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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 1, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 2pm... the prime minister tries to rally support from his top team— the cabinet after that damning report into parties the deputy pm says the government needs to reflect on sue gray's initial findings. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said ok, i want to address and fix this. not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that has gone on since. the pm has left for ukraine, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles,
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as the take up rate drops to its lowest level, in a decade. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. and, a southern koala, born not in australia, but england, as part of a major conservation drive. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, says conservative mps still "overwhelmingly" support borisjohnson, following the release of the initial findings, of the report into lockdown parties in downing st. sue gray's inquiry, concluded there'd been
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a "failure of leadership." but the tory mp andrew mitchell warned the crisis risked "breaking the conservative party." the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has accused borisjohnson, of trying to "save his own skin," and taking the public "for fools" , in his defence of his own actions, in relation to alleged breaches of covid rules. with the latest, here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. leaving his political woes at home, borisjohnson went to immerse himself in a different crisis, that of ukraine. he is now a prime minister under police investigation. firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended at least three events highlighted by the report into downing street parties, it found there were serious failings of leadership. on the streets of strade this morning, signs of how damaging the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm afraid,
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too many people have died, lost their loved ones whilst they were taking liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think to the conservatives up until now and it puts a big question over everything that everybody has been through over the pandemic. i'm disappointed with the things - that have gone on at downing street, while the rest of us have been in lockdown. - but overwriting that, i think, overall, going forward. - as much as borisjohnson wants to move things on it is clear there is still widespread anger and one important question, one of the events police are looking at happened in his own private downing street flat, he was asked yesterday in parliament was the at that event? something sir keir starmer highlighted today. the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box and being asked were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat? and he said i cannot answer that because of the investigation. he knows very well whether he was in the flat
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and he is taking us forfull. before leaving today mrjohnson met his cabinet, he has promised to shake up the way he runs things. might his chief whip be a casual day? are you sticking around? the deputy prime minister, a loyal lieutenant had been on the airwaves earlier defending him. it is precisely we take this on the prime minister takes this so seriously, first of all that the sue gray review was commissioned and then published in full, what he has received and also it is quite right she has got the prerogative to refer any issues to the police. many tories are still reserving judgment of the prime minister and his former chief whip says he has lost confidence in him. boris is running a modern government like a medieval court. you need to rule in government through structures, white, cabinet, —— whitehall... national security council, that is not the way with boris
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and many of us thought he would govern in the way he did when he was mayor of london, through being chairman of the board, running a very good team, that is not what has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there remains much unease among tory ranks and an ongoing police investigation, the full details of the sue gray report still to be published. more difficult political moments to come. damian grammaticas, bbc news. i'm joined now by liam fox — the former defence secretary. thank you so much for your time. how damaged you think the prime minister is by all this? because of course, as we heard, there are going to be more revelations, allegations the road. . . more revelations, allegations the road. ., ., ., , , ., more revelations, allegations the road. ., ., road. there are and as your report made clear. _ road. there are and as your report made clear, people _ road. there are and as your report made clear, people are _ road. there are and as your report made clear, people are upset - road. there are and as your report made clear, people are upset thatj made clear, people are upset that the sacrifices they made during the period don't appear to been followed by central government and it's natural that people would be angry about that. but also there is a growing irritation that we are focusing too much on this and not
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enough on the other issues that affect the countries and up and down the country people are complaining about the price of fuel, about the cost of living, concerns about their financial positions and also we have got this a major security crisis right in europe with the russians... on that, the thing is that boris johnson couldn't call president putin because he was defending himself against these allegations. and this is his own fault. he himself against these allegations. and this is his own fault.- and this is his own fault. he got himself into _ and this is his own fault. he got himself into this _ and this is his own fault. he got himself into this mess. - and this is his own fault. he got himself into this mess. i'm - and this is his own fault. he got himself into this mess. i'm notl and this is his own fault. he got - himself into this mess. i'm not sure if the report told us things we didn't know already and now we are waiting for the police investigation and it seems to me that we need to be getting on with the job and all these other fronts and to spend further time discussing this when it's not going to go any further until we get the police report and it seems to me to be futile and a waste of time... we it seems to me to be futile and a waste of time. . .— it seems to me to be futile and a waste of time. .. we can't 'ust move on, can waste of time. .. we can't 'ust move can we? — waste of time. .. we can't 'ust move on, can we? there _ waste of time. .. we can't 'ust move on, can we? there are _ waste of time. .. we can't 'ust move on, can we? there are so _ waste of time. .. we can'tjust move on, can we? there are so much - waste of time. .. we can'tjust move i on, can we? there are so much anger in the country and i'm sure your constituents are angry as well. we
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heard from the former prime minister theresa may yesterday and she said that either borisjohnson had not read the rules or didn't understand what they meant or he didn't think they apply to him and number ten. that was a very important question because rule makers cannot be the rule breakers.— because rule makers cannot be the rule breakers. , ., , , , ., rule breakers. obviously, but now we have to wait — rule breakers. obviously, but now we have to wait for _ rule breakers. obviously, but now we have to wait for the _ rule breakers. obviously, but now we have to wait for the police _ have to wait for the police investigation. surely we are not going to be talking with us every single day between now and that? because we're not going to get any new information and yet there are major tasks at in terms of the security crisis and in terms of the economic problems that are facing this country and others as we recover from the covid pandemic. we now need the government to be putting its full energy into these things. these questions will have to be answered, you are quite right, but it seems to me that if we talk with this all day every day when there is nothing new in terms of evidence, then it becomes a bit futile. ,., . evidence, then it becomes a bit futile. . ., futile. if, the police are investigating _ futile. if, the police are investigating 12 - futile. if, the police are| investigating 12 parties, futile. if, the police are - investigating 12 parties, three attended by the prime minister, if he ends up having to pay a fine, a
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fixed penalty notice, can you survive a spy minister? is fixed penalty notice, can you survive a spy minister?- fixed penalty notice, can you survive a spy minister? is he fit to be rime survive a spy minister? is he fit to be prime minster? _ survive a spy minister? is he fit to be prime minster? well, - survive a spy minister? is he fit to be prime minster? well, let's - survive a spy minister? is he fit to j be prime minster? well, let's wait and see to the police investigation. i am not going to think what these academic questions. i think we should be getting on with the task of running the country while at the present time. this does hang over the government, there is no doubt about that and none of us wish to be in that position and the public will want to get answers to the questions and the public are irritated and angry by the whole situation, but they also have a right to expect that the government will focus on the major issues and not spend however long it is between now and the publication of the police report talking about nothing else but this. when the prime minister in the commons yesterday attacked keir starmer and said he had failed to prosecutejimmy savile, that is not true, is it? i prosecute jimmy savile, that is not true, is it? ., �* prosecute jimmy savile, that is not true, is it?— true, is it? i don't know what the truth that matter _ true, is it? i don't know what the truth that matter is, _ true, is it? i don't know what the truth that matter is, nor - true, is it? i don't know what the truth that matter is, nor do - true, is it? i don't know what the truth that matter is, nor do i - truth that matter is, nor do i think it's particularly relevant... the
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prime minister _ it's particularly relevant... the prime minister brought it up so he must think it is relevant. but it is prosecutors who worked in the cps at the time who have said it is explicitly, that it is absently not true. why did the prime minister wrote something of that?- wrote something of that? that's somethinr wrote something of that? that's something you'd _ wrote something of that? that's something you'd have _ wrote something of that? that's something you'd have to - wrote something of that? that's something you'd have to ask- wrote something of that? that'sj something you'd have to ask the prime minister. i don't think that's relevant to the debate. we need to stick within the terms of the discussion. the prime minister has questions and others in downing street have questions that have to be answered and we have the police investigation on that and i think that for us to constantly be going over the same territory when there is no new information on which to base a discussion moving forward, i think is wasting our time. liam fox, thank ou think is wasting our time. liam fox, thank you for— think is wasting our time. liam fox, thank you for your _ think is wasting our time. liam fox, thank you for your time _ think is wasting our time. liam fox, thank you for your time and being i thank you for your time and being with us on bbc news this afternoon. let's speak now with henry hill, deputy editor of conservative home — that's a website which supports but is independent of the party. thank you very much for your time. what is your take on all of this and where we are now? the prime minister flying to ukraine and as we
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discussed he had to cancel his call with president putin yesterday, how damaged you think borisjohnson is by this? damaged you think boris johnson is b this? ~ , ., , by this? when i first read the gray re ort m by this? when i first read the gray report my initial _ by this? when i first read the gray report my initial reaction - by this? when i first read the gray report my initial reaction was - by this? when i first read the gray report my initial reaction was ok, | report my initial reaction was ok, this is something he can work with, there is damning stuff here that is written in bureaucratic language and it spreads his name around quite a lot and it is quite short. i think there was an opening there for him to stand up and be contrite and say he is ultimately responsible for what goes on and he has neglected to oversee this adequately in the day—to—day operation of downing street and he will be taking the recommendations are bought and so on, but instead, the response to the questions of keir starmer, boris was very aggressive and went on the counterattack. i think you got the tone completely wrong and made the allegation you referenced about jimmy savile and i think as far as the country is concerned, that put him back into the dead zone and he then had a private meeting with mps where he apparently fared better and had rallied conservative mps for the
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moment, but i am reserving judgment, and a lot of them too, but the prime minister is only impressing conservative mps in a sealed room, thatis conservative mps in a sealed room, that is not a long—term basis for his government. that is not a long-term basis for his government.— that is not a long-term basis for his government. that is not a long-term basis for his rovernment. , , ., , ., his government. there seems to be a feelinr that his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's _ his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's ok _ his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's ok for _ his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's ok for now, - his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's ok for now, but - his government. there seems to be a feeling that he's ok for now, but he l feeling that he's ok for now, but he has this police investigation hanging over him. the police are investigating the prime minister, they are investigating us of other people in downing street as well, but they are investigating the prime minister. , ., ~ but they are investigating the prime minister. , ., ,, ., minister. they are. i think the one qualification _ minister. they are. i think the one qualification that _ minister. they are. i think the one qualification that downing - minister. they are. i think the one qualification that downing street l qualification that downing street would offer that is that they are only investigating things that would warrant a fixed penalty notice and nothing more serious. that's not much of a defence but i think it is a problem for conservative mps but strategically it is kind of what downing street once and i don't want to drag this out as there is never a crunch moment were... we will get the rest of the serial port and in a few months' time maybe we'll get the police report and then the hope is that none of these things is big enough for a gut punch to force mps to go over the top of the downside
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is that as it is months potentially when the story is still in the papers and still having a corrosive impact on public opinion of the prime minister and the conservative party so i think tories have to decide is how much more at they prepared to put up with? and even if borisjohnson prepared to put up with? and even if boris johnson survive theoretically, what chance does he have of rebuilding trust before the general election? ., ., ., , rebuilding trust before the general election? ., ., election? liam fox was saying we need to move _ election? liam fox was saying we need to move on _ election? liam fox was saying we need to move on and _ election? liam fox was saying we need to move on and talk - election? liam fox was saying we need to move on and talk with - election? liam fox was saying we i need to move on and talk with other things but i have also heard it said that this is a bit like the mp's expenses scam where there is a drip drip of allegations and revelations and also that this really cuts through with voters and the public at large and they care about this. well, they do. there is no disputing that. you only need to look what's happening to the party poll ratings remarkably after nearly 12 years in office and they will still come to be ahead and now they are deep under water and the conservative party is behind labour in the polls, sustainably for the first time in a while and i think there is a real
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danger here that conservative mps mistake moving on in the sense that inevitably eventually the media cycle will have to focus on something else, with the fact that thatis something else, with the fact that that is the damage undone, when the prime minister's poll ratings appear to be stubbornly in decline. that is the real problem that the conservative party faces that yes, it might be in six months' time we are talking or something else, but public has shifted their view decisively and boris johnson and that he remains decisively and borisjohnson and that he remains under decisively and boris johnson and that he remains under polling keir starmer, they are still on track to lose the next election.— starmer, they are still on track to lose the next election. henry hill, alwa s lose the next election. henry hill, always good _ lose the next election. henry hill, always good to — lose the next election. henry hill, always good to talk _ lose the next election. henry hill, always good to talk to _ lose the next election. henry hill, always good to talk to you. - meanwhile, borisjohnson will arrive in ukraine shortly, for talks with the country's president, volodymyr zelensky, as fears grow over the threat of a russian invasion. the uk is expected to offer nearly £90 million in aid, to help ukraine tackle corruption and reduce its reliance, on russian energy. our kyiv correspondent, james waterhouse, has sent us this report.
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one parliament where borisjohnson could expect a warm welcome. today, ukrainian mps showed their appreciation for western allies. before that, president zelensky announced a new security partnership. translation: we are creating a new format of co-operation l in europe between ukraine, britain and poland. "glory to ukraine, glory to heroes," they chant on kyiv�*s independence square. notjust a show of thanks, but patriotism too. european countries help us, showed russia that, no, no, no, we are ready to save ukraine. so a symbol of thanks and appreciation from ukrainians for all the military aid which has come its way, but there's still uncertainty from people on both what is going to happen next and should there be an invasion, who is going to help to fight inside the country.
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there are no plans for nato troops to arrive here, though. when borisjohnson lands in kyiv from downing street he and volodymyr zelensky are expected to discuss more sanctions for russia if it invades, as well as reinforce their commitment to solving this crisis through talks. they play traditional irish music. ok, not something you'd exactly expect to see here. this woman has always been fascinated with irish culture and regularly brings this musical flavour to her home city. so does she feel threatened? i think i do, when i see the news that there might be russian aviation brought into belarus and there's new weapons found in the occupied territories where the pro—russian militia are being armed. it's different, and i'm really worried by that. russia's constantly denied planning an invasion, and says it's still open to talks on its demand nato stops expanding. the us, however, suspects 30,000
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more russian troops will arrive in belarus to the north, adding tension to an already tense border. this memorial commemorates the ukrainians who died fighting alongside russians in the second world war. the hope here remains, as ever, that they don't further turn on each other. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. and james joins us now from kyiv. with the prime ministerjust about to arrive in the new tellest what do you trainees would like to get in terms of help from the british. the ukraine has given a couple of thousand of short—range anti—tank measures. —— ukraine's want to... what else would they want? i measures. -- ukraine's want to... what else would they want? i think, on the ground. _ what else would they want? i think, on the ground, ukrainians _ what else would they want? i think, on the ground, ukrainiansjust - what else would they want? i think, on the ground, ukrainiansjust want| on the ground, ukrainians just want the question answered as you heard in that report that what they're going to get if there is an invasion. they welcome these anti
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tank missiles that have been given by the us, they have welcomed the continued military aid, 90 tonnes of ammunition arrived yesterday from the us, but, you will continue to hear more promises from the likes of the uk and us of nato troop deployments to other member states, but that only includes places like lithuania or latvia, not here in the ukraine which we are hearing, as far as the west is concerned, about the growing threat of an invasion. this is something ukrainian ministers have constantly tried to deny and moscow, which is one thing they do agree, is also accused the west of hyping things up and it has no plans to invade. they are heavily armoured police today in the capital waiting for borisjohnson's visit and he is one of the few world leaders to arrive this week. his dutch and polish counterparts are arriving over the next couple of days as well and an interesting development. we heard president zielinski talk with this new alliance with poland and eu
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us and his foreign minister hasjust announced that that has been postponed because the uk foreign minister has not travelled here because she announced that the she has tested positive for covid. you have this announcement in parliament but now they are saying that that is actually on ice for now and you can be sure that i will go ahead and we understand that there will be political cooperation, military cooperation as well in the face of what they have described as russian aggression. it is all part of the ukraine forming alliances within its evolving foreign policy. what is happening the talks? russia's foreign minister is expected to make a phone call with his american counterpart and we will see what will come out of that. you earlier mentioned adelaide phone call between borisjohnson and vladimir putin. we understand that might happen tomorrow. but there are elements and small positives to be taking from the language from
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russia. they said they have come back to the us with further questions to its ideas of its demands for the ukraine should withdraw from nato and we know those demands are not going to be met thus far as the us has a rule that out but as putin has said he is open to further talks. as long as those talks continue, that might do something to ease worries and all the while troop build—up along the border and ukraine has announced an order to increase its armed forces by 100,000 over three years and that is part of a support to fund that and is looking for more support from western allies and we have also these joint exercises in belarus to these joint exercises in belarus to the north. the political tone and the north. the political tone and the military movement working in tandem and there is very little comfort to be gained as the week goes on. comfort to be gained as the week roes on. , . , . ~' comfort to be gained as the week roes on. g ., , ., ~ i. ., goes on. james, thank you and we think that is _ goes on. james, thank you and we think that is the _ goes on. james, thank you and we think that is the prime _ goes on. james, thank you and we think that is the prime minister's l think that is the prime minister's plane touching down in kyiv for talks with the ukrainian president
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as james hasjust talks with the ukrainian president as james has just mentioned there. prime minister borisjohnson prime minister boris johnson yesterday prime minister borisjohnson yesterday had to cancel a call to president putin who has more than 100,000 troops surrounding the borders of ukraine, so much speculation that there is going to be a russian invasion sooner or later and the prime minister, as james hasjust said, one of james has just said, one of several world leaders visiting ukraine to talk to the ukrainian leadership about what exactly they want in terms of international help. much more from kyiv, the ukrainian capital throughout the afternoon as a prime minster�*s is at their own faults. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england, are at risk of measles, because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five year—olds who've had both doses of the mmr jab, has fallen to it's lowest level for a decade, and is well below the 95% recommended,
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to stop a resurgence of the disease. here's our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson. thank you for being with us. what do you think are the reasons for this for? ., . ., , you think are the reasons for this for? ., . , for? the covid pandemic has habits the had a for? the covid pandemic has habits they had a huge — for? the covid pandemic has habits they had a huge impact _ for? the covid pandemic has habits they had a huge impact on - for? the covid pandemic has habits they had a huge impact on families| they had a huge impact on families across the uk over the last couple of years and families have had a lot to bejuggling and i think it means that immunisation, the routine childhood immunisations may not be at the forefront of their minds. we have done a survey of parents which shows that about one in ten of parents who didn't get the child vaccinated wasn't aware that the nhs had continued to offer immunisations throughout the pandemic and another one in ten said that they didn't want to be a burden on the nhs so they didn't book in to get the children vaccinated. obviously, people were isolating, with covid and so many had appointments booked in but then couldn't come along, so all of those things might mean that we have seen a significant drop—off
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and so it's really important that we remind parents and in fact, the nhs is open and at the routine childhood immunisations, including mmr vaccines, remain a public health priority and we want our children to be protected by the time they turn five and in particularly before they start nursery and school is in a mixing with other children, which is the perfect time to be exposed to infections like measles and where outbreaks are likely to occur if we don't catch up with those children who have missed out during the pandemic. brute who have missed out during the pandemic— who have missed out during the andemic. ~ ., , , . pandemic. we have spent so much time wor inr pandemic. we have spent so much time worrying about — pandemic. we have spent so much time worrying about covid _ pandemic. we have spent so much time worrying about covid and _ pandemic. we have spent so much time worrying about covid and the _ worrying about covid and the pandemic and courageous bell of the reasons why people need to get their children vaccinated with the mmr jab because measles is so dangerous? you are rirht, because measles is so dangerous? ym. are right, actually measles is, well first of all it is very infectious, really easy to catch and spreads very easily in populations where you don't have a high uptake with the two doses of the mmr vaccine, so
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measles can be very serious. if a child gets measles, they are very poorly and miserable, they are sick for 7—10 days, you can get complications like ear infections, pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, or meningitis and those kinds of complications means that obviously a child is in hospital but beyond that they can have long—term disabilities and some will die. and it is completely preventable and what we want to do is to remind parents to check if their children are up—to—date now and get them caught up before we see a rise in cases. once covid restrictions are fully lifted and once international travel really picks up we expect measles to be one of the first infections to come back and we will expect to see outbreaks if we don't catch up the children who have missed out. you need two doses to be fully protected, the first dose is offered to babies when they turn one and a second dose is children who are three years and four months so that they are fully protected before
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the start nursery or school.- the start nursery or school. thank ou ve the start nursery or school. thank you very much- — the start nursery or school. thank you very much. let _ the start nursery or school. thank you very much. let me _ the start nursery or school. thank you very much. let me take - the start nursery or school. thank you very much. let me take you l you very much. let me take you straight back to the prime minister's plane taxiing on the kyiv airport runway and it is chilly there and borisjohnson is going to be talking, we think, to morrow to the russian president vladimir putin and it is thought that mrjohnson will urge the russians to dial down on what the west sees as aggression, 100,000 russian troops, more than 100,000 russian troops, more than 100,000 now, who are gathered and massed along the ukrainian border. but in the short term, mrjohnson is going to be meeting the ukrainian president in kyiv and talking about the support that britain can offer. there will be a joint news conference this afternoon in fact
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and the prime minister's official spokesperson has said that mr johnson has been very much spearheading the international response to this. some people have said that borisjohnson was not fully focused on this crisis because he has been dealing with the allegations of downing street parties and that the french president has actually had two calls with president putin in four days, whereas boris johnson with president putin in four days, whereas borisjohnson hasn't spoken to mr putin since december. the prime minister's spokesman said the totting up the number of calls is not necessarily early the sole arbitrating factor of how this is decided. mrjohnson has travelled on a chartered plane from stansted with some downing street staff and a small pool ofjournalists. the government has already announced that £88 million in aid is going to be sent to ukraine to support the country in this time of crisis.
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there will be full coverage throughout the afternoon and evening of boris johnson's throughout the afternoon and evening of borisjohnson's visit throughout the afternoon and evening of boris johnson's visit to throughout the afternoon and evening of borisjohnson's visit to ukraine andindeed of borisjohnson's visit to ukraine and indeed that a news conference with ukrainian president which we are expecting shortly before five o'clock. official figures show millions of people have been experiencing rising food and energy bills — with further price rises still to come. the office for national statistics found two thirds of adults surveyed said their cost of living had already increased in the past month, and some are cutting back on gas and electricity. i'm joined by adam scorer, chief executive of national energy action, the uk's national fuel poverty charity. we know there are bigger rises to come and the fear is that they are going to disproportionately affect the worst off in society. the certainty — the worst off in society. the certainty that _ the worst off in society. the certainty that they're - the worst off in society. tia: certainty that they're going to affect the worst off in society. the ons figures show that not only the
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impact of price wises from last october are hard and are making people cut back on heating and essentials but that what is coming on monday, we think, will be extraordinary in comparison to what we had already and it will simply devastate incomes of low income households who are already struggling to make ends meet. hagar struggling to make ends meet. how would ou struggling to make ends meet. how would you like _ struggling to make ends meet. how would you like those people to be protected? flan would you like those people to be rotected? ., , , , ., . protected? can they be protected? i think they have _ protected? can they be protected? i think they have to _ protected? can they be protected? i think they have to be _ protected? can they be protected? i think they have to be protected. - protected? can they be protected? i think they have to be protected. i i think they have to be protected. i think they have to be protected. i think what the government needs to do urgently and at scale is a one—off crisis intervention and to put money into the pockets and the welfare system of people at the most risk or to take money off their bills. there is very little choice, if we are to avert the worst of a catastrophe for those budgets and they have to do that quickly because a price rise announced on monday will announce lead to huge anxiety and people will take dangerous steps and people will take dangerous steps and they will not heat their home, they were not eat properly, it will not bathe, they will cut out some of
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the essentials for a good life. but this is a global, i mean, there are lots of global factors behind this is a global, i mean, there are lots of globalfactors behind his energy price rises. they are out of the government plasma control. is it really a matter for government to intervene in this and to spend more money as they have spent so much already? money as they have spent so much alread ? ., . already? you are quite right, because of— already? you are quite right, because of this _ already? you are quite right, because of this is _ already? you are quite right, because of this is the - already? you are quite right, because of this is the globall because of this is the global economy responding to growth during the pandemic, the wholesale price of gas is a globally traded and there is nothing the government can do about it but that is not the point. the government's responsibility is the care and well—being of its citizens and to its most vulnerable in particular and it is responsibility to make sure it doesn'tjust regards the crisis coming towards us but takes action to avert it. it is retirement in the government rip. tax revenues have been directly averted... it could at
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least revert those tax revenues back to households that could get hit the hardest. it is a government responsibility to do what it can to take the sting out of what will be an extraordinary price crisis come april. an extraordinary price crisis come aril. ~ ., , . an extraordinary price crisis come aril.~ ., , . an extraordinary price crisis come aril. ., , . , . april. we are expecting those price rises shortly _ april. we are expecting those price rises shortly as _ april. we are expecting those price rises shortly as you _ april. we are expecting those price rises shortly as you have _ rises shortly as you have been discussing. but after that, what is the long—term prospect do you think? you are quite right, there's the urgent and necessary but then there is the important and fundamental. we need to see greater levels of support to low—income households just to afford decent levels of energy. i think we need to accept that households need a below—market rate and protect them and his they can from this but the best way of insulating the people in the lowest incomes and in the least efficient homes from the punitive impact of global wholesale prices is to insulate their homes. our homes lose heat faster almost than anywhere else in europe. we have a stop start, mainly stop energy efficiency programme over the years and it is
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the way of making sure people use less, spend less, or less, get into less, spend less, or less, get into less debt, it is something that we have known is the best solution for some time. it's time is done and the government needs to commit to it in a decade of delivery on energy efficiency that we build food fuel poverty other people's comms. thank ou ve poverty other people's comms. thank you very much — poverty other people's comms. thank you very much indeed. _ poverty other people's comms. thank you very much indeed. this _ poverty other people's comms. thank you very much indeed. this take - poverty other people's comms. thank you very much indeed. this take you back to ukraine where boris johnson's plane has just back to ukraine where boris johnson's plane hasjust landed. johnson's plane has just landed. sorry johnson's plane hasjust landed. sorry for the camera work there. can't control it from this end. but thatis can't control it from this end. but that is the plane that has just touched down as we watched arriving, it is a chartered plane which left stansted with some of boris johnson's staff and i'm not sure if the prime minister is quite ready to disembark yet but as soon as he does, there is a guard of honour there for him and here come the steps and that's always a good start. what a moment of relief when
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you see the steps coming on a plane. speaking from personal experience. anyway, he is going to be meeting ukrainian president, there's going to be a news conference between the leaders and the prime minister is going to be talking about the support that britain can offer. it has already sent anti—tank missiles, 2000 short range anti—tank missiles, and advisers to tutor the ukrainians on how to use those missiles. but we will see whether the prime minister of ukraine request for the military support from britain but in terms of financial support, the british government has also promised £88 million overnight in aid that will be sent to ukraine to support the country. that is part of the uk's good governance fund which is to support stable governments and energy independence, supporting transparency, anti—corruption transparency, anti—corru ption initiatives and
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transparency, anti—corruption initiatives and efforts to reduce ukraine's reliance on russian energy supplies. in the short term perhaps ukraine want more military help, perhaps, because they are facing the threat of more than 100,000 russian troops who have been gathering over the last couple of months, a steady build—up of russian military forces, along the borders with ukraine. the fear that there is going to be an invasion. the conservative mp tobias ellwood have thought the invasion is imminent, but we don't know what is in the mind of vladimir putin and whether he does want to go through within invasion or whether it is bluff but the door has been opened here and so we are about to see the prime minister and his staff coming down the steps. some criticism of
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the prime minister yesterday that he was so bogged down in defending himself in regarding the party gay allegations that he had to postpone allegations that he had to postpone a call to the russian president —— partygate allegations. in that time, the french president, emmanuel macron has spoken twice to the russian president in the space of four days. but borisjohnson is getting away from the partygate allegations and all of the allegations and all of the allegations about parties during lockdown are both at number ten and elsewhere in whitehall. he is getting away from that. he is the prime minister walking down the steps. there will be a guard of
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honour from the ukrainians as steps. there will be a guard of honourfrom the ukrainians as he is welcomed to kyiv in a moment of international crisis for ukraine. is it facing a russian invasion in the coming days? a partial invasion or the whole country being invaded? ostensibly this is military exercises by russia and russia have denied repeatedly their intention to invade but military analysts around the world are fearful that there is going to be a russian invasion, that the russians ever since the disintegration of the soviet union, have wanted to take back either all of ukraine or part of it. that was borisjohnson of ukraine or part of it. that was boris johnson arriving of ukraine or part of it. that was borisjohnson arriving in the ukraine. we will be in ukraine
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throughout the afternoon for more and especially the news conference with the prime minister and the ukrainian president but now we can have a look at the sport news. good afternoon. the author val mcdermid has said she will withdraw her support and sponsorship of raith rovers after the club signed striker david goodwillie. the player was ruled to be a rapist — and ordered to pay damages in a civil case in 2017. he neverfaced a criminal trial after prosecutors said there was not enough evidence. the captain of the club's women's team, tyler rattray, has quit in protest. mcdermid — known for her popular crime fiction novels — has taken to social media saying... golf's saudi arabian—funded asian tour will stage its first event in england this year.
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the centurion club in hertfordshire is set to host the £1.5 million tournament from the 9th to 12th june — one of ten international events. the asian tour season starts on thursday. the tour recently revealed it'd been boosted by a £1118 million investment from the saudi arabia government's private investment fund. that funding has been increased by a further £75 million. and we're just a few days away from the start of the beijing winter olympics. one of those competing for britain, with high hopes for a medal, is snowboarder charlotte bankes. after nearly giving up on the sport a few years back — she could be among those toasting success this month. laura scott has been to meet her. think bmx on snow, and you get pretty close to the adrenaline fuelled olympic sport of snowboard cross. this is a lap of honour...
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0h! drama! favourites haven't always fared so well in this most unpredictable event, but great britain's charlotte bankes is leading the pack going into beijing. what are your hopes in beijing? be at my top game. i think that was the main goal i've got, and it'sjust being able to ride at the level i'm riding at in training, and hopefully it all goes well and i can put that on a good race. i mean, it's boarder cross, so everything can happen and some things are out of our control. with each rider trying to find the best line down a course ofjumps... 0h! ..bumps.. oh, no, gone! ..and tight turns... 0h, they've all gone! ..high—speed crashes aren't unusual, making it nail—biting viewing for her family. it's always a little bit scary to watch. i know, like, my parents can't eat or drink anything whilst they're watching. they're extremely tense. they'll be hiding behind the sofa at the same time. bankes knows the risks of snowboarding only too well, having fractured her pelvis in her very first season racing internationally. i lost a bit of the love that i've got for snowboarding,
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because i wasn't able to actually snowboard without any pain, and it was a pretty tough time, yeah. it is still there, it niggles a bit, but it's nothing like it used to be and i'm able to do proper training on the snow, and that's really nice. charlotte bankes is so fast through here. born in hemel hempstead, bankes has twice competed at the winter olympics, finishing 17th in 2014 and seventh four years later. but look at the flag — both times she was representing france. in 2018 she defected to join the british setup and hasn't looked back since, clinching four world cup wins and a world championship title under the british flag. why did you make the change? it works really well for me. the athlete comes first and that's really nice. i'd always had that in the back of my mind, to compete for great britain. if we can come back with a medal from the olympics it would be good. i was at the point of giving up
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when i made that switch, and i didn't think anybody actually believed i could make it. few would doubt she can make it now. after all, bankes knows what it takes to be on top of the world. laura scott, bbc news. can't wait for all of that to start. that's all the sport for now. the former health secretary, jeremy hunt, has criticised the government's decision to drop mandatory covid vaccinations, for health and social care workers in england. mr hunt, who chairs the health and social care committe, says people had been marched to the top of the hill, before the u—turn, making it harder to win the argument next time round. our health editor hugh pym has been telling us more. it is a significant intervention because not only is he a former conservative health secretary but a select committee chair, and he has come out with this criticism barely 2a hours after the government announced its new policy of mandatory vaccination for the nhs.
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mr hunt acknowledges workforce is an issue, there were worries about staff leaving because they did not want to be vaccinated at a time when the service was under extreme pressure but he said that was a longer term issue. right now, he thinks the decision made sends out wrong signals as he explained in an interview earlier. from a patient safety point view it's really disappointing, that we've won the argument about the need for staff, unless there is a medical exemption, to be properly vaccinated — i think that was widely supported across the health and care systems. but having marched people up to the top of the hill, there is now a u—turn which means that the next time we have a big debate, perhaps for a flu vaccine in this coming winter, it's going to be much harder to win that argument. now, the health secretary, sajid javid, said in his announcement yesterday, that one reason for the change of plan was that the omicron variant
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was less severe than delta had been last autumn when the policy was first announced, more people had been announced and there was a workforce issue and it would be put out to consultation. although some health staff are pleased because they would otherwise have lost theirjobs, and also the royal colleges, some health and social care leaders are privately frustrated. we had the mandatory vaccine policy in social care. that was announced in the autumn and that will now be scrapped, but some social care workers have left. i think the feeling of frustration because it seems to have been rather sprung on health trusts as well as the social care world when so much effort had gone into trying to persuade staff to be vaccinated ahead of the deadline, which would have been on thursday.
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racist, sexist and homophobic messages exchanged between metropolitan police officers — between 2016 and 18 — have been released in a report by the police watchdog. the mayor of london says he is "utterly disgusted". the met says it's "deeply sorry". sal naseem, is the police watchdog's director for london. in total, we carried out nine separate investigations into these teams. we investigated a total of ia police officers. two of them for gross misconduct and a range of other disciplinary sanctions happened for these officers. what we actually uncovered was deeply worrying. we uncovered a culture of bullying, of sexual harassment, of misogyny, racism and a range of discrimination that was prevalent within these teams. and i have to say, our investigations wouldn't possible without the bravery of serving police officers
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coming forward who were victims and were fearful of reprisal, who cooperated with our investigations. it is only because of their courage that the outcomes that we achieved against these officers were possible. what our investigation uncovered was officers bullying other officers within the team, and there was a culture of fear. what we found was that female officers, probationers, officers from diverse and ethnic backgrounds were being bullied. this report is upsetting, it is graphic in nature, but we wanted to expose what canteen culture actually looks like. notjust for the public, but also, equally importantly, for members of the metropolitan police service. so that other officers can see what some of their colleagues have to go through. an inquiry into child sexual abuse, has concluded that police and councils still don't understand the risk of organised gangs grooming children in their areas, and aren't collecting data which would help identify paedophiles.
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the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse says its own inquiries had identified examples of abuse the police should have seen, but were not aware of. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has more. ten, 15 years after this problem of gangs of men praying on often children from difficult backgrounds, giving them drink and drugs over months and abusing them. it is ten or 15 years since the country started to realise this was a problem. but this inquiry looking closely at six particular areas including st helens, durham, bristol, swansea, warwickshire and tower hamlets, concludes these areas are still not dealing with this problem properly. a quote from the report, "none of the police forces or local "authorities in the case study areas had an accurate understanding "of networks sexually exploiting children in their areas." the report says this is an area
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the government wants to be a national priority akin to dealing with terrorism, so i think the report has found serious findings, one in particular is a failure to record racial backgrounds of perpetrators and victims — the report says that is a must. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister tries to rally support from the cabinet — after the damning report into downing street parties. he's arrived in ukraine this afternoon in the last few minutes, to hold talks with the country's president as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level in a decade. thousands of people are still without power, after last weekend's storms battered parts of scotland and north east england. gale force winds brought down trees and power lines, destroying several homes.
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our correspondent, david shanks, has been giving us the latest from angus in north east scotland. this is the main road in and out of the village of edzell in angus. once there was a very thick wood on either side of the road and if you look now, you can see pretty much straight through it. such were the forces of the winds of storm corrie over the weekend. the teams are starting to clear up and make things safer for cars to get through but it was much wider than that, across scotland 9,500 people without power all those days on, thousands more still without broadband as well. we are told by the electricity network ssen that most people without electricity will have supplies restored by tonight but it could go into tomorrow for more rural and isolated areas. david shanks, there. the actress and television personality, whoopi goldberg, has apologised after saying that the holocaust "was not about race".
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speaking on a us talk show ms goldberg said that the holocaust — the murder of 6 millionjews by the nazis who saw themselves as an aryan "master race" — involved "two groups of white people". earlier we spoke to elise preston from cbs who's been following this. whoopi goldberg and her co—hosts were discussing how a tennessee school band the pulitzer prize—winning world war ii era graphic novel maus over concerns over nudity and profane language. at some point in the discussion, goldberg said the holocaust was not about race. she was immediately pushed back by her co—hosts and the controversial remark sparked uproar here in the states. others later, she tweeted, "on today's show i said the holocaust is not about race but about man's inhumanity to man — i should have
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said it was about both." "i think that the holocaust was about the nazis' systematic "annihilation of thejewish people, who they deem that inferior race. "i stand corrected. "thejewish people around the world have always "had my support and that will never waver, i and sorry "for the hurt i have caused." the family of a 21—year—old woman, who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend, is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill who was sentenced to seven and a half years at a young offenders institute. the attorney general has now agreed to review the sentence. rachel stonehouse has this report. this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend, rocco sansome. just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van,
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here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise... it's kind of, there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship, and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 202a. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed. angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse.
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when we think about the context of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked, because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just... ijust feel reluctant to go out. even just in my house, having someone come to check the boiler — erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. rachael stonehouse, bbc news. the first southern koala ever born in europe has entered the world at longleat safari
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park in wiltshire. it's part of a conservation drive, to learn more about the animals, which are under threat. they normally live, of course, in australia. jonah fisher has that story. i have got a little bit of news for you. james, a keeper at longleat safari park, is on a zoom with chris... oh, well, let's hear it! ..a koala expert in southern australia. so, i'd like to introduce you to — obviously, you know violet, one of your lovely adelaide koalas, but she also has a joey. oh, that's fantastic news, james! well done. congratulations, you're an uncle! absolutely brilliant. i know. yeah, it's a little overwhelming. it's been quite a journey to get here. three and a half years ago, violet was a koala pioneer, travelling from chris' park in australia, to start england's only koala colony at longleat. when it was first born, violet's joey was the size of a jelly bean, and spent all of its time in its mother's pouch.
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now, six months on, the park and the koala are going public, and the joey is also starting to snack on more than just milk. so what the little joey is eating is called pap. it's recycled koala poo from violet, which means that it's gone through her, which takes the toxin levels out of the leaf, meaning that it's safe for the joey, but gets it used to the leaves that it will eat in its future life. so there are two subspecies of koala — the northern koala, and what violet is, which is a southern koala, which is a bit bigger and hairier than its northern cousins. oh, look — it'sjust popping out there. they're probably the fussiest animal that we have. keeping the koalas happy so far from home is a major undertaking. if they don't like it, they will let you know very, very quickly. they only eat eucalyptus, some of which is grown specially for them in the grounds at longleat. growling with a new baby koala on site, this male is trying to persuade his partner
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to try for another. growling you don't have to be an expert in koala body language to recognise a polite "no"! jonah fisher, bbc news. bbc3 returns to television schedules today, six years after being being taken off air. it follows the success of shows like fleabag, killing eve and normal people which were shown on iplayer. the channel was moved online in 2016 to save money, but the bbc hopes its return will offer enough to attact younger viewers more used to streaming programmes online. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar.
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blu from drag race and the rest of bbc three are going to have a new broadcast home. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to sa—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary, old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we use, like, disney plus and netflix and amazon prime.
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however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. yeah, poirot. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. around 80% of 16 to sa—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so, six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it?
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david sillito, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, while we've got a bit of sunshine to the north and east of the country at the moment, once again it is another pretty windy day. ok, winds are not as strong as they were through the weekend, but in northern scotland whipping up some pretty rough seas so far today. and it is here where we are seeing gusts of 50—60 mph, maybe a little bit more, to take us through the rest of the day and into the evening. even further south into northern england, we could still see gusts close to gale force. it's this area of low pressure which is going to bring snow across scandinavia, continues to clear away, those winds will ease down later. but it's opening the door to slightly chillier air across the north and east of the country compared with this morning. to the south and west, milder air holds on. dividing line. well, there is not a huge amount of cloud on it, but some patchy light rain and drizzle, particularly across some western areas. northern ireland, through wales, towards central southern england.
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many northern and eastern areas stay clear. a few showers continue, a bit wintry in nature across the north of scotland. and a chillier feel to end the day across the north—east. four in lerwick, six in aberdeen. then, into this evening and overnight, briefly quite chilly across eastern areas to begin with, but then cloud, patchy rain and drizzle starts to work its way eastwards once again, lifting temperatures towards dawn back into double figures. so, for some, a temporary dip and then temperatures rising by the end of the night and into tomorrow. and that's because our weather front is moving back northwards again, dragging in the air all the way from the mid—atlantic. so temperatures are going to be pushing back above normal for this stage of the year as we go through wednesday. here's the dividing line. cloud, patchy rain and drizzle. northern scotland, down through eastern england initially. that pushes eastwards, then we see some good cloud breaks here and there in eastern scotland, parts of eastern wales, into the south. making it feel pretty warm actually for a february day. but still further rain at times into north—west scotland. a mild night will follow to take us into thursday.
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a few spots of light rain or drizzle around initially, but turning wet and windy across scotland and northern ireland later on. some of the rain will be heavy and, watch the temperature difference, 12 in london, nine in aberdeen. other side of our weather front in stornoway, four degrees. colder air is going to push its way back in. as that weather front pushes its way southwards. it may actually bring a bit of rain to southern counties for a change through thursday night into friday, but it opens the door to blustery and chilly conditions for friday. the overnight rain clearing away from the south—east. good sunny spells to some southern and eastern areas. but frequent showers in the north and west, a mixture of rain, hail, sleet and snow. and your temperatures on friday afternoon, mid single figures for some of you.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben boulos. —— ben brown... the headlines... as the prime minister arrives for talks in ukraine, dominic raab dismisses anger from several tories, saying the damning report into downing street parties will force change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said ok, i want to address and fix this. not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that has gone on since. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level, in a decade. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist,
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sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. and, a southern koala, born not in australia, but england, as part of a major conservation drive. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. in the past hour borisjohnson has arrived for talks in ukraine — as mps back at westminster continue to discuss yesterday's report into lockdown parties in downing st. the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, says conservative mps still "overwhelmingly" support boris johnson. but the tory mp andrew mitchell warned the crisis risked "breaking the conservative party.". the labour leader, sir keir starmer,
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has accused borisjohnson, of trying to "save his own skin," and taking the public "for fools" , in his defence of his own actions, in relation to alleged breaches of covid rules. with the latest, here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. leaving behind his political woes at home, borisjohnson headed to immerse himself in a different crisis, the russian threats to ukraine. the prime minister. thank you very much, mr speaker. he is now a prime minister under police investigation. firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended at least three events highlighted by the report into downing street parties. it found there were serious failures of leadership. on the streets of stroud this morning, signs of how damaging the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm afraid, too many people have died, lost their loved ones whilst they were taking liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think, to the conservatives up until now, and it puts a big question mark
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because of everything else that everybody has been through during the pandemic. i'm a little bit disappointed - with the all the things that have gone on at 10 downing street, while the rest of us _ have been in lockdown. but overriding that, i think, i overall, we're going forward. as much as borisjohnson wants to move things on it is clear there is still widespread anger and one important question. one of the events police are looking at happened in his own private downing street flat. he was asked yesterday in parliament, was he at that event? something sir keir starmer highlighted today. the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box and being asked "were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat?" and he said, "i cannot answer that because of the investigation". he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he is taking us forfools. before leaving today, mrjohnson met his cabinet, he has promised to shake up the way he runs things. might his chief whip be one casualty?
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are you sticking around, chief whip? the deputy prime minister, a loyal lieutenant, had earlier been on the airwaves defending him. it is precisely because we take this, and the prime minister takes this so seriously, first of all, that the gray review was commissioned and then published in full, what he has received, and also why it is quite right she has got the prerogative to refer any issues to the the police. but many tories are still reserving judgment of the prime minister, and this former chief whip says he has lost confidence in him. boris is running a modern government like a medieval court. you need to rule and govern through structures, whitehall, cabinet, through the national security council, that is not the way with boris, and many of us thought he would govern in the way he did when he was mayor of london, through being chairman of the board, running a very good team. that is not what has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there remains much unease among
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tory ranks, an ongoing police investigation, the full details of the sue gray report still to be published. more difficult political moments to come. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent helen catt is in parliament. after a difficult day yesterday, helen, the prime minister has arrived in kyiv, in ukraine, for talks with the president there, in an international crisis but very much a political crisis back on that he has left behind.— he has left behind. absolutely. he ma be he has left behind. absolutely. he may be abroad _ he has left behind. absolutely. he may be abroad but _ he has left behind. absolutely. he may be abroad but all _ he has left behind. absolutely. he may be abroad but all the - he has left behind. absolutely. he may be abroad but all the talk - he has left behind. absolutely. he| may be abroad but all the talk here is about what has happened yesterday with that report by sue gray and as you heard in damien's report there, what it hasn't done for a lot of mps is provide that definitive evidence that would enable them to make up their mind one way or the other. she set herself she wasn't able to provide a meaningful report because of the restrictions that had been
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imposed by the met police investigation on the events that they are investigating. she did make some keyjudgments in saying that the failure of leadership and saying some of those events should not have happened, but without the full detail, it seems that a number of mps who have been waiting for that report, it is still not quite enough for them to the balance when we are of the other. some have as you heard in the report and it has pushed in one way but others do seem to be reserving judgment but that does not mean the borisjohnson is out of the woods in any way shape or form, there are certainly a feeling that they will be watching very closely to what he does next and a lot will also depend on what that full reports says and another thing that might have pushed some tory mps into sending him letters and calling for a leadership campaign would have been if there was no commitment to publish the full findings and boris johnson has reassured them they will get an updated version of sue gray's report at some point and that has
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come to some nerves. this report at some point and that has come to some nerves.— report at some point and that has come to some nerves. as well as the full report, — come to some nerves. as well as the full report, whenever _ come to some nerves. as well as the full report, whenever we _ come to some nerves. as well as the full report, whenever we get - come to some nerves. as well as the full report, whenever we get it, - come to some nerves. as well as the full report, whenever we get it, of. full report, whenever we get it, of course the police investigation, they are looking at 12 alleged parties, three allegedly attended by the prime minister himself and the possibility of fines to downing street staff and even the prime minster. , , ., ., ., ., minster. yes, they are, and one of those events _ minster. yes, they are, and one of those events in _ minster. yes, they are, and one of those events in the _ minster. yes, they are, and one of those events in the prime - minster. yes, they are, and one of. those events in the prime minister's flat, in his home, and that investigation will go on. the quick question today is will we ever find out who or anyone is fine? in the met police is that it will not name any individuals who are fined but will provide a total number of fines per gathering and the reasons why they have been dished out. downing street, the number ten spokesman today said he wouldn't speculate on that hypothetical situation about whether or not anyone would be named. labourare whether or not anyone would be named. labour are already saying that the government can't or shouldn't hide the names of anyone who does get this fixed penalty notices and that is if anybody does. helen, thank you very much indeed.
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let's speak now with conservative mp for lichfield, michael fabricant, who has been supportive of the prime minister. thank you very much forjoining us. should we know first of all, if the prime minister is defined by the police, should we be told? l prime minister is defined by the police, should we be told? i think we should and _ police, should we be told? i think we should and people _ police, should we be told? i think we should and people expect - police, should we be told? i think we should and people expect to l police, should we be told? i think - we should and people expect to know that and we will see whether that is going to happen but my view is there should be a degree of evidence of this. fir should be a degree of evidence of this. ., , , , should be a degree of evidence of this. .,, ,, .,, , this. or openness. has there been openness? — this. or openness. has there been openness? he _ this. or openness. has there been openness? he has— this. or openness. has there been openness? he has been _ this. or openness. has there been openness? he has been denied . this. or openness. has there been i openness? he has been denied there was any sort of gatherings that went against the rules.— against the rules. yes, ben, but i think the problem _ against the rules. yes, ben, but i think the problem is _ against the rules. yes, ben, but i think the problem is trying - against the rules. yes, ben, but i think the problem is trying to - think the problem is trying to define when a party as a party and not just define when a party as a party and notjust quiet drinks after work or in between work at the end of a normal working day. is that a party or not? i think that has been a lot of the confusion. the other area of
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confusion as i suspect that the prime minister didn't think at any time that he was breaking the law. why do i say that? these were people who had been working together in a work bubble anyway, so there was no risk of spreading the disease. he might well have thought... the prime minister's wife, was she part of the work bubble? bud minister's wife, was she part of the work bubble?— work bubble? and lulu little? they are all part — work bubble? and lulu little? they are all part of _ work bubble? and lulu little? they are all part of the _ work bubble? and lulu little? they are all part of the same _ work bubble? and lulu little? they are all part of the same bubble, . are all part of the same bubble, aren't they? because of the said yesterday there were some 400 workers in the downing street complex and it is a whole maze of offices and we know that, because we know the way that covid does spread dramatically when boris johnson caught the disease himself and the flat is also very much part of the office space, with people going up and down there constantly. i suspect that it and down there constantly. i suspect thatitis and down there constantly. i suspect that it is speculation to that was going through his mind.- going through his mind. people listenin: going through his mind. people listening to _ going through his mind. people listening to you, _ going through his mind. people listening to you, including - going through his mind. people listening to you, including no . going through his mind. people - listening to you, including no doubt your constituents were furious about
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this, they were just making excuses and when you say these weren't parties, well why were suitcases sent out to stock up on alcohol. why was abba music being played loudly? yes, people are furious and i absolutely understand that. i was locked down in lichfield most of us stuck to the rules as they were. but then i wasn't working in number 10 downing street and i always like to see two points of view. i mean, it's very rarely somebody is completely in the wrong and someone else is completely in right and of course thatis completely in right and of course that is precisely what the metropolitan police are looking at. as far as the suitcases are concerned, i have been doing some fishing around myself and as i understand it, this was a pretty regular thing before covid, both with david cameron, with theresa may and the president prime minister and on friday when the prime minster
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would be away at chequers, 40 miles away or in the constituency. i'm also told, it may not be right, but i have been told by labour in three friends of mine that this used to happen as well in the days of blair and brown. happen as well in the days of blair and idrown-— happen as well in the days of blair and brown. ., ., ~._ and brown. you mention theresa may. you are in the — and brown. you mention theresa may. you are in the commons _ and brown. you mention theresa may. you are in the commons yesterday - and brown. you mention theresa may. you are in the commons yesterday to l you are in the commons yesterday to hear what she had to say and that was that either borisjohnson had not read the rules or he didn't understand what they meant or he didn't think they apply to him. which was it? i certainly don't think he thought these don't apply to me because i am prime minister. i can set laws for others while not buying them myself. i don't think that's what he thought. i think, as i said earlier on, what he might have thought that because it was a work bubble that therefore he was operating within the law. but work bubble that therefore he was operating within the law.— operating within the law. but lots of --eole operating within the law. but lots of people up _ operating within the law. but lots of people up and _ operating within the law. but lots of people up and down _ operating within the law. but lots of people up and down the - operating within the law. but lots| of people up and down the country were at work but they didn't have gatherings of 30 odd people with wine and cheese because they were in the middle of a pandemic. they were told they couldn't do that. yes.
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the middle of a pandemic. they were told they couldn't do that.— told they couldn't do that. yes, but a lot of people _ told they couldn't do that. yes, but a lot of people were _ told they couldn't do that. yes, but a lot of people were told _ told they couldn't do that. yes, but a lot of people were told not - told they couldn't do that. yes, but a lot of people were told not to - a lot of people were told not to turn up to work and that's why i was staying in lichfield and did my work via zoom. but they were key workers. i am not making excuses. it sounds like you are. no, what i'm trying to do is try to explain what was going through the prime minster�*s mind and thatis through the prime minster�*s mind and that is always a complicated thing to do at any time. can that is always a complicated thing to do at any time.— to do at any time. can i ask you arain, to do at any time. can i ask you again, in _ to do at any time. can i ask you again, in the — to do at any time. can i ask you again, in the commons - to do at any time. can i ask you i again, in the commons yesterday, to do at any time. can i ask you - again, in the commons yesterday, the prime minister tried to turn the attack on keir starmer by saying he had failed to prosecutejimmy savile when he was director of public prosecutions. that is not true. why did appointments write something thatis did appointments write something that is absolutely... l did appointments write something that is absolutely. . .— that is absolutely... i thought keir starmer was _ that is absolutely... i thought keir starmer was director _ that is absolutely... i thought keir starmer was director of _ that is absolutely... i thought keir starmer was director of public - starmer was director of public prosecutions.— starmer was director of public prosecutions. , , , ., ., prosecutions. yes, but people around him so that was _ prosecutions. yes, but people around him so that was not _ prosecutions. yes, but people around him so that was not his _ prosecutions. yes, but people around him so that was not his decision - prosecutions. yes, but people around him so that was not his decision at. him so that was not his decision at the time, it was much lower down the chain. ~ , ., the time, it was much lower down the chain. ~ ,., ~ ., �*, ,, chain. well, you know, it's like sa inr chain. well, you know, it's like saying all— chain. well, you know, it's like saying all right. _ chain. well, you know, it's like saying all right, in _ chain. well, you know, it's like saying all right, in that - chain. well, you know, it's like saying all right, in that case i chain. well, you know, it's like. saying all right, in that case why blame borisjohnson if he was 40
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miles away for a party or not party or drinks or not drinks that may or may not have gone on when he wasn't even there? you can't have it both ways. even there? you can't have it both wa s. . ~' even there? you can't have it both wa s. . ~ , ., y even there? you can't have it both was. . , . even there? you can't have it both was. .,~ , . ., even there? you can't have it both was. .,~ , . ways. thank you very much for your time. borisjohnson has arrived in ukraine for talks with the country's president, amid rising concerns over a possible russian invasion. the uk's prime minister promised to work with the president to find a diplomatic solution and "avoid further bloodshed". russia has massed an estimated 100,000 troops, tanks, artillery and missiles near its borders with ukraine. but president vladimir putin denies he is planning an attack. our correspondentjames waterhouse has more. one parliament where borisjohnson could expect a warm welcome. today, ukrainian mps showed their appreciation for western allies. before that, president zelensky announced a new security partnership.
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translation: we are creating a new format of co-operation l in europe between ukraine, britain and poland. "glory to ukraine, glory to heroes," they chant on kyiv�*s independence square. notjust a show of thanks, but patriotism too. european countries help us, showed russia that, no, no, no, we are ready to save ukraine. so a symbol of thanks and appreciation from ukrainians for all the military aid which has come its way, but there's still uncertainty from people on both what is going to happen next and, should there be an invasion, who is going to help with the fight inside the country. there are no plans for nato troops to arrive here, though. when borisjohnson lands in kyiv from downing street, he and volodymyr zelensky are expected to discuss more sanctions for russia if it invades, as well as reinforce
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their commitment to solving this crisis through talks. they play traditional irish music. ok, not something you'd exactly expect to see here. nadia has always been fascinated with irish culture and regularly brings this musical flavour to her home city. so does she feel threatened? i think i do, when i see the news that there might be russian aviation brought into belarus and there's new weapons found in the occupied territories where the pro—russian militia are being armed. it's different, and i'm really worried by that. russia's constantly denied planning an invasion, and says it's still open to talks on its demand nato stops expanding. the us, however, suspects 30,000 more russian troops will arrive in belarus to the north, adding tension to an already tense border. this memorial commemorates the ukrainians who died fighting alongside russians in the second world war.
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the hope here remains, as ever, that they don't further turn on each other. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. news from lincoln crown court. a violent ex—partner who fatally stabbed a mother and her young autistic son in front of a distressed baby before leading police on a 24—hour manhunt has been convicted of their murders.daniel boulton travelled 28 miles on foot from skegness to louth, lincolnshire, in order to kill his former girlfriend bethany vincent and her nine—year—old son darren henson at around 8pm on may 31 last year. boulton tried to claim he was on "autopilot" at the time of the murders, butjurors dismissed his defence of loss of control. the 30—year—old killer admitted manslaughter on the second day of his trial,
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as well as assault with intent to resist arrest, and burglary, but denied murder. boulton, of alexandra road, skegness, will be sentenced at the same court on wednesday. daniel bolton the violent ex partner who fatally stabbed a mother and her young autistic son in front of a baby has been convicted of the murders. convicted at lincoln crown court. the met police says it's "deeply sorry", following a highly critical report into unacceptable behaviour by officers, based at charing cross police station in central london. the independent office for police conduct found evidence of bullying, misogyny, discrimination and sexual harassment, and made 15 recommendations to fix "underlying cultural issues".
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here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford this was an investigation into the charing cross police station in the west end of london. the report has found that there was a bullying culture, and misogynistic culture. this was in the period from 2016 — 2018, but if those messages that are going to grab the headlines. the officers joke about rape, about hitting their girlfriends, one male officer tells a female officer he would happily chloroform her. the use the word gay as an insult, they make derogatory remarks about the black lives matter movement and about mosques and it just goes on and on and on. in the culture of the metropolitan police was already in the spotlight after one of its own officers was convicted of kidnapping and murdering sarah everard and this is only going to increase the scrutiny. the iopc has warned that subsequent investigations have made similar findings are so these are notjust a few bad apples. we have just had a statement from the home secretary on this. she says
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that being a police officer is a privilege which has been abused by these sickening officers. it has been clear for some these sickening officers. it has been clearfor some time these sickening officers. it has been clear for some time that there are problems with the culture of the metropolitan police which is why last year i tasked an inquiry and the police inspectorate with investigating these deeply concerning issues. i expect the metropolitan police and the mayor of london to prevent recommendations to this report as soon as practically possible. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england, are at risk of measles, because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds who've had both doses of the mmr jab, has fallen to it's lowest level for a decade, and is well below the 95% recommended, to stop a resurgence of the disease. i'mjoined by adam finn, professor of paediatrics at bristol medical school and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. we have talked to so much over the
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last couple of years due to covid but this talk about this. and this fall in vaccinations.— but this talk about this. and this fall in vaccinations. what you put down to? good _ fall in vaccinations. what you put down to? good afternoon. - fall in vaccinations. what you put down to? good afternoon. yes, i fall in vaccinations. what you put | down to? good afternoon. yes, it fall in vaccinations. what you put i down to? good afternoon. yes, it is quite a change to talk to but measles rather than covid for once. this is probably a combination of things. everybody�*s lives have been disrupted by covid and inevitably it has disrupted the routine immunisation programme to some degree as well. we have built up a deficit of children who have missed their routine measles immunisation over the last two years. there is good news and bad news here. the good news and bad news here. the good news and bad news here. the good news is it is never too late to get your measles vaccine and get protected. so even if children have missed their vaccine of the normal time, they can have a light and it willjust protect time, they can have a light and it will just protect them time, they can have a light and it willjust protect them equally time, they can have a light and it will just protect them equally well. but the bad news is that if we accumulate enough children without immunities to measles, inevitably we will see importation and outbreaks. and this is a much more serious
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disease for young children than covid. this is when we really do need to keep under control. this talk a bit more _ need to keep under control. this talk a bit more about that two parents who don't may be understand or know about the full applications of measles. or know about the full applications of measles-— or know about the full applications of measles. , . ., , , of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i was — of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i was old _ of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i was old enough _ of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i was old enough to _ of measles. yes, i mean, measles, when i was old enough to actually l when i was old enough to actually have measles and we all got it in my generation and of course, for most children, they make a full recovery, but as many as one in 500 to one in 1000 children can die or get very serious complications, damage to the brain, damage to the eyes, damage to the lungs. the mild cases disguise these much more serious cases which are when measles was prevalent, were much more frequent than meningitis for example, a disease that we all worry about. this is a serious illness in a minority of children and is a very, very infectious virus. ., ., and is a very, very infectious virus. . ., , ., and is a very, very infectious virus. . ., ., virus. can i ask you one quick question _ virus. can i ask you one quick question with _
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virus. can i ask you one quick question with the _ virus. can i ask you one quick l question with the government's u—turn on compulsory vaccination for covid for nhs front line staff? what you think of that decision? first covid for nhs front line staff? what you think of that decision?- you think of that decision? first i would like _ you think of that decision? first i would like to _ you think of that decision? first i would like to say _ you think of that decision? first i would like to say i _ you think of that decision? first i would like to say i am _ you think of that decision? first i would like to say i am on - you think of that decision? first i would like to say i am on nhs . you think of that decision? first i l would like to say i am on nhs staff member and i've had my vaccine anything is the logical and sensible thing to do, but i never really supported the idea of doing this by making it compulsory. the uk has not needed to make vaccines compulsory to have successful programmes over the past decades and i think it would be a sad departure if we went down that road. we have enormous public support, enormous support within the professions for vaccination to protect staff and to protect patients and the way to win, if you like, and to get everybody�*s hearts and minds behind immunisation is by providing information, answering questions and bringing people on board, rather than compelling them. in addition, i think this is going to avoid a
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crisis that was looming in april where we would have had a significant staffing problems if this had gone forward. all in all, i think is very good news.— this had gone forward. all in all, i think is very good news. thank you and rood think is very good news. thank you and good to _ think is very good news. thank you and good to talk— think is very good news. thank you and good to talk to _ think is very good news. thank you and good to talk to you. _ an inquiry into child sexual abuse, has concluded that police and councils still don't understand the risk of organised gangs grooming children in their areas, and aren't collecting data which would help identify paedophiles. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse, says its own inquiries had identified examples of abuse the police should have been, but were not aware of. with me now is michael sheath from the lucy faithfull foundation who specialise in tackling child sexual abuse. thank you very much for being with us. what is the problem here? what other place really seeing? l us. what is the problem here? what other place really seeing?— other place really seeing? i think there is a question _ other place really seeing? i think there is a question of _ other place really seeing? i think| there is a question of recognition. i would say first of all and most sexual abuse occurs within the family context so in terms of child
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sexual exploitation, as we understand that model, and there are various models, we are dealing with a minority of the actual activities. i think the problem is there's a sense of deja vu here as we have heard about this before and we have heard about this before and we have heard about this before and we have heard about failure to deal with it before. i think the tendency here over time to blame the victims, to ascribe qualities or failures to the victims in respect of their qualities, their behaviour, the personalities and so forth and not to think about what it is that is driving the crime, which is choices made by perpetrators and most of those perpetrators are men. i think there are vague definitions. i think there are vague definitions. i think there are vague definitions. i think there are sometimes a struggle to take on the issue, even though quite a lot of mechanisms are available to prevent the crime. bud a lot of mechanisms are available to prevent the crime.— prevent the crime. and the inquiry secificall prevent the crime. and the inquiry specifically is _ prevent the crime. and the inquiry specifically is talking _ prevent the crime. and the inquiry specifically is talking about - prevent the crime. and the inquiry specifically is talking about police | specifically is talking about police and councils not understanding the risk of organised gangs. i mean, who are these gangs? what are they
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doing? tell us more about them. thea;r doing? tell us more about them. they are usually loose _ doing? tell us more about them. tt2 are usually loose coalitions doing? tell us more about them. tu21: are usually loose coalitions of individual men who approached children that they find to be vulnerable, exploit them using sometimes drugs, sometimes cash, sometimes drugs, sometimes cash, sometimes i need for affection and sometimes i need for affection and so forth and then draw them in to a relationship of sorts, clearly an exploitative relationship and when children try to escape from those relationships these menus violence, they use violence against the families. they are not beyond intimidation of parents or intimidation of parents or intimidation of parents or intimidation of the children. and it is all driven by sex and driven by power. in terms of prevention, which is my organisation's interest, i think the police have various tools available to them to injunctive individual men, to prevent men from
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engaging with the children and injunctions against premises where children sometimes gather and are therefore and thereafter exploited. that seems to be the main issue for me that we can prevent these behaviours if we try harder and there are huge issues for resources for the police and resources for local authorities that they currently lack but also issues around training. and also i think issues around attitude and i think the kind of attitude that people take towards these children and it is often unhelpful, that they are seen as having agency or being able to make choices at this idea of children making bad choices. i think it is particularly toxic and unhelpful and we need to concentrate on where the culpability comes from and frankly it is behaviour of men. good to talk to you. the foundation
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specialises in tackling child sexual abuse. many thanks for your time. the former health secretary, jeremy hunt, has criticised the government's decision to drop mandatory covid vaccinations, for health and social care workers in england. mr hunt, who chairs the health and social care committe, says people had been marched to the top of the hill ,before the u—turn, making it harder to win the argument next time round. our health editor, hugh pym has been telling us more. it isa it is a significant intervention because not only is he a former health secretary but a select committee chair and he has come up with this criticism only 24 hours after the government announced its new policy on mandatory vaccinations for the nhs. mr hunt acknowledges that workforce is an issue and worries about nhs staff are leaving because they didn't want to be vaccinated at a time when the service was under extreme pressure but he said there was a longer term issue. right now, he fixed a
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decision made sense at the wrong signals and he explained to me in an interview earlier today. t signals and he explained to me in an interview earlier today.— interview earlier today. i think from a patient _ interview earlier today. i think from a patient safety - interview earlier today. i think from a patient safety point - interview earlier today. i think from a patient safety point of| interview earlier today. i think - from a patient safety point of view it's really— from a patient safety point of view it's really disappointing that we won the — it's really disappointing that we won the argument about the need for staff and _ won the argument about the need for staff and there is a medical exemption to adding that was widely supported across but the health and care systems _ across but the health and care systems. but having marched people of the _ systems. but having marched people of the top _ systems. but having marched people of the top of the hill, there is now u-turn_ of the top of the hill, there is now u—turn which means that the next time _ u—turn which means that the next time we _ u—turn which means that the next time we have a big debate, perhaps for a flu _ time we have a big debate, perhaps for a flu vaccine in this winter, it's going _ for a flu vaccine in this winter, it's going to be much harder to win that argument. the it's going to be much harder to win that argument.— it's going to be much harder to win that argument. the health secretary said in his announcement _ that argument. the health secretary said in his announcement yesterday | said in his announcement yesterday that one of the reasons for the change of plan was the omicron variant was less severe than delta had been last autumn and the policy was first announced. more people have been vaccinated and there was a workforce issue and they would be put out to consultation, although it seems pretty likely that the government wants to go ahead and
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stop although some health staff are pleased, as they would otherwise have lost their jobs, pleased, as they would otherwise have lost theirjobs, and the royal colleges as well, some health and social care leaders are privately frustrated. of course, there has been a u—turn for social care in england as well, and the mandatory vaccination policy was announced in the autumn and that is now going to be scrapped and some social care workers have left. i think the feeling is frustration because it seems to have been rather sprung on health trusts is well as the social care world when so much effort had gone into trying to persuade staff to get vaccinated ahead of the deadline, which would have been on thursday. deadline, which would have been on thursda . , ., deadline, which would have been on thursda . , . ., ., thursday. hugh pym are health editor there. hello. a little bit of sunshine at times, the north and east through the day, but it's another blustery day and there, especially for scotland. gale force winds, may be in excess of 50—60 miles an hour to the far north of scotland, ripping up some rough seas and feel in that wind as well,
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temperatures in lerwick for degrees, aberdeen six celsius as we head into the evening. milder elsewhere, the best of sunshine as we have said is in the eastern areas but patchy drizzle in south—west wales and northern ireland and that is a weather front which will push its way back eastwards tonight bringing more of that milder air back in. rain at times of scotland, northern and eastern england especially, temperatures here for some in double figures, but are chillier but brighter and breezy start with a few showers for the north east of scotland. now a weather front will stretch from northern scotland down to eastern england initially with outbreaks of rain and drizzle. that starts to move away. good cloud breaks with some sunshine for wales and southern england and to the east of scotland for a while. there will still be some further rain for western scotland, the odd spot of drizzle in the west, but what you will notice is it's going to feel milder as a day goes on, which will lead us to pretty mild night, too. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines:
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as borisjohnson arrives for talks in ukraine, the deputy prime minister dismisses anger from several tories and says the report into downing street parties will bring change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said ok, i want to address and fix this. not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that has gone on since. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level in a decade. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog.
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and, a southern koala, born not in australia, but england, as part of a major conservation drive. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we start with the breaking news in the last hour, that tom brady, one of the greatest players in nfl history, has confirmed his retirement at the age of 44. the tampa bay buccaneers quarterback has won seven super bowls in an astonishing career spanning 22 seasons. brady won six titles with the new england patriots before his final triumph with the buccaneers last year. in a lengthy statement he said... golf's saudi arabian—funded asian tour will stage its first event in england this year.
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the centurion club in hertfordshire is set to host the £1.5 million tournament from the 9th to 12thjune — one of 10 international events. the asian tour season starts on thursday. the tour recently revealed it'd been boosted by a £148 million investment from the saudi arabia government's private investment fund — that funding has been increased by a further £75 million. and we're just a few days away from the start of the beijing winter olympics. one of those competing for britain, with high hopes for a medal, is snowboarder charlotte bankes. after nearly giving up on the sport a few years back — she could be among those toasting success this month. laura scott has been to meet her. think bmx on snow, and you get pretty close to the adrenaline fuelled olympic sport of snowboard cross. this is a lap of honour... 0h! drama! favourites haven't always fared so well in this most unpredictable event, but great britain's charlotte bankes is leading the pack
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going into beijing. what are your hopes in beijing? be at my top game. i think that was the main goal i've got, and it'sjust being able to ride at the level i'm riding at in training, and hopefully it all goes well and i can put that on a good race. i mean, it's boarder cross, so everything can happen and some things are out of our control. with each rider trying to find the best line down a course ofjumps... 0h! ..bumps.. oh, no, gone! ..and tight turns... 0h, they've all gone! ..high—speed crashes aren't unusual, making it nail—biting viewing for her family. it's always a little bit scary to watch. i know, like, my parents can't eat or drink anything whilst they're watching. they're extremely tense. they'll be hiding behind the sofa at the same time. bankes knows the risks of snowboarding only too well, having fractured her pelvis in her very first season racing internationally.
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i lost a bit of the love that i've got for snowboarding, because i wasn't able to actually snowboard without any pain, and it was a pretty tough time, yeah. it is still there, it niggles a bit, but it's nothing like it used to be and i'm able to do proper training on the snow, and that's really nice. charlotte bankes is so fast through here. born in hemel hempstead, bankes has twice competed at the winter olympics, finishing 17th in 2014 and seventh four years later. but look at the flag — both times she was representing france. in 2018 she defected to join the british setup and hasn't looked back since, clinching four world cup wins and a world championship title under the british flag. why did you make the change? it works really well for me. the athlete comes first and that's really nice. i'd always had that in the back of my mind, to compete for great britain. if we can come back with a medal from the olympics it would be good. i was at the point of giving up
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when i made that switch, and i didn't think anybody actually believed i could make it. few would doubt she can make it now. after all, bankes knows what it takes to be on top of the world. laura scott, bbc news. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. official figures show millions of people have been experiencing rising food and energy bills — with further price rises still to come. the office for national statistics found two thirds of adults surveyed said their cost of living had already increased in the past month, and some are cutting back on gas and electricity. angie clemson lives in a two—bed bungalow in sheffield and has felt the impact of rising energy prices. she is a former green party candidate but no longer is a member of any politcal party. thanks forjoining us. in terms of the cost of living crisis, we talk about this a lot, but what does it
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mean to you personally? the squeeze is well and truly _ mean to you personally? the squeeze is well and truly on, _ mean to you personally? the squeeze is well and truly on, let's _ mean to you personally? the squeeze is well and truly on, let's put - mean to you personally? the squeeze is well and truly on, let's put it - is well and truly on, let's put it this way. energy prices have skyrocketed. the quote when we had when we came to the end of our tariff, the energy bill, the dual energy bill went from £162 per month to £340 per month, and we said, let's shop around. we phoned up a week later and it was £460 per month. but we had to do was go on to a variable rate tariff which brings it down to about £160 per month but with that you have got the insecurity of a flexible rate which means that in april if we have a 50%
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increase it will still go up to over £300 per month. everything is increasing in price. i have got my own business. the materials have increased a colossal amount. people are cancelling work. the squeeze is well and truly on. you are cancelling work. the squeeze is well and truly on.— well and truly on. you are noticing the hirh well and truly on. you are noticing the high inflation _ well and truly on. you are noticing the high inflation rate _ well and truly on. you are noticing the high inflation rate in _ well and truly on. you are noticing the high inflation rate in the - well and truly on. you are noticing j the high inflation rate in the shops as well? ,, ~' g ., as well? shocking. my wife and m self, as well? shocking. my wife and myself, we _ as well? shocking. my wife and myself, we don't _ as well? shocking. my wife and myself, we don't eat _ as well? shocking. my wife and myself, we don't eat dairy - as well? shocking. my wife and myself, we don't eat dairy and | as well? shocking. my wife and - myself, we don't eat dairy and food and drink. we are very much on the lower income scale, universal credit, and my wife has been a teacher now for over 30 years, she is at the top of her pay scale, and i've got my own business, but if you
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are on benefits, on universal credit, and your income is £500 per month for two people, how on earth are people going to manage? if you are people going to manage? if you are a single person at the age of 25, and you live on your own, your universal credit is something like £257 per month but what if you are a pensioner? living on your own? what if you have got a family and you are on benefits and you are at home all day and having to have the heating on? people are really going to suffer, they really are. tt on? people are really going to suffer, they really are. if people are rroin suffer, they really are. if people are going to _ suffer, they really are. if people are going to suffer _ are going to suffer disproportionately as you say, the poorer members of the community suffering more, watch of the government do in your view to help the most vulnerable? —— what should the most vulnerable? —— what should the government do. the the most vulnerable? -- what should the government do.— the government do. the first thing the government do. the first thing the can the government do. the first thing they can do _ the government do. the first thing they can do is _ the government do. the first thing they can do is stick _ the government do. the first thing they can do is stick to _
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the government do. the first thing they can do is stick to their - they can do is stick to their promises before brexit, cutting vat on fuel bills, that transpires to be a lie. a lot of issues around brexit. a good living wage for people, encourage people into work, yes, but encourage people into work where they haven't gotjob insecurity. where they haven't got 'ob uncured where they haven't got 'ob insecuri . ., ., ,, ., insecurity. good to talk to you. thanks for _ insecurity. good to talk to you. thanks forjoining _ insecurity. good to talk to you. thanks forjoining us. - the actress and television personality, whoopi goldberg, has apologised after saying that the holocaust "was not about race". speaking on a us talk show ms goldberg said that the holocaust — the murder of 6 millionjews by the nazis who saw themselves as an aryan "master race" — involved "two groups of white people". earlier we spoke to elise preston from cbs who's
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been following this. whoopi goldberg and her co—hosts were discussing how a tennessee school banned the pulitzer prize—winning world war ii era graphic novel maus over concerns over nudity and profane language. at some point in the discussion, goldberg said the holocaust was not about race. she was immediately pushed back by her co—hosts and the controversial remark sparked uproar here in the states. hours later, she tweeted, "on today's show i said "the holocaust is not about race but about man's inhumanity "to man — i should have said it was about both." adding that "the holocaust was about the nazis' systematic "annihilation of thejewish people, who they deem that inferior race. "i stand corrected. "thejewish people around the world have always "had my support and that will never waver, i am sorry "for the hurt i have caused." joining me now is
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jonathan sacerdoti, journalist, broadcaster and campaigner against anti—semitism. what did you make of these remarks? quite extraordinary to think that somebody is given a platform on such a mainstream american television show, to come out with such absolute nonsense. it is basically racist to say such a thing and for the programme to use that platform in order to provide misinformation and mission education is also outrageous and it is worth reminding ourselves because clearly do not know anything about the holocaust, that in 1935 the nazi regime introduced to laws, the nazi regime introduced to laws, the citizenship law and the law for the citizenship law and the law for the protection of german blood and german honour and these so called nuremberg laws were there to put in place the ideas of race into law. it is like a dictionary definition of racism, the nazis thought the
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germans were of the aryan race and jews were inferior and they had set citizenship stripped giving them no political rights and they could not be full citizens of germany at the german blood law prohibited what the nazis thought of mixed race marriage, it banned that between jews and people of german blood, and so i think there is no more pertinent example of textbook racism than what the nazis did to 6 million dues who they killed during the holocaust. —— 6 millionjews. although she has apologised this was not a one—off remark and she said it is not about race and the co—host of the programme then said, the nazis said thejews were a different race but she said it is not about race, it is about man's in humanity to other men. the other co—host said it
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is about white supremacy and then she said, you are missing the point, the minute you turn it into race it goes down this alley, let's talk about it for what it is, it is about how people treat each other, but she has now apologised. tt how people treat each other, but she has now apologised.— how people treat each other, but she has now apologised. it was about two rrou is has now apologised. it was about two irou is of has now apologised. it was about two groups of white _ has now apologised. it was about two groups of white people _ has now apologised. it was about two groups of white people she _ has now apologised. it was about two groups of white people she said - has now apologised. it was about two groups of white people she said thatl groups of white people she said that reveals what the problem is with her understanding and flimsy understanding and flimsy understanding of racism. she seems to think that racism only occurs to prejudice and judgment about other people based on the colour of their skin when actually racism is far more than that. the current fashionable definition of racism that she is touting may be is the ideal it can only be something against black people and people of colour, but that is obviously ridiculous and the holocaust is a perfect example of why it is ridiculous, it doesn't stand up to scrutiny. simply put, it is not even about a group of people who are more
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fortunate or powerful, persecuting a group who are below them or poorer, as is also the case in much of this millennial woke thinking because if we look at what happened in the holocaust we see thatjews who were integrated into german society, jews who were academics and politicians, who were academics and politicians, who were academics and politicians, who were just as integrated into german society as anybody else, very quickly they became the persecuted minority group based on their race, the nazis were clear it was based on race, and this needed you to have a jewish grandparents for you to be deemed impure, it was not about your culture, but purely passed down as they saw it through genetics effectively. i think that whoopi goldberg needs to do more, and this apology, she went on the late show and she said this was about skin colour, but it is not about skin colour. jews were the victims of this terrible mass industrialised murder during the holocaust, and she
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needs to be much better, and they should really dedicate time in the actual programme to some proper serious holocaust education because thatis serious holocaust education because that is really what is needed to counter this idiocy and ignorance that she put on display. jonathan, thank ou that she put on display. jonathan, thank you so _ that she put on display. jonathan, thank you so much. _ that she put on display. jonathan, thank you so much. good - that she put on display. jonathan, thank you so much. good to - that she put on display. jonathan, thank you so much. good to have | that she put on display. jonathan, . thank you so much. good to have you on the programme on bbc news. thanks forjoining us. we have some breaking news. the driver who mowed down leon mccaskre in his car after mccaskre stabbed his ex—partner yasmin chkaifi to death in the street in maida vale, west london, last week has been released with no further action, the metropolitan police said. so the driver who came to her aid by
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mowing down herformer partner, is not going to face any further action and has now been released without any further action. the headlines on bbc news... as borisjohnson arrives for talks in ukraine, the deputy prime minister dismisses anger from several tories and says the report into downing street parties will bring change. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level, in a decade. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. thousands of people are still without power, after last weekend's storms battered parts of scotland and north east england. gale force winds brought down trees and power lines, destroying several homes. our correspondent, david shanks,
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has been giving us the latest from angus in north east scotland. this is the main road in and out of the village of edzell in angus. once there was a very thick wood on either side of the road and if you look now, you can see pretty much straight through it. such were the forces of the winds of storm corrie over the weekend. the teams are starting to clear up and make things safer for cars to get through but it was much wider than that, across scotland 9,500 people are without power all those days on, thousands more still without broadband as well. we're told by the electricity network ssen that most people without electricity will have supplies restored by tonight but it could go into tomorrow for more rural and isolated areas. bbc 3 returns to television schedules today, six years after being being taken off air. it follows the success of shows like fleabag, killing eve and normal people
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which were shown on iplayer. the channel was moved online in 2016 to save money, but the bbc hopes its return will offer enough to attact younger viewers more used to streaming programmes online. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest of bbc three are going to have a new broadcast home. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed
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down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to 34—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary, old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we use, like, disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. yeah, poirot. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. around 80% of 16 to 34—year—olds do still use the bbc every week,
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but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. tv or lots of laptops. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so, six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. let's talk to levi jevalle, one of the presenters of �*the catch up, bbc three's brand new weeknight news bulletin which debuts tonight. what is the idea of the programme?
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it is a weekday bulletin, and it's targeted at 16—24 —year—olds which is the target audience for bbc three in genoa we are hoping to attract people that don't watch traditional news —— and we are hoping to attract people. people who might have got their news from social media, hoping to target those people, and people who feel like they want stuff explained in a different way. tell us some of the stories you'll be covering tonight? we have the famous sue gray report and we have a bit on ukraine and also stuff on the chinese new year and we are hoping to explain more complex stories like ukraine in eight more simplistic and young friendly way. —— in a more. teiiii eight more simplistic and young friendly way. -- in a more. tell us more about— friendly way. -- in a more. tell us more about bbc— friendly way. -- in a more. tell us more about bbc three _ friendly way. -- in a more. tell us more about bbc three generally l friendly way. -- in a more. tell us i more about bbc three generally and you are one of the flagship programmes on it, it is back on the tv tonight, and it was online for the last couple of years, but what kind of channel is it? tt is
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the last couple of years, but what kind of channel is it?— kind of channel is it? it is a channel — kind of channel is it? it is a channel that _ kind of channel is it? it is a channel that a _ kind of channel is it? it is a channel that a lot - kind of channel is it? it is a channel that a lot of - kind of channel is it? it is a channel that a lot of us - kind of channel is it? it is a l channel that a lot of us have kind of channel is it? it is a - channel that a lot of us have grown up channel that a lot of us have grown up with and i was 21 and i was not allowed to watch it when i was younger but i used to watch it anyway. there were so many good shows on it, like gavin and stacey, but there are not many options for young people, that is how young people feel, so i hope that is what bbc three will bring back. tt people feel, so i hope that is what bbc three will bring back.- bbc three will bring back. it has created some _ bbc three will bring back. it has created some great _ bbc three will bring back. it has created some great shows - bbc three will bring back. it has created some great shows like l created some great shows like fleabag and killing eve.- created some great shows like fleabag and killing eve. some of that will be _ fleabag and killing eve. some of that will be back _ fleabag and killing eve. some of that will be back on _ fleabag and killing eve. some of that will be back on the - fleabag and killing eve. some of that will be back on the channel. | that will be back on the channel. others which have done well online are going to be back on the channel. drag race, for example. tt is drag race, for example. it is important — drag race, for example. it is important for _ drag race, for example. it is important for the _ drag race, for example. it is important for the bbc - drag race, for example. it is important for the bbc to - drag race, for example. it is important for the bbc to attract some of those younger viewers who may be going astray.— may be going astray. hundred ercent. may be going astray. hundred percent. definitely _ may be going astray. hundred percent. definitely important. j percent. definitely important. younger people, some people don't really watch traditional tv, they
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watch more netflix and that kind of stuff but hopefully this will bring people back. stuff but hopefully this will bring people back-— stuff but hopefully this will bring --eole back. ~ , , ., ., people back. when is the show on? 755. that people back. when is the show on? 755- that is — people back. when is the show on? 755. that is monday _ people back. when is the show on? 755. that is monday to _ people back. when is the show on? 755. that is monday to friday - people back. when is the show on? 755. that is monday to friday every | 755. that is monday to friday every week? the — 755. that is monday to friday every week? the time _ 755. that is monday to friday every week? the time slightly _ 755. that is monday to friday every week? the time slightly changes i 755. that is monday to friday every | week? the time slightly changes but usually after — week? the time slightly changes but usually after 7pm. _ week? the time slightly changes but usually after 7pm. it _ week? the time slightly changes but usually after 7pm. it is _ week? the time slightly changes but usually after 7pm. it is news - week? the time slightly changes but usually after 7pm. it is news in - usually after 7pm. it is news in under five usually after 7pm. it is news in underfive minutes. mt usually after 7pm. it is news in under five minutes.— usually after 7pm. it is news in under five minutes. all you need to know in under— under five minutes. all you need to know in under five _ under five minutes. all you need to know in under five minutes. - under five minutes. all you need to know in under five minutes. yes. i under five minutes. all you need to i know in under five minutes. yes. and it takes us know in under five minutes. 123 and it takes us 24—hour is everyday to tell the same news! good luck with the programme. tell the same news! good luck with the programme-— now you know how much we love a cute animal here on breakfast and we've got a treat for you. this is is the first southern koala to be born in europe — he was born in longleat safari park. six months ago he was the size of a jelly bean but now he's started venturing out of the pouch and he likes nothing more
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than chomping on eucalyptus and hanging out with his mum, violet. the new york times has bought the popular word game �*wordle' for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play — for the time being. we can now see the latest pictures of borisjohnson, the prime minister, with the ukrainian president, president zelensky. they are talking about the threat of a russian invasion, of course. these are dark days for ukraine and they are dark days for ukraine and they are inside the presidential palace and we are expecting a news conference in about one hour. boris
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johnson leaving behind his political troubles, like the sue gray report, and claims of parties and breaches of covid rules and regulations inside downing street and he is now on the international stage with the ukrainian president. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, while we've got a bit of sunshine to the north and east of the country at the moment, once again it is another pretty windy day. ok, winds are not as strong as they were through the weekend, but in northern scotland whipping up some pretty rough seas so far today. and it is here where we are seeing gusts of 50—60 mph, maybe a little bit more, to take us through the rest of the day and into the evening. even further south into northern england, we could still see gusts close to gale force. it's this area of low pressure which is going to bring snow across scandinavia, continues to clear away, those winds will ease down later. but it's opening the door to slightly chillier air across the north and east of the country compared with this morning.
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to the south and west, milder air holds on. dividing line. well, there is not a huge amount of cloud on it, but some patchy light rain and drizzle, particularly across some western areas. northern ireland, through wales, towards central southern england. many northern and eastern areas stay clear. a few showers continue, a bit wintry in nature across the north of scotland. and a chillier feel to end the day across the north—east. four in lerwick, six in aberdeen. then, into this evening and overnight, briefly quite chilly across eastern areas to begin with, but then cloud, patchy rain and drizzle starts to work its way eastwards once again, lifting temperatures towards dawn back into double figures. so, for some, a temporary dip and then temperatures rising by the end of the night and into tomorrow. and that's because our weather front is moving back northwards again, dragging in the air all the way from the mid—atlantic. so temperatures are going to be pushing back above normal for this stage of the year as we go through wednesday. here's the dividing line. cloud, patchy rain and drizzle. northern scotland, down through eastern england initially. that pushes eastwards, then we see some good cloud breaks here and there in eastern scotland, parts of eastern wales, into the south. making it feel pretty warm actually for a february day.
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but still further rain at times into north—west scotland. a mild night will follow to take us into thursday. a few spots of light rain or drizzle around initially, but turning wet and windy across scotland and northern ireland later on. some of the rain will be heavy and, watch the temperature difference, 12 in london, nine in aberdeen. other side of our weather front in stornoway, four degrees. colder air is going to push its way back in. as that weather front pushes its way southwards. it may actually bring a bit of rain to southern counties for a change through thursday night into friday, but it opens the door to blustery and chilly conditions for friday. the overnight rain clearing away from the south—east. good sunny spells to some southern and eastern areas. but frequent showers in the north and west, a mixture of rain, hail, sleet and snow. and your temperatures on friday afternoon, mid single figures for some of you.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 4pm. borisjohnson is in ukraine, holding talks with the country's president — as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. we'll bring you a live news conference from the two leaders in kyiv in the next hour. in the fallout of sue gray's initial findings, the deputy pm dismisses anger from several tories and says the report will bring change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said ok, i want to address and fix this. not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up
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that has gone on since. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level, in a decade. and, a southern koala, born not in australia, but england, as part of a major conservation drive. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister is in ukraine, where he is meeting president, volodymyr zelensky.
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the uk has offered kyiv £88 million in aid, and continued to warn russia against invading. here they are — borisjohnson and ukraine's president zelensky met a short while ago here in the mariinsky palace in kyiv. the uk has promised to work with ukraine to find a diplomatic solution and to "avoid further bloodshed". russia has massed an estimated 100,000 troops, tanks, artillery and missiles near its borders with ukraine. but president vladimir putin denies he is planning an attack. our correspondentjames waterhouse has more. one parliament where borisjohnson could expect a warm welcome. today, ukrainian mps showed their appreciation for western allies. before that, president zelensky announced a new security partnership.
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translation: we are creating a new format of co-operation l in europe between ukraine, britain and poland. "glory to ukraine, glory to heroes," they chant on kyiv�*s independence square. notjust a show of thanks, but patriotism too. european countries help us, showed russia that, no, no, no, we are ready to save ukraine. so a symbol of thanks and appreciation from ukrainians for all the military aid which has come its way, but there's still uncertainty from people on both what is going to happen next and, should there be an invasion, who is going to help with the fight inside the country. there are no plans for nato troops to arrive here, though. when borisjohnson lands in kyiv from downing street, he and volodymyr zelensky are expected to discuss more sanctions for russia if it invades, as well as reinforce
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their commitment to solving this crisis through talks. they play traditional irish music. ok, not something you'd exactly expect to see here. nadia has always been fascinated with irish culture and regularly brings this musical flavour to her home city. so does she feel threatened? i think i do, when i see the news that there might be russian aviation brought into belarus and there's new weapons found in the occupied territories where the pro—russian militia are being armed. it's different, and i'm really worried by that. russia's constantly denied planning an invasion, and says it's still open to talks on its demand nato stops expanding. the us, however, suspects 30,000 more russian troops will arrive in belarus to the north, adding tension to an already tense border. this memorial commemorates the ukrainians who died fighting alongside russians in the second world war.
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the hope here remains, as ever, that they don't further turn on each other. james waterhouse, bbc news, in kyiv. let's bring you up—to—date on the latest diplomatic efforts to avoid a russian invasion in the us secretary of state has been talking to the russian foreign minister and urged immediate russian de—escalation and withdrawal of troops and equipment from ukraine's borders. anthony brink and emphasising america's willingness to an expansive exchange with russia and excusejersey concerns. security concerns... the talking continues and i have boris johnson in kyiv. what other ukrainians going to be looking for from britain in particular in the middle this crisis? t
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from britain in particular in the middle this crisis?— from britain in particular in the middle this crisis? i think more on to- of the middle this crisis? i think more on top of the uk _ middle this crisis? i think more on top of the uk has _ middle this crisis? i think more on top of the uk has already - middle this crisis? i think more on top of the uk has already given, i top of the uk has already given, military training, more lethal weapons, the uk is held in very high regard, especially this week, and i think president zelensky is keen to put on a charm offensive, but it looks like borisjohnson may be looking to do the same. he arrived wearing a green tie, that as president zelensky�*s surname which is a play on green and is also his party's official colour. some mutual respect going on there in the meeting is good to last around an hour ahead of a press conference. in it we expect them to discuss this continued promise to continue talks as well as discussing new sanctions on president putin and russia as a whole, along with this £88 million package already promised by the uk government to help ukrainian ministers deal with corruption and become less reliable and reliant on russia for energy. the tone is very
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much friendly here and as you say, this call, this half hour call between the us secretary of state and his russian counterpart, the us has seems to become repeating what are you occurring government are saying that if you are serious about peace, pull yourtroops saying that if you are serious about peace, pull your troops away from the border, stop these exercises and less engage in dialogue but we have to hear yet on moscow of us might take.~ . to hear yet on moscow of us might take. ~ ., , to hear yet on moscow of us might take. ~ . , ., ., , ., take. what is the mood in kyiv and ukraine as — take. what is the mood in kyiv and ukraine as a _ take. what is the mood in kyiv and ukraine as a whole? _ take. what is the mood in kyiv and ukraine as a whole? the _ take. what is the mood in kyiv and ukraine as a whole? the whole - take. what is the mood in kyiv and i ukraine as a whole? the whole world is sort of talking about the likelihood, even the probability of a russian invasion. does it feel like you're about to be invaded there? , ., . , like you're about to be invaded there? , ., ., , , ., there? the short answer is no. peole there? the short answer is no. people still — there? the short answer is no. people still go _ there? the short answer is no. people still go to _ there? the short answer is no. people still go to work, - there? the short answer is no. people still go to work, the - there? the short answer is no. i people still go to work, the traffic can occasionally be chaotic in the case of kyiv, and yes, the economy are starting to be found, we have heard reports of investors being nervous because of this turmoil but the best way to sum it up is you hear all of these news reports which we know ukrainians have grown tired
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of and exhausted by of potential invasion. ukrainians have had to live with russian aggression for eight years now since the crimea war and thousands have died in long term fighting in the east. but what i think this week has shown that the language of a politician and world leaders and superpowers intensifies, at some point that does start to affect people's day—to—day lives on the ground. so yes, it will be seen as a positive that both in moscow previous today's phone call it says it is still open for talks to continue, the us is also open to that and borisjohnson, we understand, could have a call with president putin either today or tomorrow and as long as continue talks that might be seen as ukrainians for buying more time. but we have discontinued russian exercises to the north of belarus, a three hourjourney exercises to the north of belarus, a three hour journey from exercises to the north of belarus, a three hourjourney from the capital, we have this continued movement of
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troops along the border in the east and south and coming up to the north which russia has long said it is a sovereign right to do so. we have more nato members promising troop deployment enabling member states of the volume is being turned up on all sides and that is getting harder to ignore. sides and that is getting harder to irnore. �* , , , ., ignore. briefly, the russian military build-up _ ignore. briefly, the russian| military build-up continues, ignore. briefly, the russian . military build-up continues, so ignore. briefly, the russian - military build-up continues, so does military build—up continues, so does the ukrainian build—up. we have british anti—tank missiles. ukrainians want more military help? essentially yes. you make a good point there because up until now, president zelensky has very much taken a diplomatic tone. this morning he signed an order promising to increase the size of his armed forces by 100,000 years and to do that he is going to rely on more foreign aid and investment, not only that, he to end conscription which is currently in place for men and he wants to end that within three years as well and increase in basic pay
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for soldiers. we are now starting to hear a bit more of a military strategy from ukraine, alongside this potential alliance between ukraine, poland and the uk to counter what it calls russian aggression, although the foreign minister has tried to put the brakes on that because alyssa trust has not been able to make this trip due to covid, but all of these new alliances are continually being formed as ukraine tries to take a longer view with all the tension building the shorter term. thank you for talkinr building the shorter term. thank you for talking to — building the shorter term. thank you for talking to us. _ well, the prime minister's trip comes as the commons foreign affairs committee launches a new inquiry into the "dirty money" associated with corruption. its chairman and conservative tom tugendhat said "the uk is in a unique position to act against threats" and that the government had "done little to address these dangers". on monday, the foreign secretary announced plans for new powers to sanction individuals and businesses linked to the russian state. liz truss said those
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sharing responsibility for the kremlin's "aggressive, destabilising action" could have their assets in the uk frozen. let's speak to tom keatinge, from the royal united services institute, a nonpartisan think—tank specialising in defence and security. he's director of centre for financial crime and security studies. to what extent to think there is so much russian money, dirty money in the uk that it is very hard for britain to impose meaningful sanctions on russian regime? that is ossibl sanctions on russian regime? that is possibly the — sanctions on russian regime? that is possibly the reason _ sanctions on russian regime? that is possibly the reason why _ sanctions on russian regime? that is possibly the reason why it _ sanctions on russian regime? that is possibly the reason why it is - possibly the reason why it is possible to impose meaningful function of the russian regime. we have a 25 years of working russian money of all descriptions to the uk and it is here in spades and therefore, we obviously have a leverage, one of the few levers the
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uk does have, alongside military assistance, we have a lever which we can pull and frankly should have pulled previously. [10 can pull and frankly should have pulled previously.— pulled previously. do over this money is? _ pulled previously. do over this money is? how _ pulled previously. do over this money is? how can _ pulled previously. do over this money is? how can we - pulled previously. do over this money is? how can we track. pulled previously. do over this money is? how can we track it pulled previously. do over this - money is? how can we track it down? how can we stop the laundering of russian money in this country? there are assets. — russian money in this country? there are assets, properties _ russian money in this country? there are assets, properties in _ russian money in this country? there are assets, properties in the - russian money in this country? there are assets, properties in the uk, - are assets, properties in the uk, there has been a lot of work done by civil society and journalists to identify the property. there are russians paying school fees in the uk, we might want to look at where that money comes from. there are russians making big cultural donations which we might belong to look at that. that's not to say that all of that money of course is dirty, but we have spent and other people have been sounded a warning sign for a number of years. we have spent a good number of your turning a blind eye to this money and it has taken the brink of war in europe for the government to seemingly now take that issue seriously. be the government to seemingly now take that issue seriously.— that issue seriously. do you realistically _ that issue seriously. do you realistically think _ that issue seriously. do you realistically think that - that issue seriously. do you - realistically think that president putin, if he wants to invade
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ukraine, he is going to be deterred by the threat of financial sanctions? it is speculated that he has got so much money tied up in various hiding places in russia and around the world, is he really going to be that bothered personally about the sort of sanctions?— the sort of sanctions? that's a really important _ the sort of sanctions? that's a really important point - the sort of sanctions? that's aj really important point because the sort of sanctions? that's a - really important point because we shouldn't conflate here of the action we should have taken against corrupt money in the uk many years ago with the action we should take against the economy of a country thatis against the economy of a country that is showing the kind of aggression that russia is showing. no, going after oligarchs might make us feel good, but i could change the attitude of vladimir putin but what could change the attitude of vladimir putin as if we go after elements of the economy. if it were to say that russian banks are not in the uk, or in the us any more, these are critical bits of national infrastructure for russia. i think taking the ukraine aggression opportunity to go after oligarchs,
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sure, the government can do that. but that is not going to change the calculation of putin. share but that is not going to change the calculation of putin.— calculation of putin. are we a bit schizophrenic _ calculation of putin. are we a bit schizophrenic about _ calculation of putin. are we a bit schizophrenic about all - calculation of putin. are we a bit schizophrenic about all this? - calculation of putin. are we a bit schizophrenic about all this? we | schizophrenic about all this? we take russian money, there is a lot of it in london in particular, we hold our noses, but actually we kind of secretly think it must be good for the economy. t of secretly think it must be good for the economy.— of secretly think it must be good for the economy. i think some people are schizophrenic _ for the economy. i think some people are schizophrenic that's _ for the economy. i think some people are schizophrenic that's for _ for the economy. i think some people are schizophrenic that's for sure, - are schizophrenic that's for sure, this is a conversation that i personally think the current government might find difficult to have because you don't have to go far down the path of the discussion of russian money before you start talking about political donations. i think the government has painted themselves into a corner in a way, have chosen to ignore this issue and perhaps we saw the economic crime bill was going to be postponed prior to lord agnew�*s intervention last week and now frankly, they have had a hand forced and committees of the foreign affairs committee are going to make sure the government
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hopefully moves ahead in what they should have done a number of years ago. should have done a number of years aro. . ~' should have done a number of years aro. . ~ , ., should have done a number of years aro. . ~ ,, ., ,, and just to remind you that we are expeting the press conference between boris johnson and the uklrainian president some —— ukrainian president... time in the next hour which we will rbing you live. mps are continuing to talk about lockdown parties in downing street. the conservative mp andrew mitchell warned the crisis risks breaking the conservative party. the labour leader xi keir starmer has accused borisjohnson of trying to save his own skin and taking the public for frozen defending his own actions in
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ledge to breaches in covid rules and... leaving behind his political woes at home, borisjohnson headed to immerse himself in a different crisis, the russian threats to ukraine. the prime minister. thank you very much, mr speaker. he is now a prime minister under police investigation. firstly, i want to say sorry. he attended at least three events highlighted by the report into downing street parties. it found there were serious failures of leadership. on the streets of stroud this morning, signs of how damaging the affair has been. there have been too many mistakes, i'm afraid, too many people have died, lost their loved ones whilst they were taking liberties. i've been quite loyal, i think, to the conservatives up until now, and it puts a big question mark because of everything else that everybody has been through during the pandemic. i'm a little bit disappointed - with the all the things that have gone on at 10 downing street, while the rest of us _
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have been in lockdown. but overriding that, i think, i overall, we're going forward. as much as borisjohnson wants to move things on it is clear there is still widespread anger and one important question. one of the events police are looking at happened in his own private downing street flat. he was asked yesterday in parliament, was he at that event? something sir keir starmer highlighted today. the spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box and being asked "were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat?" and he said, "i cannot answer that because of the investigation". he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he is taking us forfools. before leaving today, mrjohnson met his cabinet, he has promised to shake up the way he runs things. might his chief whip be one casualty? are you sticking around, chief whip? the deputy prime minister, a loyal lieutenant, had earlier been on the airwaves defending him. it is precisely because we take
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this, nd the prime minister takes this so seriously, first of all, that the gray review was commissioned and then published in full, what he has received, and also why it is quite right she has got the prerogative to refer any issues to the police. but many tories are still reserving judgment of the prime minister, and this former chief whip says he has lost confidence in him. boris is running a modern government like a medieval court. you need to rule and govern through structures, whitehall, cabinet, through the national security council, that is not the way with boris, and many of us thought he would govern in the way he did when he was mayor of london, through being chairman of the board, running a very good team. that is not what has happened. mrjohnson is far from out of trouble. there remains much unease among tory ranks, an ongoing police investigation, the full details of the sue gray report still to be published. more difficult political moments to come. damian grammaticas,
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bbc news, westminster. list talk to glen smyth about this. his mother was a constituent of borisjohnson who died in may 2020. only a select few members of her family were able to attend the funeral and they were not able to hold a church service. glenn, thank you forjoining us. i suppose you have a personal interest in this and that you are a constituent of the prime minister and all this in terms of the funeral was in may 2020 one of the funeral was in may 2020 one of the funeral was in may 2020 one of the alleged, or all of the nice part of some of them alleged parties took place in downing street in which the prime minster admitted to attending. what you make of all of these so—called gatherings that took place during lockdown? t’m these so-called gatherings that took place during lockdown?— place during lockdown? i'm frankly star rered place during lockdown? i'm frankly staggered by _ place during lockdown? i'm frankly staggered by what _ place during lockdown? i'm frankly staggered by what we _ place during lockdown? i'm frankly staggered by what we have -
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place during lockdown? i'm frankly staggered by what we have heard. | place during lockdown? i'm frankly i staggered by what we have heard. my family, my brothers and sisters, my we had to comply with regulations and we did and we weren't able to visit our mum, most of us, i was one of the only two months to six of us that was able to spend any time with mum before she died. she was extremely ill in the weeks before her death on the 21st of may and to find out that her mp, actually my mum's mp, not mine thankfully, was behaving in the way that he was behaving in the way that he was behaving and residing over what he was residing over, i'm just so angry i can't tell you how angry i am. we couldn't even have a church service from one. we couldn't all be present at her burial. it's just, well, from one. we couldn't all be present at her burial. it'sjust, well, the words fail me. i am just lost for words fail me. i am just lost for words and very, very upset. tithe
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words and very, very upset. one of the defences _ words and very, very upset. one of the defences we _ words and very, very upset. one of the defences we have _ words and very, very upset. one of the defences we have heard - words and very, very upset. one of the defences we have heard from l words and very, very upset. one of l the defences we have heard from the prime minister and certainly the garden gathering in the may of 2020 was that this is a work event. tlirui’hat was that this is a work event. what ou make was that this is a work event. what you make of _ was that this is a work event. what you make of that? _ was that this is a work event. what you make of that? well, _ was that this is a work event. what you make of that? well, i- was that this is a work event. “1511ng you make of that? well, i have heard some rubbish in my time, but that is the best, is in a pathetic excuse. he set the rules. he told us what to do and he broke them. and frankly, for those of us that kept that the rules, and that is most of us, it is, how can you trust somebody that tells you to do one thing and then does another? figs t tells you to do one thing and then does another?— tells you to do one thing and then does another? as i mentioned, you are chairman _ does another? as i mentioned, you are chairman of _ does another? as i mentioned, you are chairman of the _ does another? as i mentioned, you are chairman of the metropolitan i are chairman of the metropolitan police federation, what you think of the police's role in this? because they have been criticised for not investigating at the very beginning of all of this because of course there are police in downing street and then they were criticised for not launching a retrospective investigation and then were criticised for launching an investigation and for saying that that meant we couldn't hear all of sssooo great�*s report.
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that meant we couldn't hear all of sssooo great's report.— sssooo great's report. yes, it's a case of damned _ sssooo great's report. yes, it's a case of damned if _ sssooo great's report. yes, it's a case of damned if you _ sssooo great's report. yes, it's a case of damned if you do - sssooo great's report. yes, it's a case of damned if you do and - sssooo great's report. yes, it's a - case of damned if you do and damned if you don't but it's also that the police have reason to tread very carefully when it comes to investigating politicians, particularly those at the highest level of government. it is always tending to end badly for the senior officer in charge, cash for peerages, but didn't end well for john yates, we had the same with bob quick who was in charge of the investigation into the deputy prime minister and it didn't end well for him. so it's a career threatening sort of process when it comes to police officers, particularly the man or woman of the top at this case, but also the officers underneath that figurehead who are doing the legwork.— doing the legwork. potentially, we have the police _ doing the legwork. potentially, we have the police investigating - have the police investigating downing street staff but also the police investigating the prime minister and it is said that he was
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at three of these parties that sue gray has listed and that the police are investigating 12 altogether and i have 300 photographs, 500 documents. it's quite a major investigation. tt documents. it's quite a ma'or investigation.�* investigation. it is a massive undertaking _ investigation. it is a massive undertaking and _ investigation. it is a massive undertaking and they - investigation. it is a massive undertaking and they will. investigation. it is a massive l undertaking and they will want investigation. it is a massive - undertaking and they will want to make sure that they dot eyes and cross 30s and i hope those in decision—making roles and to make the same decisions with the students that weren't caught having parties as they would with those in government. it is good for the goose it has to be good for the gander. we have to be fair and treat people fairly and i personally feel that on behalf of my family that we were badly treated and treated with contempt and i'm sure many other people do as well and ijust hope that those found to have broken the law are held responsible and that we
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are told about it.— are told about it. glen, so sorry to ou for are told about it. glen, so sorry to you for your _ are told about it. glen, so sorry to you for your loss, _ are told about it. glen, so sorry to you for your loss, your _ are told about it. glen, so sorry to you for your loss, your mother, i are told about it. glen, so sorry to you for your loss, your mother, a l you for your loss, your mother, a constituent of borisjohnson who died in 2020 and thank you for being with us. glen smyth, former chairman of the metropolitan police association. a man has been found guilty of murdering his ex—girlfriend and her nine—year—old son. 26—year—old bethany vincent, and darren henson were found stabbed to death at their home in lincolnshire, on 31 may last year. 30—year—old daniel boulton, was convicted after a trial. he had pleaded guilty to manslaughter mid—trial but had our correspondent danny savagejoins us now. give us the background to this case? this was a trial that lasted several weeks and ended quickly this afternoon with a jury deliberating for a very short period of time. this happened on may the 31st of
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last year when daniel boulton had spent the weekend before that monday bombarding his former girlfriend bethany vincent with lots of messages on facebook, a total of 900 messes are more than that over that weekend and he did that despite a restraining orderfor weekend and he did that despite a restraining order for him weekend and he did that despite a restraining orderfor him not to contact her because of a history of domestic violence in their relationship. his violent behaviour ended their relationship and they were living at separate dresses addresses are a must for them as a bombarding her with those messages that he then walked the 28 miles from skegness to louth where he murdered both bethany and her son darren henson who was nine years old and suffered from autism. the defendant had created a hatred of the nine—year—old boy and that was part of his motive that he had hated him so much that he went to murder his ex partner and her son. he then went on the run for some time before police caught him but it was an
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awful violent attack on multiple stabbing and it left louth in lincolnshire, a small market town which is normally quiet, deeply shocked by what has happened. daniel boulton tried to say that he was suffering from mental health problems, try to present that as his defence and pleaded guilty to manslaughter but not to murder, but thejury took a manslaughter but not to murder, but the jury took a very short period of time to find him guilty of four charges of murder.— time to find him guilty of four charges of murder. danny, tell us how he was _ charges of murder. danny, tell us how he was arrested. _ charges of murder. danny, tell us how he was arrested. i _ charges of murder. danny, tell us how he was arrested. i think- charges of murder. danny, tell us how he was arrested. i think he i how he was arrested. i think he stabbed an off duty police officer in the leg and eventually he was tasered. , ., �* ., ., tasered. yes, i mean daniel boulton basically went _ tasered. yes, i mean daniel boulton basically went on _ tasered. yes, i mean daniel boulton basically went on the _ tasered. yes, i mean daniel boulton basically went on the run _ tasered. yes, i mean daniel boulton basically went on the run after- basically went on the run after carrying out those killings on the monday evening. police were quickly on the scene and realised what had happened and who they were looking for and issued a public appealfor anybody who saw him not to approach him but to report that and an off duty police officer was the first people or one of the first people to
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spot him and he was attacked by him, was injured by boulton and boulton managed to get away but eventually he was cornered by a large number of police officers who had been searching for him and was tasered and brought into custody, but it was and brought into custody, but it was an alarming and worrying 24 hours after the original killings in louth before they actually got the person that they believed was responsible. daniel boulton was then arrested and he came to trial here in lincoln over the last few weeks. a series of awful events with lots of twists and turns, one of them being that bethany vincent and her son were due to move to a new address in the few days that followed then being killed to get away from daniel boulton because he was harassing them so much and they were due to move to an address which he did not know, but he got to them before they moved. figs he got to them before they moved. as i say, a horrific case but thank you for bringing us up—to—date. the met police says it's "deeply
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sorry", following a highly critical report into unacceptable behaviour by officers, based at charing cross police station in central london. the independent office for police conduct found evidence of bullying, misogyny, discrimination and sexual harassment, and made 15 recommendations to fix "underlying cultural issues". here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this was an investigation into the charing cross police station in the west end of london. the report has found that there was a bullying culture, and misogynistic culture. this was in the period from 2016 — 2018, but if those messages that are going to grab the headlines. the officers joke about rape, about hitting their girlfriends, one male officer tells a female officer he would happily chloroform her. the use the word gay as an insult, they make derogatory remarks about the black lives matter movement and about mosques and it just goes on and on and on. and the culture of the metropolitan
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police was already in the spotlight after one of its own officers was convicted of kidnapping and murdering sarah everard and this is only going to increase the scrutiny. the iopc has warned that subsequent investigations have made similar findings are so these are notjust a few bad apples. i want to bring you up—to—date on what would happen if there were fines relating to downing street party is in breach of covid restrictions. downing street now says it would hypothetically make it public if the prime minister were to be handed a fine for breaching covid rules. a bit earlier on, the official spokesman for the prime minister said he wouldn't speculate on the matter as regards boris johnson and wide number ten staff, in other words whether they would be named for having a fine or fixed penalty notice, but this afternoon, downing street has said that that
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had been in reference to the process related to fixed penalty notices as generally speaking, the gender identity people are not published. the spokesman said quote, we are aware of the significant public interest with regard to the prime minster and we would look to provide what updates we can on him specifically, but beyond that, i cannot get into individuals. asked if that hypothetically therefore should the prime minister himself be cleared orfined, number ten would make that public, the spokesman did say that hypothetically yes, but number ten again stressed not prejudging the met�*s investigation and it doesn't want to prejudge the investigation but hypothetically yes, we would hear if the prime minister himself was fined. a bit complicated but probably important for us to establish the facts on that front downing street. now let's
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get the facts on the weather forecast. a bit windy and the coast and it has been whipping up big seas today but the weather a bit less complicated set of light. the windsor easing down but into this evening we could see costs close to gale force across eastern and northern parts of the country, showers continuing in northern scotland and finishing the day with clear skies elsewhere but there is more cloud across northern ireland, wales and the south—west and is approaching a one front and an area of figure cloud with patchy rain or drizzle and will work its way northwards and after a brief dip in temperature it will lift the temperature it will lift the temperature for most of you and it will be a mile start a wednesday morning across southern and western areas and it will be chilly and naughty scotland and more particularly in the orkneys and shetland with two or 5 degrees. as we go into wednesday, there will be a cloudy start for much of scotland with northern and eastern wing england and they will continue that rain on and off through the day but
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elsewhere a lot of drizzle will start to ease with one or two spots around and plenty of cloud but the worst of its in north and scotland in the midlands and midlands and south and temperatures around 12 or 13 and the sunny spells will be chilly 5 degrees. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson is in ukraine, holding talks with the country's president — as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. we'll bring you a live news conference from the two leaders in kyiv in the next hour. in the fallout of sue gray's initial findings, the deputy prime minister dismisses anger from several tories and says the report will bring change. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also
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the prime minister has come back and said "ok, i want to address and fix this." not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that has gone on since. officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages, claiming it was just "banter" according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog. a plea to get young children vaccinated against measles, as the take up rate drops to its lowest level in a decade. and a southern koala, born not in australia, but england, as part of a major conservation drive. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we start with the news that tom brady, one of the greatest players in nfl history,
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has confirmed his retirement at the age of 44. the tampa bay buccaneers quarterback has won seven super bowls in an astonishing career spanning 22 seasons. brady won six titles with the new england patriots before his final triumph with the buccaneers last year. in a lengthy statement he said... golf's saudi arabian—funded asian tour will stage its first event in england this year. the centurion club in hertfordshire is set to host the £1.5 million tournament from the 9th to 12thjune — one of 10 international events. the asian tour season starts on thursday. the tour recently revealed it'd been boosted by a £148 million investment from the saudi arabia government's private
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investment fund. that funding has been increased by a further £75 million. and we're just a few days away from the start of the beijing winter olympics. one of those competing for britain, with high hopes for a medal, is snowboarder charlotte bankes. after nearly giving up on the sport a few years back — she could be among those toasting success this month. laura scott has been to meet her. think bmx on snow, and you get pretty close to the adrenaline fuelled olympic sport of snowboard cross. this is a lap of honour... 0h! drama! favourites haven't always fared so well in this most unpredictable event, but great britain's charlotte bankes is leading the pack going into beijing. what are your hopes in beijing? be at my top game. i think that was the main goal i've got, and it'sjust being able to ride at the level i'm riding at in training, and hopefully it all goes well and i can put that on a good race. i mean, it's boarder cross,
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so everything can happen and some things are out of our control. with each rider trying to find the best line down a course ofjumps... 0h! ..bumps.. oh, no, gone! ..and tight turns... 0h, they've all gone! ..high—speed crashes aren't unusual, making it nail—biting viewing for her family. it's always a little bit scary to watch. i know, like, my parents can't eat or drink anything whilst they're watching. they're extremely tense. they'll be hiding behind the sofa at the same time. bankes knows the risks of snowboarding only too well, having fractured her pelvis in her very first season racing internationally. i lost a bit of the love that i've got for snowboarding, because i wasn't able to actually snowboard without any pain, and it was a pretty tough time, yeah. it is still there, it niggles a bit, but it's nothing like it used to be and i'm able to do proper training on the snow, and that's really nice. charlotte bankes is so fast through here. born in hemel hempstead,
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bankes has twice competed at the winter olympics, finishing 17th in 2014 and seventh four years later. but look at the flag — both times she was representing france. in 2018 she defected to join the british setup and hasn't looked back since, clinching four world cup wins and a world championship title under the british flag. why did you make the change? it works really well for me. the athlete comes first and that's really nice. i'd always had that in the back of my mind, to compete for great britain. if we can come back with a medal from the olympics it would be good. i was at the point of giving up when i made that switch, and i didn't think anybody actually believed i could make it. few would doubt she can make it now. after all, bankes knows what it takes to be on top of the world. laura scott, bbc news. that's all the sport for now. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england,
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are at risk of measles, because they haven't been vaccinated. the number of five year—olds who've had both doses of the mmr jab, has fallen to it's lowest level for a decade, and is well below the 95% recommended, to stop a resurgence of the disease. with life returning to normal, so are the viruses. once again, measles is a concern, particularly in school—age children. experts believe the pandemic has disrupted vaccinations. vaccination services have continued throughout the pandemic, but because of the first lockdown, when we were all advised not to go anywhere, a lot of parents thought maybe they could not get their children vaccinated, or they might have been scared about going out in case they caught covid. but this is not the case, vaccination services continue to be offered and it's really important to make sure children are vaccinated.
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the mmr jab protects against measles, mumps and rubella, but the latest figures show only 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses, the lowest rate for a decade and well below the 95% target needed in order to prevent outbreaks of measles in the community. this is the distinctive rash it causes. it can lead to severe complications. measles is a very serious disease and canhave serious complications. it can lead to death, hospitalisation for various complications like pneumonia, like encephalitis, which is the inflammation the brain. and these have long—term consequences. and it can also suppress your immune system, leading to more susceptibility to disease in later life. experts are particularly concerned about measles because it spreads so easily, faster than covid. in fact, it is the most infectious known virus.
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once we have international travel open up and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back to this country and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected. around one in ten of the youngest children at school in england are not fully vaccinated, with some areas having far lower rates. public health officials are clear, now it is time to get vaccinated. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. earlier i spoke to dr vanessa saliba, consultant epidemiologist at the uk health security agency. she told me why the mmr jab uptake has been falling. the covid pandemic has had a big impact on families over the last couple of years and families have had a lot to bejuggling. it means immunisation, the routine childhood immunisation, the routine childhood immunisation might not have been at the forefront of their minds, but we have done a survey with parents
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which shows that about one in ten of parents who did not get their child vaccinated was not aware that the nhs had continued to office of the immunisations during the pandemic —— i continue to offer the. another said they did not want to be a burden on the nhs and did not want to book their children in. obviously, people were isolating with covid, and so they had a booking but could not come along, so those things combined mean we haven't seen a significant drop off and it is really important that we remind parents that the nhs is open and the routine childhood immunisations including the mmr vaccine remain a health priority and we want our children to be protected by the time they turn five and especially before they start nursery and school when they are mixing with other children which is the perfect time to be exposed to infections like measles. and where outbreaks are likely to occur if we don't catch up those children who have missed out during the pandemic. taste
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missed out during the pandemic. we have spent so much time worrying about covid and the pandemic but speu about covid and the pandemic but spell out the reasons why children need to be vaccinated with the mmr jab because measles is so dangerous? potentially? jab because measles is so dangerous? potentiall ? ., . ~ , jab because measles is so dangerous? potentiall? ., . ~ , , potentially? correct. measles is actuall , potentially? correct. measles is actually, first — potentially? correct. measles is actually, first of _ potentially? correct. measles is actually, first of all, _ potentially? correct. measles is actually, first of all, it - potentially? correct. measles is actually, first of all, it is - potentially? correct. measles is actually, first of all, it is very i actually, first of all, it is very infectious, it really easy to catch and it spreads very easily, if you don't have a high uptake with the two doses of the mmr vaccine, so measles can be very serious and if a child gets it and they are very poorly and miserable, they can be sick for 7—10 days, you can get complications like ear infections, pneumonia, inflammation of the brain, or meningitis. those kinds of complications means that a child is in hospital but beyond that they can have long—term disabilities and some will die. it is completely preventable and what we want to do is to remind parents to check if
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their children are up—to—date now and get them caught up before we see and get them caught up before we see a rise in cases because once covid restrictions are fully lifted and especially once international travel picks up, we think measles will be one of the first infections to come back and we expect to see outbreaks if we don't catch up with the children who have missed out. you need two doses to be protected and the first is offered to babies when they turn one and the second to children at about three years and four months so they are fully protected before they start nursery and of course school. the former health secretary, jeremy hunt, has criticised the government's decision to drop mandatory covid vaccinations, for health and social care workers in england. mr hunt, who chairs the health and social care committe, says people had been marched to the top of the hill, before the u—turn, making it harder to win the argument next time round. our health editor hugh pym has been telling us more. it is a significant intervention because not only
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is he a former conservative health secretary but he's a select committee chair, and he has come out with this criticism barely 24 hours after the government announced its new policy of mandatory vaccination for the nhs. mr hunt acknowledges workforce is an issue, there were worries about staff leaving because they did not want to be vaccinated at a time when the service was under extreme pressure but he said that was a longer term issue. right now, he thinks the decision made sends out wrong signals as he explained in an interview earlier. from a patient safety point view it's really disappointing, that we've won the argument about the need for staff, unless there is a medical exemption, to be properly vaccinated — i think that was widely supported across the health and care systems. but having marched people up to the top of the hill, there is now a u—turn which means that the next time we have a big debate, perhaps for a flu vaccine in this coming winter, it's going to be much harder to win that argument.
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now, the health secretary, sajid javid, said in his announcement yesterday, that one reason for the change of plan was that the omicron variant was less severe than delta had been last autumn when the policy was first announced, more people had been announced and there was a workforce issue and it would be put out to consultation. although some health staff are pleased because they would otherwise have lost theirjobs, and also the royal colleges, some health and social care leaders are privately frustrated. we had the mandatory vaccine policy in social care. that was announced in the autumn and that will now be scrapped, but some social care workers have left. i think the feeling of frustration because it seems to have been rather sprung on health trusts as well as the social care world when so much effort had gone into trying to persuade staff to be vaccinated ahead of the deadline, which would have been on thursday.
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hugh pym, there. this is vladimir putin who is having a press conference at the moment with the hungarian prime minister. all eyes on vladimir putin because of the more than 100,000 russian troops massed on the ukrainian border. is he going to invade or not? he hasjust said that border. is he going to invade or not? he has just said that the west has ignored russia's security concerns. the russian fear is that the will become part nato. vladimir putin says it is wrong to allow one country to increase its security at the expense of another country. he says the west is not satisfied —— has not satisfied the main security demands of russia. us foreign secretary antony blinken has been talking to sergei lavrov and they have been having a conversation.
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antony blinken said now is the time to pull back russian troops from the border with ukraine, if moscow is not intending to invade. they had a phone call for about 30 minutes and apparently it was professional and fairly candid and in english, but heightened tensions. borisjohnson heightened tensions. boris johnson is heightened tensions. borisjohnson is now in the ukraine in the capital kyiv and has met the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky and we will bring you their news conference very soon but this is vladimir putin talking to the hungarian prime minister, holding a press conference, saying the west has ignored russia's security concerns over the crane. an inquiry into child sexual abuse, has concluded that police and councils still don't understand the risk of organised gangs grooming children in their areas, and aren't collecting data which would help identify paedophiles. the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse,
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says its own inquiries had identified examples of abuse the police should have been, but were not aware of. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has more. ten, 15 years after this problem of gangs of men praying on often children from difficult backgrounds, giving them drink and drugs over months and abusing them. it is ten or 15 years since the country started to realise this was a problem. but this inquiry looking closely at six particular areas including st helens, durham, bristol, swansea, warwickshire and tower hamlets, concludes these areas are still not dealing with this problem properly. a quote from the report, "none of the police forces or local "authorities in the case study areas had an accurate understanding "of networks sexually exploiting children in their areas." the report says this is an area the government wants to be
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a national priority akin to dealing with terrorism, so i think the report has found serious findings, one in particular is a failure to record racial backgrounds of perpetrators and victims — the report says that is a must. the nationwide building society, says the housing market has had its strongest start to a year, since 2005. analysts say prices rose by 112.2% injanuary compared to a year ago. however, they predict the market will slow as prices become become less affordable. tesco has warned 1,400 jobs are at risk, following changes its making to overnight roles at some stores and petrol stations. the retailer is planning to cutback some overnight restocking, and convert a number of petrol sites to pay—at—pump in the evenings. thousands of people are still without power, after last weekend's storms battered parts of scotland and north east england. gale force winds brought down
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trees and power lines, destroying several homes. our correspondent, david shanks, has been giving us the latest from angus, in north east scotland. this is the main road in and out of the village of edzell in angus. once there was a very thick wood on either side of the road and if you look now, you can see pretty much straight through it. such were the forces of the winds of storm corrie over the weekend. the teams are starting to clear up and make things safer for cars to get through but it was much wider than that, across scotland 9,500 people without power all those days on, thousands more still without broadband as well. we are told by the electricity network ssen that most people without electricity will have supplies restored by tonight but it could go into tomorrow for more rural and isolated areas. the actress and television personality, whoopi goldberg, has apologised after saying that the holocaust "was not about race". speaking on a us talk
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show ms goldberg said that the holocaust — the murder of 6 millionjews by the nazis who saw themselves as an aryan "master race" — involved "two groups of white people". earlier we spoke to elise preston from cbs who's been following this. whoopi goldberg and her co—hosts were discussing how a tennessee school banned the pulitzer prize—winning world war ii era graphic novel maus over concerns over nudity and profane language. at some point in the discussion, goldberg said the holocaust was not about race. she was immediately pushed back by her co—hosts and the controversial remark sparked uproar here in the states. others later, she tweeted, "on today's show i said the holocaust is not about race but about man's inhumanity to man — i should have said it was about both." "i think that the holocaust
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was about the nazis' systematic "annihilation of thejewish people, who they deem that inferior race. "i stand corrected. "thejewish people around the world have always "had my support and that will never waver, i am sorry "for the hurt i have caused." bbc 3 returns to television schedules today, six years after being being taken off air. it follows the success of shows like fleabag, killing eve and normal people which were shown on iplayer. the channel was moved online in 2016 to save money, but the bbc hopes its return will offer enough to attact younger viewers more used to streaming programmes online. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar.
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blu from drag race and the rest of bbc three are going to have a new broadcast home. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. what about this? good _ it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to 34—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary, old school tv? no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we use, like, disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people
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have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. yeah, poirot. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. around 80% of 16 to 34—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so, six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it?
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david sillito, bbc news. the new york times has bought the popular word game �*wordle' for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the free, web—based game, which now boasts millions of players, was created by software engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play — for the time being. we will bring you the news conference between borisjohnson and the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky very shortly. the stage is set there in the ukrainian capital kyiv. at least 100,000 russian kyiv. at least 100 , 000 russian troops kyiv. at least 100,000 russian troops are massed on the ukrainian border, threatening invasion, and borisjohnson is in the ukrainian capital meeting of the ukrainian president. we will bring you that
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press conference very soon. now it's time for a look at the weather. as we head into the evening it is a fine day, well, it has been, for much of the day, and it follows on for what has been the sunniest january on record in england, helped by all of these parts in the east of the country. these have had almost double what they would generally expect in a normaljanuary. notjust sunny but also dry with below average rainfall. 100% is about average. only 30% in the south and east. we did start with some stormy weather and we also started today with blustery conditions. that is because of the area of low pressure which is off into scandinavia with lots of snowfall but bringing strong winds in its wake. this area of high pressure is nudging its way in,
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bringing in milderair pressure is nudging its way in, bringing in milder air across the country. it will feel even milder tomorrow for some of you. the winds have died down a little bit but still gusts in the north and east approaching gale force but they will ease down tonight. thick cloud and patchy rain and drizzle will work its way eastwards. the heaviest rain in southern parts of scotland. coldest in shetland, but some places in double figures as we start the day tomorrow. this is the warm front which is bringing the patchy rain and drizzle first thing in the morning but eastern parts of scotland and all the way through to eastern england will have that. it will fizzle out for summer but we still have rain at times in the north of scotland. —— outfought some. in the southern counties of england we could get to about 12—13 when the sunshine is out late in the
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day and it leads into a mild night and a mild start to thursday. places in england and wales will be dry. later on we will start to see outbreaks of rain spreading to the west of scotland and northern ireland and with it a drop in temperature across the western isles. that is the coldest air of the week set to push its way southwards thursday into friday and this could bring some welcome rain in the southern counties of england, but it will be lingering first thing on friday morning before clearing and then sunny spells and a scattering of showers, most frequent in the south and west, some of those on the heaviside with sleet and hail. on friday in the northern half of the country we are looking at around 4—5 c and it will feel cold in the breeze.
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this is bbc news. i'm clive myrie. the headlines: borisjohnson is in ukraine, holding talks with the country's president, as tension grows over whether russian forces on the border will invade. this is the scene live in kyiv, where the two leaders will be giving a news conference shortly. we'll bring you that live. in the fallout of sue gray's initial findings, the deputy pm dismisses anger from several tories and says the report will bring change. another conservative has gone on the record to call for the prime minister to resign. peter aldous, the mp for waveney, said he felt this was "in the best interests of the country, the government and the conservative pa rty". officers at the met police exchanged highly offensive racist, sexist and homophobic messages,
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claiming it was just "banter", according to a highly critical report from the police watchdog.

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