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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  February 1, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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today at one, the deputy prime minister says tory mps still overwhelmingly support borisjohnson, after the report into lockdown parties. as the prime minister leaves for talks in ukraine, dominic raab dismisses anger from several tories, saying sue gray's inquiry will force change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said, "well, ok, i want to address and fix this". not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they've taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that's gone on since. we'll have the very latest live from from westminster. also on the programme... with the threat of war looming, we look at life for ordinary ukrainians, as russian troops mass on the border
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a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level in a decade. and a southern koala, born not in australia but england, as part of a major conservation drive. and coming up on the bbc news channel: adios, aubameyang — the arsenal striker and former captain joins spanish giants barcelona on a free after a busy transfer deadline day for premier league clubs. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, says conservative mps still "overwhelmingly" support borisjohnson, following the release of the initial findings of the report into lockdown parties in downing street. sue gray's inquiry concluded there'd been a "failure of leadership."
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but tory mp andrew mitchell this morning accused the prime minister of running government like a "medieval court". and he warned the crisis risked breaking the conservative party. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has accused the prime minister of trying to "save his own skin," and taking the public "for fools" in his defence of his own actions, in relation to alleged breaches of covid rules. with the latest, here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. leaving his political woes at home, borisjohnson went leaving his political woes at home, boris johnson went to leaving his political woes at home, borisjohnson went to immerse himself in a different crisis, that of ukraine. he is now a prime minister under police investigation. firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended _ firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended at — firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended at least three events highlighted by the report into downing street parties, it found there were serious failings of leadership. on the streets of strade this morning, signs of how damaging the affair has been.—
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the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, _ the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm _ the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm afraid, - the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm afraid, too l too many mistakes, i'm afraid, too many people have died, lost their loved ones whilst they were taking liberties. �* , ., liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think to the _ liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think to the conservatives - liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think to the conservatives up . liberties. i've been quite loyal, i l think to the conservatives up until now and _ think to the conservatives up until now and it — think to the conservatives up until now and it puts a big question over everything — now and it puts a big question over everything that everybody has been through— everything that everybody has been through over the pandemic. everything that everybody has been through overthe pandemic. i�*m through overthe pandemic. i'm disappointed with the things that have gone — disappointed with the things that have gone on— disappointed with the things that have gone on at _ disappointed with the things that have gone on at downing - disappointed with the things that have gone on at downing street, i have gone on at downing street, while _ have gone on at downing street, while the — have gone on at downing street, while the rest _ have gone on at downing street, while the rest of _ have gone on at downing street, while the rest of us _ have gone on at downing street, while the rest of us have - have gone on at downing street, while the rest of us have been. have gone on at downing street, while the rest of us have been ini while the rest of us have been in lockdown — while the rest of us have been in lockdown. but _ while the rest of us have been in lockdown. but overwriting - while the rest of us have been in lockdown. but overwriting that, i while the rest of us have been in| lockdown. but overwriting that, i think. _ lockdown. but overwriting that, i think, overall, _ lockdown. but overwriting that, i think, overall, going— lockdown. but overwriting that, i think, overall, going forward. . lockdown. but overwriting that, i think, overall, going forward. mi think, overall, going forward. ae3 much think, overall, going forward. much as borisjohnson think, overall, going forward. much as boris johnson wants to think, overall, going forward- much as boris johnson wants to move much as borisjohnson wants to move things on it is clear there is still widespread anger and one important question, one of the events police are looking at happened in his own private downing street flat, he was asked yesterday in parliament was the at that event? something sir keir starmer highlighted today. the keir starmer highlighted today. tie: spectacle keir starmer highlighted today. tue: spectacle of keir starmer highlighted today. tt2 spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box and being asked were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat? and he said i cannot answer that because of the investigation.
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he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he is taking us for full. �* ., ., ., ~ full. before leaving today mr johnson met _ full. before leaving today mr johnson met his _ full. before leaving today mr johnson met his cabinet, - full. before leaving today mr johnson met his cabinet, he| full. before leaving today mr- johnson met his cabinet, he has promised to shake up the way he runs things. might his chief whip be a casual day? are you sticking around? the deputy prime minister, a loyal lieutenant had been on the airwaves earlier defending him. tt is earlier defending him. it is precisely _ earlier defending him. it is precisely we _ earlier defending him. it is precisely we take - earlier defending him. it is precisely we take this - earlier defending him. it is precisely we take this on the prime minister— precisely we take this on the prime minister takes this so seriously, first of— minister takes this so seriously, first of all— minister takes this so seriously, first of all that the sue gray review _ first of all that the sue gray review was commissioned and then published _ review was commissioned and then published in full, what he has received _ published in full, what he has received and also it is quite right she has— received and also it is quite right she has got the prerogative to refer any issues — she has got the prerogative to refer any issues to the police. many tories are _ any issues to the police. many tories are still— any issues to the police. many tories are still reserving - any issues to the police. i’s"ié“'u}' tories are still reserving judgment of the prime minister and his former chief whip says he has lost confidence in him.- chief whip says he has lost confidence in him. �* ., , , confidence in him. boris is running a modern government _ confidence in him. boris is running a modern government like - confidence in him. boris is running a modern government like a - confidence in him. boris is running . a modern government like a medieval court. you need to rule in government through structures, white, cabinet, national security council, that is not the way with boris and many of us thought he
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would govern in the way he did when he was mayor of london, through being chairman of the board, running a very good team, that is not what has happened. mr a very good team, that is not what has happened-— a very good team, that is not what has hauened. ~ , ., ., has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. _ has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there _ has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there remains - has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there remains much l out of trouble. there remains much unease among tory ranks and an ongoing police investigation, the full details of the sue gray report still to be published. more difficult political moments to come. damian grammaticas, bbc news. let's talk now to our political correspondent nick eardley. how would you characterise the level of conservative support within the parliamentary party for mrjohnson? it's interesting because the big question around the sue gray report had always been wooded lead to a flood of criticism of the prime minister, would conservative mps start to turn on the boss and say that they need a change of leader? that has not happened. there are a number of mps coming out and putting their letters of confidence in to
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lead to that vote that would take place in borisjohnson �*s leadership. but that said, i don't think this is done. there is a fear amongst many government, many in the conservative party that this story is going to run and run and run. we now have a metropolitan police investigation as was just reported, into various things that boris johnson attended. there is that spectre of another sue gray report in the next few weeks or months went that metropolitan police investigation is completed. although borisjohnson can go to ukraine to date knowing that he is not facing that imminent challenge to his leadership, it does not mean that that will never happen but it does mean this is not done yet. nick, thank you. boris johnson will arrive in ukraine shortly for talks with the country's president, volodymyr zelensky, as fears grow over the threat of a russian invasion. the uk is expected to offer nearly £90 million in aid to help ukraine tackle corruption and reduce its reliance
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on russian energy. our kyiv correspondent, james waterhouse, has sent us this report. one parliament where borisjohnson could expect a warm welcome. today, ukrainian mps showed their appreciation for western allies. before that, president zelensky announced a new security partnership. translation: we are creating a new format of co-operation l in europe between ukraine, britain and poland. "glory to ukraine, glory to heroes," they chant on kyiv�*s independence square. notjust a show of thanks, but patriotism too. european countries help us, showed russia that, no, no, no, we are ready to save ukraine. so a symbol of thanks
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and appreciation from ukrainians for all the military aid which has come its way, but there's still uncertainty from people on both what is going to happen next and should there be an invasion, who is going to help to fight inside the country. there are no plans for nato troops to arrive here, though. when borisjohnson lands in kyiv from downing street he and volodymyr zelensky are expected to discuss more sanctions for russia if it invades, as well as reinforce their commitment to solving this crisis through talks. they play traditional irish music. ok, not something you'd exactly expect to see here. this woman has always been fascinated with irish culture and regularly brings this musical flavour to her home city. so does she feel threatened? i think i do, when i see the news that there might be russian aviation brought into belarus and there's new weapons found in the occupied territories where the pro—russian
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militia are being armed. it's different, and i'm really worried by that. russia's constantly denied planning an invasion, and says it's still open to talks on its demand nato stops expanding. the us, however, suspects 30,000 more russian troops will arrive in belarus to the north, adding tension to an already tense border. this memorial commemorates the ukrainians who died fighting alongside russians in the second world war. the hope here remains, as ever, that they don't further turn on each other. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. we can talk now to our diplomatic correspondent james landale in kyiv. jiras, following on from that report, the visit of borisjohnson is a public support for the ukrainian people. —— a show support. he is not the only leader here, the prime minister of holland is here, the prime minister of poland,
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clearly there is an attempt by european leaders to show as much physical support as they can to ukraine alongside the deterrence and the diplomacy taking place elsewhere. the question is will this be enough? it is certainly welcome here, the ukrainians welcomed the fact they are getting extra money, and extra military support but what they would dearly love is a lot more financial support to support the economy at the moment. we are in this sort of limbo, there is the threat of invasion hanging but no one knows if it will happen but in the meantime, a lot of investment is leaving this country and investors are getting cold feet and i think the balance that the prime minister has to get here between on the one hand morning and deterring russia against any invasion but at the same time, listening to what the ukrainian leadership is saying about calming some of the rhetoric a little to avoid inflaming tensions. james, thank you. thousands of people
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are still without power after last weekend's storms battered parts of scotland and north east england. gale force winds brought down trees and power lines, destroying several homes. our correspondent, david shanks, is in edzell in angus in north—west scotland. david, how bad is it there? as you said, this is the main road in and out of the village here in angus. once there was a very thick wood on either side of the rude and if you look, you can see pretty much straight through it. such was the force of the wind of storm corrie over the weekend, the teams are starting to clear up and make things safer for cars to get through but it was much wider than that, across scotland, 9500 people without power of these days on, thousands more still without broadband as well. we are told by the electricity network sse that most people without electricity will have supplies restored by tonight but it could go
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into tomorrow for more rural and isolated areas. david, thank you. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england, are at risk of measles because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds who've had both doses of the mmr jab, has fallen to its lowest level for a decade, and is well below the 95% recommended to stop a resurgence of the disease. here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. with life returning to normal, so are the viruses. once again, measles is a concern especially in school—age children. experts believe the pandemic has disrupted vaccinations.— the pandemic has disrupted vaccinations. ., ., , . , vaccinations. vaccination services have continued — vaccinations. vaccination services have continued throughout - vaccinations. vaccination services have continued throughout the i have continued throughout the pandemic. but because of the first lockdown when we were all advised not to go anywhere, a lot of parents thought maybe they could not get their children vaccinated or they might have been scared about going out in case they cut covid but this
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is not the case, vaccination services continue to be offered and it's really important to make sure children are vaccinated. the it's really important to make sure children are vaccinated. the mmr 'ab rotects children are vaccinated. the mmr 'ab protects against fl children are vaccinated. the mmr 'ab protects against measles, �* children are vaccinated. the mmr 'ab protects against measles, mumps]- children are vaccinated. the mmrjab| protects against measles, mumps and rubella but the latest figures show only 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses, the lowest rate for a decade and well below the 95% target needed in order to prevent outbreaks of measles in the community. this is the distinctive rash it causes, it can lead to severe complications. measles is very serious and could have serious complications. it can lead to death, hospitalisation for various complications like pneumonia, and kept —itis which is the inflammation the brain. and these have long—term consequences and it can also suppress your immune system leading to more susceptibility to disease in later life. , , .,
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susceptibility to disease in later life. , . life. experts are particularly concerned _ life. experts are particularly concerned about _ life. experts are particularly concerned about measles i life. experts are particularly - concerned about measles because it spreads so easily, faster than covid, in fact it is the most infectious known virus. once we have international— infectious known virus. once we have international travel _ infectious known virus. once we have international travel open _ infectious known virus. once we have international travel open up - infectious known virus. once we have international travel open up and - international travel open up and restrictions lifted we expect measles to come back to this country and for it to spread in those not fully protected.— and for it to spread in those not fully protected. around one in ten ofthe fully protected. around one in ten of the youngest — fully protected. around one in ten of the youngest children - fully protected. around one in ten of the youngest children at - fully protected. around one in ten of the youngest children at school in england are not fully vaccinated with some areas having for lower rates, public health officials are clear and now it is time to get vaccinated. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the former health secretary, jeremy hunt, has criticised the government's decision to drop mandatory covid vaccinations for health and social care workers in england. mr hunt — who chairs the health and social care committe said people had been marched to the top of the hill — before the u—turn, making it harder to win the argument next time round. our health editor, hugh pym, is at westminsterfor us. what exactly has jeremy what exactly hasjeremy had been
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saying? tt what exactly has jeremy had been sa int? , ., what exactly has jeremy had been sa in? saying? it is a significant intervention _ saying? it is a significant intervention because - saying? it is a significant intervention because not saying? it is a significant - intervention because not only is a conservative health secretary but a select committee chair and he has come out with this criticism barely 24 come out with this criticism barely 2a hours after the government announced its new policy of mandatory vaccination for the nhs. he acknowledges workforce is an issue, there were worries about staff leaving because they did not want to be vaccinated at a time when the service was under extreme pressure but he said that was a longer term issue. pressure but he said that was a longerterm issue. right pressure but he said that was a longer term issue. right now he thinks the decision made sense at the wrong signals as he explained in an interview earlier. from a patient safety point view of it's really disappointing that we've won the argument about the need for staff, unless there is a medical exemption, to be properly vaccinated — i think that was widely supported across the health and care systems — but having marched people up to the top of the hill, there is now a u—turn which means that the next time we have a big debate, perhaps for a flu vaccine in this coming winter, it's going to be much harder to win that argument.
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now, the health secretary, sajid javid, said in his announcement yesterday, that one reason for the change of plan was that the omicron variant was less of the evangel to had been last autumn when the policy was first announced, more people had been announced and there was a workforce issue and it would be put out to consultation —— was less than the delta had been last summer. although some health staff are pleased because they would otherwise have lost their jobs, pleased because they would otherwise have lost theirjobs, and also the royal colleges, some health and social care leader's office rated. the mandatory vaccine policy. was announced in the autumn and that will now be scrapped, and some social care workers have left. i think the feeling of frustration because it seems to have been rather
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sprung on health trusts as well as the social care world when so much effort had gone into trying to persuade staff to be vaccinated ahead of the deadline, which would have been on thursday. hugh, thank you. an inquiry into child sexual abuse has concluded police and councils still don't understand the risk of organised gangs grooming children in their areas, and aren't collecting data which would help identify paedophiles. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse said its own inquiries had identified examples of abuse the police should have been, but weren't, aware of. lets talk to our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds. tom, these are damning findings? yes, and today, ten, 15 years after this problem of gangs of men praying on often children from difficult backgrounds, giving them drink and drugs over months and abusing them, it is ten or 15 years since the country started to realise this was a problem. at this inquiry looking
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closer at six particular areas including st helens, durham, bristol, swansea, warwickshire and tower hamlets, concludes these areas are still not dealing with this problem properly. a quote from the report, not of the police forces or local authorities in the case study areas had an accurate understanding of networks sexually exploited children in their areas. the report says this is an area the government wants to be a national priority akin to dealing with terrorism, so i think the reporters finding serious findings, one in particular is a failure to record racial backgrounds of perpetrators and victims, the report says that is a must. tom, thank you. the time is 13:18. our top story this lunchtime... as borisjohnson leaves for talks in ukraine, the deputy prime minister dismisses anger from several tories, saying he has mps' full support. anger from several tories, and team gb's charlotte bankes on her medal hopes for
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the beijing winter olympics which gets under way later this week. coming up on the bbc news channel, golf�*s asian tour is coming to england with the first ever event outside the continent due to be staged this summer in hertfordshire as the competition continues its expansion with saudi arabian funding. bbc three returns to television schedules today, six years after being being taken off air. it follows the success of shows like fleabag, killing eve and normal people which were shown on iplayer. new programmes on the way include a spin off of rupaul�*s drag race. the channel was moved online in 2016 to save money, but the bbc hopes its return will offer enough to attact younger viewers more used to streaming programmes online. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea.
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i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest of bbc three are going to have a new broadcast home, a tv channel. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to sa—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary, old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels,
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since no—one in our house watches it, but we use, like, disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. yeah, poirot. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. around 80% of 16 to sa—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee,
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three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. the nationwide building society says the housing market has had its strongest start to a year since 2005. analysts say prices rose by 11.2% injanuary compared to a year ago. however they predict the market will slow as prices become become less affordable. the police watchdog says it has found evidence —— the actress and television personality whoopi goldberg has apologised after saying that the holocaust "was not about race". speaking on a us talk show, ms goldberg said that the holocaust — the murder of six millionjewss by the nazis, who saw themselves as an aryan "master race" — involved "two groups of white people." we can talk now to elise preston from cbs for more on this.
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what exactly did whoopi goldberg say? what exactly did whoopi goldberg sa ? , ., ., what exactly did whoopi goldberg sa ? ., what exactly did whoopi goldberg sa ? . . what exactly did whoopi goldberg sa? ., . , say? good afternoon, whoopi goldberg and her co-hosts _ say? good afternoon, whoopi goldberg and her co-hosts were _ say? good afternoon, whoopi goldberg and her co-hosts were discussing - and her co—hosts were discussing how and her co—hosts were discussing how a tennessee school band the pulitzer prize—winning world war ii era graphic novel maus over concerns over nudity and profane language. at some point in the discussion, goldberg said the holocaust was not about race. she was immediately pushed back by her co—hosts and the controversial remark sparked an uproar here in the states. others later, she tweeted "and today's show i said the holocaust is not about race but about man's inhumanity to man, i should race but about man's inhumanity to man, ishould have race but about man's inhumanity to man, i should have said race but about man's inhumanity to man, ishould have said it race but about man's inhumanity to man, i should have said it was about both." i think that the holocaust was about the nazis' systematic annihilation of the jewish was about the nazis' systematic annihilation of thejewish people, who they deem that inferior race. i stand corrected, thejewish people around the world have always had my support and that will never waver, i
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and sorry for the hurt i have caused. elise preston from cbs, thank you. the police watchdog says it has found evidence of "disgraceful" bullying, misogyny, discrimination and sexual harassment, in some ranks of the metropolitan police. the independent office for police conduct has made 15 recommendations, including tackling "underlying cultural issues". most of the officers investigated were constables and mainly based at charing cross police station in central london. the met police says it's "deeply sorry" at the report's findings. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here. daniel, what is the background to this? absolutelyjaw chopping findings from the independent office for police conduct, one senior officer said when he saw the findings and read the messages these officers were sending, he read them with increasing shame and disgust. this was an investigation into the charing cross police station in the west end of london, the report found a bully and exogenous to culture in
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the period from 2016 to 2018, but those messages will grab headlines —— a bullying and misogynistic culture. theyjoke about rape, hitting france, one person said they would gladly clarify her, they use 93)’ would gladly clarify her, they use gay as an insult, make derogatory comments about the black lives matter movement and mosques. the culture of the metropolitan police is already in the spotlight after one of its officers was convicted of kidnapping and murdering sarah everard and this will only increase scrutiny. the ipc warns that subsequent inquiries have made similarfindings, so these subsequent inquiries have made similar findings, so these are not just a few bad apples.— similar findings, so these are not just a few bad apples. thank you, daniel sandford. _ tesco has warned 1,400 jobs are at risk following changes it's making to overnight roles at some stores and petrol stations. the retailer is planning to cut back some overnight restocking, and convert a number of petrol sites to pay—at—pump in the evenings. the start of the beijing winter olympics is just a few days away, and one of those with high hopes
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for a medal is team gb snowboarder charlotte bankes. she was on the verge of giving up the sportjust a few years ago after fracturing her pelvis. our sports news reporter, laura scott, has been to meet her. think bmx on snow, and you get pretty close to the adrenaline fuelled olympic sport of snowboard cross. this is a lap of honour... 0h! drama! favourites haven't always fared so well in this most unpredictable event, but great britain's charlotte bankes is leading the pack going into beijing. what are your hopes in beijing? be at my top game. i think that was the topical i've got, and it'sjust being able to ride at the level i'm riding at, training, and hopefully it all goes well and i can put that on a good race. -- i think —— i think that was the main goal i've got. i mean, it's boarder cross, so everything can happen and some things are out of our control. with each rider trying to find the best line down a course ofjumps...
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0h! ..bumps.. 0h, gone! ..and tight turns... 0h, they've all gone! ..high—speed crashes aren't unusual, making it nail—biting viewing for her family. it's always a little bit scary to watch. i know, like, my parents can't eat or drink anything whilst they're watching. they're extremely tense. they'll be hiding behind the sofa at the same time. bankes knows the risk of snowboarding only too well, having fractured her pelvis in her very first season racing internationally. i lost a bit of the love that i've got for snowboarding, because i wasn't able to actually snowboard without any pain, and it was a pretty tough time and it is still there, it niggles a bit but it's nothing like it used to be and i'm able to do proper training on the snow, and that's really nice. charlotte bankes is so fast through here. born in hemel hempstead, bankes has twice competed at the winter olympics, finishing 17th in 2014 and seventh four years later. but look at the flag, both times
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she was representing france. in 2018 she defected to join the british setup and hasn't looked back since, clinching four world cup wins and a world championship title under the british flag. why did you make the change? it worked really well for me. the athlete comes first and that's really nice. i'd always had that in the back of my mind to compete for great britain. if we can come back with a medal from the olympics it would be good. i was at the point of giving up when i made that switch, and i didn't think anybody actually believed i could make it. few would doubt she could make it now. after all, bankes knows what it takes to be on top of the world. laura scott, bbc news. the first southern koala ever born in europe has entered the world at longleat safari park in wiltshire. the birth is part of a conservation drive to learn more about the animals, which are under threat. they normally live,
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of course, in australia. jonah fisher has that story. i have got a little bit of news for you. james, a keeper at longleat safari park, is on a zoom with chris... oh, well, let's hear it! ..a koala expert in southern australia. so, i'd like to introduce you to — obviously, you know violet, one of your lovely adelaide koalas, but she also has a joey. oh, that's fantastic news, james! well done. congratulations, you're an uncle! absolutely brilliant. i know. yeah, it's a little overwhelming. it's been quite a journey to get here. three and a half years ago, violet was a koala pioneer, travelling from chris' park in australia, to start england's only koala colony at longleat. when it was first born, violet's joey was the size of a jelly bean, and spent all of its time in its mother's pouch. now, six months on, the park and the koala are going public, and the joey is also starting to snack on more than just milk. so what the little joey is eating is called pap.
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it's recycled koala poo from violet, which means that it's gone through her, which takes the toxin levels out of the leaf, meaning that it's safe for the joey, but gets it used to the leaves that it will eat in its future life. so there are two subspecies of koala — the northern koala, and what violet is, which is a southern koala, which is a bit bigger and hairier than its northern cousins. oh, look — it'sjust popping out there. they're probably the fussiest animal that we have. keeping the koalas happy so far from home is a major undertaking. if they don't like it, they will let you know very, very quickly. they only eat eucalyptus, some of which is grown specially for them in the grounds ta longleat. growling. with a new baby koala on site, this male is trying to persuade his partner to try for another. growling. you don't have to be an expert in koala body language to recognise a polite "no"! jonah fisher, bbc news.

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