohnson apologised yesterday after the initial findings led by the civil servant, sue gray, identified failures of leadership concerning more than a dozen events. however, the full report has not been published while the police investigate alleged covid rule breaking. mrjohnson met with conservative mps last night to reassure them and promise a shake—up of how number ten is run. our political correspondent, ben wright reports. after apologising for lockdown parties that happened under his roof, borisjohnson returned to number ten last night hoping some of the pressure on his premiership might have eased. for now, at least.
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but with the police now investigating 12 separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. sue gray's probe into what happened said there were failures of leadership and judgment. and there were events that should not have been allowed to take place. her verdict was brief but damning. in the commons the prime minister was contrite but defiant. firstly, i want to say sorry, and i'm sorry for the things we simply did not get right and sorry for the way this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, and it is no use saying that people were working hard, this pandemic was hard for everyone. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt, he showed
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himself unfit for office. it was a former conservative prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, or did not understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories�* own side. the people who were criticising him this afternoon particularly in the chamber are the people who were criticising him before he was elected as the leader of the party. they were criticising him as he was elected prime minister, and have been criticising him ever since. number ten said sue gray's full report will be published when the police have finished their investigation. but some tories want the prime minister to make that promise in the commons as soon as possible. it is clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and he attended parliament and acted
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as if he was outraged at finding out the rules were broken and we subsequently found out he already knew the parties were taking place because he was at at least one of them and according to today's report may have been at three, including one in his own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully to what their voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not have happened under previous prime ministers. i don't think they would have been doing it under theresa may, put it that way. i would love to believe he was sorry and he would fix it, _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if any laws have been remained on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. here is the deputy prime minister dominic raab speaking this morning. well, look, there's two separate i investigations going on, the police and sue gray's.
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sue gray has given us i the report subject to the individual claims that have gone to the police to investigate. - that has been published in full. and the pm's been clear that if sue gray comes back with any further |findings that she reports to him, j he will publish it in full. we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, - sue gray's and the met police, j we can't control what they give to us, but he's been clear that any further report from sue gray - will be published in full, - as indeed the interim report was. well, the labour leader sir keir starmer says there is no need for all this waiting because those involved could just be honest about what was happening. the metropolitan police asked that the full report not be published at the moment. but the idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day, is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box being asked, were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat?
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and he says, i can't answer that because of the investigation. he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he's taking us for fools. let's speak to our political correspondent helen catt. how would you assess where we are this morning? it how would you assess where we are this morning?— this morning? it feels like the imminent _ this morning? it feels like the imminent threat _ this morning? it feels like the imminent threat of _ this morning? it feels like the imminent threat of 54 - this morning? it feels like the imminent threat of 54 letters | this morning? it feels like the - imminent threat of 54 letters from imminent threat of 5a letters from his backbenchers going in and calling for a leadership contest. it feels like that has receded for now. that is down to a few things. firstly, what we got yesterday from sue gray didn't really definitively draw a line under this. there is still the police investigation to and conclusions to come out. three of the events at police are investigating are ones that the prime minister himself is known to have attended. i think that is putting off some mps who had perhaps been thinking about putting in a letter. also, it was borisjohnson's
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own performance when he spoke to his mps last night. there was a little bit of attention placed on his tone. you saw some of the comments he got from his backbenchers. when he spoke to them in a private meeting, he pulled it back a bit and reassured him that he did take this seriously. he reminded them of his own brush with covid and assured him that some of the key things that they wanted, like the full report published of the sue gray report, he reassured them that that would happen and that he would make changes. we heard that he would make changes. we heard that he said he got it and was going to fix it. the threat has receded. it has not pleased everyone. there are some who would still like to see him go. many are still calling on him to
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resign. one of the most interesting things the prime minister said yesterday was that we must look at ourselves in the mirror. and the truth is, of course, that it is he who needs to look at himself in the mirror. boris has done a fantasticjob for the country on getting us through what was effectively a collective national nervous breakdown over brexit. he achieved what he set out to achieve. he's got us through that, and we should all be immensely grateful to him. but the problem is that this crisis that we're now in with the parties and the erosion of public trust in the prime minister and in the conservative party is not going to go away. i mean, these sort of things never happened and would never happen under mrs thatcher. can you imagine it happening under mrs may? it's slightly unattractive to slough off responsibility onto the officials. and as i say, it's not going to go away. we have ukraine, we have afghanistan — major crises on our doorstep — and this, like battery acid, is corroding the fabric of the conservative party.
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while the immediate threat does seem to have receded, there is still a sense that mrjohnson is on probation, if you like, amongst his own party. there is going to be a huge focus and scrutiny on what he does next starting with what he promised yesterday, the reorganisation of number ten, the creation of the new office of the prime minister because there have been concerns among conservative mps that the downing street operation needs to get a grip. there is going to be a lot of scrutiny on what he does to do that in the coming days and there is also speculation about the role of the chief whip mark spencer, whether he will keep that role for the time being. there is going to be a lot of focus on what does borisjohnson do next and how does borisjohnson do next and how does he respond. does boris johnson do next and how does he respond.— does he respond. thank you very much, does he respond. thank you very much. helen- — does he respond. thank you very much, helen. were _ does he respond. thank you very much, helen. were going - does he respond. thank you very much, helen. were going to - does he respond. thank you very much, helen. were going to talkj does he respond. thank you very i much, helen. were going to talk to will waldon who was the communications director and for many years. he is now senior council at a
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pr firm called edelman. is boris johnson going to change? i think it's a central question. i think the answer is no. to think that he is going to change it ignores a lifetime of habit. he is 57 years old, i think the way he is is the way he is. when he talks about change, yes, he does so in the operation, and presumably they will make changes to the operation around him. there will be different people and different ways of operating. is he going to change fundamentally the way he operates? i suspect the boris i know, the answer is no. you only have to look at the fact that i don't think he has changed from his daysin don't think he has changed from his days in city hall to going to number ten. it isjust days in city hall to going to number ten. it is just the way he is. iiissssss wood i expect that drives
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his officials crazy. it is just his shtick. he would change a speech in the middle of something and it would work. but unfortunately it is not working and that is a real problem. if people are thinking that he himself will change going forward, they have got another thing coming. that is probably the calculation that tory mps are making. they are thinking we've got this guy who's a brilliant campaigner but he isn't going to change and is that going to deliver the agenda we have promised people going forward? if they think it probably is, they will stick with him. if not, they will get rid of him. if not, they will get rid of him. ~ , ., ., ~' him. if not, they will get rid of him. ~ ., ~ ., ., him. when you work for him, what sort of culture _ him. when you work for him, what sort of culture did _ him. when you work for him, what sort of culture did he _ him. when you work for him, what sort of culture did he set? - him. when you work for him, what sort of culture did he set? it - him. when you work for him, what sort of culture did he set? it he i sort of culture did he set? it he was in a boozy late _ sort of culture did he set? it he was in a boozy late evening - sort of culture did he set? it is: was in a boozy late evening culture. who knows whether them being locked down in a work bubble contributed to that. for my time in number ten
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previously or in the cabinet, i never saw anything like that. at the end of the day, unfortunately, whatever the prime minister says, he sets the tone, he is the boss. i don't think it can get much worse than a senior independent inquiry saying there is a serious failure in downing street. he did run a relaxed office. it was part of his modus operandi, part of his charm. everyone knew he was not totally for the detail, but was he a serious politician when he needed to be, yes. he was always focus. so i don't know what has gone on to change some of that. at the end of the day, the prime minister is the boss and he has to set the tone and he certainly has to set the tone and he certainly has to set the tone and he certainly has to change the tone going forward and he has to do it pretty quickly.
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obviously we have got the full report from sue gray to come at some point, we've got the metropolitan police investigation. until then, would you say, the prime minister is safe in hisjob? who would you say, the prime minister is safe in hisjob?— safe in his “ob? who knows. politics is a safe in his job? who knows. politics is a strange — safe in his job? who knows. politics is a strange one _ safe in his job? who knows. politics is a strange one and _ safe in his job? who knows. politics is a strange one and it _ is a strange one and it changes every 2a hours. there could be further revelations between now and the publication of the police report. and that could be a real problem. he is probably safer now, but the difficulty is number ten wants to move on from that, we've got months into the police investigation and we can move on from this and focus on delivery of other things. from this and focus on delivery of otherthings. but from this and focus on delivery of other things. but the sue gray report was excoriating. that means the prime minister and frankly the country are in a very difficult position. we face weeks or months of uncertainty. numberten
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position. we face weeks or months of uncertainty. number ten is not in control of any of these events or the investigations and they are not in control of the findings. a lot of this is fundamentally self—inflicted on the prime minister's part. what everything of the performance of the prime minister, they have had weeks to decide what the changes would be. he acknowledged that the changes around the staffing and how it number ten is around the staffing and how it numberten is run, around the staffing and how it number ten is run, that he had no idea. your viewers may not know, but they had his secretary in charge 18 months ago and he got promoted and then he was never replaced. if he's going to move forward, he's got to focus on delivery, demonstrate that the changes around him are real and coming to the commons yesterday with only one idea it does not help with that narrative. ok. only one idea it does not help with that narrative.— only one idea it does not help with that narrative. ok, you worked with him very closely _ that narrative. ok, you worked with him very closely for— that narrative. ok, you worked with him very closely for a _ that narrative. ok, you worked with him very closely for a number- that narrative. ok, you worked with him very closely for a number of. him very closely for a number of years. do you think he thinks he has
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not done anything wrong or do you think his apology was genuine? it is so difficult. think his apology was genuine? it 3 so difficult. yes, he is sorry. he recognises the boozy parties, whatever the circumstances are not acceptable. i think the problem that they have is they did not get in front of this in the very beginning. they said it did not happen. then they said ok, it happened, but i wasn't there. oh, 0k, they said ok, it happened, but i wasn't there. oh, ok, i they said ok, it happened, but i wasn't there. oh, 0k, iwas they said ok, it happened, but i wasn't there. oh, ok, i was there but it was not a party. people see that and think that cannot be right. so when he comes to apologise and there is contrition, but then he is political, he's very aggressive in response. and the problem that that creates in people's mine's is where is the line. is he sorry or not? we read that he goes around going to colleagues that i haven't done anything wrong. i don't think in the long term that helps him or his
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narrative or his chance of surviving this. . ., narrative or his chance of surviving this. ., ,, , ., narrative or his chance of surviving this. ., ~' , ., , narrative or his chance of surviving this. ., ,, i. , . narrative or his chance of surviving this. . ,, ,, , . ., this. thank you very much for talkin: this. thank you very much for talking to _ this. thank you very much for talking to us. _ thank you for your messages as well. allen says he is no borisjohnson supporter, he's a member of the labour party, but he says once the rules will spurt in place, it was not his responsibility to make sure that downing street followed the rules. his focus should be on his priorities globally. another person says i am a key worker, i stuck to the rules i did not see my family. i was exposed to covid at work shortly before christmas 2020. i return home on the 7th of january to be met by before christmas 2020. i return home on the 7th ofjanuary to be met by a police officer who told me that my younger brother was dead, subsequently confirmed through covid. i then cared for my mum in
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her 80s being dependent on carers for going to the toilet, etc. three days later, she was sent to hospital with covid and not being able to see her to inform her of my brother's death, she died of pneumonia precipitated by covid. borisjohnson says he understands the country's pain. he does not. thank you for those. you can message me on instagram or twitter or e—mail me. i've got some pictures of the prime minister leaving here. he is going to ukraine. i'mjust minister leaving here. he is going to ukraine. i'm just having a look at these pictures myself. he's getting into a car on his way to ukraine to meet the prime minister, the prime minister —— the president, i beg your pardon. he wants to concentrate on that. are diplomatic correspondent is already in the ukrainian capital. well, the prime minister is due
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here later on this afternoon. it will be a relatively brief visit. he will meet the president of ukraine, president zelensky, and a few other officials. he will have some discussions with them, he will get a briefing on the situation in donbas in the east of the country where the frozen conflict has been going on between government forces and pro—russian separatists since 201a. he will hold a brief press conference and then he will get back on his plane and head home. so it is a brief visit but it is clearly a symbolically important one because he is the most senior western politician to come here to show support for ukraine. he will be announcing a bit of cash, £88 million, to help ukraine do two things. try and wean itself off its dependency on russian energy and also help it improve governance here, which is clearly an issue with corruption, transparency, things like that. so he will come with some money, with some sense of support, but it is a relatively brief visit. i don't know if you have had
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a chance to talk to any people who actually live there. are they feeling that there is going to be an invasion from those russian troops or what? if you look around you there is no sense of life being any different here in any sense than normal. if you talk to officials and others they say, look, we are beginning to pick up little bits of concern, one or two people may be having bags packed, just thinking about a possible plan b. but there is a gap between the view here in ukraine and the gap in western capitals, particularly london and washington. that is primarily because washington and london and the five eyes group, the intelligence group, they have access to an awful lot more data than the ukrainian government does, so that is the first point. the second point is the ukrainian government is in a difficult position. it wants allies and support from outside, but it also doesn't want to work this into more of a crisis than it is because that is damaging the economy right now. so the message that you quite often
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get from the ukrainian president is don't panic, let's not be too strong in the rhetoric we talk about here, because they don't want it to become any kind of military action by russia, to become a self—fulfilling prophecy, so that is why there is a slight nuanced gap between the rhetoric both sides. we will have more from him in kyiv later on bbc news. that is it for now here in downing street. i will bring you a little bit more later. more than 1,a00 jobs are at risk after britain's biggest retailer tesco announced an operational shake—up. tesco's overnight supplies to some supermarket and petrol stations will be restocked during the daytime for over 30 large stores and almost 50 convenience stores. the move comes after the retailer confirmed plans to close its discount supermarket arm,
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jack's, on monday, with seven of its stores shutting for good. the combined changes will put around 1,600 workers at risk. let's talk to our business correspondent emma simpson. tell us a little bit more about the changes and why tesco is making these. , . , changes and why tesco is making these. , ., , . ., , these. these are big changes, another big — these. these are big changes, another big restructuring - these. these are big changes, | another big restructuring under these. these are big changes, - another big restructuring under way. as you say, most of them involve overnight staff, the people who restock the shelves over note —— overnight so they are ready for the next day. these are going to be done during the day now. tesco is saying to ensure more staff on the shop floor to meet customers at peak times. also 36 petrol stations are going to be converted to paying at the pump overnight. so overall, 1a00
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jobs are going and that comes off the back of newsroom done yesterday that it the back of newsroom done yesterday thatitis the back of newsroom done yesterday that it is closing the budget chain jacks. there were 13 stores, at seven or going to close and six are being converted. about 1600 jobs going. fir being converted. about 1600 “obs anoin. . being converted. about 1600 “obs ..oin _ ., , ~' being converted. about 1600 “obs uuoin. ., ., being converted. about 1600 “obs ..oin, ., . ., ., , being converted. about 1600 “obs going. or at risk. what does this tell us about _ going. or at risk. what does this tell us about the _ going. or at risk. what does this tell us about the way _ going. or at risk. what does this tell us about the way we - going. or at risk. what does this tell us about the way we shop i going. or at risk. what does this. tell us about the way we shop and given that tesco has since had a very good christmas why is it doing this? , ., , ., this? yes, all the groceries have had a cracking _ this? yes, all the groceries have had a cracking christmas. - this? yes, all the groceries have had a cracking christmas. why i this? yes, all the groceries have had a cracking christmas. why is this? yes, all the groceries have l had a cracking christmas. why is it having to cut the cost? well, all the big brochures have seen an explosion in costs. wage bill is going up, supply chains, commodity costs and tesco announced in october that it was going to try and save £1 billion over three years. it needs to become more efficient and streamline its business. i think some costs are starting to creep in during the pandemic and i think
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cost—cutting is going to be a big theme this year across all the brochures and indeed across retail more generally. this isjust the start. this comes off the back of a wave of restructurings, changes to store hours and terms and conditions across all the groceries before the pandemic. across all the groceries before the andemic. . ., across all the groceries before the andemic. ., «i , ., , across all the groceries before the andemic. ., ,, , ., , . pandemic. ok, thank you very much, emma. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england are at risk of measles because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds with both doses of mmr which helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella — has dropped to the lowest for a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness. as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop
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in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade, and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles. when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection
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we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one, with a second dose offered at around the age of three and a half, before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. let's stay with the subject of vaccinations. covid vaccinations in england because the office for national statistics have just published some data today talking about students living in the most deprived areas versus those living in less deprived areas and comparing
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their vaccination status. our health reporterjim reed is with us to tell us more about that.— us more about that. yes, you 'ust heard the report i us more about that. yes, you 'ust heard the report talking �* us more about that. yes, you just heard the report talking about. heard the report talking about measles. this is covid vaccinations in school children. the data is out in school children. the data is out in the last hour or so. overall it is showing that the uptake among that group of 12 to 15—year—olds who have had at least one dose of the covid vaccine is at about 53%. you remember last year when it was approved for that age group, there was a bit of a debate between the scientists and the politicians about whether to go ahead with this. some of the scientific evidence about the benefit to the individual is not as strong as it is for older age groups. the interesting thing that i think is worth pointing out is the variation between different groups. if you look at the most deprived areas in the uk, the highest 10%
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most apprised areas against the most affluent, you will see that you are twice as likely as a child to have a covid vaccine in the wealthiest areas. in the least deprived areas. it goes up from 36% of children in the least deprived right up to 70% in the most deprived. big variations there. also between ethnic groups and regional variations. there. also between ethnic groups and regionalvariations. in there. also between ethnic groups and regional variations. in london and regional variations. in london and in the northwest much lower rates of vaccinations. in the southeast outside of london, much higher uptake in that age group. also if you look at the ethnic rates, in children and a family of chinese or indian, it's much higher. in students who come from a black caribbean background or a roma background much lower, 12% of children. you can see some of the challenges, some of the issues for
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the nhs going forward if they want to increase take—up in those younger age groups. fiend to increase take-up in those younger age groups-— age groups. and student to speak enalish as age groups. and student to speak english as an _ age groups. and student to speak english as an additional _ age groups. and student to speak english as an additional language| english as an additional language much less likely to have been vaccinated. i want to talk to you about the subject. we heard about the removal of mandatory vaccines for nhs workers. what is the fallout from that today? lots of organisations will have already lost staff because of that. big organisations will have already lost staff because of that.— staff because of that. big debate about this- _ staff because of that. big debate about this. this _ staff because of that. big debate about this. this was _ staff because of that. big debate about this. this was made - staff because of that. big debate about this. this was made in - staff because of that. big debate about this. this was made in the j about this. this was made in the evening last night by sajid javid. it only applies to england. there has been some debate. the deadline for this was this thursday. that was the first doses for all health care workers. that now it has been scrapped. there is a consultation
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thatis scrapped. there is a consultation that is going to go on. the government has said they do not want to do this and the labour party is supporting the government. it is still controversial. jeremy hunt who is a former health secretary who is in charge of the house select committee has been talking about this on twitter and he asked very pointed questions in the house of commons about this yesterday. talking about how he as a health secretary was trying to push for mandatory flu vaccinations for health workers thinking it is the responsible thing to do. the fact that this is being scrapped for covid vaccinations he thinks is sending a mixed message. some people walking in health care, the bosses of trust have expressed frustration that they have been heavily encouraging staff and trying to advocate this policy for the last couple of months only to have it reversed at the last minute. ok. reversed at the last minute. ok, thank you _ reversed at the last minute. ok, thank you very — reversed at the last minute. ok, thank you very much _ reversed at the last minute. 0k, thank you very much for that. the time is exactly 11:30pm. let's take
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a look at the weather. hello, again. as we go through the rest of this week, it still is going to be quite windy at times — but not as windy as it was yesterday. today, we've got a weather front across northern ireland, parts of england and wales which is seeing a fair bit of cloud and some spots of rain. it is heading southwards and westwards. behind it, a fair bit of sunshine, some showers and strong winds, gusty winds, especially across the far north of scotland and the northern isles. gusting to gale force at times. now, as we head onto the evening and overnight, we've got the cloud and the rain starting to pep up as it pushes northwards and eastwards. some clear skies in wales, some clear skies in aberdeenshire, but generally speaking it is going to be a mild night. so a mild start to the day tomorrow but a fairly cloudy one. still with some spots of rain but brightening up quite nicely across parts of wales, the west midlands and also southern england. the other thing you will notice is it's going to be another mild day across the board. 10—12 degrees. something a little bit cooler
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coming into the north. hello, this is bbc news with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines... the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. meanwhile, borisjohnson is making his way to ukraine today, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. the take up of the mmr vaccine
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is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. 1,600 jobs are at risk at tesco as the supermarket giant ends overnight restocking at some stores and converts some petrol sites to pay—at—pump through the night. and five letters sell for seven figures — the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle. it's time for sport now. let's catch up it's time for sport now. let's catch up with all of that with gavin. let's talk transfer wrap ups to begin with — a lot of money spent in this window — £295 million changed hands before it closed last night. everton doing some good business, including donny van der beek on loan from manchester united, and one of the big name moves, delli ali, who'lljoin everton from tottenham on a two—and—a—half—year deal, for a fee that could
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reach £a0 million. ali has played 37 times for england, but his career has stalled at spurs in recent years, and he's only played for the club six times since antonio conte took over as manager. i love that celebration there. new everton boss frank lampard is clearly building his team — and fans see the signings as a good start to his tenure at goodison. i hope he is going to deliver. i think is going to bring a fairly different style of football than we have had. lampard almost the opposite. likes to play on the front foot, a high pressing game. from the board, i hope he will be given to patients because we can't have this constant turnover of managers. talk of we want a new manager that is going to take us to the new stadium. that hasn't materialised so far. is going to want to prove himself as well. barcelona have agreed a deal to sign arsenal striker pierre emerick aubameyang. he wasn't on the greatest of terms with manager mikel arteta and he's
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only scored four goals in 1a games this season. there's no fee involved, but the transfer will reportedly save arsenal around £25 million a year in wages. one of the surprise moves of the window — juventus and wales midfielder aaron ramsey has joined scottish premiership champions rangers. he could make his debut tomorrow in the old firm match. he's at ibrox on loan until the end of the season. and manchester city confirmed the 1a million pound signing of strikerjulian alvarez from river plate. the 22—year—old will remain at the argentine champions until the end ofjuly. for all the transfer deadline day news. go to the bbc sport website. the premier league say 85 per cent of players have now been at least partially vaccinated against coronavirus. the league revealed the figures as it announced 11 positive results from its latest weekly round of testing. the figure of 85 per cent is a% up on october last year
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of players who've had at least one dose. finally, we're only a few days away from the start of the winter olympics, with the snowboarding competition beginning on saturday. beijing 2022 will be the first games to use almost 100% artificial snow, deploying more than 100 snow generators and 300 snow—cannons working flat out to cover the ski slopes. the move has attracted some criticism from those concerned over the environmental impact because of the amount of water used, but one of great britain's medal hopes says the man made snow could help the british athletes it is artificial snow here, but i grew up in the uk so it is all artificial snow. grew up in the uk so it is all artificialsnow. but grew up in the uk so it is all artificial snow. but it is different and it is actually running really well, a lot better than i expected. we actually got to run through the course today, we didn't get to hit anything which is expected. it is really amazing so i am looking forward to getting stuck into training. i'm loving my olympic experience so far. a lot of covid regulations now that were there four years ago. but all in all, it has been better than i expected it to be. we have to go through david
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covid tests, health monitoring, taking temperature, even in the food hall we have screen protectors. so it is different, but all in all we can still walk around the village and it still feels relatively normal. that's all the sport for now. the government has promised to publish an updated report on lockdown gatherings at number 10 once police have finished their inquiries. the publication of the initial findings blamed a "failure of leadership" for rule breaking in downing street. labour leader, sir keir starmer, has accused the prime minister of being distracted from problems such as the cost of living crisis by fighting to save his job. let's go now to our political correspondent helen catt at westminster. helen, hello to you. we sawjust a short while ago borisjohnson heading off for his journey to
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ukraine. he wants people to focus on the fact that he is doing that, but none the less there are lots of questions about whether all of these reports, these investigations, mean that the government cannot operate effectively. that the government cannot operate effectivel . ., ., , that the government cannot operate effectivel . ., . ., , effectively. yeah, it has certainly been a massive _ effectively. yeah, it has certainly been a massive distraction - effectively. yeah, it has certainly been a massive distraction for. effectively. yeah, it has certainlyl been a massive distraction for the government in recent weeks, and yesterday— government in recent weeks, and yesterday didn't really draw a line under— yesterday didn't really draw a line under it — yesterday didn't really draw a line under it. we got that update from sue gray, — under it. we got that update from sue gray, as you said, it did raise more _ sue gray, as you said, it did raise more questions. the prime minister did say— more questions. the prime minister did say that — more questions. the prime minister did say that he is going to whip number— did say that he is going to whip number ten did say that he is going to whip numberten into shape, did say that he is going to whip number ten into shape, said at this new office — number ten into shape, said at this new office of the prime minister. what _ new office of the prime minister. what he — new office of the prime minister. what he has done in the meantime is he seems _ what he has done in the meantime is he seems to— what he has done in the meantime is he seems to have one around some of his backbench mps, to reassure them enough _ his backbench mps, to reassure them enough that there doesn't seem to be that sense _ enough that there doesn't seem to be that sense that there is 5a letters would _ that sense that there is 5a letters would go — that sense that there is 5a letters would go in for a leadership challenge imminently. i have with meat— challenge imminently. i have with meat labour's shadow work and pensions— meat labour's shadow work and pensions secretary. opposition mps were calling on conservative mps to do that, _ were calling on conservative mps to do that, to — were calling on conservative mps to do that, to put those letters in. it do that, to put those letters in. doesn't like do that, to put those letters in. it doesn't like it is going to happen? i don't know, that is a matter for
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conservative mps. what i do know is that boris johnson conservative mps. what i do know is that borisjohnson lied repeatedly, he has disgraced the office of prime minister, he has betrayed the trust that people in stoke, stevenage, sedgefield put to him, at a time when there is a desperate cost of living crisis were big tax hikes are coming, pensioners are going to see the value of their pensions cut in real terms, energy bills are rocketing and prices are going up in the shops. he cannot get a grip, he cannot do anything to take the vat off energy bills, to expand the warm home scheme, he can't do any of this because he is more worried about saving his own skin. tory mps should put the country first, act and the national interest and get rid of borisjohnson. i have never known a prime minister like like this prime minister. i have never known a prime minister. i have never known a prime minister to be so distrustful, do not tell the truth, to be breaking the rules and think you can get away with it. he really is a disgrace. you talked about all those issues
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that you think government should be focusing on, wouldn't a leadership challenge detract from that further? because you have to put the future of the country first, and the future of the country first, and the future of the country is best served by borisjohnson resigning. the thing about winston churchill, tony blair, margaret thatcher, theresa may, gordon brown, none of them would have told the lies that this prime minister has told. to be under criminal investigation for a set of rules that you yourself were responsible for and broke is absolutely extraordinary. when people across the country are facing this cost of living crisis, their tax bills are going up, prices in the shops are rocketing, heating bills are going up, we need a government focused on these issues, not completely mired in these scandals. i5 not completely mired in these scandals. , ., ., ., scandals. is there an argument on the other side _ scandals. is there an argument on the other side to _ scandals. is there an argument on the other side to say _ scandals. is there an argument on the other side to say that - scandals. is there an argument on the other side to say that it - scandals. is there an argument on the other side to say that it is - the other side to say that it is time to practice and move on, let the police do their work, focus on
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issues? �* ., , the police do their work, focus on issues? 1, _ ., the police do their work, focus on issues? _ ., ., the police do their work, focus on issues? ., ., issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell _ issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell us _ issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell us right _ issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell us right now - issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell us right now that - issues? boris johnson can do that. you can tell us right now that he i you can tell us right now that he was at a party in his own flat, apparently dancing to abba if we believe what we read, but he refuses to come clean. he could actually draw a line under that now. but he is letting it drag on, meanwhile, people in stoke, stevenage, are facing punishing tax hikes, they sing their weekly shop going up, facing their heating bills rocketing, and we have no action whatsoever from the government. what whatsoever from the government. what can be done about _ whatsoever from the government. what can be done about it? we _ whatsoever from the government. what can be done about it? we have - whatsoever from the government. what can be done about it? we have a - whatsoever from the government. what can be done about it? we have a vote i can be done about it? we have a vote here in the — can be done about it? we have a vote here in the house _ can be done about it? we have a vote here in the house of— can be done about it? we have a vote here in the house of commons - can be done about it? we have a vote here in the house of commons today | here in the house of commons today to deal with the rising energy bills. the tory mps should listen to us, they should take vat off energy bills, that is what borisjohnson promised us before brexit, and discount schemes so people have more help to pay their bills. you can pay for that by putting a windfall tax on the energy companies. instead,
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you have tory mps plotting in corners, trying to work out whether their interest is to... you corners, trying to work out whether their interest is to. . .— their interest is to... you could call a confidence _ their interest is to... you could call a confidence vote? - their interest is to... you could call a confidence vote? tory i their interest is to... you could i call a confidence vote? tory mps have to show _ call a confidence vote? tory mps have to show some _ call a confidence vote? tory mps have to show some guts - call a confidence vote? tory mps have to show some guts and - call a confidence vote? tory mps have to show some guts and get| call a confidence vote? tory mps i have to show some guts and get rid of borisjohnson. have to show some guts and get rid of boris johnson.— of boris johnson. what about that re ort? of boris johnson. what about that report? iemis— of boris johnson. what about that report? boris johnson _ of boris johnson. what about that report? boris johnson seems - of boris johnson. what about that report? boris johnson seems to l report? borisjohnson seems to have... report? boris johnson seems to have... , . ., report? boris johnson seems to have... , ., «i , , have... they are kidding themselves if they think — have... they are kidding themselves if they think they _ have... they are kidding themselves if they think they have _ have... they are kidding themselves if they think they have been - if they think they have been reassured. a leopard doesn't change its spots. he has been sacked from jobs, he has never told the truth, and now he has been caught lying repeatedly about breaking rules that he himself wrote. if tory mps think they are reassured, that i am afraid they are reassured, that i am afraid they are reassured, that i am afraid they are in cloud cuckoo land. we wait to see _ they are in cloud cuckoo land. we wait to see now. it feels like that imminent— wait to see now. it feels like that imminent pressure on the prime minister— imminent pressure on the prime minister has subsided, but there is still very— minister has subsided, but there is still very much a feeling that he is, if— still very much a feeling that he is, if you — still very much a feeling that he is, if you like, on probation amongst _ is, if you like, on probation amongst some of his mps. they want to see changes, starting with some
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of those _ to see changes, starting with some of those changes he has promised within— of those changes he has promised within number ten.— of those changes he has promised within number ten. helen, thank you very much- — police have been granted more time to question the manchester united footballer mason greenwood. the 20—year—old was arrested on suspicion of rape and assault on sunday. manchester united have said the player will not return to training or matches until further notice. proposals have been announced to improve schools across england — including help to retain teachers, and create specialist sixth—forms. the measures form part of the government's levelling up agenda — but teaching unions have questioned whether they would make up for years of funding cuts. areas identified as having the weakest education outcomes include rochdale, walsall and the isle of wight. the metropolitan police has said the force is "deeply sorry" after the police watchdog found evidence of bullying, racism and misogyny among a team of officers at charing cross police station in central london.
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let's get more detail on this from our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. what more can you tell us? multiple investigations _ what more can you tell us? multiple investigations into _ what more can you tell us? multiple investigations into the _ what more can you tell us? multiple investigations into the activities - investigations into the activities of charing cross station, and what they uncovered was officers saying how other officers had behaved, bullying, lots of discriminatory conduct, misogyny. but the thing thatis conduct, misogyny. but the thing that is truly shocking out of the report is that these officers had what's up groups, and their so—called banter that they had at the police station is reflected in these whatsapp group. using the word 93)’ these whatsapp group. using the word gay as an insult. in just sort of
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every kind of offensive and discriminatory conduct you can imagine is reflected there in their whatsapp messages. most of them are completely on broadcast above. when you see the list of whatsapp messages, you realise what's the culture was like in that police station. and as javid said he read the messages with increasing disgust and shame. —— unbroadcastable. do we know what the sanctions involved? that -- unbroadcastable. do we know what the sanctions involved?— the sanctions involved? that unit has been disbanded. _ the sanctions involved? that unit has been disbanded. that - the sanctions involved? that unit has been disbanded. that unit i the sanctions involved? that unit. has been disbanded. that unit was based in london's west end. to officers faced gross misconduct, and were found guilty of gross misconduct. one was dismissed, the other resigned. and eight other
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officers faced various levels of disciplinary process. they have gone very hard, using the disciplinary process, at this team. following the sarah everard case, there is already this review of the met�*s culture going on. this review of the met's culture auoin on. ~ . , , this review of the met's culture uaoinon.~ . , , ., , going on. which brings me to my next ruestion. going on. which brings me to my next question- we — going on. which brings me to my next question. we have _ going on. which brings me to my next question. we have talked _ going on. which brings me to my next question. we have talked a _ going on. which brings me to my next question. we have talked a lot - going on. which brings me to my next question. we have talked a lot in i question. we have talked a lot in the last couple of weeks about culture in politics, haven't we? certainly there is a debate about culture in policing as well.- culture in policing as well. there is a massive _ culture in policing as well. there is a massive debate _ culture in policing as well. there is a massive debate to _ culture in policing as well. there is a massive debate to be - culture in policing as well. there is a massive debate to be had i culture in policing as well. there i is a massive debate to be had about culture in policing. this phrase "bad apple" was being used after the sarah everard kidnap and murder, but i think what this investigation shows is that it is not the sort of a bad apple, or if you bad apples, there are a significant number of officers, in this case tend being disciplined in one shape or form officers, in this case tend being disciplined in one shape orform in one police station, for whom this...
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it seems wrong to use the word banter. this sort of banter seems widespread. bullying, misogynistic culture, discriminatory towards people of different religions, races, different sexualities. it is all there, and certainly there are definitely pockets of police officers in the metropolitan police, and i believe in forces beyond where this kind of behaviour is widespread.— this kind of behaviour is widespread. this kind of behaviour is widesread. ., «i , ., , widespread. daniel, thank you very much for telling _ widespread. daniel, thank you very much for telling us _ widespread. daniel, thank you very much for telling us about _ widespread. daniel, thank you very much for telling us about that. i the family of a 21—year—old woman who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill who was sentenced to seven and a half years at a young offenders institute. the attorney general has now agreed to review the sentence. rachel stonehouse has this report.
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this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend, rocco sansome. just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van, here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise... it's kind of... there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship, and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 202a. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed.
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angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse. when we think about the context of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked, because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just... ijust feel reluctant to go out. even just in my house, having someone come to check the boiler — erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. rachael stonehouse, bbc news.
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whoopi goldberg has apologised after saying on an american talk show that the holocaust "was not about race". the actress and tv personality said on abc's the view that the nazi genocide of thejews involved "two groups of white people". critics pointed out that hitler himself had vented his hatred of thejews in racial terms. a usjudge has rejected a plea deal between federal prosecutors and two of the three white men convicted of murdering black jogger ahmaud arbery. the ruling comes after one of the convicted men admitted for the first time that race was his motivation behind the attack. prosecutors had reached plea agreements with travis and gregory mcmichael — to the shock of mr arbery�*s family.
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they are trying to do some undercover stuff. me and momma, we don't know nothing about. some plea deal, we did not agree with that. and like i say, ahmaud is a kid you cannot place. he unplaceable. and he was killed. and we want 100% justice. not no halfjustice. the time is 11:51am. the new york times has bought the popular word game wordle for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play — for the time being. earlier ben boulos spoke to countdown's susie dent — lexicographer and wordle user — he asked her why it's so popular. it's like a collective code breaking exercise, ben. it's a process of elimination and i think itsjoy is in its simplicity.
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it's a bit like countdown, actually, in that once you've done it, you know the rules. i think it's very, very easy to get. and of course the same challenge is set for everyone each day. and community sharing like that — with a word game as opposed to, say, a video game — is really rare. you might have it between crossword players on a really low level but this one has been spectacular on that score. we're just going to go back to the live coverage of my colleague's attempt at it. 0h, marvellous, we've got one letter — and it is in the right place. so we will continue to guess the letters. but ijust wonder whether it's a reflection of perhaps our shorter attention spans? because in the past, people did crosswords and you'd devote maybe half an hour depending how good you are, but this is just getting one word. do you think it appeals to us because you've just to guess one word and that's it — once you have done it, its complete. i suppose that's true, but actually what is lovely is that there is just one challenge a day, and i'm really hoping that the new york times will keep that — because we're so used to apps or games that let us play as often
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as we like, to the point where you can just exhaust it and yourself. whereas this one is just one a day — and i think most of us think "i would like to do another one now." so i'm not sure it's about short attention span. i think crosswords are also still doing really well, and during lockdown so many of us opened our cupboards and found all our dusty board games and things, so i like to think in some ways it's coming back. it's like a sort of version of the slow tv, if you like. if ever there was a cue, let's show some coverage of slow tv. i should say, in fairness to robert, this is a team effort among colleagues in the gallery. slow progress, i think — slow and steady. we're on three guesses. so the l is correct but in the wrong place, the 0 is correct in the right place. we'll continue with that painful process, susie, but i just wonder what you think would perhaps change if the new york times does something like,
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and they haven't indicated that they will, but perhaps makes several available a day? or perhaps makes it six letters instead of five? are there any changes you think would be to its detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh wardle has absolutely found a sweet spot for this. i think six maybe — it's lovely that there's no time pressure but also, there is the pressure of getting it in five and i think if you relaxed the rules a little bit that might go and if you had more than one a day you might get associated with it so i hope the new york times will not put it behind a pay wall but will there be lots of clones, i do not know if you can copyright a game like this, i guess so. i don't blamejosh wardle
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for getting a reward for it, i think some people, think, because you had a tipjar, or crowd funded it, could he have done it in a different way but i hope it will remain on the web at any way or free for as long as it can. and the fact it will keep going, that would be the best thing. we arejust going we are just going to take one final look at robert's efforts. and there will be people shouting at the screen because he has put the back in at the end, and his first gas showed him that that letter wasn't in the word at all. full. that is not me being mean to him. that was his guest. i had four goes before i got it right today, how did you get on? now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello. as we go through the next few days, when will be a feature in the weather but it will not be as windy as it has been the last couple of days. you can see from the isobars across scotland, we have gusty winds here today but also this with singing south, taking cloud and its patchy light rain with it
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but where we have the yellow and amber it is telling you it will be mild. here we have the cloud and rain across northern ireland, parts of england and wales — sinking south and towards the south—west. so behind that, it will brighten up, the sun will come out, still some showers across the north and north—west of scotland. the black circles represent wind gusts, the strongest today in caithness and orkney, gusts in excess of 65 miles an hour. mild day across the board, roughly speaking 10 degrees up to 1a degrees. this evening and overnight the weather front continues to sink towards the south and west, flips and starts to retreat north and east taking cloud and rain with it in doing so. it's a mild night for most of us, aberdeenshire and rural areas, temperatures could reach two degrees so you could see some frost. here's the weather front tomorrow having pushed north—east,
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high pressure in charge in the south, of the yellow means it will be another mild day. here's the weather front ensconced across parts of england and scotland, producing cloud, still some spots of rain but it should brighten up across wales, parts of the midlands, southern england and as you see from the temperatures, going to be another mild day, 10 degrees to about 1a degrees. increasing wintry showers down to lower levels but ahead of that, milder conditions, drier weather and also some sunshine. later we see the rain getting into the far south of england, we see the progress of that pushing south, gone by friday and then we we'll all be in the colder air. one look at the isobars tells you on friday it will be another windy day, especially in the north. friday, lots of sunshine around but frequent wintry showers in scotland and northern england and feeling colder than it is going to in the next couple of days.
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good morning. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire, live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from his top team — the cabinet — after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says the government needs to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. the pm is now on his way to ukraine, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade.
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good morning, i'm annita mcveight. our other stories this morning... officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. the take—up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. 1,600 jobs are at risk at tesco as the supermarket giant ends overnight restocking at some stores and converts some petrol sites to pay—at—pump through the night. and five letters sell for seven figures. the new york times purchases the popular daily puzzle, wordle.
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hello, good afternoon. the prime minister has left downing street to fly to ukraine for talks with the country's president as the crisis on the russia border continues. it follows a meeting here at number ten with his top team — the cabinet — following the release of the sue gray report. the "update" blamed a "failure of leadership" for rule breaking here at downing street. the labour leader sir keir starmer says the prime minister is busy with "saving his own skin" rather than focussing on the key issues such as the rising cost of living. our political correspondent ben wright reports. after apologising for lockdown parties that happened under his roof, borisjohnson returned to number ten last night hoping some of the pressure on his premiership might have eased. for now, at least. but with the police now investigating 12 separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. sue gray's probe into what happened
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said there were failures of leadership and judgment. and there were events that should not have been allowed to take place. her verdict was brief but damning. in the commons, the prime minister was contrite but defiant. firstly, i want to say sorry, and i'm sorry for the things we simply did not get right and sorry for the way this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, and it is no use saying that people were working hard, this pandemic was hard for everyone. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. it was a former conservative prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this.
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either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, or did not understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number ten. which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories�* own side. the people who were criticising him this afternoon particularly in the chamber are the people who were criticising him before he was elected as the leader of the party. they were criticising him as he was elected prime minister, and have been criticising him ever since. number ten said sue gray's full report will be published when the police have finished their investigation. but some tories want the prime minister to make that promise in the commons as soon as possible. it is clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and he attended parliament and acted as if he was outraged at finding out the rules were broken and we subsequently found out he already knew the parties were taking place
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because he was at at least one of them and according to today's report may have been at three, including one in his own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully to what their voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it would not have happened under previous prime ministers. i don't think they would have been doing it under theresa may, put it that way. i would love to believe he was sorry and he would fix it, _ but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if any laws have been broken, one conservative mp said the prime minister remained on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. here is the deputy prime minister dominic raab speaking this morning. well, look, there's two separate i investigations going on, the police and sue gray's. sue gray has given us i the report subject to the individual claims that have gone to the police to investigate. i that has been published in full. and the pm's been clear that if sue gray comes back with any further
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|findings that she reports to him, j he will publish it in full. we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, - sue gray's and the met police, j we can't control what they give to us, but he's been clear that any further report from sue gray - will be published in full, - as indeed the interim report was. well, the labour leader sir keir starmer says there is no need for all this waiting because those involved could just be honest about what was happening. the metropolitan police asked that the full report not be published at the moment. but the idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day, is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box being asked, were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat? and he says, i can't answer that because of the investigation. he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he's taking us for fools.
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inafew in a few minutes we will talk to a supporter of borisjohnson, one of his conservative mps. do come back to us then, anita. victoria, thank you very much. we want to bring you now some breaking news. the latest report of the inquiry into child sexual abuse. some really shocking reading. the inquiry says there are continued failures to prevent organised child abuse. it says police and councils still do not understand the risk of organised gangs grooming children in their areas and are not collecting data which would help identify paedophiles. they say still don't understand because they are referring back to some of the notorious grooming gang cases from the late 2000 including in rotherham and rochdale. were going to talk to our correspondent about this.
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a bit more detail about what this latest report says. it is a bit more detail about what this latest report says.— latest report says. it is ten or 15 ears latest report says. it is ten or 15 years really _ latest report says. it is ten or 15 years really since _ latest report says. it is ten or 15 years really since this _ latest report says. it is ten or 15 years really since this became l latest report says. it is ten or 15| years really since this became an identified problem. the way in which some groups of men could pray on vulnerable children often from difficult backgrounds, offering them drinks and drugs over months and years and sexually abusing them. in some cases the number of perpetrators ran up to a hundred 150. this is a serious problem. in many places. bristow, derby, oxford. places where we have had serious cases uncovered by the police. lessons have not been learned is what is being suggested in this inquiry. and that local authorities and police are not doing enough. in inquiry and focus on six areas but they have a general concern that none of the police forces in this case have an accurate understanding
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of the networks sexually exploiting children in their area. in one case in swansea, the local authorities said they did not think there was a problem, but the inquiry found that there was. major concerns. one particular issue that the inquiry worries about is the way in which police forces are still not collecting data about the racial backgrounds of those involved and the racial backgrounds of the victims. that is a big concern out there in the country. there are lots of people saying that police are being politically correct and not gathering this data. the inquiry says they should and points out that the home office actually collects data about the racial evidence of all crimes. authorities are not able to tell one type of crime from another. one finalthing, to tell one type of crime from another. one final thing, the inquiry say that children are still being criminalised for being drunk orfor
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being criminalised for being drunk or for anti—social behaviour and not the men who are abusing them. and they say for example in one case, a girl was caught matt called to very nasty language in court after being abuse. —— called very nasty language. and one case a girl was raped by 23 men. this is a case that victims are not being seen as victims are not being seen as victims and perpetrators are not being seen as perpetrators. authorities were labelling children as young as ten as only as at risk despite clear evidence they were contracting diseases and turning up late with adults and turning up from house parties. authorities disagree about the very definition of what organised child abuse is. that sheehan really shocking in terms of what lessons are being learned from the previous cases.—
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the previous cases. there will be some criticism _ the previous cases. there will be some criticism of— the previous cases. there will be some criticism of the _ the previous cases. there will be some criticism of the inquiry i the previous cases. there will be j some criticism of the inquiry that it is concentrated on the six areas where perhaps there has not been clearly identifiable problem and perhaps those areas are not as fully geared up to deal with this problem say as rotherham or greater manchester where there have been major cases. may be that in itself is something that the inquiry is concerned about because of course if there was a problem, then they are geared up to deal with it. there are warning signs and parents can look out for them. if children are suddenly turning up with a mobile phone and they don't know where it came from or going out with adults from a particular group of men coming in late from parties, those are clear warning signs that something is wrong. as parents we are told to try and spot those but clearly the police should try and spot them.
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the recommendations include better training, better guidance for police forces and local authorities and the better collection of data about this problem. better collection of data about this roblem. ., . ., ., , problem. how much more time does the inuui problem. how much more time does the inquiry have? — problem. how much more time does the inquiry have? this _ problem. how much more time does the inquiry have? this is _ problem. how much more time does the inquiry have? this is the _ problem. how much more time does the inquiry have? this is the latest in - inquiry have? this is the latest in a series of reports. where are we on the timeline of this? it a series of reports. where are we on the timeline of this?— the timeline of this? it has been auoin for the timeline of this? it has been going for eight _ the timeline of this? it has been going for eight years. _ the timeline of this? it has been going for eight years. it - the timeline of this? it has been | going for eight years. it has been extremely expensive and has been seriously criticised over that time. it has produced 18 reports. there is one more to come about abuse in residential schools and then these offices where we are today will pack up offices where we are today will pack up with one final report due to come. that is before the end of the year according to an official i spoke to. that report will look at what the big lessons need to be learned are. one of them could be whether we should as a nation introduce something called mandatory
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reporting. which may set a criminal offence where if you have a legal duty to report abuse against children. it is quite a difficult law to bring in. one of the key areas that the final report will concentrate on is whether or not to bring that mandatory law of reporting in. bring that mandatory law of reporting im— bring that mandatory law of reporting in. bring that mandatory law of re-rortin in. ., ., «i i. , reporting in. tom, thank you very much for that. _ before we go back to victoria and downing street am going to bring you in some news coming into us from jeremy. we are also receiving reports that police searched a school in the german city of hamburg as an armed youth may have entered the building, police said on twitter. it is still unclear if the armed person entered the school in hamburg'sjenfeld district or was only passing by, the police said. we are also hearing that the police are saying it is unclear whether an armed person entered the school or
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merely passed by a. a major police operation going on at a school in hamburg according to police in the area. i'm going to say goodbye now to viewers on bbc two. we are going to viewers on bbc two. we are going to hand back to victoria on downing street. we are going to talk now to a conservative mp who supports the prime minister. let's speak to the conservative mp matt warman. good afternoon. good afternoon. does the prime minister _ good afternoon. good afternoon. does the prime minister need _ good afternoon. good afternoon. does the prime minister need to _ good afternoon. good afternoon. does the prime minister need to change? i . the prime minister need to change? i think he has acknowledged that there need to be some pretty big changes, thatis need to be some pretty big changes, that is what he said yesterday. does he need to change? _ that is what he said yesterday. does he need to change? i _ that is what he said yesterday. does he need to change? i think - that is what he said yesterday. does he need to change? i think what i that is what he said yesterday. does he need to change? i think what he | he need to change? i think what he needs to do — he need to change? i think what he needs to do is _ he need to change? i think what he needs to do is change _ he need to change? i think what he needs to do is change some - he need to change? i think what he needs to do is change some of- he need to change? i think what he needs to do is change some of the | needs to do is change some of the way he interacts with the parliamentarian party. he has committed to doing so. he needs to implement some of the recommendations from sue gray and presumably there will be more when
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she updates a report. that is not to say that we should ignore all of the record of the government outside of the stuff that we are talking about right now. the stuff that we are talking about riaht now. ~ ., ., ,., the stuff that we are talking about riaht now. ~ ., ., , the stuff that we are talking about riahtnow.~ ., , , ., right now. what about his personal behaviour? — right now. what about his personal behaviour? does _ right now. what about his personal behaviour? does that _ right now. what about his personal behaviour? does that need - right now. what about his personal behaviour? does that need to i right now. what about his personal i behaviour? does that need to change? in some senses, i'm not quite sure where you would draw the line. he is the prime minister. the way he runs downing street is very much down to him and he has acknowledged that there are things that do need to change. he there are things that do need to chan . e. . , there are things that do need to chance. .,, ., . ~i ., ., change. he has acknowledged that thins need change. he has acknowledged that things need changing, _ change. he has acknowledged that things need changing, but - change. he has acknowledged that things need changing, but none i change. he has acknowledged that things need changing, but none of| change. he has acknowledged that i things need changing, but none of it has to do with him personally and the way he behaves. i’m has to do with him personally and the way he behaves.— the way he behaves. i'm not sure that is quite _ the way he behaves. i'm not sure that is quite right. _ the way he behaves. i'm not sure that is quite right. if _ the way he behaves. i'm not sure that is quite right. if you - the way he behaves. i'm not sure that is quite right. if you look- that is quite right. if you look at the way he apologise. for instance, he said that he feels very keenly personally that when he went into the garden on downing street, he should've asked people to go back inside. he feels very personally that he needs to have a better
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relationship with the conservative erie —— the conservative parliamentarian party. those are big changes and personal to any individual prime minister. i5 changes and personal to any individual prime minister. is he responsible _ individual prime minister. is he responsible for _ individual prime minister. is he responsible for the _ individual prime minister. is he responsible for the culturing i responsible for the culturing downing street?— responsible for the culturing downing street? responsible for the culturing downin~street? . , , ., downing street? that is exactly what he said in parliament _ downing street? that is exactly what he said in parliament yesterday. i downing street? that is exactly what he said in parliament yesterday. he. he said in parliament yesterday. he said that he acknowledges that the buck stops with him. that is of course a statement of the obvious. but that is not to say that things do not go on in downing street as they do in any other ministerial department that are not personally sanctioned by the prime minister. that is a function of a large organisation. i think that is why he takes the very sensible view, i think, let's wait until we see the full details of the metropolitan police report and the update from sue gray to make sure that he can get those changes right. he has already committed to really significant changes and i think
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those are a large part of what is needed. do those are a large part of what is needed. , ., those are a large part of what is needed. ,, ., those are a large part of what is needed. i. ., ., ., , needed. do you not have worries about the fact _ needed. do you not have worries about the fact that _ needed. do you not have worries about the fact that sue _ needed. do you not have worries about the fact that sue gray i about the fact that sue gray talked about the fact that sue gray talked about failures of leadership? she is talking about your prime minister. the report has got some hard—hitting things in it and this is an interim report. of course that is why you saw the prime minister adopt what was in places yesterday a really contrite tone. that is why he went to such lengths to say that he gets it and wants to implement some of the changes. he did also and i think it's fair to do so want to talk about the record of the government on the economy, the vaccine roll—out. he want to talk about the things that the government has got right and get the credit for that, but also he has taken responsibility for some of the issues that clearly were not done as i should have been. i wonder if you might be able to
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help and so your old boss's questioned when she asked it in the house of commons yesterday, theresa may say either he didn't read the rules or understand them or he thought they did not apply to him. do you know which one it was? i think the prime minister answered that for himself and is not for me to say. i that for himself and is not for me to sa . ., ., that for himself and is not for me to say-_ what - that for himself and is not for me to say-_ what i i to say. i did not hear it. what i think he said _ to say. i did not hear it. what i think he said was _ to say. i did not hear it. what i think he said was to _ to say. i did not hear it. what i think he said was to frame i to say. i did not hear it. what i think he said was to frame it i to say. i did not hear it. what ij think he said was to frame it in to say. i did not hear it. what i l think he said was to frame it in a way that she framed it was not the right way to do so. i do have a lot of sympathy for that. i think what we should be saying is clearly, he has acknowledged that mistakes were made. he has apologised for them and has sought to put it in place a series of new measures that would address some of those. that is also not to ignore all of the other things that the government has to get on with doing and has had huge success in doing for existence the vaccine roll—out. and doing a huge
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amount of issues that face people today. amount of issues that face people toda . . ,, amount of issues that face people toda . ., «i i. amount of issues that face people toda . ., «i ., amount of issues that face people toda. ., ., ., «i ., amount of issues that face people toda . ., «i ., ., «i ., , let's speak to peter bull whose mother died alone in hospital without her family being allowed to visit herjust five days before one of those downing street parties. hello, good afternoon to you. i don't know if you managed to hear the conservative mp who was just on who said the prime minister took responsibility, he gets it, he has apologised. is that enough for you? no, not at all. and i don't think he apologised for what he had done. a lot of it was about what we had done and blaming it on other people apart from his self. i think in this case, apologising is not enough. if you are going to lie to the public, the people who voted for you, you need to take the responsibility for that.
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and in my opinion, do the honourable thing and resign. who; and in my opinion, do the honourable thing and resign-— thing and resign. why do you say the prime minister _ thing and resign. why do you say the prime minister lied _ thing and resign. why do you say the prime minister lied to _ thing and resign. why do you say the prime minister lied to the _ thing and resign. why do you say the prime minister lied to the public? i prime minister lied to the public? what do you mean? it is prime minister lied to the public? what do you mean?— prime minister lied to the public? what do you mean? it is obvious that these parties — what do you mean? it is obvious that these parties have _ what do you mean? it is obvious that these parties have taken _ what do you mean? it is obvious that these parties have taken place. i've l these parties have taken place. i've got the same view as kier starmer. we don't need a report to say that he was not there. if he wasn't there he was not there. if he wasn't there he would plainly say that he wasn't. and waiting for the investigations and the reportjust proves to me that he was and he didn't know what was going on. even if he has not lied, it blatantly looks like he was lying and he should either do something to change that or do the honourable thing and resign, really. what was your mother like? oh. honourable thing and resign, really. what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely- — what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely- she _ what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely. she was _ what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely. she was great. _ what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely. she was great. she i what was your mother like? oh, she was lovely. she was great. she was l was lovely. she was great. she was a really loving person. gave a lot of time to her friends and family and
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the charity should belong to. she gave everybody so much love. it is such a shame that the day she died we were not able to go to her to tell her that we loved her, as she was passing. we were waiting... what happened was she had change wards and we were waiting for the hospital to phone us to say if we could go and visit her. it took about two hours. but unfortunately she died and we did not get to be with her and we did not get to be with her and we did not get to be with her and we didn't get to hold her hand which she would have done for anybody in that position. we also didn't get to hear her last words. that is heartbreaking. and it is in complete difference to what it was like when my dad died. when he died, he died and my mother's arms with me
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holding his hand and the last words that he heard was that we loved him and the last words he said was that he loved us. but my mother she was alone. we were all doing what we thought was right and trying to make sure that everyone remained safe and my mother died alone in a hospital and i don't know if she was scared, i don't know if she was at peace. that is really hard to take not only for me but for the thousands of other people that this happened to. and it is wrong. it is wrong that five days previously the prime minister was having a party in his home. completely disregarding the rules that he and his government set. ., ., ., , ., set. knowing that now, when you reflect on the _ set. knowing that now, when you reflect on the way _ set. knowing that now, when you reflect on the way your _ set. knowing that now, when you reflect on the way your mother i set. knowing that now, when you i reflect on the way your mother died, do you wish youjust had gone
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straight into the hospital been with her? . , ,., , straight into the hospital been with her? . , i, straight into the hospital been with her? absolutely. my mum was... she was my mum- — her? absolutely. my mum was... she was my mum- the — her? absolutely. my mum was... she was my mum. the same _ her? absolutely. my mum was... she was my mum. the same as _ her? absolutely. my mum was... she was my mum. the same as with i was my mum. the same as with everyone. they are the main part of your life. i think itjust made to look a bit foolish. it is just wrong. if i could go back in time, i would be holding her hand and telling her i love her and that would be the last words she would have heard and she would have had that comfort knowing that a family member was there. so, yes, definitely i would have gone back and been with my mother. i don't know how — and been with my mother. i don't know how you _ and been with my mother. i don't know how you cope _ and been with my mother. i don't know how you cope with - and been with my mother. i don't know how you cope with that i and been with my mother. i don't know how you cope with that in l and been with my mother. i don't i know how you cope with that in your head. you think about the fact that you were not there. how do you... how do you get your head around that or can you not? i how do you get your head around that or can you not?— or can you not? i cannot. to be honest- it — or can you not? i cannot. to be honest. it has _ or can you not? i cannot. to be honest. it has troubled - or can you not? i cannot. to be honest. it has troubled me - or can you not? i cannot. to be i honest. it has troubled me every or can you not? i cannot. to be - honest. it has troubled me every day since. i'm having to go through some
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bereavement counciling which is helping. i blame myself a lot for it. somebody should have been there with her. it isjust it. somebody should have been there with her. it is just heartbreaking for so many people. i was reading the stories before it actually happened to you, you feel heartbroken for the people it happened to, but until it happens to yourself, you don't realise exactly how heartbreaking it is. it is devastating to the family. it really is. that devastation just is not being taken into account by the prime minister. in fact, when itv first broke the story and they question him about the parties and he blatantly said that he denied it. what was so hard is that he did so with a smirk on his face and that smirk to me proved that he just has the ultimate disregard for not only
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the ultimate disregard for not only the rules, but also to the people that voted for him. i don't know how he's going to get away with this, but it sounds like he could well do so. i think he should just do the honourable thing and resign. otherwise the conservative party are going to lose a lot of people voting for them. they won'tjust going to lose a lot of people voting for them. they won't just lose people backing him, they will lose the backing of the party completely. they need to do something and just get rid of him if he's not going to do the honourable thing and do it himself. ~ ., ., , do the honourable thing and do it himself. ~ . ., , , ., do the honourable thing and do it himself. ~ . ., �*, himself. what was your mother's name? valerie. _ himself. what was your mother's name? valerie. everybody- himself. what was your mother's name? valerie. everybody calledj himself. what was your mother's - name? valerie. everybody called her valve. -- everybody _ name? valerie. everybody called her valve. -- everybody called _ name? valerie. everybody called her valve. -- everybody called her- name? valerie. everybody called her valve. -- everybody called her val. l valve. —— everybody called her val. thank you so much for talking just about her. you take care. the prime minister will be hoping that he can focus on issues today.
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the growing tension between russia and ukraine. earlier he left for downing street to fly to the ukrainian capital kyiv for talks with the country's president. our diplomatic correspondent james landale has the latest. well, the prime minister is due here later on this afternoon. it will be a relatively brief visit. he will meet the president of ukraine, president zelensky, and a few other officials. he will have some discussions with them, he will get a briefing on the situation in donbas in the east of the country where the frozen conflict has been going on between government forces and pro—russian separatists since 2014. he will hold a brief press conference and then he will get back on his plane and head home. so it is a brief visit but it is clearly a symbolically important one because he is the most senior western politician to come here to show support for ukraine. he will be announcing a bit of cash, £88 million, to help ukraine do two things. try and wean itself off its dependency on russian energy and also help it improve governance here, which is clearly
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an issue with corruption, transparency, things like that. so he will come with some money, with some sense of support, but it is a relatively brief visit. i don't know if you have had a chance to talk to any people former scotland office minister has suggested that borisjohnson resign as conservative leader and stand for reelection in a tory party leadership contest if he wants to stay in office. that is it from us for now. here is the weather. good afternoon to. gale force gusts. may be access in 5060 mph. whipping up rough seas. we've got the sunshine
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out. it is cloudier towards the south and west, but pretty mild and there'll be some patchy light and drizzle. the drizzle will push its way north and east words. bringing back milder air more wildly. a chilly start. the northeast of scotland. elsewhere plenty of cloud to begin with. we will see some light rain and drizzle. it will start to clear through. we will see some sunny spells in wales, southern england. lots of clouds in the west. we will find the cold air will hold on in shetland but elsewhere it will turn mild well above average temperatures for february. goodbye for now.
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hello, this is bbc news with annita mcveigh. the headlines...
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the prime minister tries to rally support from his top team — the cabinet — after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says the government needs to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. the pm is now on his way to ukraine, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. a report has identified extensive failures by local authorities and police forces in the way they tackle sexual exploitation by criminal
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gangs. 1,600 jobs are at risk at tesco as the supermarket giant ends overnight restocking at some stores and converts some petrol sites to pay—at—pump through the night. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. let's bring in more that story about the metropolitan police. the force is "deeply sorry" after the police watchdog found evidence of bullying, racism and misogyny among a team of officers at charing cross police station in central london. discriminatory conduct, misogyny. but the thing that is truly shocking out of the report is that these
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officers had whatsapp groups, and their so—called banter they had at their so—called banter they had at the police station is reflected in these whatsapp groups. so it is there in black and white. and what we are seeing are officers joking about rape, sending misogynistic messages, using the word gay as an insult, using offensive terms for disabled people. just almost every kind of offensive and discriminatory conduct you can imagine is reflected there in their whatsapp�*s messages. most of them are com pletely completely unbroadcastable. the met is sa inc completely unbroadcastable. the met is sa in: it completely unbroadcastable. the met is saying it is — completely unbroadcastable. the met is saying it is deeply _ completely unbroadcastable. the met is saying it is deeply sorry _ completely unbroadcastable. the met is saying it is deeply sorry to - is saying it is deeply sorry to londoners. "we have taken a series of measures are to hold those to
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account." do you know what they're sanctions have been? the? account.�* do you know what they're sanctions have been?— account." do you know what they're sanctions have been? they have been uuite sanctions have been? they have been quite dramatic _ sanctions have been? they have been quite dramatic. that _ sanctions have been? they have been quite dramatic. that unit _ sanctions have been? they have been quite dramatic. that unit has - sanctions have been? they have been quite dramatic. that unit has been - quite dramatic. that unit has been disbanded, it doesn't exist any more, that unit in charing cross. one of them was dismissed, the other resigned before that happened. and eight other officers have faced various levels of disciplinary process. so they have gone very hard, using the disciplinary process, at this team. following the sarah everard case, there is already this review of the met's culture going on. which brings me to my next question, daniel. louie going on. which brings me to my next question, daniel.— question, daniel. we talked a lot about culture _ question, daniel. we talked a lot about culture in _ question, daniel. we talked a lot about culture in politics. - question, daniel. we talked a lot| about culture in politics. certainly there is a question about culture in policing as well.— there is a question about culture in policing as well. there is a massive debate to be _ policing as well. there is a massive
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debate to be had _ policing as well. there is a massive debate to be had about _ policing as well. there is a massive debate to be had about culture - policing as well. there is a massive debate to be had about culture in i debate to be had about culture in policing. the phrase bad apple was used in the sarah everard kidnap and murder, but i think what this investigation shows is that is not a bad apple or a view that apple is, there are a significant number of officers, in this case ten have ended up being disciplined in one shape orform in one police ended up being disciplined in one shape or form in one police station. it seems wrong even to use the word banter, but this kind of banter seems to be widespread. bullying, misogynistic culture, discriminatory towards people with different religions, different races, different sexualities, it is all there. and certainly, there are definitely pockets of police officers in the metropolitan police, and i believe in forces beyond, where this kind of behaviour is widespread. more than 1,400 jobs are at risk after britain's biggest retailer tesco announced an operational shake—up. earlier, our business correspondent emma simpson explained the reasons for the move.
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most of them involve overnight staff. people who replenish and restock the shelves overnight so they are ready for the day ahead. so these rows instead are going to be done day side. tesco say to ensure more staff on the shop floor to keep customers at peak times. so they are going at 36 large stores, and also, 36 petrol stations are going to be converted to paying at the pump overnight. so, overall, ili00jobs going there. but it goes off the back of news yesterday from tesco that it back of news yesterday from tesco thatitis back of news yesterday from tesco that it is pulling the plug on its budget chain. seven are going to close, six converted. all in all, about 1600 jobs going.- close, six converted. all in all, about 1600 jobs going. about 1600 'obs going. what does this tell us about 1600 jobs going. what does this tell us about _ about 1600 jobs going. what does this tell us about the _ about 1600 jobs going. what does this tell us about the way - about 1600 jobs going. what does this tell us about the way we - about 1600 jobs going. what does | this tell us about the way we shop, and given that tesco has had a very
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good christmas, why is it doing this? ., ., ~ this? you might wonder. all the urocers this? you might wonder. all the grocers have — this? you might wonder. all the grocers have had _ this? you might wonder. all the grocers have had a _ this? you might wonder. all the grocers have had a cracking - grocers have had a cracking christmas, tesco in particular. why is it having to cut costs? of course, all the big grocers have seen an explosion in costs, wage bills going up, supply chain costs, commodity costs, and tesco announced in october that it was going to try to save £1 billion over three years. it needs to become more efficient and streamlined. i think some costs have started to creep in during the pandemic, and i think cost—cutting is going to be quite a big theme this year across all the grocers, andindeed this year across all the grocers, and indeed across retail more generally. this isjust the and indeed across retail more generally. this is just the start. and it comes off the back of a wave of restructuring, changes to store hours and terms and conditions across all the grocers pre—pandemic. emma simpson.
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house prices have risen at the fastest annual pace forjanuary in 17 years amid "robust" demand and low supply, according lender nationwide. annual house price growth increased to 11.2% in january 2022, accelerating from 10.4% in december 2021. however, the building society predicted the market would slow this year as buying property becomes less affordable. the average uk property was £255,556 in the last month — up from £254,822 in december. health officials are warning that more than one in 10 children starting school in england are at risk of measles because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five year olds with both doses of mmr which helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella — has dropped to the lowest for a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness.
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as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade, and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles. when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk
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health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one, with a second dose offered at around the age of three and a half, before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. pupils living in the most
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deprived areas of england were almost half as likely to have been vaccinated against covid than those in the least deprived areas, according to new research from the office for national statistics. our health reporter, jim reed, has been reading the data. this is covid vaccinations in school children. the data is out in the last hour or so. overall it is showing that the uptake among that group of 12 to 15—year—olds who had had at least one dose of the covid vaccine is at about 53%. you remember last year when it was approved for that age group, there was a bit of a debate between the scientists and the politicians about whether to go ahead with this. some of the scientific evidence about the benefit to the individual is not as strong as it is for older age groups. the interesting thing that i think is worth pointing out is the variation between different groups. if you look at the most deprived areas in the uk,
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the highest 10% most deprived areas against the most affluent, you will see that you are twice as likely as a child to have a covid vaccine in the wealthiest areas. in the least deprived areas. it goes up from 36% of children in the least deprived right up to 70% in the most deprived. really big variations there. also between ethnic groups and regional variations. in london and in the northwest, much lower rates of vaccinations. in the southeast outside of london, much higher uptake in that age group. also, if you look at the ethnic breakdown, in children and a family of chinese or indian, it's much higher. in pupils who come from a black caribbean background or a roma background, much lower,
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12% of children. you can see some of the challenges, some of the issues for the nhs going forward if they want to increase take—up in those younger age groups. and pupils who speak english as an additional language much less likely to have been vaccinated. i want to talk to you about the subject of covid vaccinations. we heard about the removal of mandatory vaccines for nhs workers. what is the fallout from that today? lots of organisations will have already lost staff because of that. big debate about this. this was well trailed yesterday. made in the evening by sajid javid. it only applies to england. in scotland and wales, they are not going ahead with compulsory vaccinations and never were. there has been some debate. the deadline for this was this thursday. that was the first doses for all health care workers. that now it has been scrapped.
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there is a consultation that is going to go on. the government has said they do not want to do this and the labour party is supporting the government. so you can't see this policy going ahead. it is still controversial. jeremy hunt who is a former health secretary who is in charge of the house select committee has been talking about this on twitter and he asked very pointed questions in the house of commons about this yesterday. talking about how he, as a health secretary, was trying to push for mandatory flu vaccinations for health workers thinking it is the responsible thing to do. the fact that this is being scrapped for covid vaccinations he thinks is sending a mixed message. some people working in health care, the bosses of trust, have expressed frustration that they have been heavily encouraging staff and trying to advocate this policy for the last couple of months only to have it reversed at the last minute. the headlines on bbc news...
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the prime minister tries to rally support from his top team — the cabinet — after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says the government needs to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. the pm is now on his way to ukraine, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. a report by the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse has identified "extensive failures by local authorities and police forces" in the ways they tackle sexual exploitation by criminal gangs. the family of a 21—year—old woman, who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend, is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill who was sentenced to seven and a half years at a young offenders institute.
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the attorney general has now agreed to review the sentence. rachel stonehouse has this report. this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend, rocco sansome. just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van, here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise... it's kind of... there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship, and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty
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of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 2024. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed. angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse. when we think about the context of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked, because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just... ijust feel reluctant to go out.
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even just in my house, having someone come to check the boiler — erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. rachael stonehouse, bbc news. the time is now 12:47pm. the new york times has bought the popular word game wordle for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play — for the time being. earlier, my colleague ben boulos spoke to countdown's susie dent — lexicographer and wordle user — he asked her why it's so popular. it's like a collective code breaking exercise, ben. it's a process of elimination and i think itsjoy is in its simplicity. it's a bit like countdown, actually, in that once you've done it,
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you know the rules. i think it's very, very easy to get. and of course the same challenge is set for everyone each day. and community sharing like that — with a word game as opposed to, say, a video game — is really rare. you might have it between crossword players on a really low level but this one has been spectacular on that score. we're just going to go back to the live coverage of my colleague's attempt at it. oh, marvellous, we've got one letter — and it is in the right place. so we will continue to guess the letters. but ijust wonder whether it's a reflection of perhaps our shorter attention spans? because in the past, people did crosswords and you'd devote maybe half an hour depending how good you are, but this is just getting one word. do you think it appeals to us because you've just to guess one word and that's it — once you have done it, it's complete. i suppose that's true, but actually what is lovely is that there is just one challenge a day, and i'm really hoping that the new york times will keep that — because we're so used to apps
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or games that let us play as often as we like, to the point where you can just exhaust it and yourself. whereas this one is just one a day — and i think most of us think "i would like to do another one now." so i'm not sure it's about short attention span. i think crosswords are also still doing really well, and during lockdown so many of us opened our cupboards and found all our dusty board games and things, so i like to think in some ways it's coming back. it's like a sort of version of the slow tv, if you like. if ever there was a cue, let's show some coverage of slow tv. i should say, in fairness to robert, this is a team effort among colleagues in the gallery. slow progress, i think — slow and steady. we're on three guesses. so the l is correct but in the wrong place, the o is correct in the right place. we'll continue with that painful process, susie, but i just wonder what you think would perhaps change if the new york times
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does something like, and they haven't indicated that they will, but perhaps makes several available a day? or perhaps makes it six letters instead of five? are there any changes you think would be to its detriment? both of those, actually. i thinkjosh wardle has absolutely found a sweet spot for this. i think six maybe — it's lovely that there's no time pressure but also, there is the pressure of getting it in five. and i think if you relaxed the rules a little bit that might go. and equally, if you had more than one a day, you mightjust get a bit associated with it. i'm not sure. i hope the new york times won't put it behind a pay wall. but then the question is, will there be lots of clones? i don't know if you can copyright a game like this — i'm guessing so. i don't blamejosh wardle for getting a reward for it, i think some people are thinking, could he have crowdfunded it? or had a tipjar? or done it in a different way? but hopefully it will remain
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on the web any way — and free for as long as it can. and the fact it will keep going, obviously, is the best thing. we arejust going we are just going to take one final look at robert's efforts. and there will be people shouting at the screen because he has put e back in at the end, and his first gas showed him that that wasn't in the word at all. fool. that is not meeting mean it to him, that was his guest. and just so we don't leave you on a cliffhanger, our producer robert did manage to get it on his sixth — and last — guess. the correct answer was knoll. that's k-n-o-l-l. he was under pressure, live broadcasting and all of that, so he did really well puzzle solving live on air. it's responsible for launching shows like gavin and stacey, two pints of lager and bad education
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but bbc three went exclusively to iplayer as part of a cost—cutting exercise six years ago. it's returning as a full tv channel from today as our media and arts correspondent david sillito explains. bbc three is now on tv. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest of bbc3 are going to have a new broadcast home, a tv channel. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. and what better channel than bbc three? what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number
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of 16 to 34—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? i mean, do they even know where programmes come from that they love? because i've got a little list here of bbc three programmes. what about bbc one, bbc two? no. do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we use like disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20.
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bbc three? no. and when i started reading out my list of bbc three programmes... drag race? yeah. man like mobeen? have you seen that one? yes. i watch that. around 80% of 16 to 34—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops, and on top of that, the content we make that's really targeted at under 355, we've got to make sure it's really easy to discover. so by having it on a channel, it's adding to the possibility of them finding it on iplayer. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so, six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee,
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three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. special barcodes are being added to stamps by the royal mail in order to make it possible for people to watch videos and send birthday messages. the new stamps will be available from tomorrow following a successful trial. this is something you can see on social media. now bar code stamps are here, they say, to make things more innovative, efficient are here, they say, to make things more innovative, efficient and secure. and you can also use the stamps to send videos to the recipient of the letter or parcel, because royal mail have commissioned a series of exclusive videos. the one that you can currently see in just a second is the unmistakable
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shaun the sheep, created exclusively for royal mail by our demand. and it is the first in a series of planned videos to be released during 2022 that will allow customers sending stamped mail when they receive that item of mail. _by —— by aardman. making stamps a little bit more interesting. you may find stamps interesting anyway. here is the weather with matt taylor. when is not as strong as during the weekend. and it is in scotland where weekend. and it is in scotland where we are seeing gusts of 50—60 mph. even further south into northern england we can still see gusts close to gale force. snow across
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scandinavia, there is winds will ease the way, but it is opening the door to slightly chilly air in the north and east of the country. south and west, milder air holes on. not a huge amount of cloud, but some patchy rain and drizzle, particularly across western areas. many northern and eastern areas are staying clear, a few shower is continuing in wintry nature across the north of scotland. for in larick, six in aberdeen. overnight, briefly quite chilly and eastern areas. patchy rain and drizzle starts to work its way eastwards, lifting temperatures towards dawn back into double figures. for some, a temporary dip and then temperatures rising. that is because the weather front is moving northwards again, dragging in the air all the way from the mid—atlantic. temperatures pushing mid—atla ntic. temperatures pushing back mid—atlantic. temperatures pushing back above normal for the stage of the year as we go through wednesday. here is the dividing line. that
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drizzle pushes eastwards, then some good cloud breaks here and there. eastern scotland, parts of eastern wales, into the south, barely warm for a january day. a mild wales, into the south, barely warm for ajanuary day. a mild night wales, into the south, barely warm for a january day. a mild night will follow to take us into thursday. if few spots of light rain and drizzle around initially, but turning wet and windy across scotland and northern ireland later on. so whether heavy, and watch the temperature difference. colder air is going to push its way back in as that weather front pushes its way southwards. rain to southern counties for a change, but it opens the door to blustery and chilly conditions for friday and saturday. good sunny spells to some southern and eastern areas, but frequent showers in the north and west, rain, hail, sleet and snow. many single figures for saturday.
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today at one, the deputy prime minister says tory mps still overwhelmingly support borisjohnson, after the report into lockdown parties. as the prime minister leaves for talks in ukraine, dominic raab dismisses anger from several tories, saying sue gray's inquiry will force change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said, "well, ok, i want to address and fix this". not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they've taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that's gone on since. we'll have the very latest live from from westminster. also on the programme... with the threat of war looming, we look at life for ordinary ukrainians, as russian troops mass on the border
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a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles,

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