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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  February 1, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. european leaders have arrived in ukraine to show their support and to try and deter any russian attack. fix, try and deter any russian attack. further russian invasion of ukraine would be a political disaster, humanitarian disaster, in my view it would also be, for russia, for the world, a military disaster. meanwhile, vladimir putin is accusing the west of using ukraine as a tool to try to contain russia. we are going to be live in kyiv and washington. at home, borisjohnson facing pressure at home after the
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report into down street parties. another of his mps have called for them to go. andy who says medical waste from the pandemic is a threat to the environment and to human health. —— and the who. let me bring you right up to date on the tensions around ukraine. in the past hour, the uk by minister boris johnson has warned that europe is at a critical moment. we also note the mats and russia and the west have been engaged in talks —— diplomats. and president putin has made his first public comment on the situation there since december. translation: the united states most im ortant translation: the united states most important goal — translation: the united states most important goal is _ translation: the united states most important goal is to _ translation: the united states most important goal is to contain _ translation: the united states most important goal is to contain russia. - important goal is to contain russia. that is the most important thing. in that sense ukraine isjust that is the most important thing. in that sense ukraine is just a tool to achieve this goal. this can be done in different ways. one is to draw us into some armed conflict. meanwhile,
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boris into some armed conflict. meanwhile, iz'oris johnson — into some armed conflict. meanwhile, boris johnson has _ into some armed conflict. meanwhile, boris johnson has been _ into some armed conflict. meanwhile, boris johnson has been meeting - into some armed conflict. meanwhile, boris johnson has been meeting with l borisjohnson has been meeting with president zelensky in kyiv. we heard from them afterwards. it goes without saying that a further — it goes without saying that a further russian invasion of ukraine would _ further russian invasion of ukraine would be _ further russian invasion of ukraine would be a — further russian invasion of ukraine would be a political disaster, a military— would be a political disaster, a military disaster. in my view, it would _ military disaster. in my view, it would also _ military disaster. in my view, it would also be, for russia, for the world, _ would also be, for russia, for the world, a — would also be, for russia, for the world, a military disaster. andy potential— world, a military disaster. andy potential invasion completely flies in the _ potential invasion completely flies in the face of president putin's claims — in the face of president putin's claims to— in the face of president putin's claims to be acting in the interest of ukrainian people. earlier today, president zelensky signed an order for the country's armed forces to increase by 100,000 over the next three years. let's hearfrom him. translation: the prime minister assured me _ translation: the prime minister assured me the _ translation: the prime minister assured me the support _ translation: the prime minister assured me the support for- translation: the prime minister assured me the support for the - assured me the support for the sovereignty— assured me the support for the sovereignty and _ assured me the support for the sovereignty and territorial - sovereignty and territorial integrity. _ sovereignty and territorial integrity, the _ sovereignty and territorial| integrity, the continuation sovereignty and territorial i integrity, the continuation of cooperation— integrity, the continuation of cooperation under— integrity, the continuation of cooperation under crimean l integrity, the continuation of- cooperation under crimean platform, the occupation — cooperation under crimean platform, the occupation of _ cooperation under crimean platform,
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the occupation of our _ cooperation under crimean platform, the occupation of our peninsula - cooperation under crimean platform, the occupation of our peninsula and i the occupation of our peninsula and bringing _ the occupation of our peninsula and bringing back— the occupation of our peninsula and bringing back all— the occupation of our peninsula and bringing back all of _ the occupation of our peninsula and bringing back all of our _ bringing back all of our territories. _ bringing back all of our territories. we - bringing back all of our territories. we have i bringing back all of our - territories. we have discussed bringing back all of our _ territories. we have discussed also the set _ territories. we have discussed also the set of — territories. we have discussed also the set of activities _ territories. we have discussed also the set of activities to _ territories. we have discussed also the set of activities to provide - territories. we have discussed also the set of activities to provide the. the set of activities to provide the deterrence — the set of activities to provide the deterrence of— the set of activities to provide the deterrence of russian _ the set of activities to provide the deterrence of russian federation. j deterrence of russian federation. any activities, _ deterrence of russian federation. any activities, as _ deterrence of russian federation. any activities, as i _ deterrence of russian federation. any activities, as i said, - deterrence of russian federation. any activities, as i said, are - any activities, as i said, are efficient— any activities, as i said, are efficient before _ any activities, as i said, are efficient before rather- any activities, as i said, are efficient before rather thanl any activities, as i said, are - efficient before rather than after. prevention — efficient before rather than after. prevention is— efficient before rather than after. prevention is better— efficient before rather than after. prevention is better than - efficient before rather than after. i prevention is better than treatment. all of this revolves around a recent esclation of russian military activity close to ukraine. russia has over 100,000 troops close to the ukraine border. it has troops conducting military exercises in belarus. and today, the us told its staff there to leave. the us secretary of state, antony blinken, has told his russian counterpart to de—escalate. here's sergey lavrov�*s response. translation: we will insist on an honest conversation, _ translation: we will insist on an honest conversation, an _ translation: we will insist on an honest conversation, an honest - honest conversation, an honest expedition of whitey west does not want to fulfil this commitment or wants to fill them only selectively, in its favour. russia has denied all along that
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it's planning to invade ukraine. it does, though, have demands, which you heard mr lavrov refer to there. top of the list is no nato membership for ukraine. russia also wants nato to stop its expansion eastwards. and it wants the rollback of all nato military deployments in the region. america hasn't relented on any of this. and here's the analysis of a former us commanding general in europe. i have not seen a diplomatic effort by the _ i have not seen a diplomatic effort by the united states, at this level of intensity and scale, probably since _ of intensity and scale, probably since 1995, of intensity and scale, probably since1995, during the dayton peace at efforts _ since1995, during the dayton peace at efforts. the biden administration, secretary blinken, all of— administration, secretary blinken, all of our — administration, secretary blinken, all of our professional diplomats could _ all of our professional diplomats could have been working very closely, — could have been working very closely, of course, with our allies and partners to maintain this unity, because _ and partners to maintain this unity, because i_ and partners to maintain this unity, because i really do believe this is the key— because i really do believe this is the key -- — because i really do believe this is the key —— have been working hard. this transition to active deterrence, providing capabilities that ukraine is asked for and, by
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the way, — that ukraine is asked for and, by the way, ukraine has not asked for a single _ the way, ukraine has not asked for a single soldier, but what they are asking _ single soldier, but what they are asking for— single soldier, but what they are asking for is support. both russia and ukraine have been holding military drills. these pictures show russia's strategic missile forces holding exercises. and you can see the ukrainian army holding its own military drills here, close to the crimea region, which russia annexed from ukraine in 2014. the latest country to back ukraine with military hardware is poland. here's the country's prime minister. translation: our part of europe does not experience — translation: our part of europe does not experience earthquakes _ translation: our part of europe does not experience earthquakes or - not experience earthquakes or volcanic— not experience earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. _ not experience earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. but - not experience earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. but living i not experience earthquakes or - volcanic eruptions. but living close to a neighbour— volcanic eruptions. but living close to a neighbour like _ volcanic eruptions. but living close to a neighbour like russia, - volcanic eruptions. but living close to a neighbour like russia, we - volcanic eruptions. but living close i to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling — to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of — to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of living _ to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of living at _ to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of living at the - to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of living at the foot - to a neighbour like russia, we have the feeling of living at the foot of l the feeling of living at the foot of the feeling of living at the foot of the volcano _ as you can see, there is a lot of phonetic activity —— diplomatic activity. mr putin has been speaking with the italian prime minister, mario draghi. mr draghi has stressed the need for de—escalation. and also today in moscow,
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president putin held talks with hungary's prime minister, viktor orban. mr orban is arguably russia's closest ally in the european union. indeed, he's been criticised by some eu member states for going ahead with this. this is what he's said. translation: my visit today is artl also translation: my visit today is partly also a — translation: my visit today is partly also a peace _ translation: my visit today is partly also a peace mission - translation: my visit today is partly also a peace mission to l translation: my visit today is i partly also a peace mission to stop i would like to assure you that not a single european union member state's leader... we stand for a peaceful solution. let's stay in russia and see how the story is being seen there. here's one mp from united russia, the ruling party. we don't want nato military structure at our borders. just pull back— structure at our borders. just pull back from — structure at our borders. just pull back from our borders and get out from _ back from our borders and get out from post—soviet countries. we are not _ from post—soviet countries. we are not that — from post—soviet countries. we are not that is — from post—soviet countries. we are not... that is a direct threat to our— not... that is a direct threat to our citizens. _ not... that is a direct threat to our citizens, to russian citizens. let's talk to lyse doucet, life with
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us from kyiv, and barbara plett usher, live with us from the us state department. help us understand what the west is trying to achieve today with these multiple different diplomatic manoeuvres. abs, today with these multiple different diplomatic manoeuvres.— today with these multiple different diplomatic manoeuvres. a very public show of sopport _ diplomatic manoeuvres. a very public show of support for _ diplomatic manoeuvres. a very public show of support for president - show of support for president zelensky, not less than three european prime ministers in kyiv today. no wonder the members of parliament, no matter what side they are on politically, all stood up and they held the flags of the nations who have been giving support to ukraine. it was a forest of flags. president zelensky will feel very much that the european countries, of nato, has his back, but he made it clear in that press conference today that there is to be an invasion of ukraine, any kind of military activity, it would not be a ukrainian — russian war, it would be
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a european war —— if there was to be. borisjohnson very much taking the same line, this is a critical moment, and we must all stand together. very symbolic steps like visits of prime ministers, but also a lot of military support. hardly a day goes by without some form of military support arriving stub and also economic support, which is also on the minds of ukrainians. star; on the minds of ukrainians. stay with us, on the minds of ukrainians. stay with us. lyse- — on the minds of ukrainians. stay with us, lyse. barbara _ on the minds of ukrainians. stay with us, lyse. barbara at the state department, what are you hearing there? ,, . ., , ., ,, ., . ~ there? secretary of state blinken had a call with _ there? secretary of state blinken had a call with his _ there? secretary of state blinken had a call with his counterpart - had a call with his counterpart sergey— had a call with his counterpart sergey lavrov this morning, and officials — sergey lavrov this morning, and officials here briefed us on the call~ _ officials here briefed us on the call~ the — officials here briefed us on the call. the upshot of that was there was not _ call. the upshot of that was there was not any— call. the upshot of that was there was not any movement out of it, at least _ was not any movement out of it, at least we could see full sub the tone was professional and fairly candid, they said. — was professional and fairly candid, they said, which makes a big difference from that very bitter
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public — difference from that very bitter public exchange at the un yesterday between _ public exchange at the un yesterday between russia and the united states. — between russia and the united states, but by and large, it sounded as if both _ states, but by and large, it sounded as if both men held to their positions. this call came after the americans— positions. this call came after the americans had submitted a formal security— americans had submitted a formal security proposal to moscow last week, _ security proposal to moscow last week, to — security proposal to moscow last week, to address russian security concerns— week, to address russian security concerns in— week, to address russian security concerns in europe, and basically the secretary of state said, we think— the secretary of state said, we think this — the secretary of state said, we think this will work, we just would like to— think this will work, we just would like to talk— think this will work, we just would like to talk about a format, but mr lavrov _ like to talk about a format, but mr lavrov was — like to talk about a format, but mr lavrov was not ready to move on that score _ lavrov was not ready to move on that score he _ lavrov was not ready to move on that score. he repeatedly russian concerns— score. he repeatedly russian concerns that this does not far enough — concerns that this does not far enough. he said don acker we are not escalating, _ enough. he said don acker we are not escalating, and mr blinken said, i would _ escalating, and mr blinken said, i would be — escalating, and mr blinken said, i would be a — escalating, and mr blinken said, i would be a good time to follow through— would be a good time to follow through and pull back your troops from _ through and pull back your troops from the — through and pull back your troops from the border —— he said that. they— from the border —— he said that. they basically agreed to talk again after the _ they basically agreed to talk again after the russians respond formally to the _ after the russians respond formally to the american security proposals, and the _ to the american security proposals, and the americans have said, we
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think— and the americans have said, we think this — and the americans have said, we think this means that they are interested in diplomatic engagement, yes, maybe they are just trying to draw— yes, maybe they are just trying to draw things out, we don't know, but as long _ draw things out, we don't know, but as long as— draw things out, we don't know, but as long as they are willing to talk, we are _ as long as they are willing to talk, we are ready to talk with them. barbara, — we are ready to talk with them. barbara, let's pick up that point with lyse. if there is a willingness to talk, there still has to be some common ground, and when we look at the public positions of america and russia, the doesn't appear to be any, but you're talking to people involved in this tussle. do you think there maybe some route out of this without a conflict? it think there maybe some route out of this without a conflict?— this without a conflict? it will take some — this without a conflict? it will take some very _ this without a conflict? it will take some very clever - this without a conflict? it will. take some very clever diplomatic language, because both sides, and ukraine as well, have redlines, and the red lines are drawn now in bright red fluorescent paint, and those redlines are very far apart. but you can use words like what will be the fate of eastern ukraine? will it be special status, as in the minsk agreements? will it be
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autonomy? that's what russia wants. we are creeping towards greater connection to russia. it will be very hard. it was interesting today that president zelensky made a point of saying that one format for dialogue that was working was the normandy format, the normandy group, which includes germany, france, ukraine and russia. it is one place where the ukrainians and the russians get together because one person who is not been talking to president putin on the telephone is president zelensky, because president putin does not pick up the phone to call him.— phone to call him. lyse, thank you. and one final— phone to call him. lyse, thank you. and one final question _ phone to call him. lyse, thank you. and one final question to _ phone to call him. lyse, thank you. and one final question to barbara. l and one final question to barbara. in domestic political terms for president biden, how does this fit in? are the escalating tensions cutting through in us media coverage?— cutting through in us media coveraue? , ., ., ., ., coverage? there is a lot of media covera . e coverage? there is a lot of media coverage about _ coverage? there is a lot of media coverage about the _ coverage? there is a lot of media coverage about the us _ coverage? there is a lot of media coverage about the us - - coverage? there is a lot of media coverage about the us - ukrainel coverage about the us — ukraine crisis. _ coverage about the us — ukraine crisis. so — coverage about the us — ukraine crisis. so to— coverage about the us — ukraine crisis, so to speak. mr biden has been _ crisis, so to speak. mr biden has been getting fairly good marks from the for— been getting fairly good marks from
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the for policy establishment —— foreign — the for policy establishment —— foreign policy establishment. for the way— foreign policy establishment. for the way he has thrown diplomacy at this issue _ the way he has thrown diplomacy at this issue and what he has sought to unify the _ this issue and what he has sought to unify the european and american response — unify the european and american response. many experts here think this is— response. many experts here think this is the — response. many experts here think this is the right approach and that he is _ this is the right approach and that he is also — this is the right approach and that he is also projecting a strength by trying _ he is also projecting a strength by trying to— he is also projecting a strength by trying to organise a very stiff sanctions _ trying to organise a very stiff sanctions response, and otherwise if there _ sanctions response, and otherwise if there is— sanctions response, and otherwise if there is an _ sanctions response, and otherwise if there is an invasion. he does get some _ there is an invasion. he does get some pushback from the republican party _ some pushback from the republican party. there is a small minority amongst — party. there is a small minority amongst those who have taken up donald _ amongst those who have taken up donald trump's pro russian, anti—interventionist rhetoric, but by and _ anti—interventionist rhetoric, but by and large, the republican party is with— by and large, the republican party is with the — by and large, the republican party is with the democrats on this. you've — is with the democrats on this. you've got— is with the democrats on this. you've got the traditional republic and hawks who also see this as a line in_ and hawks who also see this as a line in the — and hawks who also see this as a line in the sand, that this could be a punic— line in the sand, that this could be a punic moment. they feel if mr putin— a punic moment. they feel if mr putin goes— a punic moment. they feel if mr putin goes into ukraine, he won't stop. _ putin goes into ukraine, he won't stop. so— putin goes into ukraine, he won't stop, so there has been very strong
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support— stop, so there has been very strong support in— stop, so there has been very strong support in congress for mr biden to push forward, to be pushing forward more _ push forward, to be pushing forward more than _ push forward, to be pushing forward more than he has —— a punic moment. i more than he has —— a punic moment. ithink. _ more than he has —— a punic moment. ithink. given— more than he has —— a punic moment. i think, given the debacle after the chaos— i think, given the debacle after the chaos of— i think, given the debacle after the chaos of the afghanistan withdrawal, ithink— chaos of the afghanistan withdrawal, i think he _ chaos of the afghanistan withdrawal, i think he is— chaos of the afghanistan withdrawal, i think he is seeing as having done a reset— i think he is seeing as having done a reset on— i think he is seeing as having done a reset on his diplomatic record. barbara — a reset on his diplomatic record. barbara in — a reset on his diplomatic record. barbara in washington, lyse in kyiv, thank you very much forjoining us. while borisjohnson is in ukraine, back in westminster, the fallout from monday's initial report by sue gray into those lockdown parties in downing street has continued. the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, says conservative mps still "overwhelmingly" back borisjohnson to stay in his job — although one more among their number has today called on the prime minister to resign. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. after a mauling from mps in public and pleading with his backbenchers in private yesterday, fleeing abroad — even to a potential war zone —
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must have felt like a relief for the prime minister today. but 1,500 miles and a few hours later, the questions he faces at home had followed him to ukraine. he didn't want to say much about them. my focus is entirely on delivering on the priorities of the british people, and they include ensuring that we are secure in our relations with our friends and allies and that our friends and allies are secure. back here in westminster, conversation is still reflecting on the report that said there was rule—breaking at the top of government. not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they've taken the country for fools by insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that's gone on since. borisjohnson's promised a shake—up in how downing street works... are you sticking around, chief whip? ..which means questions for the man in charge of persuading conservative mps to back the prime minister...
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are you making a run for it? ..and ones with the prime minister's chief of staff, too. down the road in parliament, one of mrjohnson's most loyal allies insisted... we're moving on with delivering for the british people. we're implementing the manifesto in which he got an intensely personal mandate in 2019. but others have had enough. people want honesty! yeah, i agree. this conservative backbencher congratulated by a passer—by for talking candidly about his grandma's funeral. i didn't hug my siblings, i didn't hug my parents. i gave a eulogy, and then afterwards i didn't even go to her house for a cup of tea. does the prime minister think i'm a fool? i feel this is tarnishing us all, and the longer it goes on, the more damage it does to the conservative party as a whole. that means finding another leader? it may well do. i've had hundreds of people in my inbox overnight, and they don't feel that they can vote for this government as it stands.
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the prime minister has survived for now, but there are two big questions — for how long and can he recover? even some of borisjohnson's biggest supporters acknowledge privately he has been damaged by this, perhaps irreversibly changing some people's perceptions of him. and this is farfrom over. with a police investigation ongoing, there is still the prospect the prime minister could be found to have broken the law. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. another conservative mp has said they have written a letter trying to trigger a vote in no—confidence in borisjohnson. here is peter aldous. he said... ben wright is in westminster.
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how many letters do we know about now? we how many letters do we know about now? ~ ~ . how many letters do we know about now? . ~' ., ., ~' , how many letters do we know about now? ~ ~ ., ., ,, , now? we think that makes nine. those are the ones — now? we think that makes nine. those are the ones who _ now? we think that makes nine. those are the ones who have _ now? we think that makes nine. those are the ones who have publicly - are the ones who have publicly declared they have written to the chair of the 1922 committee of a calling for a confidence vote. the only person who knows precisely how many letters have been put in is graham brady, and he never says a word. he is the most tightly leapt word. he is the most tightly leapt word around here —— manor in here. in his safe in his office is the true number — could be more, could be considerably more. 5a is the number to trigger a confidence vote. it doesn't feel that we are anywhere close to that moment at the moment. i was just close to that moment at the moment. i wasjust going close to that moment at the moment. i was just going to say, i guess we need to focus on the fact that, first of all, that number is a long way from 5a, but even if it reached, that doesn't mean the prime minister would necessarily get kicked out of number 10. would necessarily get kicked out of number10. . v would necessarily get kicked out of number 10-— number 10. that's exactly right. that would _ number 10. that's exactly right. that would trigger _ number 10. that's exactly right. that would trigger a _ number 10. that's exactly right. that would trigger a vote - number 10. that's exactly right. that would trigger a vote of - that would trigger a vote of confidence. if the prime minister
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chose to stood up which everybody would expect he would, he would require more than 50% of the parliamentary party to vote for him to stay in place. if he gets more than 50%, he can carry on his prime minister. if he loses that confidence vote, he cannot stand in that race to replace them. my feeling is, westminster is nowhere near that point at the moment. there are some who have said publicly that they think the prime minister should go. we heard andrew mitchell, yesterday, a big figure in the party, a former chief whip, save this morning in an interview that this morning in an interview that this whole song around parties is that cursive as battery acid and he had lost faith in the prime minister for privately, there are a number of tory mps agonising but all of this also they were saying they were waiting for sue gray to report before deciding what to do. now, those same mps are agonising, waiting for the police to decide whether anybody should be slapped with a fine for breaking lockdown
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rules. there is a feeling this could get kicked further and further into the year before making a decision about boris johnson's future. other tory mps say, we have to wait for the may elections before making a call on his electoral appeal or not, so i thing this could drag on for sometime. it feels there a smoldering fuse, we're a long way a bank. �* ., ., , , smoldering fuse, we're a long way a bank. �* ., , ., ., ., bank. ben, always great to have you on outside source. _ bank. ben, always great to have you on outside source. thanks - bank. ben, always great to have you on outside source. thanks for - bank. ben, always great to have you on outside source. thanks for your i on outside source. thanks for your help —— we're a way from a bang. the actress and television personality whoopi goldberg has apologised, after saying that the holocaust "was not about race". ms goldberg was speaking on a us talk show when she said that the holocaust involved "two groups of white people". elise preston from cbs has the details. whoopi goldberg and her co—hosts
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were discussing how a tennessee school banned the pulitzer prize—winning world war ii era graphic novel maus over concerns over nudity and profane language. at some point in the discussion, goldberg said the holocaust was not about race. she got immediately pushback by her co—hosts and the controversial remark sparked an uproar here in the states. hours later, she tweeted, "on today's show, i said the holocaust is not about race but about man's inhumanity to man, i should have said it was about both. i think that the holocaust was about the nazis' systematic annihilation of thejewish people, who they deem that inferior race. i stand corrected. thejewish people around the world have always had my support and that will never waver, i am sorry for the hurt i have caused. next, let's hearfrom our
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entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. she is seen as somebody who is a prominent woman, a prominent black woman, one of the only black women to win an acting oscar. what she didn't do yesterday, she didn't deny the scale or the horror of the holocaust in terms of numbers, but as you pointed out, what she did do was say that it wasn't about race. she said it was about two groups of white people and one's treatment of the other. that is more than an oversimplification, that actually is inaccurate, it diminishes the experience of the holocaust, as so many people pointed out who were both upset and offended by what she said. the anti—defamation league's jonathan greenblatt said the holocaust was about the systematic extermination of the jewish people who they deem to be an inferior race. the way she described the holocaust
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was deemed by so many to be upsetting and basically wrong. the holocaust museum tweeted, in what has been widely interpreted as a response to what she said, "racism was central to national socialist ideology. jew were defined by race, not religion. the manchester united footballer mason greenwood has been further arrested on suspicion of sexual assault and threats to kill. the 20—year—old premier league star was initially arrested on sunday afternoon on suspicion of the rape and assault of a young woman. our sports editor dan roan is at old trafford. manchester united striker mason greenwood is now set to spend a third night in police custody. he was originally arrested on sunday on suspicion of rape and assault. and he has been questioned ever since. that was after a woman posted allegations on social media. and in a statement tonight, greater manchester police said that the suspect continues to be
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questioned after magistrates authorised an extension until tomorrow. following inquiries so far, they said, he has since been further arrested on suspicion of sexual assault and threats to kill. manchester united, meanwhile, have just issued a statement of their own, saying that it reiterates its strong condemnation of violence of any kind. and they say that, as previously communicated, mason greenwood will neither train or play for the club. his sponsor nike yesterday also said that they were suspending their relationship with him. greenwood has worked his way up here at the club from the academy. he made his debut in 2019, and he's become a key member of the first—team squad. he is yet to respond to these allegations. next we go to wiltshire in the west country of england.
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the first southern koala ever born in europe has entered the world. the birth is part of a conservation drive to learn more about the animals, which are under threat. they normally live, of course, in australia. the bbc�*sjonah fisher is at longleat safari park with that story. i have got a little bit of news for you. james, a keeper at longleat safari park, is on a zoom with chris... oh, well, let's hear it! ..a koala expert in southern australia. so, i'd like to introduce you to — obviously, you know violet, one of your lovely adelaide koalas, but she also has a joey. oh, that's fantastic news, james! well done. congratulations, you're an uncle! absolutely brilliant. i know. yeah, it's a little overwhelming. it's been quite a journey to get here. three and a half years ago, violet was a koala pioneer, travelling from chris' park in australia to start england's only koala colony at longleat. when it was first born, violet's joey was the size of a jelly bean, and spent all of its time in its mother's pouch. now, six months on, the park and the koala are going public,
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and the joey is also starting to snack on more than just milk. so what the little joey is eating is called pap. it's recycled koala poo from violet, which means that it's gone through her, which takes the toxin levels out of the leaf, meaning that it's safe for the joey, but gets it used to the leaves that it will eat in its future life. so there are two subspecies of koala — the northern koala, and what violet is, which is a southern koala, which is a bit bigger and hairier than its northern cousins. oh, look — it'sjust popping out there. they're probably the fussiest animal that we have. keeping the koalas happy so far from home is a major undertaking. if they don't like it, they will let you know very, very quickly. they only eat eucalyptus, some of which is grown specially for them in the grounds at longleat. growling with a new baby koala on site, this male is trying to persuade his partner to try for another. growling
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you don't have to be an expert in koala body language to recognise a polite "no"! jonah fisher, bbc news. thanks to jonah for that thanks tojonah for that report. i will see you in a couple of minutes here on outside source. hello. after a sunny end to the day for many, as the winds ease down for a time through tonight, it may turn briefly chilly. but, ifanything, milderair is on the way, and with it will come thicker cloud, some patchy rain or drizzle, all linked into this weather front here. it's not produced much through the day, but it gets a bit more active as it works its way northwards and eastwards through the night and into the morning, all around this area of high pressure. the air�*s coming off the atlantic by the end of the night. you can see it here, on the forward edge of it. rain at times, scotland, northern england, and also developing later in the night across some eastern
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parts of england too. not quite getting the milder air into the far northeast of scotland, 2—5 celsius here into the morning, so a chilly start. but very mild elsewhere, with temperatures around 9 or 10 degrees. and that milder air, as i said, is coming all the way from the mid—atlantic, around this area of high pressure. there's our weather front to begin with, northern, eastern scotland, down through eastern england. outbreaks of rain around first thing. it's slowly turning a little bit drier, though we'll continue rain at times in the north of scotland. parts of orkney and shetland staying in the colder air, a blustery day here with sunshine and showers. but the sunshine will break through at times in eastern parts of scotland. and the cloud will break across wales, the midlands and southern england. the breeze coming off the atlantic, by this stage, much lighter than we saw through today, but a noticeable breeze at that, lifting temperatures to around 12 or 13 degrees in the sunnier spots in the south. 10 degrees in aberdeenshire after that chilly start, but staying cold across shetland. even here, though, it'll turn a bit milder as we go through wednesday night into thursday. into thursday, though, we're in between these two weather fronts.
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and in between these two weather fronts. the warm se warm and the warm sector. there is the warm front pushing toward scandinavia. the approaching and between which will see some patchy rain and drizzle around. fair bit of cloud at times, but some sunnier breaks as the breeze picks up once again. and by the end of the day, we'll see more in the way of heavy rain for western scotland, into the west of northern ireland. that brings a change. milder airfor most, but notice 9 in aberdeen, just 4 in stornoway. there's the chilliest air of the week on the way through thursday night into friday, behind this cold front, which will work its way south. it's bringing us all some rain through thursday night, clearing away from the southeast corner first light on friday morning, lingering a little bit longer in the channel islands, but then sunny spells to most in the south and east. a few showers dotted around in those blustery northwest winds, most frequent across the north and west of the country, with a mixture of rain, hail, sleet and, yes, cold enough for a bit of snow too.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. european this is outside source. leaders have been arriving european leaders have been arriving in ukraine to show their support and to try and deter russia from considering any attack. by, to try and deter russia from considering any attack. a further russian invasion _ considering any attack. a further russian invasion of _ considering any attack. a further russian invasion of ukraine - considering any attack. a further. russian invasion of ukraine would considering any attack. a further - russian invasion of ukraine would be a political disaster, a humanitarian disaster, in my view it would also be for russia, for the world a
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military disaster.— be for russia, for the world a military disaster. vladimir putin meanwhile _ military disaster. vladimir putin meanwhile is _ military disaster. vladimir putin meanwhile is accusing - military disaster. vladimir putin meanwhile is accusing the - military disaster. vladimir putin meanwhile is accusing the west j military disaster. vladimir putin i meanwhile is accusing the west to using ukraine as a tool to try and contain russia. in miramar a year now since the cooler people of the marking by taking the streets in defiance of the military. and the world health organization says tens of thousands of medical waste from the pandemic are a threat to the environment and also to human health. it's a year since the military crackdown on dissent. it's a year since the military the un is warning violence in myanmar has descended into civil categorises this. we think we are on the verge of the civil war because the verge of the civil war because the response of the other people who don't want to be killed. so they have been organising this militia. i
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mean, of course the forces not so big so they have victims of air strikes, drones, of killings, bessie village burnings etc. fin strikes, drones, of killings, bessie village burnings etc.— village burnings etc. on the elements — village burnings etc. on the elements of _ village burnings etc. on the elements of the _ village burnings etc. on the elements of the civil - village burnings etc. on the elements of the civil war i village burnings etc. on the i elements of the civil war there village burnings etc. on the - elements of the civil war there now the casualties, the attacks across the casualties, the attacks across the country, is it not time to call this is it is a civil war) yes, i agree. so dui now says this is a civil war. exactly a year ago the military ousted. the burmese mark today by holding a silent strike in defiance of the strike. people clapped out 4pm local time, the streets were empty, shops were shot. the residents told the start and to punish business owners who didn't open. also a about a dozen
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protesters demonstrated against the military, one of those demonstrators through pain, others carried smoking flares. to understand is that we need to go right back to february the 1st, need to go right back to february the ist, 2021. in need to go right back to february the 1st, 2021. in the capital people woke up to soldiers and tanks in the up woke up to soldiers and tanks in the up that day the newly elected democratic government was supposed to be sworn in. and said over 100 elected officials including the countries de facto leader were detained. protests were immediate. you remember the pictures, millions joined the national civil disobedience movement and gets what was happening. they were loud and they would be so. you also remember these pictures of the brutal crackdown that followed. it continues today for the up according to monitoring groups 11,000 people have been arbitrarily detained about 1500 people have been killed. many young pro—democracy activists who resisted the military or forced into hiding. one of them...— hiding. one of them. .. since the cou hiding. one of them. .. since the coop started _ hiding. one of them. .. since the coup started we've _ hiding. one of them. .. since the coup started we've clearly - hiding. one of them. .. since the
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coup started we've clearly seen l hiding. one of them. .. since the . coup started we've clearly seen that now is the time the military chart showing their true colors. they been hiding this on your draught a constitution, and they were using the civilian government and everyone else as a player of their script. now in the wake of coup attempt we all realise that this is all fake. so we are now on our own path to have our own where we write our own script for our truly new nation for fair democratic union. i feel like script for our truly new nation for fair democratic union. ifeel like i was so confused in the past ten years. but now it means a much more clearer that military never change, they never change their ideology. and they are not the one who can lead us to where we were supposed to. we are the only ones, ourselves, we need to lead ourselves to where we are supposed to. that's the main! the main i have now.
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a year on, the situation is much more dangerous. you can see from this graphs that in the coup's immediate aftermath, most civilians died in the crack down on protests. now the rising death toll is because of combat, as civilians take up arms against the military. the situation is now being compared to the civil war in syria. this is un human rights michelle bachelet has been speaking to the bbc�*s rebecca heschke. the truth is the international community has not been very effective and lacked a sense of purpose, i agree on map atop the international community has struck stronger but also the regional actors, their important there like india, china, japan, they need to do more. unfortunately, i'm frustrated because we have very little tools other than speaking out. so for me. there is evidence of this being a civil war. data from the ground shows fighting is increasingly coordinated
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and spreading to urban centres which haven't seen armed resistance to the military previously. many of those taking up arms are civilians — who joined the protests a year ago. a warning, this report from rebecca henshke is distressing from the start. this is the aftermath of a brutal raid by the military on a village in central maymar. the bodies of six mends were found. they were the ones who couldn't run. three were elderly, two had a mental health condition. some had their hands tied as well as ropes around their neck. this man's body showed signs of torture. his widow says he stayed to look after their animals. translation: he had a limp after falling from a palm tree, they must�*ve seen he was disabled. he was old enough to be their father or grandfather and they killed him. i
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am heartbroken. this grandfather and they killed him. i am heartbroken.— grandfather and they killed him. i am heartbroken. , ., ., , ., am heartbroken. this man was rounded u . am heartbroken. this man was rounded u- in the am heartbroken. this man was rounded up in the same — am heartbroken. this man was rounded up in the same group _ am heartbroken. this man was rounded up in the same group but _ am heartbroken. this man was rounded up in the same group but managed - am heartbroken. this man was rounded up in the same group but managed to l up in the same group but managed to escape by pretending to be dead. he says soldiers were looking for resistance fighters put up members of the civilian militia network called the people's defence forces or pdf. . ,, . ., ., or pdf. translation: we wanted our names, we or pdf. translation: we wanted our names. we ask. _ or pdf. translation: we wanted our names, we ask, are _ or pdf. translation: we wanted our names, we ask, are you _ or pdf. translation: we wanted our names, we ask, are you the _ or pdf. translation: we wanted our names, we ask, are you the pdf? - names, we ask, are you the pdf? everyone — names, we ask, are you the pdf? everyone said they were in. after while _ everyone said they were in. after while a _ everyone said they were in. after while a short man with small boxcars walked _ while a short man with small boxcars walked in. _ while a short man with small boxcars walked in, he started killing people say you _ walked in, he started killing people say you are pdf fighters. the military is — say you are pdf fighters. the military is now _ say you are pdf fighters. tie: military is now under attack say you are pdf fighters. tue: military is now under attack across the country from the people's defence forces. what started a year ago as peaceful protest against the military coup is now a guerrilla war. : ,, : military coup is now a guerrilla war. : ,, ~ , :, war. translation: there is no country we _
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war. translation: there is no country we can't _ war. translation: there is no country we can't rely _ war. translation: there is no country we can't rely on. - war. translation: there is nol country we can't rely on. there's war. translation: there is no - country we can't rely on. there's no international organisation can rely on. , :, :, , international organisation can rely on. ,:, :, , :, international organisation can rely on. ,:, :,:, �*, on. his name means dragon, he's emerred on. his name means dragon, he's emerged as _ on. his name means dragon, he's emerged as one — on. his name means dragon, he's emerged as one of— on. his name means dragon, he's emerged as one of the _ on. his name means dragon, he's emerged as one of the prominent| emerged as one of the prominent leaders of the armed resistance. before the coup he was a businessman. now he controls pdf units fighting with whatever weapons they can find. units fighting with whatever weapons they can find-— they can find. translation: i took u . they can find. translation: i took u- arms in they can find. translation: i took op arms in the _ they can find. translation: i took up arms in the hope _ they can find. translation: i took up arms in the hope our weapons i up arms in the hope our weapons would bring justice for the whole society. i keep fighting for that as long as i live. the society. i keep fighting for that as long as i live-— long as i live. the pdf are being backed by _ long as i live. the pdf are being backed by ethnic— long as i live. the pdf are being backed by ethnic armies - long as i live. the pdf are being backed by ethnic armies of - long as i live. the pdf are being backed by ethnic armies of been fighting the military for decades in the border areas. nearjungle camps thousands of young protesters have been trained in weapons of war. translation: i never dreamt of handling — translation: i never dreamt of handling a real gun or any other weapon — handling a real gun or any other weapon. he handling a real gun or any other wea on. , , [w handling a real gun or any other weaon. , , 'f~ �* :, weapon. he is “ust 18. before the cou she weapon. he is 'ust 18. before the coup she was— weapon. he isjust 18. before the coup she was planning _ weapon. he isjust18. before the coup she was planning to - weapon. he isjust18. before the coup she was planning to study i coup she was planning to study economics. now she's in a pdf unit
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in central maymar attacking state infrastructure and military informers. : ,, : informers. translation: ifeel nothin: informers. translation: ifeel nothing about _ informers. translation: ifeel nothing about killing _ informers. translation: ifeel nothing about killing soldiers i informers. translation: ifeel. nothing about killing soldiers back from military dictators. our people are in_ from military dictators. our people are in deep— from military dictators. our people are in deep trouble because of them. some of the military�*s most brutal attacks have happened in kayah state. 200,000 people there have fled violence in the past year. according to the guardian, 35 civilians were killed by soldiers in december and their bodies burned in their cars. two were charity workers for save the children. the un says some of the atrocities amount to war crimes. this is tom andrews, the un's special rapporteur on human rights. it is brutalising the people of maymar. what is happening is they now can set or the people of maymar to be the enemy. so there is a campaign of terror taking many, many forms. for example, the poverty rate it maymar now, over half the
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population is now estimated to have fallen within under the poverty range. we now have a humanitarian disaster and they are using humanitarian aid is a political weapon. they blocking convoys of relief supplies getting into these villages, terrorising those who are driving the truck come asking for their mobile phones to see if there's any activity whatsoever connected to the opposition. just about any way you can imagine, including arbitrary detention. we found thousands of people, a terror campaign under way. the military — for its part — says anyone who opposes its rule are terrorists. and it's vowing to hold onto power. today it extended its national state of emergency for six months. it also realeased this video. this is said to be a pro—military demonstration in an unspecified location. diplomat x efforts have been effective. russia and china, powerful allies is failed to
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intervene. regional talks also have and stop the un develop meant programme in the un develop meant programme in the asia—pacific. all parties in the conflict have to find a way to peace. i think people have the right to protest peacefully but the minute this moves, which it is into conflict it all ends with all parties taking two arms then there is less light in the end of there is less light in the end of the tunnel. so as our special envoy has said, i hope the two of them can get to the country, speak to everyone for the has to be part of their talks but social orders and national unity government. they've got to see how this can be a cessation of hostilities was of a humanitarian pause is a necessary pa rt necessary part of this. it's not enough. it's not enough. the bbc�*s rebecca henschkejoins me now. economic and humanitarian impact
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of the civil war, is either side when you look at the different sides of this argument is there anything remotely likely to common ground? know, there isn't. the chance of getting to that negotiation table is very slim. what we hear from the government is very clear, all political prisoners need to be released. the democratically elected government needs to be recognised in the military needs to be removed from the political process. on the other side what we hear it from the military is that they will not even speak to the international community, to the united nations envoy has been blocked from entering the country. when i asked the military spokesperson about this he said that the un statements were not constructive and said that they wouldn't engage with the international community, the un particularly and then of course the government that they see as terrorists unless the united nations recognises them as the legitimate
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rulers of maymar. which of course the united nations as they will not do at this stage. t the united nations as they will not do at this stage.— do at this stage. i want to understand _ do at this stage. i want to understand better - do at this stage. i want to understand better that i do at this stage. i want to - understand better that statement do at this stage. i want to _ understand better that statement you heard from the un in your interview about the style being a civil war. to what degree do the opponents of the military coordinated work together across the country? iloathed the military coordinated work together across the country? what we are seeinr together across the country? what we are seeing is — together across the country? what we are seeing is loose _ together across the country? what we are seeing is loose networks - together across the country? what we are seeing is loose networks of i are seeing is loose networks of civilian militia at work some of the people defence forces without there being backed by ethnic armies up near the thai border. what we are seeing increasing coordination across these units. when this first started as an armed rebellion, people were literally taking up arms with whatever they had come rifles in such cases for the people were making bombs. and there was a sense that this resistance would be very easily crushed by the well—trained. but that hasn't happened. what we are seeing now is a national unity government which is declared war on the military is increasingly
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coordinating these attacks. and putting the military under a lot more pressure than many people thought would happen. so even the military spokes person, when i spoke to him and admitted that they were in control of parts of the country. also, we've heard from fighters that i'm in contact closely and they are complaining that in some places they have control perhaps of 80% of that area. of course this is now a propaganda war with both sides claiming different. what's clear that the bbc�*s analysed is that this is now a nationwide conflict, intense coordinated and are very much a nation and state of civil war. , : : :, much a nation and state of civil war. , : ., ~ much a nation and state of civil war. , : :, ~ i:, much a nation and state of civil war. , :, ,, ., war. rebecca, thank you for the sto . inafew in a few minutes we can talk about borisjohnson. he has been reviewed by the speaker of the house of commons for making an accusation for
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making... inde keir starmer. you may have heard of world, it's the simple word game invented by a man for his girlfriend during lockdown. six guesses to find the five letter word, and it's free. the puzzle first appeared in november but it went viral. millions now play it. and now the new york times has bought it — for a price said to be seven figures. our technology correspondent marc cieslak reports. i got it in three guesses. three. two this morning. i think it was like five. i've got it the first time. no! yeah! no, i promise it, i swearto god. how many goes does it take you to solve the daily wordle puzzle? wordle has proved an online smash. it's the kind of game that offers its legions of fans the opportunity to take a few moments out of their day,
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the sort of thing they can enjoy while taking a break. so far, its strength and popularity seems to be in its simplicity and the fact that, up until now, it's been free. once a day, a new challenge arrives on the wordle website at midnight. the player has six attempts to guess a five—letter word. after each attempt, correct letters that are in the right place turn green. if it's the right letter but in the wrong place, it turns yellow. if a letter isn't in the word at all, it turns grey. and that's it. keep going until you correctly guess the day's word. created by software engineer josh wardle as a fun pastime for his partner, it's garnered millions of fans online. it's also attracted the attention of the new york times, who have bought the game from mr wardle for an undisclosed low seven—figure sum. it's free to play. we don't want to restrict the game as it comes to our site. i am susie dent and i am a lexicographer and a linguist. hopefully, they will realise just how much the world cherishes
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wordle at the moment. and they've said they'll keep it free for a while, so fingers crossed they'll stick to that. marc cieslak, bbc news. here in the bbc news room. our lead story is that president putin is said the west is failed to satisfy security demands or tensions around you can continue to ratchet up. now the world health organization says the world health organization says the vast amount of waste that's been generated as everyone's responded to the pandemic is a threat to the environment and a threat to human out. tens of thousands of tonnes of use protective equipment pbe along with needles, lateral flow tests and other medical ways is all been produced during the pandemic. much of it has ended up in landfill. the
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who file most of the 1.5 billion medical items distributed by that un and the first few months of covid ended up as rubbish. the who bears in mind is a un agency. which all disposable gloves with the biggest consist attributed to ways according to one estimate more than 3 billion certain use mask were discarded worldwide every day in the first year of the pandemic. thank you very much forjoining us. i suppose the question is, it was this avoidable? definitely. we need to start with rational use which is very much needed. we want to protect our health workers, we need to protect our patients but we need to protect then environment. all those ways, all those tonnes and tonnes and millions of tonnes of ways will end “p millions of tonnes of ways will end up in the landfills, in some cases around the world many countries they don't have the capacity to do the waste management meant proper, in an
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adequate way and we let that burn and then we will have dioxins that will pollute the water, environment and in the environment will pollute ourselves with the yes, it was avoidable. ourselves with the yes, it was avoidable-— ourselves with the yes, it was avoidable. ~ :, avoidable. we needed those facemask, we still need — avoidable. we needed those facemask, we still need those _ avoidable. we needed those facemask, we still need those lateral— avoidable. we needed those facemask, we still need those lateral flow - we still need those lateral flow tests, if we are a doctor still need pbe. how do we avoid creating that waste when we are being advised to use masks to do lateral flows for doctors to that equipment? th use masks to do lateral flows for doctors to that equipment? in many wa s. we doctors to that equipment? in many ways- we want _ doctors to that equipment? in many ways. we want to _ doctors to that equipment? in many ways. we want to protect _ doctors to that equipment? in many ways. we want to protect our i doctors to that equipment? in many ways. we want to protect our health care workers and our citizens but we can do it reducing the amount of waste we produce by centralising the procurement, using material that is more biodegradable, more eco—friendly, buy back rationalizing the use many times we use material that was nonessential. for instance
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gloves, we have reports that they are almost 50% of the occasion we are almost 50% of the occasion we are using material that was not essential covers for shoes, gloves that were not recommended. we can promote the use of recyclable material repackage in a different way, reusing all packaging and moving toward a type of material and thinking of the way we recycle ways. finally, we are broadcasting in the uk but also around the world. is there a country you can highlight and say well, i think this country is making good progress, this country is due to better? t is making good progress, this country is due to better? i think we have some — country is due to better? i think we have some anti-docents _ country is due to better? i think we have some anti-docents some. i country is due to better? i think we l have some anti-docents some. there have some anti—docents some. there is a campaign in the uk about gloves off which is very good. in australia date use a material that they can reuse and they are now using it for roads or building material. so if you go in this idea of recycling,
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reuse, event, reuse, reduce in a rational way i think we can obtain good resource and i'll be part of this. t good resource and i'll be part of this. :, :, :, :, :, this. i got a minute or two would ask ou this. i got a minute or two would ask you want _ this. i got a minute or two would ask you want for _ this. i got a minute or two would ask you want for the _ this. i got a minute or two would ask you want for the question, . this. i got a minute or two wouldl ask you want for the question, let me ask you more broadly about the pandemic. what is your assessment of the current state, particularly in europe, what is the who does position on mccright at the moment? i think you heard today our director, his call for again classes approach in a course in each country is different. we require very good analysis of the situation and put in place on balance, whether the vaccination coverage, what are the measures we can afford? and then be cautious until we can finally see light at the end of this tunnel. thank you very much forjoining us. we appreciate you sharing those lessons that the who says it's learning.
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pressure has remained on boris johnson sense report released by sucre. bbc struggling to back the prime minister or call for him to go they say. mrjohnson is fighting for their support despite the report binding failures of leadership and judgment. questions are being raised about the prime ministers behaviour in office. on monday then please consider the report and in the middle of the debate johnson of the debatejohnson said there is. this leader of the opposition, a former director of public prosecutions, mr speaker, who spent most of his time prosecuting journalism, failing to prosecutejimmy savile! there's no evidence to support this claim. keir starmer was director of public prosecutions from 2008 to 2013. jimmy savile turned out to be one of the uk's most prolific sexual predators. but keir starmer didn't fail to prosecute him. bbc reality check notes...
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there's isn't evidence — but this idea has circulated online for years. this graphic on facebook calls keir starmer the "man who failed to prosecutejimmy savile in spite of evidence, threw out the case and then earned a knighthood". the knighthood is true. the rest isn't. and as patrick maguire from the times points out... but on monday the idea moved from the darker corners of the internet to the home of british democracy. sebastian payne from the financial times reports... the prime minister went ahead anyway. and deputy prime minister dominic raab describes what happened in these terms. this is the cut and thrust of parliamentary debates and exchanges. shortly after these comments tory mp julian smith turned to twitter. in the past, mr smith served borisjohnson as a minister. but now he wrote.
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well the man responsible for the �*cut and thrust�* is house of commons speaker lindsay hoyle. he too addressed the issue. iam farfrom i am far from satisfied that the comments in question were appropriate on this occasion. keir starmer himself put it this way, telling sky news. when asked about it, mrjohnson's spokesperson said... "the prime minister stands by what he said in the house." and if that was on the specifics, culture secretary nadine dorries offered a broader reassurance in a channel 4 news interview on monday... but on this occasion, he's provided no evidence that he did. a british airways plane got caught up a british airways plane got caught up in high whenjust
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a british airways plane got caught up in high when just today as storm cory swept across the uk. the aircraft was affected by a gust of wind as he came in to land in heathrow. as you can see the plain sale look like it would hit the runway. luckily, thanks and skill of the pilot the landing was aborted thoughts minute and the plane did eventually land safely. thank goodness for that. scary moment there. a quick reminder of her lead story. a number of european leaders have been engaging with the tensions around the situation in ukraine. that includes prime minister boris johnson who travelled to ukraine to meet residency landscape and between vladimir putin and the leader of hungry as well. the fundamentals of the situation having changed with the situation having changed with the russians demanding there is a promise that ukraine doesn'tjoin nato. also demanding that nato rolls back its military deployments in eastern europe and america saying thatis eastern europe and america saying that is simply not going to happen. lots of activity to try and avoid any form of conflict but no movement
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in the positions of the two key protagonists. thank you for watching. i will see you soon. hello. after a sunny end to the day for many, as the winds ease down for a time through tonight, it may turn briefly chilly. but, ifanything, milderair is on the way, and with it will come thicker cloud, some patchy rain or drizzle, all linked into this weather front here. it's not produced much through the day, but it gets a bit more active as it works its way northwards and eastwards through the night and into the morning, all around this area of high pressure. the air�*s coming off the atlantic by the end of the night. you can see it here, on the forward edge of it. rain at times, scotland, northern england, and also developing later in the night across some eastern parts of england too. not quite getting the milder air into the far northeast of scotland, 2—5 celsius here into the morning, so a chilly start. but very mild elsewhere, with temperatures around 9 or 10 degrees. and that milder air, as i said,
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is coming all the way from the mid—atlantic, around this area of high pressure. there's our weather front to begin with, northern, eastern scotland, down through eastern england. outbreaks of rain around first thing. it's slowly turning a little bit drier, though we'll continue rain at times in the north of scotland. parts of orkney and shetland staying in the colder air, a blustery day here with sunshine and showers. but the sunshine will break through at times in eastern parts of scotland. and the cloud will break across wales, the midlands and southern england. the breeze coming off the atlantic, by this stage, much lighter than we saw through today, but a noticeable breeze at that, lifting temperatures to around 12 or 13 degrees in the sunnier spots in the south. 10 degrees in aberdeenshire after that chilly start, but staying cold across shetland. even here, though, it'll turn a bit milder as we go through wednesday night into thursday. into thursday, though, we're in between these two weather fronts. there's the warm front pushing toward scandinavia. approaching cold fronts bit of drizzle around. fair bit of cloud at times, but some sunnier breaks
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as the breeze picks up once again. and by the end of the day, we'll see more in the way of heavy rain for western scotland, into the west of northern ireland. that brings a change. milder airfor most, but notice 9 in aberdeen, just 4 in stornoway. there's the chilliest air of the week on the way through thursday night into friday, behind this cold front, which will work its way south. it's bringing us all some rain through thursday night, clearing away from the southeast corner first light on friday morning, lingering a little bit longer in the channel islands, but then sunny spells to most in the south and east. a few showers dotted around in this blustery northwest winds, most frequent across the north and west of the country, with a mixture of rain, hail, sleet and, yes, cold enough for a bit of snow too. bye for now.
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this is bbc news, i'm tim willcox. the headlines at 8pm... borisjohnson urges russia to step back and engage in diplomacy as he flies to ukraine. he warned there'd be consequences for russia if any soldiers cross the border. we are also preparing a package of sanctions and other measures to be enacted at the moment the first russian toecap crosses further into ukrainian territory. manchester united footballer mason greenwood has been further arrested on suspicion of sexual assault and threats to kill. the police officers at london's charing cross accused of bullying, misogyny, discrimination and sexual harassment. britain's looming energy bill crisis we explain why bills are about to rise so steeply.

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