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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 2, 2022 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. a pledge to close the gap between between rich and poor communities — the government sets out its levelling up plan. it includes improvements to transport, education and life expectancy — but labour says it lacks funding and new ideas. wolverhampton is one of the towns that could benefit — i'll be finding out what people here make of the new proposals. the police questioning manchester united footballer mason greenwood over allegations of rape and assault, have until later today to charge him.
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an extra hour in school for some pupils in wales as heads try out changes to the academic year. the winter olympics torch relay kicks off in beijing as china's capital gears up for the games. good morning. quite a lot of cloud producing light rain in the north and east. not as windy as it has been but it is still going to be mild. details later in the programme. good morning. it's wednesday, the 2nd of february. the government will today set out its long—delayed manifesto plan to level up the lives of millions of people across the uk. the proposals include a series of pledges to improve education, public transport and housing in some of the most disadvantaged areas of the country. labour have dismissed the project as more "slogans and strategies". our political correspondent jessica parker reports. we are a government committed to levelling up. it is absolutely what
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levelling up is all about. what we're doing is levelling up. level up across the whole of the uk. ministers have talked about it a lot. i'm here to talk about levelling up. michael gove will talk about it more today. levelling up was at the heart of the conservatives' 2019 election campaign. plans to be outlined include plans to be outlined include creating more regional mayors, with london style powers. bringing public transport closer to london standards. giving the large majority of the country access to 4g broadband. and eliminating illiteracy in primary school leavers. many of these ideas may sound familiar. but labour says it amounts to shuffling the deck chairs. a report from the national audit office says the government hasn't always properly monitored how well its local spending plans are worked. their department hasn't always got a
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very good grasp of what it is trying to deliver with the money it is pouring in. this is taxpayers money. we want to see outcomes. that means, in economic terms, jobs and thriving —— thriving business areas. we are not clear that is going to happen. there is a long way to go to prove this money is being spent as well as the teller cities. the government plans to give these national missions status in law, with a system to measure progress, and says it wants to work with devolved government to achieve its aims across the uk. borisjohnson, who has been fighting for his job, he may want to show he still has an eye on a longer term agenda. jessica parker, bbc news in westminster. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent adam fleming. there are some distractions on the road today? — there are some distractions on the
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road today? good morning. some of the newspapers have been looking into downing street parties again. some _ into downing street parties again. some of— into downing street parties again. some of the parties we already knew about _ some of the parties we already knew about. they claim the prime minister was at _ about. they claim the prime minister was at some — about. they claim the prime minister was at some of them, which we didn't know_ was at some of them, which we didn't know he _ was at some of them, which we didn't know he was— was at some of them, which we didn't know he was at. that is still speculation, which downing street is refusing _ speculation, which downing street is refusing to _ speculation, which downing street is refusing to confirm, and because sue gray's _ refusing to confirm, and because sue gray's report— refusing to confirm, and because sue gray's report was a slimmed down version, _ gray's report was a slimmed down version, because she couldn't say everything — version, because she couldn't say everything she wanted to say because of the _ everything she wanted to say because of the met _ everything she wanted to say because of the met police investigation, that is, — of the met police investigation, that is, i— of the met police investigation, that is, i think, going to remain a mystery— that is, i think, going to remain a mystery for— that is, i think, going to remain a mystery for now, unless we can get some _ mystery for now, unless we can get some more — mystery for now, unless we can get some more witnesses that can actually— some more witnesses that can actually back up that story. but what _ actually back up that story. but what we — actually back up that story. but what we have seen is the theme this week, _ what we have seen is the theme this week, the _ what we have seen is the theme this week, the government trying to get on with— week, the government trying to get on with governing. the prime minister— on with governing. the prime minister went to on with governing. the prime ministerwent to ukraine on with governing. the prime minister went to ukraine yesterday, to boister— minister went to ukraine yesterday, to bolster the ukrainian government with ail— to bolster the ukrainian government with all those russian troops massing _ with all those russian troops massing on the border. and today we're _ massing on the border. and today we're going to get from michael gove this flagship policy of the about levelling up. so that every bit of the country feels as rich and successful and nice as every other bit of— successful and nice as every other bit of the — successful and nice as every other bit of the country. so we are going to get— bit of the country. so we are going to get a _ bit of the country. so we are going to get a huge paper today, which is made _ to get a huge paper today, which is made up _ to get a huge paper today, which is
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made up of— to get a huge paper today, which is made up of loads of things. the main stock— made up of loads of things. the main stock is _ made up of loads of things. the main stock is we _ made up of loads of things. the main stock is we have got 12 missions, they— stock is we have got 12 missions, they are — stock is we have got 12 missions, they are called. you would have called _ they are called. you would have called them targets in the old days. it called them targets in the old days. it includes — called them targets in the old days. it includes everything from transport, education, skills, health. _ transport, education, skills, health, technology and even something called pride in place, people — something called pride in place, people feeling happier about their town centre or their village or their— town centre or their village or their suburb actually looks. and the main _ their suburb actually looks. and the main way— their suburb actually looks. and the main way for delivering this is going — main way for delivering this is going to — main way for delivering this is going to be more devolution. in other— going to be more devolution. in other words, going to be more devolution. in otherwords, more mares. so some places— otherwords, more mares. so some places in— otherwords, more mares. so some places in england have already got merrimacks with a lot of powers, some _ merrimacks with a lot of powers, some places have merrimack that don't _ some places have merrimack that don't have — some places have merrimack that don't have a lot of powers. it is about— don't have a lot of powers. it is about spreading the model everywhere. what i would say is this is about— everywhere. what i would say is this is about the — everywhere. what i would say is this is about the government and the civil service getting ready to deiiver— civil service getting ready to deliver levelling up over the next ten years — deliver levelling up over the next ten years. it is not the actual ieveiiing _ ten years. it is not the actual levelling up itself happening straightaway. thank you very much for that. the minister for levelling up, michael gove, willjoin us here on breakfast at around
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seven—thirty this morning. police have until later today to either charge or release manchester united footballer mason greenwood, over allegations of rape and assault. he was further arrested yesterday, on suspicion of sexual assault and making threats to kill. our reporter dave guest is at old trafford for us this morning. what is the latest? yes, good nrorning _ what is the latest? yes, good morning. mason greenwood has, of course, _ morning. mason greenwood has, of course, spent a third night in police — course, spent a third night in police custody after three days of questioning by detectives. he was arrested _ questioning by detectives. he was arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and _ arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and assault. his arrest foiiowed _ rape and assault. his arrest followed claims made online by a woman— followed claims made online by a woman who said the 20—year—old had assaulted _ woman who said the 20—year—old had assaulted her. yesterday came that further— assaulted her. yesterday came that further development when greater manchester police said he had been further— manchester police said he had been further arrested on suspicion of making — further arrested on suspicion of making threats to kill and sexual assault — making threats to kill and sexual assault. now, when the allegations against _ assault. now, when the allegations against him first became public on sunday. _ against him first became public on sunday, manchester united announced that he _ sunday, manchester united announced that he would not be training with or playing — that he would not be training with or playing for the club until further— or playing for the club until further notice. it said in a
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statement did not condone violence of any— statement did not condone violence of any kind, a position it reiterated yesterday. on monday, of course, _ reiterated yesterday. on monday, of course, the — reiterated yesterday. on monday, of course, the sportswear company nike said it _ course, the sportswear company nike said it was _ course, the sportswear company nike said it was suspending its relationship with the player because it was— relationship with the player because it was deeply concerned about these allegations. and yesterday, the computer game developer ea sports said mason greenwood would be removed — said mason greenwood would be removed from its products, including fifa 22 _ removed from its products, including fifa 22. magistrates had granted police _ fifa 22. magistrates had granted police extra time to continue questioning mason greenwood. that is due to _ questioning mason greenwood. that is due to expire later today. what happens — due to expire later today. what happens next is unknown. meanwhile, there has— happens next is unknown. meanwhile, there has been no public comment yet on behaif— there has been no public comment yet on behalf of— there has been no public comment yet on behalf of the player.— on behalf of the player. dave, thank ou ve on behalf of the player. dave, thank you very much- _ shoppers are seeing the highest price rises in almost a decade according to new data. figures from the british retail consortium, and the research company nielsen, show that annual shop inflation injanuary, almost doubled compared with december.
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hormone replacement therapy could be made available over the counter without the need for a prescription. a public consultation will be held on the proposal. last year it was announced at the cost of repeat prescriptions for hrt would be significantly reduced in england. the russian president has accused the us of trying to draw russia into war with its neighbour. vladimir putin has denied he is planning an invasion. this comes as boris johnson visited ukraine yesterday. and he is expected to talk to vladimir putin at some point this week. whoopi goldberg has been suspended as presenter of the american talk show, the view, for two weeks. it's after she made comments, and apologised for claiming the holocaust wasn't about race. the president of abc news, kim godwin, said she'd asked ms goldberg to take time to reflect and learn about the impact of her "wrong and hurtful" comments. beijing has kicked off the winter olympics torch relay,
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ahead of the opening ceremony on friday. later today, the games begin with team gb getting things started in the curling. our china correspondent stephen mcdonell is in beijing. stephen, how has china prepared for these games? well, excitement is building here. but on _ well, excitement is building here. but on the — well, excitement is building here. but on the streets of beijing here, there _ but on the streets of beijing here, there aren't people lining these major— there aren't people lining these major arteries waiting for the torch relay— major arteries waiting for the torch relay to— major arteries waiting for the torch relay to come through. that's because — relay to come through. that's because it _ relay to come through. that's because it is a very scaled—down torch _ because it is a very scaled—down torch relay _ because it is a very scaled—down torch relay. it is not one involving mass _ torch relay. it is not one involving mass bubiic — torch relay. it is not one involving mass public participation. there are only three _ mass public participation. there are only three days of the relay leading up only three days of the relay leading up to— only three days of the relay leading up to the _ only three days of the relay leading up to the opening ceremony on friday — up to the opening ceremony on friday. and even then, it's only part— friday. and even then, it's only part of— friday. and even then, it's only part of these three days when there is a bit _ part of these three days when there is a bit of— part of these three days when there is a bit of a — part of these three days when there is a bit of a really being held. that— is a bit of a really being held. that said _ is a bit of a really being held. that said though, we have seen some famous _ that said though, we have seen some famous people carrying the torch today _ famous people carrying the torch today for— famous people carrying the torch today. for example, an astronaut, former— today. for example, an astronaut, former chinese olympians and world
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renowned _ former chinese olympians and world renowned basketballer passing the torch on _ renowned basketballer passing the torch on to the greek ambassador. they— torch on to the greek ambassador. they are _ torch on to the greek ambassador. they are trying to give it an international field. they are trying to give it an internationalfield. of the they are trying to give it an international field. of the big story— international field. of the big story that remains here. these huge bubbies _ story that remains here. these huge bubbles have been created to keep the spectators and the athletes and the spectators and the athletes and the general public separated in this city. the general public separated in this city but— the general public separated in this city. but within those bubble areas, they are _ city. but within those bubble areas, they are finding cases by the dozen. an extra _ they are finding cases by the dozen. an extra 32— they are finding cases by the dozen. an extra 32 cases have been added today _ an extra 32 cases have been added today. interestingly, only half of those _ today. interestingly, only half of those have been detected at the airport — those have been detected at the airport. that means within those oiymbic— airport. that means within those olympic bubbles there is some spread of the _ olympic bubbles there is some spread of the virus. _ olympic bubbles there is some spread of the virus, it seems. it is either that— of the virus, it seems. it is either that or— of the virus, it seems. it is either that or people are coming through and carrying the virus, and then it is kicking — and carrying the virus, and then it is kicking through a few days later. every _ is kicking through a few days later. every day — is kicking through a few days later. every day within the bubble you get tested _ every day within the bubble you get tested it_ every day within the bubble you get tested. it would be a big challenge to see _ tested. it would be a big challenge to see if— tested. it would be a big challenge to see if this keeps spreading. we know— to see if this keeps spreading. we know how— to see if this keeps spreading. we know how easy it is for omicron to be passed — know how easy it is for omicron to be passed on and how much that end
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-- that— be passed on and how much that end -- that ends— be passed on and how much that end —— that ends up affecting the games overait _ overall. thank you. overall. thank ou. , ,., overall. thank ou. , , ., thank you. they need some snow there will sto thank you. they need some snow there will step carroll — thank you. they need some snow there will stop carroll has our _ thank you. they need some snow there will stop carroll has our weather. - will stop carroll has our weather. good morning. good morning. there is a wee bit of snow in our forecast in the next couple of days but not for everyone. this morning it is a mild start, the exception is around aberdeenshire and also the northern isles, where temperatures have fallen away to three or four. today generally is going to be fairly cloudy and mild. the cloud will be thick enough for patchy drizzle. this front yesterday went south, today it is going north. it is producing a lot of cloud. some light and patchy rain in the north and east. that rain will pep up in the north—east later. a breezy day. these are the average wind speeds. nowhere near as windy as it has been. it should brighten up quite nicely across parts of east wales, the midlands, down towards the south of indian, the south—east and east anglia. these are our temperatures.
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nine to 12 degrees. we are still in the colder air across the northern isles. this evening and overnight we have got some rain in the north and also the west. one or two bits of clear sky. also the west. one or two bits of clearsky. fairly also the west. one or two bits of clear sky. fairly fleeting. also the west. one or two bits of clearsky. fairly fleeting. it also the west. one or two bits of clear sky. fairly fleeting. it is going to be windy by the ant of the night across the north west of scotland. as you can see, it is not going to be a cold night. tomorrow we start off with some bits and pieces of rain. bright skies as well. it is this band of rain we are watching, which is going to bring in some more significant rainfall. and behind it, it turns colder. we see some wintry showers. ahead of it, we are looking at mild conditions. it is going to be a windy day. thank you, carol. a trial to lengthen the school day in wales has begun, with pupils offered an extra five hours a week to take part in more activities and learning. more school! that is what we need. it's part of a reform which could also change the academic year and end the long summer holiday. our wales correspondent, hywel griffith, has been to visit
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one school taking part. ifeel excited because i can make new friends and it's an opportunity for me to learn new skills. i was quite lonely during the pandemic because i was by myself in my house. but i think this extra hour| will help our socialisation, make friendships better. best foot forward, followed by a fist. this lesson in mixed martial arts is the first taste the pupils here at the six bells primary campus are getting of their new extended school day. the extra hour at the end of every day will mean taekwondo, dance, cooking and lego—building all become part of the timetable for the next ten weeks. it's going to be all right. i'll get to see my friends, but it will be a bit tiring. i think i'll be fine. being with friends and things always makes me a bit happy. today's number of the day is 36. so all the possibilities
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around on your whiteboard. but not everyone is pleased by the prospect of reform. the national association of head teachers warn schools aren't childcare—providers, and staff shouldn't be expected to take on extra work. diane? at this school, most of the activities will be taken by companies coming in — to offer something different. post—pandemic, learner confidence has been low. we want them to re—engage with learning. we want them to have the opportunity to develop their friendships and generally seek out something in the wider community that they can go forward and use. hello, morning, welcome to the lego club. - ministers in wales are also lining up a potential change to the school year that could mean ending the long summer holidays that have been in place for over a century, and having longer breaks in autumn and winter. so what do parents make of that?
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i find the six—week holiday really difficult to cover because i'm self—employed, and it's a real struggle to try and cover for six weeks. it's hard — you've got to pay for private childcare. i would prefer them to break it down — maybe have an extra week at christmas, extra week at easter, and then not such a long period over the six—weeks holiday. it makes sense to have it _ in the summer because the winter's bad weather anyway, isn't there? so keep the long holiday? yeah, kids can't really| do much in the winter. let's be real. summer, yes. summer — late nights the best childhood, that was. _ staying out all sixl weeks, weren't it? with so many routines revolving around school times, adding an extra hour mayjust be the first step in changing the pattern of family life across wales. hywel griffith, bbc news, abertillery. let's take a look at today's papers. "what a £13 billion waste" is the daily mail's headline, with the paperfocusing on the money
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written off by the government on ppe and covid fraud. the mail says the losses of taxpayer money is a "staggering illustration" of waste, pointing out the losses exceed the £12 billion expected to be raised april's planned rise in national insurance. the telegraph says hormone replacement therapy will be sold over the counter for the first time. the paper says health watchdogs are set to announce a reclassification of the medication, which will mean the guardian focuses on the government's �*levelling up' agenda for poorer areas. the paper says it has been criticised as lacking in funding and clarity by labour. "peace in our tea—time" writes the daily star, referring to the end of a "brutal" war over caterpillar cakes between marks and spencer and aldi. the paper says the "world breathes a sigh of relief" as the supermarkets settled their copyright dispute over colin and cuthbert. iam not i am not going to make a joke about having your cake and eating it. don't do that. i have got something
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here. commemorative plates to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. here. commemorative plates to mark the queen's platinumjubilee. the express has a story about a company in china which has been making commemorative plates for everybody to buy. they have made a significant spelling mistake. you won't be able to state create —— seed. platinum jubilee. they might be worth even more money. jubilee. they might be worth even more money-— jubilee. they might be worth even more money. here is a question for ou. if a more money. here is a question for you- if a bird _ more money. here is a question for you. if a bird takes _ more money. here is a question for you. if a bird takes your— more money. here is a question for you. if a bird takes your parking - you. if a bird takes your parking ticket off your car, do you still have to pay for it? it ticket off your car, do you still have to pay for it?— ticket off your car, do you still have to pay for it? it depends if ou have have to pay for it? it depends if you have got — have to pay for it? it depends if you have got evidence. - have to pay for it? it depends if you have got evidence. you - have to pay for it? it depends if. you have got evidence. you need have to pay for it? it depends if - you have got evidence. you need the evidence. w' w' you have got evidence. you need the evidence. x' a , evidence. picking ticket is the oint. evidence. picking ticket is the point- this — evidence. picking ticket is the point. this is _ evidence. picking ticket is the point. this is a _ evidence. picking ticket is the point. this is a seagull. - evidence. picking ticket is the point. this is a seagull. i - evidence. picking ticket is the i point. this is a seagull. i believe it is a seagull. is it a seagull? an unlucky motorist, says this paper, could get a shock fine after a seagull swiped their parking ticket. no ticket when he got back. but you
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do get one in the post anyway, apparently. somebody will get a nasty surprise in the post. a ticket can be halved if you paid within14 days. i can be halved if you paid within 14 da s. ~ ., can be halved if you paid within 14 da s. ~' . ., ., days. i like that extra info. new uniforms for _ days. i like that extra info. new uniforms for the _ days. i like that extra info. new uniforms for the aria. _ days. i like that extra info. newl uniforms for the aria. apparently they need modernising. their uniforms have not been updated since the 1980s. the telegraph has leaked documents, pictures from a leaked document, but what the new uniforms may look like. they have been compared on what subgroups to star trek uniforms. —— what's app groups. lots of people don't like the potential change. they are seen as more streamlined, more modern. let me see. there is a lovely comment from one of the groups on the social media. here we go. a little bit like a thunderbird puppet. or a budget airline staff uniform. they are not keen. ! airline staff uniform. they are not keen. ~ , ,
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airline staff uniform. they are not keen. ~' , , ., airline staff uniform. they are not keen. ,, , , ., , keen. i think this is an interesting one. you know— keen. i think this is an interesting one. you know how _ keen. i think this is an interesting one. you know how saudi - keen. i think this is an interesting one. you know how saudi arabia | keen. i think this is an interesting - one. you know how saudi arabia have been accused of what has been called a sport washing? they are paying a lot of money to sports like golf and boxing to improve the reputation around the world. the latest effort is golf. there was a lot of talk about them last year trying to get involved in some of the tours around the world and starred like a world tour. that was denied them. but now they have bought the asian tour. and there is an asian tour event actually taking place in the uk this year. they are offering people like ian poulter of £222 million to be involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he _ involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he is _ involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he is then _ involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he is then ruled - involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he is then ruled out - involved with in saudi arabia. would that mean he is then ruled out of. that mean he is then ruled out of things like the ryder cup? the ryder cu is things like the ryder cup? the ryder cop is owned — things like the ryder cup? the ryder cop is owned by _ things like the ryder cup? the ryder cup is owned by the _ things like the ryder cup? the ryder cup is owned by the european - things like the ryder cup? the ryder cup is owned by the european tour. cup is owned by the european tour and the pga tour. they are really uncomfortable with the saudis putting so much money into golf. he has been told under no uncertain terms that if he does sign up for that money, that will date for the ryder cup, so he won't be able to play in it again and won't be able
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be captain. ibig play in it again and won't be able be captain-— be captain. big decision. a lot of mone . be captain. big decision. a lot of money- it _ be captain. big decision. a lot of money- it is _ be captain. big decision. a lot of money. it is 19 _ be captain. big decision. a lot of money. it is 19 minutes- be captain. big decision. a lot of money. it is 19 minutes past - be captain. big decision. a lot ofj money. it is 19 minutes past six. you are watching breakfast. if you've ever wondered what it would be like to visit bob marley's recording studio or step into the jamaican rainforest — well now is your chance, and you can do it without even leaving the country. an immersive exhibition celebrating the life of reggae legend opens in london later this week, and our music correspondent, mark savage went along for a sneak peek. my feeling about this music is that this music will get bigger and biggerand biggerand bigger and find its right people as it gets bigger. bob marley's prophecy came true. after this interview was filmed, he became one of the world's best loved and best selling musicians. so, they've got a brand - new one out called exodus — here are bob marley and the wailers. # exodus
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# movement ofjah people.# now, a little more than 40 years after his death, his legacy is being celebrated, with an extensive exhibition featuring unseen photographs, rare concert footage and platinum discs, all overseen by his eldest daughter, cedella. going through every room, i think you leave with a little piece of daddy. you can see the accomplishments of this little boy from nine mile, you know, who grew up in poverty, struggled with identity, you know? and just still overcoming it all. # we'rejammin' # see, i want to jam it with you.# but staging an exhibition of bob marley's life presented a unique problem. the musician wasn't someone who held on to mementos and memorabilia. have you made, say, millions of dollars? i no. are you a rich man?
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when you mean rich, what do you mean? do you have a lot of possessions, a lot of money in the bank? - possession make you rich? i know i don't have that type of richness. my riches is life, forever. there wasn't tonnes of concert ticket stubs and other traditional exhibit material, so you needed to create these environments for people to be able to have a multi—sensory experience where they could really feel what bob marley was all about. one such experience comes in the rainforest room, designed as a place to hang out and imbibe bob's music. i love the forest. it's like we brought a little bit ofjamaica to cold london, you know? yeah! and there's a pair of his football boots? i brought them in with me. yeah _ just yesterday? yeah. oh, wow! so they've literally been put in the case. where were they before that? in my closet. do you have a lot of
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memorabilia, just at home? no. that was like the only piece of dad's stuff that i actually held on to. were you a fan of his music growing up, or did you come to it later in life? no, i like michael jackson and shalamar... ..eh, cyndi lauper. yeah, because it's almost like, say, when when you cook rice and peas every day, you're not — you don't go, "oh, rice and peas", you know? you're kind of used to it. was there a rivalry? did he want you to like him as much as you liked michaeljackson? no, because he's my dad. yeah. nobody ever respects their dad, do they? yeah, i mean, come on! you know, it's my dad! # no woman, no cry.# why do you think his music continues to have the impact it does today? because the message
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is still relevant. i would think being a child that was born in the late 60s, i was hoping that the world would have changed in some way that i would feel safe for my black sons to leave the house and go about their business. but it's not. so bob marley still has work to do. # stir it up # little darlin' # stir it up.# as the head of the bob marley foundation, it's cedella's job to ensure his legacy. and after this exhibition spends ten weeks in london, it will tour the world to spread his message further. # stir it up, woh.# glorious. do you like what he said there? not rich in possessions, rich in life. , ., . ., .,
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in life. very important. we have got much richness _ in life. very important. we have got much richness in _ in life. very important. we have got much richness in our _ in life. very important. we have got much richness in our tests. - in life. very important. we have got much richness in our tests. sir - much richness in our tests. sir lenny henry will be here talking about comic relief. another comic relief. i think he is getting some boxing gloves on for us, apparently. i think he is. find boxing gloves on for us, apparently. i think he is— i think he is. and also, i don't know if you — i think he is. and also, i don't know if you have _ i think he is. and also, i don't know if you have been - i think he is. and also, i don't i know if you have been watching i think he is. and also, i don't - know if you have been watching the responder with martin freeman? we are going to speak to one of his co—stars. abs. are going to speak to one of his co-stars. �* ,., ~ are going to speak to one of his co-stars. ~ ,., . ., co-stars. a boxing theme. we are auoin to co-stars. a boxing theme. we are going to take _ co-stars. a boxing theme. we are going to take you _ co-stars. a boxing theme. we are going to take you inside _ co-stars. a boxing theme. we are going to take you inside the - co-stars. a boxing theme. we are | going to take you inside the boxing club fighting parkinson's, specialist classes to support people with the condition. they say can really help. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are good morning, i'm sonja jessup. around 35 people had to be evacuated from their homes last night after a fire broke out near acton town tube station. around 70 firefighters were called
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to the blaze at the car garage, which they said contained a number of gas cylinders. they say nobody was hurt, and an investigation's under way to find out how it started. gatwick airport bosses say there's been a dramatic rise in the number of passengers since further easing of covid restrictions. carriers including easyjet expect to be back to pre—pandemic passenger levels this summer. passengers who are fully vaccinated no longer need to take a test before coming into the uk, and from next friday they also won't need a test two days after arrival. a woman who went to work for the nhs blood and transplant service during the pandemic says the experience made such an impression on her, she's now donated one of her kidneys to a stranger. sasha cooke used to be an actor, but when work dried up in lockdown she retrained as a carer. i wouldn't be doing what i'm about to do if i wasn't doing thisjob, you know — i'm meeting donors that are coming in through nothing
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other than goodwill, and that's so inspiring to me. but if i can comfortably give someone something that could get them off dialysis, and i'm eligible, then... you know, why not? and you can see more on that story on we are england — that's tonight at 7.30 here on bbc one. let's take a look at the travel now. this is how the tube is running this morning. now because of the fire in acton, the district line has no service between turnham green and ealing broadway. and the northern line still closed for works between moorgate and kennington. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. temperatures mid to high single figures celsius. now we should get a bright start with a bit of sunshine — patchy cloud, however, perhaps a little bit of mistiness over higher ground. so we should see some sunny spells —
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decent ones — through this morning, the patchy cloud coming and going. a moderate breeze today, but temperatures are still mild — we're looking at a maximum of 12 celsius later on this afternoon. now, overnight tonight we've still got a bit of clouds — some clearer spells, but that cloud, you can't really rule out the odd spot of rain. nothing more significant overnight, and the temperature — it's still mild, the minimum between six and eight celsius. so another mild start tomorrow morning. for thursday it's looking dry. some sunny spells, patchy cloud. it is going to get breezier, though, as we head overnight. this cold front heads towards us, a spell of potentially quite heavy rain for a time. those isobars squeezing together, as well — so getting windier — but also behind it, represented by this blue colour, some colder air. so once that rain clears on friday morning, it is going to get chilly. we'll see some sunshine, though, to end the week, and temperatures on friday a little cooler — around eight or nine celsius. i'm back in around half an hour— plenty more over on our website.
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now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... if you haven't binged—watched it already, the final episode of the gripping police drama the responder airs on bbc one tonight. we'll be joined one of the show�*s stars, adelayo adedayo. i think that is at about 8:50am this morning. # w“ according to musician sam fender, he's living the dream — he takes us on a tour of his studio, and explains why he's teaching his nan to use tiktok. love him. and sir lenny henry will be live in a boxing ring as he launches this year's comic relief campaign. all will be revealed just before 8.00.
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part of the "levelling—up" agenda is addressing regional inequalities across the uk. ben is in wolverhampton this morning, one of the places set to benefit from the government's proposals. we canjoin him. good morning. good mornin: we canjoin him. good morning. good morning from — we canjoin him. good morning. (emf. morning from wolverhampton. in fact, from the newly refurbished railway station. take a look around because this is all part of a £150 million regeneration project to improve transport in the city. the hope is the money that has been announced today will go towards funding other regeneration projects a little bit like this one. it is what the government talks about when it says about levelling up, but what does levelling up actually mean? the government says it is about reducing the gap, the inequality between
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different regions in england. it will do that by spending money on transport, infrastructure, housing. because, for example, at the moment, london gets twice as much is spent on transport as some other parts of england. the plan is also to create more powerful decision local makers, so people can champion their bit of the country directly to westminster. a bit like the mayors we currently have for manchester and the west midlands. the reason we are in wolverhampton is because along with sheffield it has been chosen as one of 20 places to share £1.5 billion, to make all of this a reality. some wonder whether even that will be enough to make much of an impact. i really wanted to know what do people who actually live here in wolverhampton think that money needs to be spent on? i went into the town to be spent on? i went into the town to find out. once a thriving centre of production and manufacturing, wolverhampton is now a city in need of investment.
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is there anything that has been invested in here in wolverhampton that you think is a good example of where money can be spent well, and can have a real benefit to people who live in here? it's quite telling that it takes you a long time to even think of an example. well, yeah! darrell, who's 30, is an entrepreneur and youth worker. he's pleased that wolverhampton is getting an extra slice of government money, but... we don't get again a situation in five years, whereby they say, "the levelling up money went into all of this, and look, that's failed" — in fact, we can say, "you know what? as an onus, as a community, we helped decide where this million goes." so what exactly do people here think the money for wolverhampton should be used for? i think wolverhampton need to spend the money on more youth environment engagements, just so that the youth have something to go to. we've got the trams, but, i don't know, there seems to be delaysl after delays after- delays on the trams. the trams were off for six weeks
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at a vital part of the season. - and so that means obviously it needs more investment. - a lot of people travel to birmingham, because most shops in birmingham are open. you get me? so, i like birmingham myself, but i can't give away wolverhampton, you get what i mean? so, around here is quite nice. we just need to get some of the shops open, and that. car parking is a real problem, the cost of parking. and also a lot of the competition with the outside retailers in the outside retail parks, where they can offer free parking. so if we could do something about that, that would be great. and also, just to encourage some of the main shop fronts to look a lot nicer, because when people come into the town, they want to come somewhere where it's nice, a nice feeling. and certainly in this area here, there's quite a lot of shops that are closed down and empty, so it'd be great if we could sort of bring those back into the town. the money will be spent on things like improving housing, high street, transport and broadband. but the question is, will that be enough to make
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wolverhampton thrive once again? well, let's speak to one of the people who has a real interest in what is going on. corin is from the black country chamber of commerce. this share of £1.5 billion, wolverhampton is one of the first two places to be chosen. what is your reaction? it two places to be chosen. what is your reaction?— two places to be chosen. what is your reaction? it is genuinely good news. we know _ your reaction? it is genuinely good news. we know the _ your reaction? it is genuinely good news. we know the potential- your reaction? it is genuinely good news. we know the potential of. your reaction? it is genuinely good i news. we know the potential of areas like wolverhampton and the west midlands has been around for years but for— midlands has been around for years but for decades we have been held back by— but for decades we have been held back by not having the right powers and budget to get this done. any news _ and budget to get this done. any news focused on bringing all this to life is— news focused on bringing all this to life is good — news focused on bringing all this to life is good news for us.— life is good news for us. some eo - le life is good news for us. some people say _ life is good news for us. some people say that _ life is good news for us. some people say that that _ life is good news for us. some people say that that money i life is good news for us. some i people say that that money come as welcome as it is, is not enough to make a difference. do you think it is enough? we make a difference. do you think it is enough?— make a difference. do you think it is enough? make a difference. do you think it is enou~h? ~ ., . , ., ., is enough? we would always want more mone , that is enough? we would always want more money. that is — is enough? we would always want more money, that is for— is enough? we would always want more money, that is for certain. _ is enough? we would always want more money, that is for certain. loads - is enough? we would always want more money, that is for certain. loads of i money, that is for certain. loads of work— money, that is for certain. loads of work needs— money, that is for certain. loads of work needs doing loads of great
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ideas _ work needs doing loads of great ideas to— work needs doing loads of great ideas to bring to life. most important is what you do with the money _ important is what you do with the money. whatever money we get, it is having _ money. whatever money we get, it is having the _ money. whatever money we get, it is having the power is next to it. for too long _ having the power is next to it. for too long we — having the power is next to it. for too long we have had great ideas locally, _ too long we have had great ideas locally, but the bureaucracy of going — locally, but the bureaucracy of going down to whitehall for decisions and coming back locally has always held us back. with the i’ili'it has always held us back. with the right to _ has always held us back. with the right to de—polluted power this money— right to de—polluted power this money will come to the right local area which— money will come to the right local area which makes this exciting if it works— area which makes this exciting if it works welt — area which makes this exciting if it works well-— works well. restructures of decision-making, - works well. restructures of decision-making, local- works well. restructures of - decision-making, local government, decision—making, local government, it is not generally the thing to get people excited over their breakfast. i suppose that is how you get to have a say in how the money is spent and local knowledge about what it means to actually be spent on to make a difference. by, means to actually be spent on to make a difference.— means to actually be spent on to make a difference. a vibrant economy comes in many _ make a difference. a vibrant economy comes in many ways. _ make a difference. a vibrant economy comes in many ways. in _ make a difference. a vibrant economy comes in many ways. in areas - make a difference. a vibrant economy comes in many ways. in areas like i comes in many ways. in areas like ours, _ comes in many ways. in areas like ours. the — comes in many ways. in areas like ours, the schools have to be good, the transport, good quality offices. they are _ the transport, good quality offices. they are complex issues so we want the powers— they are complex issues so we want the powers here in the west midlands and wolverhampton because we know what is _ and wolverhampton because we know what is best for our local areas. because — what is best for our local areas. because the bureaucracy, give us the
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money— because the bureaucracy, give us the money and _ because the bureaucracy, give us the money and we will revolutionise the way we _ money and we will revolutionise the way we do _ money and we will revolutionise the way we do business. if money and we will revolutionise the way we do business.— way we do business. if you were involved in _ way we do business. if you were involved in the _ way we do business. if you were involved in the decision-making| way we do business. if you were i involved in the decision-making what involved in the decision—making what would you say wolverhampton needs the money spent on most? most im ortant the money spent on most? most important thing _ the money spent on most? most important thing is _ the money spent on most? most important thing is to _ the money spent on most? most important thing is to get - the money spent on most? most important thing is to get the dissenter ready for developers and businesses to move into an existing businesses — businesses to move into an existing businesses to move into an existing businesses to grow so we can unlock land and _ businesses to grow so we can unlock land and get planning permission for a really— land and get planning permission for a really good quality office space. the potential for this city and the black— the potential for this city and the black country, but we have been held back so— black country, but we have been held back so take the shackles away and we will _ back so take the shackles away and we will move forward quickly. what is currently — we will move forward quickly. what is currently stopping _ we will move forward quickly. “twist is currently stopping companies we will move forward quickly. "“tausgt is currently stopping companies and businesses that you speak to. you are saying to come and invest, have are saying to come and invest, have a presence, what is stopping them? we have loads of brilliant companies. one of the hide things if they don't— companies. one of the hide things if they don't always grow as fast as they don't always grow as fast as they could. this has been held back by decades— they could. this has been held back by decades of investment. either skills— by decades of investment. either skills coming through from the school— skills coming through from the school systems? sometimes they aren't— school systems? sometimes they aren't invested, sometimes congestion is high, getting to and from _ congestion is high, getting to and from the — congestion is high, getting to and from the city. sometimes the buildings are old—fashioned and need
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updating _ buildings are old—fashioned and need updating. this, a really good policy that comes — updating. this, a really good policy that comes together, it will help those _ that comes together, it will help those existing businesses go and naturally— those existing businesses go and naturally becomes more attractive to move _ naturally becomes more attractive to move to _ naturally becomes more attractive to move to. ., ., ., ~ , . move to. the national audit office has said part _ move to. the national audit office has said part of — move to. the national audit office has said part of the _ move to. the national audit office has said part of the problem i move to. the national audit office has said part of the problem with l has said part of the problem with regeneration when it is not enough tabs are kept on how it is being spent and how effectively it is being managed. how would you feel about having to keep answering to someone in whitehall about how the money is being used? it someone in whitehall about how the money is being used?— money is being used? it looks like these targets _ money is being used? it looks like these targets until _ money is being used? it looks like these targets until about - money is being used? it looks like these targets until about 2030 i money is being used? it looks like| these targets until about 2030 and there _ these targets until about 2030 and there are _ these targets until about 2030 and there are strict statutory targets to work— there are strict statutory targets to work along to. part of devolution is trusting _ to work along to. part of devolution is trusting local areas to get on the business felt with those local areas _ the business felt with those local areas we — the business felt with those local areas. we don't mind reporting on these _ areas. we don't mind reporting on these things that we can do it ourselves, we don't need to go to whitehalt — ourselves, we don't need to go to whitehall. ., ., ., ,, , ., whitehall. corin crane, thank you very much- _ whitehall. corin crane, thank you very much. that _ whitehall. corin crane, thank you very much. that is _ whitehall. corin crane, thank you very much. that is corin - whitehall. corin crane, thank you very much. that is corin crane. i whitehall. corin crane, thank you i very much. that is corin crane. the whole department for levelling up is moving right here to wolverhampton. in fact, it will be based at the headquarters just a few hundred yards from where we are standing right now. expect to be hearing a
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lot more from and about wolverhampton in the coming months and years. we wolverhampton in the coming months and ears. ~ �* ., ., wolverhampton in the coming months and ears. ~ �* ., ,, and years. we will. ben, thank you very much — and years. we will. ben, thank you very much indeed _ and years. we will. ben, thank you very much indeed that _ and years. we will. ben, thank you very much indeed that white i and years. we will. ben, thank you very much indeed that white we i and years. we will. ben, thank you | very much indeed that white we are talking about the winter olympics. we are about to embark.— we are about to embark. friday is the official— we are about to embark. friday is the official opening _ we are about to embark. friday is the official opening ceremony i we are about to embark. friday is the official opening ceremony but| the official opening ceremony but there is so much curling to get in they will be starting with that today so we have team gb in action this afternoon. might fear of my student days, just watching loads and loads of curling, —— reminds me of my student days. i don't know if india have a team, that would be fun. that will be at 1205 fpm, bruce muir and jen dodds are our medal hopes in the curling. katie ormerod has been speaking to us, she will go in the slopestyle competition, the first to win the cup title in 2020 and she has been telling us she thinks these particular conditions in beijing this time might round ——
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at this time around might suit her. since 2018, i've had a few really good seasons — including my best season of my career — and i think having that success and, you know, being on the podium, it's really helped me to come into these games feeling really confident. and, you know, i'm the best snowboarder i've ever been, so i'm just really excited now to get stuck into it. it is artificial snow here but, you know, i grew up in the uk, so it's all artificial snow! but it is different and it's actually running really well — like, a lot better than i expected. you can follow all of that action by the bbc sport website. moving onto football... it's one of sport's great rivalries. celtic take on champions rangers tonight, in an old firm battle which could prove pivotal in deciding the winners of the scottish premiership. aaron ramsey won't be making his rangers debutjust yet. his new side's six—point lead has been whittled down to two. they let in a last—minute equaliser to draw 3—3 with ross county on saturday. celtic then scored a late winner to beat dundee united 1—0. they've won 12 of
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their last 13 games. the reality of it is, is that it's an important game, it's an important game for us and this football club for a number of reasons. one, most importantly, it's important for our supporters. secondly, we've got a chance to go top and, you know, climb up a position, which would be good. but after that, we've got to dust ourselves off and go again on a weekend. the edinburgh derby between hibs and hearts finished goalless last night. hearts were denied several times by keeper kevin dabrowski. elsewhere, same score between dundee and dundee united. ross county and aberdeen drew, as did st mirren and motherwell, but stjohnstone beat livingston. raith rovers have defended their signing of the striker david goodwillie. the striker was ruled to be a rapist
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in a civil case in 2017. he neverfaced a criminal trial and always maintained the sex was consensual. to directors and captain of the side have quit over the decision. the crime author val mcdermid has said she will withdraw her sponsorship of the club. mcdermid said on social media she ended her lifelong support of raithrovers over their signing of the rapist david goodwillie, and cancelled next season's shirt sponsorship over this disgusting and despicable move. she added it "shatters any claim to be a community or family club". there is more bad news for england fans ahead of the six nations calcutta cup against scotland at murrayfield on saturday. courtney lawes and jenny hill are both out of the games. courtney lawes recovering from concussion, hill has a concussion. owen farrell is already out of the competition. marchand has tested positive for decision—macro, making him doubtful. plenty of tributes online to tom brady, who has confirmed his retirement at the age of 44! the tampa bay buccaneers
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quarterback won seven super bowls, an astonishing career over 22 seasons. he won six with his team the new england patriots before last year. the question as to what tom brady will do next.— brady will do next. anything he wants, i imagine. _ brady will do next. anything he wants, i imagine. golf. - brady will do next. anything he wants, i imagine. golf. he i brady will do next. anything he wants, i imagine. golf. he is. wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed — wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed with _ wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed with golf _ wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed with golf so - wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed with golf so i i wants, i imagine. golf. he is obsessed with golf so i think| wants, i imagine. golf. he is- obsessed with golf so i think you will become even better. there is a brilliant _ will become even better. there is a brilliant picture of him with all seven— brilliant picture of him with all seven super bowl rings.- brilliant picture of him with all seven super bowl rings. more then he has actual fingers, _ seven super bowl rings. more then he has actual fingers, which _ seven super bowl rings. more then he has actual fingers, which is _ seven super bowl rings. more then he has actual fingers, which is crazy. i has actual fingers, which is crazy. politics is evidential. he said the strong women in his life and him who he is. he is the youngest of four siblings, three older sisters and his mum, allare siblings, three older sisters and his mum, all are really sporting family and apparently growing up he was the one least likely to make it and what a turnaround. is was the one least likely to make it and what a turnaround.— was the one least likely to make it and what a turnaround. is that when he not his and what a turnaround. is that when he got his drive _ and what a turnaround. is that when he got his drive back? _ and what a turnaround. is that when he got his drive back? what - and what a turnaround. is that when he got his drive back? what a i he got his drive back? what a career. thank _ he got his drive back? what a career. thank you _ he got his drive back? what a career. thank you very - he got his drive back? what a career. thank you very much | he got his drive back? what a i career. thank you very much for that, _ career. thank you very much for that see — career. thank you very much for that, see you later on. the prime minister has called on the russian president to step
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back from "military disaster" amid rising tensions between moscow and ukraine. borisjohnson — who is expected to call vladimir putin sometime this week — said he would impose sweeping sanctions if a single russian toe—cap crossed into its neighbour's territory. so how should the uk respond to the crisis? we“re joined now by lord ricketts, a former national security adviser to the uk government. good morning. good morning. really interested to — good morning. good morning. really interested to see _ good morning. good morning. really interested to see what _ good morning. good morning. really interested to see what you _ good morning. good morning. really interested to see what you make i good morning. good morning. really interested to see what you make of. interested to see what you make of boris johnson's interested to see what you make of borisjohnson“s comments that he made in kyiv. boris johnson's comments that he made in kyiv— made in kyiv. boris johnson in ukraine had _ made in kyiv. boris johnson in ukraine had relatively - made in kyiv. boris johnson in ukraine had relatively easy i made in kyiv. boris johnson in i ukraine had relatively easy day, in fact, because britain is known to be a strong supporter with ukraine, supporting them on the military side, politically, and now with financial aid. the toughest thing is when he has to speak to president putin because there he has tojoin other western leaders in trying to convince putin that he has more to gain now by stepping back, by the
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escalating crisis, by getting into a serious discussion with the west about pressure“s security worries in europe, ratherthan about pressure“s security worries in europe, rather than the reckless step of invasion. yesterday he was doing the deterrence, he was making clear what a strong reaction would come if russia invaded. the call with putin has to be about, how do we now get out of this crisis without a war? we don't know exactly when this coal will take place. we know it is imminent. haifa when this coal will take place. we know it is imminent. how challenging will the call be _ know it is imminent. how challenging will the call be between _ know it is imminent. how challenging will the call be between the - know it is imminent. how challenging will the call be between the two i know it is imminent. how challenging will the call be between the two men | will the call be between the two men and how will boris johnson's will the call be between the two men and how will borisjohnson“s the position at home affect the tone of it? ~ position at home affect the tone of it? . ., position at home affect the tone of it? ~ ., ,., .., position at home affect the tone of it? ~ ., ., position at home affect the tone of it? . ., ,., .. ., ., position at home affect the tone of it? ~ ., ., ., , it? well, a political leader who is weak at home — it? well, a political leader who is weak at home is _ it? well, a political leader who is weak at home is bound _ it? well, a political leader who is weak at home is bound to - it? well, a political leader who is weak at home is bound to have i it? well, a political leader who is. weak at home is bound to have his authority weakened abroad. president putin will be aware of the precious borisjohnson is under. but the uk is important to russia. not least because most of the russian elite seem to have their money stashed away in london with their children at school here. the prospect of tough financial sanctions against russian oligarchs and russian dodgy
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money in london will make an impact. i think it is important both that the prime minister stresses how strong the western reaction will be to an invasion, but also does a bit of the carrot, the west is very much ready to talk to russia about its genuine security concerns. we may not at all agree with them but we have to address the fact that putin has it in his mind that nato is deeply hostile to russia. that is what the discussion needs to be about. ., .., . ., ,, ., what the discussion needs to be about. ., . ., ,, ., , about. how concerned would russia be about. how concerned would russia be about the threat _ about. how concerned would russia be about the threat of _ about. how concerned would russia be about the threat of sanctions? - about. how concerned would russia be about the threat of sanctions? i - about the threat of sanctions? i think russia has to take that into account. putin has been winding this thing up now for so long that the west has had time to get its act together, to get together what sounds to be a tough set of sanctions. we know germany has doubts about some of them. but if the sanctions are strong, if the support for ukraine is a staunch and we have been supplying arms and so on, that all has to change russian calculus a bit, and no one can know what putin is going to do. he is now
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holding the whip hand, but i think he is in a bit ofa holding the whip hand, but i think he is in a bit of a corner because he is in a bit of a corner because he now has to calculate on a strong western reaction as well as all the risks of invasion, and see whether he can get out of this with some sort of face saver and i think the task for western diplomacy is to give him that face saver in a way that still protects the sovereignty of ukraine. ., ., , ., ., ., of ukraine. you were a diplomat for 40 ears. of ukraine. you were a diplomat for 40 years how _ of ukraine. you were a diplomat for 40 years. how concerned _ of ukraine. you were a diplomat for 40 years. how concerned are i of ukraine. you were a diplomat for 40 years. how concerned are you . a0 years. how concerned are you about the situation between russia and ukraine, have worried? i about the situation between russia and ukraine, have worried?- and ukraine, have worried? i think it is a very — and ukraine, have worried? i think it is a very worrying _ and ukraine, have worried? i think it is a very worrying situation. - it is a very worrying situation. when you have that number of forces piled up on the border, there is always a risk even of some sort of miscalculation. the rhetoric is now very high and there must be a real risk that putin feels he has to do something with these military forces he has accumulated, even if it is short of a full invasion and of course any kind of military attack would have shock waves that will go across europe. i think the energy prices would spike, financial markets would tumble, we would
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probably have refugee flows to the rest of europe. 50 all of us would be at risk of damage from an invasion. and therefore we have to take this very seriously. but it is not certain, and while the wheels of diplomacy are turning there is still hope that putin can be brought back from the brink and we can get back to a serious discussion. it is pretty extraordinary in the 21st—century to be facing a prospect of one nation invading another with a massive set of armed forces. we really have got to do everything we can to try to prevent that. isu’ith can to try to prevent that. with such a busy _ can to try to prevent that. with such a busy and _ can to try to prevent that. with such a busy and complex - can to try to prevent that. with such a busy and complex news agenda here at home, as you have just said very clearly, the situation in ukraine could affect people living here in the uk.— here in the uk. yes, we will not have a war _ here in the uk. yes, we will not have a war between _ here in the uk. yes, we will not have a war between nato - here in the uk. yes, we will not have a war between nato and i here in the uk. yes, we will not - have a war between nato and russia over ukraine, i think that is clear. but any military action in our interconnected world would have shock waves that would impact on all of us and i think we would feel the effect of that here. sanctions, as well. they might have impact on us,
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british banks, british businesses. i hope britain's national security council is meeting to plan all contingencies that might flow from the outbreak of hostilities in ukraine. yes, there are concerns for all of us here, and therefore it is right that politicians should be working night and day to try to get out of this crisis without a war. lord ricketts, thanks very much indeed. . ~ lord ricketts, thanks very much indeed. ., ~ , ., good morning if you havejust switched on your tv. this is what is happening with the weather. good morning, carol. happening with the weather. good morning. carol-— happening with the weather. good morning, carol. good morning. if you have not yet— morning, carol. good morning. if you have not yet stepped _ morning, carol. good morning. if you have not yet stepped outside - morning, carol. good morning. if you have not yet stepped outside it - morning, carol. good morning. if you have not yet stepped outside it is - have not yet stepped outside it is quite a mild start to the day except for across the north of scotland where we still are in some cold air. generally it will be mild for most, fairly cloudy, and that i have thick enough for some drizzle. this way the frontier moved south yesterday, flicked overnight and is now moving northwards. you can see behind it all of the yellows representing mild conditions. quite a murky start in
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western areas, some hill and coastal list, hill farm and where we have the weather front is where we have all the cloud and also some rain. the rain will pep up in the north and west through the afternoon and it will brighten up the east wales, central and southern england, down to the south—east and east anglia, and these white circles represent the average wind speed so not as windy as it has been except for across the far north. here, too, temperatures in lerwick of 5 degrees, but for most another mild days, nine to 12 or 13. through this evening and overnight, we start off with some rain, one or two clearer skies, but equally quite a bit of cloud around. by the end of the night in the north—west the wind will be picking up. not a cold night, another mild one. tomorrow we start off with spots of rain, scotland, northern ireland, parts of england and wales. some sunshine for a time but then you can see in that
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weather rain. all around it, squally winds, and tomorrow will be windier. ahead of this weather front, it will remain mild, but behind it it will turn colder and showers will increasingly turn to sleet and snow. here is our weather front coming increasingly turn to sleet and snow. here is our weatherfront coming in thursday into friday, it sinks steadily southwards, if the mild air, and the cold air follows behind. as you can tell from the isobar it will also be windy. there was the rain on friday morning, a platter of snow showers behind, also some sleet. most of this note will be in scotland and the tops of the hills but some get down to lower levels. if you see snow showers where you are it is more likely to be sleet at lower levels and in between there will be sunshine but it will feel colder, particularly so when you add on the wind. as we head into the weekend, we have a new weather front sinking south. it is a cold front as well, it will bring rain behind it. maintains colder, so
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some snow showers and as you can see from those snow showers it will be a windy weekend with a risk of gates across parts of the night. this is what you can expect. quite a bit of cloud, some rain, some sleet and snow but most of that will be in the north and most of the snow will tend to be on the hills.— to be on the hills. thank you. lots to be on the hills. thank you. lots to -a to be on the hills. thank you. lots to pay attention — to be on the hills. thank you. lots to pay attention to. _ to be on the hills. thank you. lots to pay attention to. we _ to be on the hills. thank you. lots to pay attention to. we will - to be on the hills. thank you. lots to pay attention to. we will see i to be on the hills. thank you. lots. to pay attention to. we will see you after 7am. this is kind of the dream story, isn't it? his first two albums have topped the charts, his arena tours have sold out and he's recently scored his first top—ten single. and, now the musician sam fender is in the running for three brits. our reporter sharuna sagar has been to meet him. # i'm only gettin' started. # don't mean to be disheartened. sam fender's star is rising so fast, his head is spinning. his arena tours have sold out, both his albums went to number one, and he's now working hard to make sure he stays at the top.
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aye, so we've just been in here for a couple of weeks now. wow! it's proper lush, isn't it? this is like a proper toy shop, isn't it? it is exactly that. we are in a place called sleeper sounds, and it's a lovely studio — it's a lush little room. i love it because it's kind of... it's all contained in the thing, so you're kind of making the music and playing with all of the knobs and that in the room that you're making the music in. it's a lush place to work. just spin around on these chairs. yeah! and just play all the instruments. and everything's all, like, loaded up and ready to go. # and i can talk to anyone. # i can talk to anyone. sam fender famously writes songs about his life growing up in north shields, and this precious studio time is a chance for him to work on ideas for the next album before he's off on tour again. i don't think there's a limit to how many guitars it can have, that's for sure. i think ijust tripped over a mandolin. you tripped over a... that is a mandolin. yes, that's my mandolin!
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that's spit of you. # i can talk to anyone. # i can't talk to you. that comes in halfway through the song. you've been hanging out with sting too long. that's what this is about. no, man! i've been hanging out... i've been hanging out with lindisfarne! oh, yes, of course. it's the lindisfarne feel, that one. and like his northeast heroes, the 27—year—old is being recognised for his songwriting. # i was far too scared to hit him. # but i would hit him in a heartbeat now. his second album, seventeen going under, was released on the same day as the newcastle united takeover. i'm a little bit late for my album launch party. for a die—hard toon fan, it was a launch party to end all launch parties — but somehow the geordie springsteen
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made it onto the breakfast sofa the following morning. my saxophone playerjohnny got on the statue and started playing local hero and 5,000 geordies just started singing along because ashley's out, yeah. i did about a thousand selfies, got mobbed. but everyone was absolutely class and they gave us a lot of cans and i'm really hung over. i'm really, really hungover. another monumental hangover could be on the cards now that he's been nominated for three brit awards — including best album and best artist. i don't know about the other two, whether we've got a chance in hell of winning any of them, but the one i do know that i think we might have a chance is the alt—rock category one, which is fan—voted. basically, i think they've tried to purposely alienate all my aunties and uncles by making — the only way you can vote is on tiktok. so i've had me gran on the phone going, "right, how do i get on this tiktok, then?" right? and i'm like, "right, i'll show you."
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# i'm 17 going under. because it is bonkers, like, what's going on, you know? the boys are — me and the boys are completely, like, freaking out with the whole thing, you know? you're living the dream. ithink so! i think we are, yeah, i think we are. i think you are. sharuna sagar, bbc news. i love ilove him. i love him. wait until his nan get crackin: i love him. wait until his nan get cracking on _ i love him. wait until his nan get cracking on tiktok. _ i love him. wait until his nan get cracking on tiktok. i _ i love him. wait until his nan get cracking on tiktok. i saw - i love him. wait until his nan get cracking on tiktok. i saw an - cracking on tiktok. i saw an interview — cracking on tiktok. i saw an interview recently _ cracking on tiktok. i saw an interview recently when - cracking on tiktok. i saw an interview recently when he l cracking on tiktok. i saw an - interview recently when he said his main motivation is to make sure his mum is ok. main motivation is to make sure his mum is 0k-_ main motivation is to make sure his mum is ok. ., �* ., ., ., mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't. mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't- his— mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't. his appearance _ mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't. his appearance on - mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't. his appearance on this - mum is ok. can't go wrong with that. you can't. his appearance on this so i you can't. his appearance on this so that will go — you can't. his appearance on this so that will go down _ you can't. his appearance on this so that will go down as _ you can't. his appearance on this so that will go down as one _ you can't. his appearance on this so that will go down as one of- you can't. his appearance on this so that will go down as one of the - that will go down as one of the legends. that will go down as one of the leaends. ., ., ., ., , , legends. one of our favourite guests ever. we should _ legends. one of our favourite guests ever. we should have _ legends. one of our favourite guests ever. we should have more - legends. one of our favourite guests ever. we should have more hung - legends. one of our favourite guestsl ever. we should have more hung over people on the server.— people on the server. there is a thouaht. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. around 35 people had to be evacuated from their homes last night, after a fire broke out
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near acton town tube station. around 70 firefighters were called to the blaze at the car garage, which they said contained a number of gas cylinders. they say nobody was hurt. an investigation's underway to find out how it started. gatwick airport bosses say there's been a dramatic rise in the number of passengers since further easing of covid restrictions. carriers including easyjet expect to be back to pre—pandemic passenger levels this summer. passengers who are fully vaccinated no longer need to take a test before coming into the uk, and from next friday, they also won't need a test two days after arrival. a woman who went to work for the nhs blood and transplant service during the pandemic says the experience made such an impression on her. she's now donated one of her kidneys to a stranger. sasha cooke used to be an actor, but when work dried up in lockdown she retrained as a carer.
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i wouldn't be doing what i'm about to do if i wasn't doing thisjob, you know — i'm meeting donors that are coming in through nothing other than goodwill, and that's so inspiring to me. but if i can comfortably give someone something that could get them off dialysis, and i'm eligible, then... you know, why not? and you can see more on that story on we are england — that's tonight at 7.30 here on bbc one. travel now. now because of the fire in acton, the district line has no service between turnham green and ealing broadway, and the northern line still closed for works between moorgate and kennington. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. temperatures mid to high single figures celsius. now we should get a bright start with a bit of sunshine — patchy cloud, however, perhaps a little bit of mistiness over higher ground. so we should see some sunny spells —
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decent ones — through this morning, the patchy cloud coming and going. a moderate breeze today, but temperatures are still mild — we're looking at a maximum of 12 celsius later on this afternoon. now, overnight tonight we've still got a bit of cloud — some clearer spells, but that cloud, you can't really rule out the odd spot of rain. nothing more significant overnight, and the temperature — it's still mild, the minimum between six and eight celsius. so another mild start tomorrow morning. for thursday it's looking dry. some sunny spells, patchy cloud. it is going to get breezier, though, as we head overnight. this cold front heads towards us, a spell of potentially quite heavy rain for a time. those isobars squeezing together, as well — so getting windier — but also behind it, represented by this blue colour, some colder air. so once that rain clears on friday morning, it is going to get chilly. we'll see some sunshine, though, to end the week, and temperatures on friday a little cooler — around eight or nine celsius. plenty more over on our website.
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including the story of the london powered who has won the costa book of the year award. now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. a pledge to close the gap between between rich and poor communities — the government sets out its levelling up plan. it includes improvements to transport, education and life expectancy — but labour says
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there's a lack of funding and new ideas. the police questioning manchester united footballer mason greenwood, over allegations of rape and assault have until later today to charge him. the duchess of cambridge will be the new figurehead of british rugby, becoming the patron for both codes of the game. this year's comic relief campaign is launched — sir lenny henry willjoin us with the details. good morning. quite a lot of cloud around, patchy rain. brightening up in the south. breezy and still mild. details coming up. good morning. the government will today set out its long—delayed manifesto plan to level up the lives of millions of people across the uk. the proposals include a series of pledges to improve education,
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public transport and housing in some of the most disadvantaged areas of the country. labour have dismissed the project as more "slogans and strategies". our political correspondent jessica parker reports. we are a government committed to levelling up. it is absolutely what levelling up is all about. what we're doing is levelling up. level up across the whole of the uk. ministers have talked about it a lot. i'm here to talk about levelling up. michael gove will talk about it more today. levelling up was at the heart of the conservatives' 2019 election campaign. plans to be outlined today include creating more regional mayors with london—style powers in areas of england that want them, bringing public transport closer to london standards, giving the large majority of the country access to 5g broadband, and eliminating illiteracy in primary—school leavers. many of these ideas may sound familiar, and labour says it amounts
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to shuffling the deckchairs, while a report by the national audit office spending watchdog says the government hasn't always properly monitored how well its local spending plans have worked. the department has and i was had a good grasp. we want to see thriving business areas and we are not clear thatis business areas and we are not clear that is going to happen. there is a long way to go to prove this money is being spent as well as the government tells us it is. the government plans to give these national missions status in law, with a system to measure progress, and says it wants to work with devolved governments to achieve its aims across the uk. for borisjohnson, who's been fighting for hisjob, he may want to show he still has an eye on a longer—term agenda. jessica parker, bbc news, in westminster. we'rejoined now
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by our chief political correspondent adam fleming. a government keen to get us to talk about levelling up today, aren't they? about levelling up today, aren't the ? ., ., ., ., ., they? yeah, we are going to get a hue they? yeah, we are going to get a huge paper— they? yeah, we are going to get a huge paper from _ they? yeah, we are going to get a huge paper from the _ they? yeah, we are going to get a j huge paper from the government, they? yeah, we are going to get a l huge paper from the government, it may he _ huge paper from the government, it may be 400 pages long. lots to read. it may be aoo pages long. lots to read. it will_ may be aoo pages long. lots to read. it will spell— may be 400 pages long. lots to read. it will spell out much more clearly what _ it will spell out much more clearly what this— it will spell out much more clearly what this idea of levelling up actually— what this idea of levelling up actually is. it is going to take the form _ actually is. it is going to take the form of— actually is. it is going to take the form of 12— actually is. it is going to take the form of 12 national mission is to close _ form of 12 national mission is to close the — form of 12 national mission is to close the gap between different areas _ close the gap between different areas. these national emissions, which _ areas. these national emissions, which may— areas. these national emissions, which may be you could call targets, that is _ which may be you could call targets, that is what — which may be you could call targets, that is what they were called in the old days. _ that is what they were called in the old days, encompass all sorts of things— old days, encompass all sorts of things such as health, education, skills. _ things such as health, education, skills, technology, transport, you name _ skills, technology, transport, you name it — skills, technology, transport, you name it. some are very precise. some are very— name it. some are very precise. some are very vague. but they will all be put in _ are very vague. but they will all be put in low— are very vague. but they will all be put in low and there will be lots of ways of— put in low and there will be lots of ways of monitoring how it is going to work _ ways of monitoring how it is going to work. the way of delivering this is by— to work. the way of delivering this is by having — to work. the way of delivering this is by having more mayors. in england we have _ is by having more mayors. in england we have some places with mayor with lots of _ we have some places with mayor with lots of powers. in some places we have _ lots of powers. in some places we have mayors with not very many
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powers. — have mayors with not very many powers, and in other places now mayors — powers, and in other places now mayors at — powers, and in other places now mayors at all. the issue is, this is all about— mayors at all. the issue is, this is all about the _ mayors at all. the issue is, this is all about the government and the civil service getting itself ready to deliver levelling up, which is then— to deliver levelling up, which is then going to take about a decade to actually— then going to take about a decade to actually d0~ — then going to take about a decade to actually do. this isjust then going to take about a decade to actually do. this is just the then going to take about a decade to actually do. this isjust the start rather— actually do. this isjust the start rather than _ actually do. this isjust the start rather than even the middle. and desite rather than even the middle. and despite all _ rather than even the middle. and despite all of _ rather than even the middle. jifuc despite all of this, rather than even the middle. fif1c despite all of this, more distractions relating to events at downing street, more coming? yeah, downina downing street, more coming? yeah, downing street _ downing street, more coming? yeah, downing street refusing _ downing street, more coming? yeah, downing street refusing to _ downing street, more coming? yeah, downing street refusing to comment on newspaper reports saying again the prime — on newspaper reports saying again the prime minister was at one of the parties. _ the prime minister was at one of the parties, alleged parties, in his downing — parties, alleged parties, in his downing street flat on the 13th of november, 2020, which is one of the ones being _ november, 2020, which is one of the ones being investigated by the police — ones being investigated by the police. and also, the newspapers are now claiming the prime minister was at two _ now claiming the prime minister was at two other parties which we found out about— at two other parties which we found out about a — at two other parties which we found out about a via the sue gray report, to other— out about a via the sue gray report, to other parties which are also being — to other parties which are also being investigated by the police. downing — being investigated by the police. downing street are sticking to their line that _ downing street are sticking to their line that they will not comment on any of— line that they will not comment on any of this— line that they will not comment on any of this until the metropolitan police _ any of this until the metropolitan police investigation is complete. we now at— police investigation is complete. we now at least have the prime
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minister. _ now at least have the prime minister, when he was in ukraine yesterday. — minister, when he was in ukraine yesterday, making his strongest pledge _ yesterday, making his strongest pledge yet to publish as much as possible — pledge yet to publish as much as possible from all the various investigations into this. adam _ investigations into this. adam fleming, thank you. the ministerfor adam fleming, thank you. the minister for levelling up, michael gove, willjoin us at about half past seven. police have until later today to either charge or release manchester united footballer mason greenwood, over allegations of rape and assault. he was further arrested yesterday, on suspicion of sexual assault and making threats to kill. our reporter dave guest is at old trafford for us this morning. morning. yes, mason greenwood has spent _ morning. yes, mason greenwood has spent a _ morning. yes, mason greenwood has spent a third night in police custody— spent a third night in police custody after three days of questioning by detectives. he was arrested _ questioning by detectives. he was arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and _ arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and assault. that followed social— rape and assault. that followed social media posts by a woman who claimed _ social media posts by a woman who claimed the — social media posts by a woman who claimed the 20—year—old had assaulted her. yesterday, further developments when greater manchester police announced he had been for
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arrested — police announced he had been for arrested on suspicion of making threats— arrested on suspicion of making threats to — arrested on suspicion of making threats to kill and a sexual assault _ threats to kill and a sexual assault. when the allegations against — assault. when the allegations against him first became public at the weekend, manchester united said he would _ the weekend, manchester united said he would not be training with or playing — he would not be training with or playing for the club until further notice — playing for the club until further notice it— playing for the club until further notice. it said it did not condone violence — notice. it said it did not condone violence of— notice. it said it did not condone violence of any kind. a position it reiterated — violence of any kind. a position it reiterated yesterday in a brief statement. now, on monday, the sportswear firm nike said it was suspending its relationship with mason — suspending its relationship with mason greenwood because it was deeply— mason greenwood because it was deeply concerned by these allegations. and yesterday, the video— allegations. and yesterday, the video game developer ea sports said mason _ video game developer ea sports said mason greenwood was being removed from its _ mason greenwood was being removed from its products, including fifa 22. magistrates had granted the police _ 22. magistrates had granted the police extra time to question the footballer, but that time expires later— footballer, but that time expires later today. what happens next, of course _ later today. what happens next, of course is — later today. what happens next, of course is as— later today. what happens next, of course, is as yet unknown. and up to now: _ course, is as yet unknown. and up to now. there _ course, is as yet unknown. and up to now, there has been no statement on behalf— now, there has been no statement on behalf of— now, there has been no statement on behalf of the footballer. thank _ behalf of the footballer. thank you. hormone replacement therapy could be made available over the counter
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without the need for a prescription. a public consultation will be held on the proposal. last year it was announced that the cost of repeat prescriptions for hrt would be significantly reduced in england. the russian president has accused the us of trying to draw russia into war with its neighbour. tension is high over troop build—up close to the ukraine border, but mr putin has denied he is planning an invasion. this comes as borisjohnson visited ukraine yesterday. let's speak to james waterhouse. what has been the reaction to the prime minister's visit?— what has been the reaction to the prime minister's visit? morning. if ou no b prime minister's visit? morning. if you go by the _ prime minister's visit? morning. if you go by the news _ prime minister's visit? morning. if you go by the news channels - prime minister's visit? morning. if| you go by the news channels here, prime minister's visit? morning. if i you go by the news channels here, it has been _ you go by the news channels here, it has been pretty positive. they talked — has been pretty positive. they talked about yesterday being a big day of _ talked about yesterday being a big day of diplomacy for the country and said boris— day of diplomacy for the country and said borisjohnson had decisively chosen— said borisjohnson had decisively chosen to — said borisjohnson had decisively chosen to be on the side of kyiv. resident— chosen to be on the side of kyiv. resident selenski talked about prevention rather than treatment being _ prevention rather than treatment being better. he repeated his calls
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for sanctions to arrive now, for russia — for sanctions to arrive now, for russia to — for sanctions to arrive now, for russia to face economic punishments to put— russia to face economic punishments to put it _ russia to face economic punishments to put it off— russia to face economic punishments to put it off an invasion before it happens — to put it off an invasion before it happens. we also learned yesterday, after weeks of him staying silent, what _ after weeks of him staying silent, what president putin made of the whole _ what president putin made of the whole situation. he said russia is being _ whole situation. he said russia is being pushed into war with the west. he said _ being pushed into war with the west. he said this— being pushed into war with the west. he said this isn't about countries choosing — he said this isn't about countries choosing whether they can join nato or not _ choosing whether they can join nato or not he _ choosing whether they can join nato or not. he said it is about containing moscow. andy gave the scenario _ containing moscow. andy gave the scenario of— containing moscow. andy gave the scenario of saying, 0k, containing moscow. andy gave the scenario of saying, ok, if ukraine joins— scenario of saying, ok, if ukraine joins nato, — scenario of saying, ok, if ukraine joins nato, would it then invade crimea, — joins nato, would it then invade crimea, a — joins nato, would it then invade crimea, a part of the country which he invaded — crimea, a part of the country which he invaded eight years ago and annexed — he invaded eight years ago and annexed from the rest of the country? _ annexed from the rest of the country? on the ground, rushing backed _ country? on the ground, rushing backed militants in the east say a soldier— backed militants in the east say a soldier has— backed militants in the east say a soldier has been killed by a ukrainian drone strike. they accuse ukrainian _ ukrainian drone strike. they accuse ukrainian forces are planting a bomb there _ ukrainian forces are planting a bomb there as _ ukrainian forces are planting a bomb there as well. there is still tension _ there as well. there is still tension along the border. and we say it, tension along the border. and we say it. don't— tension along the border. and we say it. don't we. — tension along the border. and we say it, don't we, along the whole border to the _ it, don't we, along the whole border to the north, — it, don't we, along the whole border to the north, there is tension. but
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politically. — to the north, there is tension. but politically, all sides are saying they— politically, all sides are saying they want talks to continue. so what concessions— they want talks to continue. so what concessions are going to be given we don't _ concessions are going to be given we don't yet _ concessions are going to be given we don't yet know. the point is they are going — don't yet know. the point is they are going to continue. this is all to do— are going to continue. this is all to do with — are going to continue. this is all to do with nato's expansion and ukraine's— to do with nato's expansion and ukraine's potential membership. james _ ukraine's potential membership. james waterhouse in kyiv. whoopi goldberg has been suspended as presenter of the american talk show, the view, for two weeks. it's after she made comments, and apologised for claiming the holocaust wasn't about race. the president of abc news, kim godwin, said she'd asked ms goldberg to take time to reflect and learn about the impact of her "wrong and hurtful" comments. beijing has kicked off the winter olympics torch relay, ahead of the opening ceremony on friday. later today, the games begin with team gb getting things started in the curling. our china correspondent stephen mcdonell is in beijing. it is interesting how, obviously a
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huge global event, but how is it going down in china?— huge global event, but how is it going down in china? people are becomina going down in china? people are becoming more _ going down in china? people are becoming more and _ going down in china? people are becoming more and more - going down in china? people are i becoming more and more excited. going down in china? people are - becoming more and more excited. that said, becoming more and more excited. that said. it _ becoming more and more excited. that said. it is _ becoming more and more excited. that said. it isan— becoming more and more excited. that said, it is an unusual olympics. you can't _ said, it is an unusual olympics. you can't buy— said, it is an unusual olympics. you can't buy tickets. it is a case of watching — can't buy tickets. it is a case of watching at— can't buy tickets. it is a case of watching at home, only invited guests— watching at home, only invited guests will get to go from party organisations. as for today's torch relay. _ organisations. as for today's torch relay. a _ organisations. as for today's torch relay. a very— organisations. as for today's torch relay, a very modest one. nothing like the _ relay, a very modest one. nothing like the torch relays in years gone by. like the torch relays in years gone by i_ like the torch relays in years gone by i have — like the torch relays in years gone by. i have been on the streets. it is not _ by. i have been on the streets. it is not as— by. i have been on the streets. it is not as if— by. i have been on the streets. it is not as if you have people waiting for the _ is not as if you have people waiting for the torch to move through the city because it is not happening. 0nty— city because it is not happening. only three — city because it is not happening. only three days, and only a couple of hours _ only three days, and only a couple of hours each day, the torch will be sort of _ of hours each day, the torch will be sort of shown for a couple of hours. that said. _ sort of shown for a couple of hours. that said, some famous people have been involved. an astronaut carried the torch _ been involved. an astronaut carried the torch today, former olympians, a basketballer passed on the flame to the greek_ basketballer passed on the flame to the greek ambassador. but the big challenge _ the greek ambassador. but the big challenge is going to be up to write
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the coronavirus. inside the olympic bubble _ the coronavirus. inside the olympic bubble to _ the coronavirus. inside the olympic bubble to we are getting hundreds of people _ bubble to we are getting hundreds of people testing positive every day. half of— people testing positive every day. half of those are not at the airport but inside — half of those are not at the airport but inside the olympic zones already _ but inside the olympic zones already. so it seems like within those _ already. so it seems like within those huge olympic bubbles, the virus _ those huge olympic bubbles, the virus is _ those huge olympic bubbles, the virus is spreading around. and even though— virus is spreading around. and even though they— virus is spreading around. and even though they are testing every day, and catching cases, they are hoping it doesn't— and catching cases, they are hoping it doesn't mean there is going to be a huge _ it doesn't mean there is going to be a huge outbreak of covid for these olympics — a huge outbreak of covid for these ol mics. ., . a huge outbreak of covid for these ol mics. ,, , ., ~ a huge outbreak of covid for these olmics. ,, , ., marks & spencer and aldi have reached a settlement in a copyright row over caterpillar cakes. m&s had accused the german discounter of copying its colin the caterpillar cake. the supermarkets confirmed they had reached a settlement, but declined to give details. m&s said it was pleased with the outcome, and aldi said its cuthbert the caterpillar cake was "free" and looking forward to seeing his fans.
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i think carol would agree with us, cake of any kind is fine. free doesnt cake of any kind is fine. free doesn't mean... _ cake of any kind is fine. free doesn't mean... it _ cake of any kind is fine. free doesn't mean... it means i cake of any kind is fine. free i doesn't mean... it means free cake of any kind is fine. fee: doesn't mean... it means free from the shackles. you still have to pay for it. i agree with you, sally, cake at any time is ok. good morning. this morning it is not a cold start. this gives you an idea of the temperatures. it is fairly mild. the exception is across the northern isles where you are in the cold air. what is happening is there is a lot of cloud around. also some patchy rain. some murky conditions in parts of the west and the coast and the hills. this weather front has been pushing northwards through the course of the night. a lot of cloud. some dampness. some patchy rain. it should brighten up later on across parts of east wales, central and southern england, and the south, south—east and east anglia. it will not be as windy as it has been across the board. these are the
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temperatures. mild for this time of the year. widely, ten to 12, maybe 13. still nippy in the northern as. as we head into the evening and overnight, we still have some rain in the north and the west. some clear skies but still a lot of cloud. by the ant of the night of the wind will be strengthening across the north west. again, not a cold night. temperatures falling away to six and 9 degrees. tomorrow we start off with a fair bit of cloud. some sunnier breaks. some spots of rain before heavier rain comes in from the north—west with squally winds. this is a cold front. behind it, the air will turned colder. the showers will turn wintry. i had a bit of they will be some dry weather, some sunshine and still wintry. i had a bit of they will be some dry weather, some sunshine and still mild. thank you. let's return to our top story now. and the government will today outline its plans to transform the lives of those in some of the most disadvantaged parts of the country, as part of its
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so—called levelling up agenda. at the heart of the strategy is a plan to create more regional mayors. we're joined now by steve rotheram, the current metro mayor of the liverpool city region. let's start with the broad plans for this white paper. does it go far enough? we this white paper. does it go far enouuh? ~ . , this white paper. does it go far enouuh? ~ ., , ., this white paper. does it go far enouuh? ~ . , ., ., ., enough? we are yet to find that out. the secretary — enough? we are yet to find that out. the secretary of _ enough? we are yet to find that out. the secretary of paper _ enough? we are yet to find that out. the secretary of paper -- _ enough? we are yet to find that out. the secretary of paper -- state - the secretary of paper —— state yesterday — the secretary of paper —— state yesterday said of the white paper is recognition of the success that metro— recognition of the success that metro merrimacks have had so far with devolution. this offers a greater— with devolution. this offers a greater range of opportunities for areas _ greater range of opportunities for areas right the way around england. if we have _ areas right the way around england. if we have done it, i'm sure others can do— if we have done it, i'm sure others can do it — if we have done it, i'm sure others can do it it— if we have done it, i'm sure others can do it it is— if we have done it, i'm sure others can do it. it is nice you said i am the current— can do it. it is nice you said i am the current metro mayor. i don't know— the current metro mayor. idon't know if— the current metro mayor. i don't know if you _ the current metro mayor. i don't know if you know something i don't, but i intend — know if you know something i don't, but i intend to serve my full time and maybe — but i intend to serve my full time and maybe another one! i�*ve but i intend to serve my full time and maybe another one!— and maybe another one! i've not heard any _ and maybe another one! i've not
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heard any whispers! _ and maybe another one! i've not heard any whispers! in _ and maybe another one! i've not heard any whispers! in terms - and maybe another one! i've not heard any whispers! in terms of| and maybe another one! i've not i heard any whispers! in terms of you pointing to the success of those mayoral roles, is not something you would welcome a sort of using the blueprint that you and others have put into place, in other parts of the country?— put into place, in other parts of the count ? ., ., ., , the country? yeah. if we are really aenuine the country? yeah. if we are really genuine about _ the country? yeah. if we are really genuine about levelling _ the country? yeah. if we are really genuine about levelling up, - the country? yeah. if we are really genuine about levelling up, and i l genuine about levelling up, and i don't _ genuine about levelling up, and i don't think— genuine about levelling up, and i don't think this white paper will do what we _ don't think this white paper will do what we wanted to do, but if we were. _ what we wanted to do, but if we were. it — what we wanted to do, but if we were, it would be about addressing regional— were, it would be about addressing regional inequalities such as health conditions, life expectancy, educational attainment, conditions, life expectancy, educationalattainment, skills levels. — educationalattainment, skills levels, job opportunities and certainly— levels, job opportunities and certainly transport connectivity. that _ certainly transport connectivity. that is — certainly transport connectivity. that is not _ certainly transport connectivity. that is not what this paper does. but it— that is not what this paper does. but it does— that is not what this paper does. but it does offer some opportunities for areas _ but it does offer some opportunities for areas that have not got devolution. and i think that most people _ devolution. and i think that most people would rather have more decision—making at a local level rather— decision—making at a local level rather than whitehall mandarins from westminster or whitehall deciding what's _ westminster or whitehall deciding what's in _ westminster or whitehall deciding what's in the best interests of their— what's in the best interests of their areas. we what's in the best interests of their areas.— what's in the best interests of their areas. ~ ., ., ., ,, .w their areas. we are going to speak to michael gove _ their areas. we are going to speak to michael gove in _ their areas. we are going to speak to michael gove in about - their areas. we are going to speak to michael gove in about 15 - their areas. we are going to speak. to michael gove in about 15 minutes about some of the specific figures
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involved. if you look back at the october funding announcements, involved. if you look back at the octoberfunding announcements, i am sure you are aware that the liverpool city region i think received something like £37.5 million for transport infrastructure improvements, which you touched on. how much of that money have you seen? how does that work in terms of leading down to local level? lslate]!!! leading down to local level? well actuall , i leading down to local level? well actually. i will — leading down to local level? well actually, i will be _ leading down to local level? well actually, i will be more _ leading down to local level? well actually, i will be more generous to the government, we got a settlement of £710 _ the government, we got a settlement of £710 million. it was a big per capita _ of £710 million. it was a big per capita summer for the liverpool city region _ capita summer for the liverpool city region. and that is to try to do things— region. and that is to try to do things that you take for granted when _ things that you take for granted when you — things that you take for granted when you live in london. as you know. _ when you live in london. as you know. i— when you live in london. as you know. iwas— when you live in london. as you know, i was a member of parliament. ecb transport system every single day down — ecb transport system every single day down there. we need a london style transport system in the liverpool city region. we have got some _ liverpool city region. we have got some big _ liverpool city region. we have got some big money that we can do some structural— some big money that we can do some structural things. some big money that we can do some structuralthings. but some big money that we can do some structural things. but of course if we want — structural things. but of course if we want the quality alternative to the car. _ we want the quality alternative to the car, then you also need to reduce — the car, then you also need to reduce fares and we are not getting subsidies— reduce fares and we are not getting subsidies like they are in london
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and elsewhere, so that is the next stage _ and elsewhere, so that is the next stage of— and elsewhere, so that is the next stage of development, that genuine quality— stage of development, that genuine quality alternative to jumping in the car— quality alternative to jumping in the car in — quality alternative to jumping in the car in the morning. you mentioned _ the car in the morning. you mentioned that _ the car in the morning. you mentioned that larger i the car in the morning. gm. mentioned that larger figure, because there is also culturing level up money, 10 million for tate liverpool, 10 million are national museums liverpool. are the people of the city is seeing the benefits of that money at the moment? it the city is seeing the benefits of that money at the moment? it takes a while for that — that money at the moment? it takes a while for that money _ that money at the moment? it takes a while for that money to _ that money at the moment? it takes a while for that money to filter - while for that money to filter through _ while for that money to filter through. the promises if you brought a business _ through. the promises if you brought a business case to government that passes— a business case to government that passes muster, then you can get some of it. t hat— passes muster, then you can get some of it. that is— passes muster, then you can get some of it. that is what we are doing with— of it. that is what we are doing with some _ of it. that is what we are doing with some of those things. it's churlish— with some of those things. it's churlish to _ with some of those things. it's churlish to come on and so we haven't— churlish to come on and so we haven't had anything. we have come under— haven't had anything. we have come under devolution has been a great opportunity for us to do more with the money— opportunity for us to do more with the money that we receive because we know our— the money that we receive because we know our areas better locally than national _ know our areas better locally than national government do. so we are getting _ national government do. so we are getting a _ national government do. so we are getting a bigger bang for buck for uk plc. _ getting a bigger bang for buck for uk plc, and we are getting investment from the national
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government given the return to treasury — government given the return to treasury. that is why we say it needs — treasury. that is why we say it needs to — treasury. that is why we say it needs to be rolled out across the whole _ needs to be rolled out across the whole country. we still are the most centralised _ whole country. we still are the most centralised democracy in the oecd, politically— centralised democracy in the oecd, politically centralised command we have the _ politically centralised command we have the most unbalanced economy in the whole _ have the most unbalanced economy in the whole of europe. i'd say those two things— the whole of europe. i'd say those two things are intrinsically linked. what _ two things are intrinsically linked. what we — two things are intrinsically linked. what we need to do is give local areas _ what we need to do is give local areas the — what we need to do is give local areas the genuine opportunity, the resources. — areas the genuine opportunity, the resources, the funding and the powers. — resources, the funding and the powers, to do things for themselves. do you _ powers, to do things for themselves. do you think— powers, to do things for themselves. do you think the government listening? i do you think the government listenin: ? . do you think the government listening?— do you think the government listenin: ? . ~ . ., listening? i have met with michael gove and the _ listening? i have met with michael gove and the secretary _ listening? i have met with michael gove and the secretary of - listening? i have met with michael gove and the secretary of state i listening? i have met with michael| gove and the secretary of state for transport _ gove and the secretary of state for transport yesterday. they both understand that we know our areas and the _ understand that we know our areas and the needs of our areas. this latent _ and the needs of our areas. this latent -- — and the needs of our areas. this latent —— there is latent potential and lots — latent —— there is latent potential and lots of — latent —— there is latent potential and lots of those areas around the country _ and lots of those areas around the country that have been left behind for far— country that have been left behind for far too — country that have been left behind for far too long, that i had to endure — for far too long, that i had to endure the cuts, the very, very deep cuts of— endure the cuts, the very, very deep cuts of 12_ endure the cuts, the very, very deep cuts of 12 years of tory austerity. if we _ cuts of 12 years of tory austerity. if we are — cuts of 12 years of tory austerity. if we are to — cuts of 12 years of tory austerity. if we are to level up, you need to .ive if we are to level up, you need to give people — if we are to level up, you need to give people the chance to do something for themselves. i think we
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have demonstrated, and the secretary of state _ have demonstrated, and the secretary of state michael gove said we have demonstrated, that having devolution and a metro mayor has meant we have started _ and a metro mayor has meant we have started to _ and a metro mayor has meant we have started to redress the imbalance that has— started to redress the imbalance that has existed for far too long in this country. if that has existed for far too long in this country-— this country. if you listen to the labour this country. if you listen to the labour party — this country. if you listen to the labour party on _ this country. if you listen to the labour party on this _ this country. if you listen to the labour party on this issue, i this country. if you listen to the labour party on this issue, with regards to this white paper, they are talking about needing good jobs, decent wages, genuinely affordable housing in action to deal with the cost of living crisis. from the people you speak to in liverpool, are those the same sorts of things on their lips, the same concerns they have?— on their lips, the same concerns the have? ~ ~ ., , they have? when you knock on doors and ou they have? when you knock on doors and you get — they have? when you knock on doors and you get beyond _ they have? when you knock on doors and you get beyond the _ they have? when you knock on doors and you get beyond the sort - they have? when you knock on doors and you get beyond the sort of- and you get beyond the sort of partygate stuff, most people will say it _ partygate stuff, most people will say it is — partygate stuff, most people will say it is about their family and what _ say it is about their family and what happens in their local areas. they— what happens in their local areas. they want— what happens in their local areas. they want good jobs for their kids or their— they want good jobs for their kids or their grandkids. you speak to older— or their grandkids. you speak to older people on the doorstep, that is the _ older people on the doorstep, that is the thing they always speak about — is the thing they always speak about. what is the future for their grandkids? — about. what is the future for their grandkids? government can't do that
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from the _ grandkids? government can't do that from the centre. so areas like the liverpool— from the centre. so areas like the liverpool city region, we are forging — liverpool city region, we are forging our on identity. we are looking — forging our on identity. we are looking at— forging our on identity. we are looking at what we need to do to tackle _ looking at what we need to do to tackle climate emergency. there will be tens _ tackle climate emergency. there will be tens of— tackle climate emergency. there will be tens of thousands ofjobs there. they will— be tens of thousands ofjobs there. they will be good high paid jobs with good apprenticeships. that is the sort _ with good apprenticeships. that is the sort of— with good apprenticeships. that is the sort of thing we can do. central government— the sort of thing we can do. central government can't do that on our behalf — government can't do that on our behalf. ., government can't do that on our behalf. ,, ., ., ., ., ., behalf. steve rotherham, good to talk to you- _ behalf. steve rotherham, good to talk to you. thank _ behalf. steve rotherham, good to talk to you. thank you _ behalf. steve rotherham, good to talk to you. thank you very - behalf. steve rotherham, good to talk to you. thank you very much. j talk to you. thank you very much. the current metro mayor of the liverpool city region. when you think of treatments to help people with parkinson's disease, boxing might not immediately spring to mind. but one boxing gym in cheshire hosts weekly sessions which help with tremors, balance, and strength. mairead smyth has been along to have a look. this is training for the body and the brain. iam going i am going to go down and pick up a ring.
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tommy set up rock steady boxing club three years ago. he trained in america, where the clubs for people with parkinson's first began. they are what motivate me. i have my bad days, sane as the guys. i was diagnosed in 2013 with it. it is progressive. eventually it will overtake. i will be here as often as we can, and keep rock steady boxing working. because it does work. it doesn't cure parkinson's, but it will give you better quality of life. jackie has been coming from the beginning — six years after she was diagnosed with parkinson's. i was at rock bottom when i first come here. it has given me my confidence back. made me part of a team. i am so much steadier on my feet. medical research shows that these sessions can actually improve neural plasticity — which means the brain can actually rewire itself around structural damage, and those who take part in these sessions become less dependent on medical intervention.
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uppercut! there's lots of evidence that all of these neurological diseases and many other diseases benefit from exercise—orientated therapy. this specifically attacks the symptoms of parkinson's disease. so there are specific stations for balance, for coordination, for tremor — even for your voice, because patients often start to talk very quietly. the patients walk out of here looking almost sometimes like they don't have parkinson's disease. the group is getting back on its feet after the sessions had to go online during the pandemic. since it's reopened, things have got a lot better. everybody has been improving since the pandemic. it's great, these sessions are fantastic. the sessions really help because it teaches you everything that parkinson's takes away — it teaches you balance, coordination and everything. tommy's keen to get even more men and women involved. i've been inundated with requests tojoin, which is brilliant, which means i might have to put more classes on for everybody.
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cos my aim is not to turn people away. rock steady boxing! mairead smyth, bbc news. brilliant. we've got a bit more boxing later. i am just tearing stuff up. it feels nice to tear things. very therapeutic. lenny henry is here in half an hour. ihe things. very therapeutic. lenny henry is here in half an hour. he is auoin to henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be — henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be in _ henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be in a — henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be in a boxing _ henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be in a boxing ring. i- henry is here in half an hour. he is going to be in a boxing ring. i have been reliably _ going to be in a boxing ring. i have been reliably informed _ going to be in a boxing ring. i have been reliably informed he - going to be in a boxing ring. i have been reliably informed he is i going to be in a boxing ring. i have been reliably informed he is going| been reliably informed he is going to jab a for us in the n. ihe been reliably informed he is going to jab a for us in the n.— to jab a for us in the n. he is talkin: to jab a for us in the n. he is talking about _ to jab a for us in the n. he is talking about comic - to jab a for us in the n. he is talking about comic relief. l to jab a for us in the n. he is i talking about comic relief. last year, 55 million raised. an incredible amount of money. he is one of the voices and the faces of it since the start. he is going to be telling us about red nose day, which is on friday the 18th of march. �* which is on friday the 18th of march. . , ., ., which is on friday the 18th of march. . i. ., ., . march. and you might have noticed, ou march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned _ march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it _ march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it a _ march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it a while _ march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it a while ago - march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it a while ago on i march. and you might have noticed, you mentioned it a while ago on the| you mentioned it a while ago on the programme, it has been announced this morning the duchess of
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cambridge has become the patron of the rugby football union and the rugby football league. isn't that brilliant? both codes together. she is incredibly sporty. always takes the opportunities to play hockey come around us.— the opportunities to play hockey come around us. ., , come around us. good at everything. it is a big move _ come around us. good at everything. it is a big move for _ come around us. good at everything. it is a big move for rugby _ come around us. good at everything. it is a big move for rugby league i come around us. good at everything. it is a big move for rugby league to i it is a big move for rugby league to get something like —— summary like that. get something like -- summary like that. . .. get something like -- summary like that. ., ~ ., ., . get something like -- summary like that. ., ., . ., , that. taking over from prince harry. that will be — that. taking over from prince harry. that will be a _ that. taking over from prince harry. that will be a popular— that. taking over from prince harry. that will be a popular choice - that. taking over from prince harry. that will be a popular choice to i that will be a popular choice to have her as the figurehead, going to all the games and going to both codes, which is great. we have got ralph rimmer, chief executive of rugby football league in the next half an hour. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. around 35 people had to be evacuated from their homes last night after a fire broke out near acton town tube station. around 70 firefighters were called to the blaze at the car garage,
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which they said contained a number of gas cylinders. they say nobody was hurt, and an investigation's underway to find out how it started. gatwick airport bosses say there's been a dramatic rise in the number of passengers since further easing of covid restrictions. carriers including easyjet expect to be back to pre—pandemic levels this summer. passengers who are fully vaccinated no longer need to take a test before coming into the uk, and from next friday they also won't need a test two days after arrival. a woman who went to work for the nhs blood and transplant service during the pandemic says the experience made such an impression on her, she's now donated one of her kidneys to a stranger. sasha cooke used to be an actor, but when work dried up in lockdown she retrained as a carer. i wouldn't be doing what i'm about to do if i wasn't doing thisjob, you know — i'm meeting donors that are coming in through nothing other than goodwill,
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and that's so inspiring to me. but if i can comfortably give someone something that could get them off dialysis, and i'm eligible, then... you know, why not? and you can see more on that story on we are england — that's tonight at 7.30 here on bbc one. let's take a look at the travel now. and this is how the tube is running this morning. now because of the fire in acton, the district line has no service between turnham green and ealing broadway, and the northern line still closed for works between moorgate and kennington. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. temperatures mid to high single figures celsius. now we should get a bright start with a bit of sunshine — patchy cloud, however, perhaps a little bit
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of mistiness over higher ground. so we should see some sunny spells — decent ones — through this morning, the patchy cloud coming and going. a moderate breeze today, but temperatures are still mild — we're looking at a maximum of 12 celsius later on this afternoon. now, overnight tonight we've still got a bit of cloud — some clearer spells, but that cloud, you can't really rule out the odd spot of rain. nothing more significant overnight, and the temperature — it's still mild, the minimum between six and eight celsius. so another mild start tomorrow morning. for thursday it's looking dry. some sunny spells, patchy cloud. it is going to get breezier, though, as we head overnight. this cold front heads towards us, a spell of potentially quite heavy rain for a time. those isobars squeezing together, as well — so getting windier — but also behind it, represented by this blue colour, some colder air. so once that rain clears on friday morning, it is going to get chilly. we'll see some sunshine, though, to end the week, and temperatures on friday a little cooler — around eight or nine celsius.
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i'm back in around an hour — plenty more over on our website. now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. as we've been reporting, the government is to set to lay out its long—delayed plan to "level up" the country, within the next decade. the white paper will set out a series of legally binding "missions" — ranging from improving public transport to ensuring access to 5g broadband. last year, the communities secretary, michael gove said that if you wanted to see "levelling up in reality, come to teesside". our north of england correspondent fiona trott has been to meet people there. an area that's asked to be levelled up. at the heart of it, the development of a former steelworks promising around 20,000 jobs.
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but it's something people can't yet see — or feel. what is levelling up to you? go on — what do you say? you go. don't know. you say. go on. don't know! levelling up to me means better transport because it makes i middlesbrough and the northeast more available to people, _ and it means that they'll be able to come and see our town- and everything that's here. what about for you, particularly? how would better transport make you feel? i work in a community, _ so having the bus routes available to places that are harder for me j to walk to is really, really good. levelling up to me means, like, um, provision of a more flexible transportation system in the train and process aspects — like cheaper transportation, as well.
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i do think it's better that we're getting more facilities in the area. we could... getting more facilities and building train stations and stuff and building houses like there's no tomorrow, but we're not getting better hospitals or better schools. that's how i would take levelling up — as just being able to cater for everybody in the area better — like health—wise and school—wise and everything like that. it's a good thing that they've got the treasury coming to darlington. more jobs for the area. what does it mean, levelling up? like, to mean putting everyone even? well, obviously, we're not even. jane doesn't feel qualified for any future jobs — for her, levelling upjust means having somewhere nice to live on. having somewhere nice to live. the inside of our house is really nice, but as soon as you come out of our front door, it lets us down. we look like scum. i think that money — more money needs to be spent on education in this community
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or in the communities that need it, to help them respect our area and learn more respect ready for when they have children in the future. educating the engineers of the future. at middlesbrough college, they're learning about renewable energy — a sector that's receiving millions of pounds worth of investment here. we've got a reading of 6.361. i am pretty excited for being in this field of work because i think that it's perfect for the change from steel to green energy now. and i don't have to travel for work — like, i'm in the perfect place, like, it's happening in teesside, where i live, so i don't have to move away. the whole leveling up will, like, improve that — like, building new houses, newjobs, the whole
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infrastructure created. people dojudge you about people do judge you about where you come _ people do judge you about where you come from _ people do judge you about where you come from i'm — people do judge you about where you come from. i'm not _ people do judge you about where you come from. i'm not from _ people do judge you about where you come from. i'm not from teesside, . come from. i'm not from teesside, and from _ come from. i'm not from teesside, and from somewhere _ come from. i'm not from teesside, and from somewhere else - come from. i'm not from teesside, and from somewhere else and i come from. i'm not from teesside, and from somewhere else and that| and from somewhere else and that .ets and from somewhere else and that getsiudged — and from somewhere else and that gets judged a — and from somewhere else and that getsiudged a lot _ and from somewhere else and that getsjudged a lot. it— and from somewhere else and that getsjudged a lot. it hasn't- and from somewhere else and that getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got- getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much — getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much if— getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much if we _ getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much. if we are _ getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much. if we are all— getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much. if we are all going - getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got much. if we are all going the i getsjudged a lot. it hasn't got- much. if we are all going the same it will— much. if we are all going the same it will look— much. if we are all going the same it will look the _ much. if we are all going the same it will look the same _ much. if we are all going the same it will look the same and _ much. if we are all going the same it will look the same and to - much. if we are all going the same it will look the same and to be i much. if we are all going the same i it will look the same and to be more welcoming _ it will look the same and to be more welcoming and — it will look the same and to be more welcoming and that. _ middlesbrough is one of the most deprived areas of the uk. levelling up post—pandemic isn'tjust about the economy, it's about life expectancy. you're talking about population health. the fact that people are living five years less here as opposed to a similar area in london. as far as politicians are concerned, health has got to be a theme that runs through all these sorts of policies — whether it's jobs, whether it's education, whether it's employment, think of health in everything you're doing, then i don't see
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that we are going to level up and actually move it forward because we've got to do that. it's unjust what we have at the present time, and that can be easily done. an area that needs to change to improve the lives of the people living there. today's white paper will show if their voices have been heard. fiona trott, bbc news, middlesbrough. we can speak now to levelling up secretary, michael gove. good morning to you, mr gove. i hope you caught a bit of that report that my first question to you is about levelling up itself, and for people watching us this morning at home who keep hearing this raised levelling up, what will it mean for them? it means making opportunity more equal. forfar too long the uk, england in particular, has had an economic powerhouse in london and the south—east but not everyone is shared in that success so we want to
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make sure that overlooked and undervalued communities from middlesbrough to mansfield, wolverhampton to walsall, get the support they need and that we shift both money and power into the hands of working people. length? both money and power into the hands of working people-— of working people. why have these communities _ of working people. why have these communities been _ of working people. why have these communities been overlooked i of working people. why have these communities been overlooked for i of working people. why have these i communities been overlooked for so long when the conservatives have beenin long when the conservatives have been in power? i long when the conservatives have been in power?— been in power? i think we had a wake-up call— been in power? i think we had a wake-up call with _ been in power? i think we had a wake-up call with the _ been in power? i think we had a wake-up call with the brexit i wake—up call with the brexit referendum in 2016. i think of there was a clear desire to take back control from the eu, but there was also a clear instruction to us repeatedly underlined in 2019 to change the economic model of this country. i think good work was already being done by george osborne with the northern powerhouse initiative that he put in place but we need to go further. today we are setting out 12 big missions to commit that research and development spending, the rocket fuel that will help our economy grow, is to spread more equally and also that we tackle
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some of the other underlying inequalities in health and education and housing. i inequalities in health and education and housing-— and housing. i will start with transport- — and housing. i will start with transport. you _ and housing. i will start with transport. you will— and housing. i will start with transport. you will say i and housing. i will start with transport. you will say that i and housing. i will start with i transport. you will say that by and housing. i will start with - transport. you will say that by 2030 local public transport connectivity across the country will be significantly closer to the standards of london. how will that work? ii standards of london. how will that work? , ., standards of london. how will that work? i., standards of london. how will that work? ,~. ., standards of london. how will that work? ., ., ., , work? if you look at, for example, what the mayor — work? if you look at, for example, what the mayor of _ work? if you look at, for example, what the mayor of greater - what the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, has been doing. andy has been setting out plans in order to ensure effective credit transport across greater manchester, trams and buses and bikes, which enable people to get from home to work, to leisure more quickly. we are working with mayors in the west midlands like andy street who is doing an amazing job to deliver the infrastructure. of course the prime minister, when he was mayor of london, ensured we had a transport infrastructure that worked for the whole of the city, so we want to ensure that what boris did in london to improve transport also occurs across the uk. i wonder if andy burnham _ also occurs across the uk. i wonder if andy burnham might _ also occurs across the uk. i wonder
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if andy burnham might say - also occurs across the uk. i wonder if andy burnham might say to i also occurs across the uk. i wonder if andy burnham might say to you, | if andy burnham might say to you, why are you cutting back funding to improve the buses outside london where there is less money which we have both improvement plans and additionalfunding have both improvement plans and additional funding which will be committed to all of the mayors across the uk.— committed to all of the mayors across the uk. . ., .., , ., across the uk. and of course i want to work with _ across the uk. and of course i want to work with andy, _ across the uk. and of course i want to work with andy, with _ across the uk. and of course i want to work with andy, with tracy i to work with andy, with tracy brabin, andy street, then hampshire in teesside, in order to ensure that we can improve transport links, the critical transport links that ensure that people in the towns around major cities can get to the job opportunities which, as a result of a commitment to levelling up, we will create. abs, a commitment to levelling up, we will create-— will create. a letter sent to the local transport _ will create. a letter sent to the local transport authority - will create. a letter sent to the i local transport authority directed by the department for transport just last month, seen by the observer a few days ago, said to reveal that the budget for the transformation of buses has actually shrunk from 3 billion to la billion. this idea of bus back better that borisjohnson
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talked about, has a funding gone elsewhere?— talked about, has a funding gone elsewhere? ., ., ., ., ., , elsewhere? that was additional money in the spending — elsewhere? that was additional money in the spending review— elsewhere? that was additional money in the spending review to _ elsewhere? that was additional money in the spending review to improve i in the spending review to improve local transport. in the spending review to improve localtransport. buses in the spending review to improve local transport. buses are a vital element of that and we are working with mayors and leaders outside our big cities to ensure we have improved bus services in the future of. �* , �* ., , improved bus services in the future of. y�* ., ., of. andy burnham is asking for 75 does between _ of. andy burnham is asking for 75 does between 75 _ of. andy burnham is asking for 75 does between 75 million - of. andy burnham is asking for 75 does between 75 million and i of. andy burnham is asking for 75| does between 75 million and £100 million to ensure services for isolated communities. will they get that many? me isolated communities. will they get that man ? ~ ., ., . ., that many? we will announce later exactly how _ that many? we will announce later exactly how much _ that many? we will announce later exactly how much money - that many? we will announce later exactly how much money will- that many? we will announce later exactly how much money will be i that many? we will announce later i exactly how much money will be given to greater manchester, but andy burnham's ambitions are laudable and i want to work with him to make sure we achieve them. 50 i want to work with him to make sure we achieve them.— i want to work with him to make sure we achieve them. so he will get some fundin: the we achieve them. so he will get some funding the department _ we achieve them. so he will get some funding the department for _ we achieve them. so he will get some funding the department for transport | funding the department for transport itself will be announcing all the areas receiving additional bus funding shortly and i don't want to pre—empt the detail of that announcement but it is the case that i can confirm that all gi announcement but it is the case that i can confirm that al— i can confirm that all of the combined _ i can confirm that all of the combined authorities i i can confirm that all of the combined authorities that i i can confirm that all of the i combined authorities that have i can confirm that all of the - combined authorities that have bid for additional bus funding, we will
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make sure people can get to work and ensure that the communities around our big cities, oldham, rochdale, wigan, all of those communities around the core of manchester get the support they need will stop let's move on to broadband because one of your missions is this, by 2030 the uk will have nationwide gigabit capable broadband with ag coverage and 5g coverage for the majority of the population. flu]!!! majority of the population. full fibre gigabit — majority of the population. full fibre gigabit capable broadband by 25 was promised. you now say it will be about 2030. actually you are delaying it by five years. hat be about 2030. actually you are delaying it by five years.- delaying it by five years. not at all and we _ delaying it by five years. not at all and we have _ delaying it by five years. not at all and we have made - delaying it by five years. not at all and we have made huge i delaying it by five years. not at i all and we have made huge progress in the roll—out of gigabit broadband and that progress under successive administrations has been accelerated on the prime minister. it is important to recognise that making sure some of the most isolated
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communities in scotland, wales, rural england pose particular challenges that we are committed to making sure it is a universal service. i making sure it is a universal service. ., ., , ., ., service. i am not sure how you are not delaying _ service. i am not sure how you are not delaying it _ service. i am not sure how you are not delaying it by _ service. i am not sure how you are not delaying it by pushing - service. i am not sure how you are not delaying it by pushing it i service. i am not sure how you are not delaying it by pushing it back i not delaying it by pushing it back for five years. not delaying it by pushing it back for five years-— for five years. they are slightly different targets _ for five years. they are slightly different targets and _ for five years. they are slightly different targets and it - for five years. they are slightly different targets and it is i different targets and it is important to recognise that. of all the missions we have put forward, they are long—term emissions because we recognise that levelling up, whilst it is important that changes being seen instantly in communities and we have already seen that in the way in which, for example, teesside's economic revival has been spearheaded it is also the case that we need to be it for the long term which is why there are clear goals in the white paper and metrics against which the government can be measured and held to account. let’s measured and held to account. let's talk about another _ measured and held to account. let's talk about another mission, by 2030 and of a primary school children achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and maths will have significantly increased. that means that in england 90% of children will
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achieve the expected standard. how will you do that when, in real terms, funding has been going down? the key thing is that it is about of course funding but also reform and rigour. we know that in the best schools children can reach that expected level, that they can leave primary school ready to learn in secondary school. it is an absolute requirement and we have the best teaching profession we have ever had, so i have total confidence in their ability to deliver on that because, ultimately, as you say, resources matter in education but so does a focus on standards, making sure that we use phonics to get children decoding and reading fluently and making sure that arithmetic and number skills in a focused and effective way in primary school... but focused and effective way in primary school... �* ., ., , ., focused and effective way in primary school... �* ., ., ,~. , ., school... but how do you improve the standards school. .. but how do you improve the standards if— school... but how do you improve the standards if funding _ school... but how do you improve the standards if funding is _ school... but how do you improve the standards if funding is falling? -
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standards if funding is falling? from the institute for fiscal studies, they say that cuts to education spending over the last decade are effectively, without precedent, in post—war uk history, including 9% in real terms. you're talking about standards and teachers and staff trying to achieve these targets but how do you do that if the funding is being taken away from them? . the funding is being taken away from them? , ., , them? there is no funding being taken away- _ them? there is no funding being taken away. it _ them? there is no funding being taken away. it is _ them? there is no funding being taken away. it is being _ them? there is no funding being taken away. it is being reduced i them? there is no funding being| taken away. it is being reduced in real terms- _ taken away. it is being reduced in real terms. the _ taken away. it is being reduced in real terms. the key _ taken away. it is being reduced in real terms. the key thing - taken away. it is being reduced in real terms. the key thing is i taken away. it is being reduced in real terms. the key thing is that. taken away. it is being reduced in l real terms. the key thing is that we have supported _ real terms. the key thing is that we have supported schools _ real terms. the key thing is that we have supported schools through i real terms. the key thing is that we \ have supported schools through the pandemic and before. we have provided resource for those at the front line, but also when it comes to effective delivery in education, resources matter. but so does the right culture in the classroom. so does a focus on standards. so does maintaining that absolutely laser—like attention to the literacy and numeracy, which of the building blocks on which creativity and further learning depend. we have already seen a significant
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improvement in standards over the course of the last 12 years, more schools are good and outstanding, more children achieving what. refill? more children achieving what. really simle more children achieving what. really simple question _ more children achieving what. really simple question for— more children achieving what. really simple question for you, _ more children achieving what. really simple question for you, mr- more children achieving what. really simple question for you, mr gove. is there any new money anywhere in this? , there any new money anywhere in this?- where? _ there any new money anywhere in this?- where?— there any new money anywhere in this? , where? , ., ., this? yes. where? in every area. the levellin: this? yes. where? in every area. the levelling up — this? yes. where? in every area. the levelling up fund, _ this? yes. where? in every area. the levelling up fund, which _ this? yes. where? in every area. the levelling up fund, which is _ this? yes. where? in every area. the levelling up fund, which is £4.8 - levelling up fund, which is £4.8 billion, we have spent 1.7 billion of that. there is more to be spent over the course of the next few years. over the course of the next few ears. ~ ., , over the course of the next few ears, ~ ., , ., ., over the course of the next few ears. ~ .,, ., ., ., over the course of the next few ears. ~ ., ., ., ,, years. was that not an spending reviews? the _ years. was that not an spending reviews? the key _ years. was that not an spending reviews? the key thing - years. was that not an spending reviews? the key thing about i years. was that not an spending | reviews? the key thing about the sendin: reviews? the key thing about the spending review _ reviews? the key thing about the spending review as _ reviews? the key thing about the spending review as it _ reviews? the key thing about the spending review as it gave - reviews? the key thing about the spending review as it gave me i reviews? the key thing about the l spending review as it gave me and other government departments a significant amount into the bank and now we are cashing those checks and the money is going out. i am interested — the money is going out. i am interested because _ the money is going out. i am interested because you - the money is going out. i am interested because you are l the money is going out. i am interested because you are talking about 2030. it is a long way off. these educational targets, the children you are talking about have not yet been born. that children you are talking about have not yet been born.— not yet been born. that is a critical point. _ not yet been born. that is a critical point. so _ not yet been born. that is a critical point. so what - not yet been born. that is a critical point. so what will. not yet been born. that is a - critical point. so what will happen to the disease _ critical point. so what will happen to the disease microgeneration, l critical point. so what will happen i to the disease microgeneration, the children who are in school now need support now? ==
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children who are in school now need sunport now?— support now? -- of the covid generation — support now? -- of the covid generation of _ support now? -- of the covid generation of these - support now? -- of the covid generation of these targets l support now? -- of the covid i generation of these targets are long—term. in future spending reviews we will be looking at how we allocate new money in those spending reviews to meet these ambitions. i don't think anyone quarrels with or challenges the importance of levelling up, or i don't think anyone would say that these ambitions are anything other than noble and right.— ambitions are anything other than noble and right. government will be 'udued b noble and right. government will be judged by our _ noble and right. government will be judged by our ability _ noble and right. government will be judged by our ability to _ noble and right. government will be judged by our ability to deliver - judged by our ability to deliver over the course of the next two years and then on to 2030, and that is the laying out of the basis we can be judged is the laying out of the basis we can bejudged on the basis on which future spending reviews can can be judged on the basis on which future spending reviews— future spending reviews can be 'udued, future spending reviews can be judged. as _ future spending reviews can be judged, as well. _ future spending reviews can be judged, as well. let's - future spending reviews can be judged, as well. let's move . future spending reviews can be judged, as well. let's move onj future spending reviews can be - judged, as well. let's move on from the white paper- _ judged, as well. let's move on from the white paper. i _ judged, as well. let's move on from the white paper. i want _ judged, as well. let's move on from the white paper. i want to _ judged, as well. let's move on from the white paper. i want to talk- the white paper. i want to talk about a story that has been rumbling on about the parties in downing street. some of the newspapers are reporting yet more claims that the prime minister was present at the bit lockdown events. on a day like today when you are talking about
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your huge set piece project, how frustrating is it for you that you have to keep defending the prime minister? was borisjohnson in the party in his flat? we minister? was boris johnson in the party in his flat?— minister? was boris johnson in the party in his flat? we have at... you talk about— party in his flat? we have at... you talk about the _ party in his flat? we have at... you talk about the frustration. - party in his flat? we have at... you talk about the frustration. we - party in his flat? we have at... you talk about the frustration. we have | talk about the frustration. we have three, robust and open media that reports without fear or favour so politicians like me will be asked also to questions about all sorts of events, quite right. as i think you know, and i know it is boring for viewers for me to say this, but it is true that there is a limit to what i can say because there is an ongoing metropolitan police investigation and i don't know the details of all of these events, they are news to me. they are reported fairly and objectively in the media on the basis of the information that reporters here but it will be the police that will determine the ultimate truth of this matter and i think that is as it should be. in
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think that is as it should be. in the commons on monday borisjohnson claimed sir keir starmer, the labour leader, to prosecutejimmy several when he was director of public prosecutions. —— jimmy temple. there is no evidence to support this and get borisjohnson said it. how is no evidence to support this and yet borisjohnson said it. house of commons speaker poured scorn on the comments, should borisjohnson apologise for what he said with yellow no. why not?— apologise for what he said with yellow no. why not? well, these are uniuuel yellow no. why not? well, these are uniquely sensitive _ yellow no. why not? well, these are uniquely sensitive matters _ yellow no. why not? well, these are uniquely sensitive matters and - yellow no. why not? well, these are uniquely sensitive matters and i - uniquely sensitive matters and i recognise that when you are dealing with someone like savile who is responsible for tremendous crimes, it is important to deal with these matters sensitively. it was the case that the cps apologised for aspects of this case and the mishandling of it. keir starmer, to his credit, as the head of the cps, asked an independent lawyer to look at this case, appropriate conclusions were drawn about mistakes that have been
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made, an apology was made at the time. �* ., �* ., , made, an apology was made at the time. �* ., time. but what boris johnson said in the house was _ time. but what boris johnson said in the house was not _ time. but what boris johnson said in the house was not correct, - time. but what boris johnson said in the house was not correct, what - time. but what boris johnson said in the house was not correct, what it? | the house was not correct, what it? i havejust the house was not correct, what it? i have just outlined the facts and i think in deference to the feelings of all those involved, i want to let the facts stand for themselves and not get into an argument about this. should borisjohnson have remembered the people who were involved when he raised this matter in the house? well, as i say, it was the case that the cps investigated what went on at the cps investigated what went on at the time, and appropriate apology was made. i think keir starmer was absolutely right to hold the organisation to account and he was the person quite properly, and i think rightly, who did an audit of what happened and then appropriate conclusions were drawn. that was right and proper at the time and i think the facts speak for themselves and i make no criticism of anyone
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because i think that when errors are made within an organisation and the person at the top takes steps to deal with it, we should recognise that. ~ . ., deal with it, we should recognise that. ~. ., ., ~ deal with it, we should recognise that. ~. ., ., , that. michael gove, thank you very much. that. michael gove, thank you very much- no. — that. michael gove, thank you very much. no, thank— that. michael gove, thank you very much. no, thank you _ that. michael gove, thank you very much. no, thank you. _ it's been announced this morning that british rugby has a new figurehead, in the shape of the duchess of cambridge. what a great appointment that is. in the last hour, the duchess has been named patron of both codes, the rugby football league and the rugby football union. and one man who has a busy year ahead with the rugby league world cup is ralph rimmer, chief executive of the rugby football league, and he's with us now. he has a big smile on his face. how excited are you by this appointment, this news? it is excited are you by this appointment, this news? , . ., . ., this news? it is a great day. we are very appreciative — this news? it is a great day. we are very appreciative of _ this news? it is a great day. we are very appreciative of our _ this news? it is a great day. we are very appreciative of our royal- very appreciative of our royal patronage and an announcement like this makes it all worthwhile and brings home how important it is. she loves the sport generally. what does she know about rugby league? have
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you had conversations, does she watch it? ,, , , you had conversations, does she watchit? ,, , , , watch it? she is very sporty, i heard that — watch it? she is very sporty, i heard that earlier, _ watch it? she is very sporty, i heard that earlier, she - watch it? she is very sporty, i - heard that earlier, she absolutely is, and seems to genuinely care about communities in the uk. we can certainly connect with all of our communities and so i think it will work really well.— communities and so i think it will work really well. how good will it be that both _ work really well. how good will it be that both codes _ work really well. how good will it be that both codes are _ work really well. how good will it be that both codes are united - work really well. how good will it be that both codes are united by| work really well. how good will it. be that both codes are united by one figurehead? be that both codes are united by one fiaurehead? ., ., , ., , ., be that both codes are united by one fiaurehead? ., ., , ., ., , figurehead? contrary to popular myth we aet figurehead? contrary to popular myth we net on figurehead? contrary to popular myth we get on very _ figurehead? contrary to popular myth we get on very well— figurehead? contrary to popular myth we get on very well with _ figurehead? contrary to popular myth we get on very well with our - we get on very well with our counterparts. we have spoken about this. it is a great opportunity for us both, signifies that we do work together and her having a figurehead of both of us is something to be celebrated. of both of us is something to be celebrated-— of both of us is something to be celebrated. ~ ., ., celebrated. what sort of impact... you mentioned _ celebrated. what sort of impact... you mentioned grass _ celebrated. what sort of impact... you mentioned grass roots - celebrated. what sort of impact... you mentioned grass roots level l celebrated. what sort of impact... | you mentioned grass roots level of the clubs, what sort of impact could she have, what schemes might she be involved in and how might that get to those communities? it is involved in and how might that get to those communities?— involved in and how might that get to those communities? it is huge. we run activities — to those communities? it is huge. we run activities from _ to those communities? it is huge. we run activities from grassroots - to those communities? it is huge. we run activities from grassroots from i run activities from grassroots from under sixs through to the events that run at wembley or st james's park were old trafford. she can connect with us on any level and she
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will be embraced wherever she turned up, no doubt. it is a real day to be celebrating. it up, no doubt. it is a real day to be celebrating-— celebrating. it is such a big year for ru . b celebrating. it is such a big year for rugby league. _ celebrating. it is such a big year for rugby league. the _ celebrating. it is such a big year for rugby league. the timing i celebrating. it is such a big year. for rugby league. the timing could not he _ for rugby league. the timing could not be better for you. i�*m for rugby league. the timing could not be better for you.— not be better for you. i'm glad you ointed not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that _ not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that out, _ not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that out, yes. _ not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that out, yes. well, i not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that out, yes. well, at i not be better for you. i'm glad you pointed that out, yes. well, at the end of the year, delay from year, frustratingly. we will be welcoming nations from all over the globe, we are winning three world cups in parallel, men's, women's and wheelchair, making us completely unique and all of those venues i mentioned earlier, she will have the opportunity to show up for any and as i say she will be absolutely embraced wherever she turns up. hagar embraced wherever she turns up. how does it work — embraced wherever she turns up. how does it work with a patronage? you might get access to her for one day a year? if you love that she can get involved in more? we a year? if you love that she can get involved in more?— a year? if you love that she can get involved in more? we will make the most of it- — involved in more? we will make the most of it- we _ involved in more? we will make the most of it. we are _ involved in more? we will make the most of it. we are very _ involved in more? we will make the most of it. we are very difficult i involved in more? we will make the most of it. we are very difficult to i most of it. we are very difficult to shake off a. it most of it. we are very difficult to shake off a-_ most of it. we are very difficult to shake off a._ it - most of it. we are very difficult to shake off a._ it is - most of it. we are very difficult to shake off a._ it is true. l shake off a. it is true. it is true. we appreciate _ shake off a. it is true. it is true. we appreciate how _ shake off a. it is true. it is true. we appreciate how precious i shake off a. it is true. it is true. we appreciate how precious are| we appreciate how precious are timeless. there are lots of calls. we will speak with them later and we
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will hopefully see her at some world cup events, give us a great lift. it is a great day after weathering it has been tough. it has, our sport resides in distressed communities. anyway the pandemic has exacerbated those stresses. let's celebrate where you are, there are lots of reasons to be optimistic about our sport. reasons to be optimistic about our sort. ~ , ., , ., , ., sport. why the other stories we have followed closely _ sport. why the other stories we have followed closely on _ sport. why the other stories we have followed closely on bbc _ sport. why the other stories we have followed closely on bbc breakfast i sport. why the other stories we have followed closely on bbc breakfast is | followed closely on bbc breakfast is rob burrow, motor neurone disease and some of the incredible fundraising work with kevin sinfield and many others. you'll probably be perfect guy to take a step back and look at the impact that that story, their friendship, look at the impact that that story, theirfriendship, that money look at the impact that that story, their friendship, that money raised has had on notjust the family and rugby league family, but more broadly on the game. flit rugby league family, but more broadly on the game.- broadly on the game. of my spectacles _ broadly on the game. of my spectacles l _
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broadly on the game. of my spectacles i always - broadly on the game. of my spectacles i always rose i broadly on the game. of my i spectacles i always rose tinted, broadly on the game. of my - spectacles i always rose tinted, you have to accept that. that story is far bigger than rugby league. we have known rob and kevin for a long time, the story goes to the heights of many people in the nation. not even just of many people in the nation. not evenjust sport of many people in the nation. not even just sport people. they can appreciate friendships, ties and bonds that are in how it will be league sport, it is one that connects people very strongly, it is fiercely passionate and can work for or against you but certainly in instances like that i think it connects people and it is fantastic. dan is right to talk about that. the connection— dan is right to talk about that. the connection and the friendship between those men. we talk a lot about_ between those men. we talk a lot about the — between those men. we talk a lot about the rugby league family and it is about— about the rugby league family and it is about so— about the rugby league family and it is about so much more than sport and it is about _ is about so much more than sport and it is about families and anyone watching — it is about families and anyone watching this probe in this way can probably— watching this probe in this way can probably relate to it in some. —— anybody— probably relate to it in some. —— anybody watching this programme. what people are interested, my people — what people are interested, my people are watching, more people engaged~ — people are watching, more people engaged. | people are watching, more people enruaed. ., �* people are watching, more people enruaed. ~ ., people are watching, more people enruaed. ~' ., ., people are watching, more people enruaed. ~ ., ., ., ,
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engaged. i don't know how many tears have been shed _ engaged. i don't know how many tears have been shed watching _ engaged. i don't know how many tears have been shed watching us. - engaged. i don't know how many tears have been shed watching us. it - engaged. i don't know how many tears have been shed watching us. it is i have been shed watching us. it is tragic in this first instance but some good has come out of it and it is notjust about some good has come out of it and it is not just about the fantastic pairing of rob and kevin come it goes far beyond that and far beyond sport. t goes far beyond that and far beyond sort. ., �* goes far beyond that and far beyond sort, ., �* 4' ., goes far beyond that and far beyond sort. ., �* ~' ., ., ., sport. i don't know quite how to hrase sport. i don't know quite how to phrase this _ sport. i don't know quite how to phrase this without _ sport. i don't know quite how to phrase this without saying i sport. i don't know quite how to phrase this without saying the l sport. i don't know quite how to i phrase this without saying the wrong thing. _ phrase this without saying the wrong thing. but _ phrase this without saying the wrong thing, but they are not like showbiz sportsman. — thing, but they are not like showbiz sportsman, eithera? thing, but they are not like showbiz sportsman, either a? they thing, but they are not like showbiz sportsman, eithera? they are thing, but they are not like showbiz sportsman, either a? they are not flashy~ _ sportsman, either a? they are not flashy~ do— sportsman, either a? they are not flashy. do you think that is what really— flashy. do you think that is what really helps, in rugby league, we go to a game, — really helps, in rugby league, we go to a game, you chat to someone who hasiust_ to a game, you chat to someone who hasjust played, really normal and down—to—earth. hasjust played, really normal and down-to-earth._ hasjust played, really normal and down-to-earth. they are. our playing community is — down-to-earth. they are. our playing community is incredibly _ down-to-earth. they are. our playing community is incredibly accessible. i community is incredibly accessible. they are just normal people and they are extraordinary people and i moved from the men's to the women's to the wheelchair, all those elite athletes, those incredible people with back stories and they have the power to move people.— power to move people. ordinary --eole power to move people. ordinary people doing — power to move people. ordinary people doing extraordinary i power to move people. ordinary. people doing extraordinary things. exactly— people doing extraordinary things. exactly right. part people doing extraordinary things. exactly right-— exactly right. part of your plan is rurowin exactly right. part of your plan is growing the _ exactly right. part of your plan is growing the game. _ exactly right. part of your plan is growing the game. let's - exactly right. part of your plan is growing the game. let's look- exactly right. part of your plan is growing the game. let's look at| exactly right. part of your plan is i growing the game. let's look at the five, ten year plan. having the
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duchess of cambridge on—board is huge where do you want to be a decade down the line? professionally, we are along the northern corridors. we have a community that expands way beyond that. we have some real ambition about what to achieve domestically and internationally and collecting all that. we have been through very difficult years. we have a fairly big strategy which we have just delivered. i'm sure if you avoid he would love to read it! i have great aspirations and ambitions for this sport and i think the next ten years or so, sport and i think the next ten years orso, providing sport and i think the next ten years or so, providing we adhere to the strategy, this is a great stepping stone. . , ., , ., ~ strategy, this is a great stepping stone. . , ., stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming _ stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming in. _ stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming in. it _ stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming in. it is _ stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming in. it is great i stone. that is lovely, thank you so much for coming in. it is great to i much for coming in. it is great to talk to— much for coming in. it is great to talk to you. — much for coming in. it is great to talk to you, what great news to have today _ talk to you, what great news to have toda . . ~ talk to you, what great news to have toda . ., ~ ,., talk to you, what great news to have toda . . ~' ,. , talk to you, what great news to have toda. ., , . talk to you, what great news to have toda . ., ~ y., , . ., talk to you, what great news to have toda. ., , . ., , today. thank you very much, that is ralh today. thank you very much, that is ralph rimmer _ today. thank you very much, that is ralph rimmer and _ today. thank you very much, that is ralph rimmer and we _ today. thank you very much, that is ralph rimmer and we will - today. thank you very much, that is ralph rimmer and we will continue | today. thank you very much, that is l ralph rimmer and we will continue to follow rob and kevin. if you have ever wondered what it would be like to visit bob marley
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pot recording studio or step into a jamaican rainforest you can do it without leaving the country. an a mess of the exhibition and life of reggae legend opens in london later this week and there music correspondent mike savage went along for a sneak peek. my feeling about this music is that this music will get bigger and biggerand biggerand bigger and find its right people as it gets bigger. bob marley's prophecy came true. after this interview was filmed, he became one of the world's best so, they've got a brand i new one out called exodus — here are bob marley and the wailers. # exodus # movement ofjah people.# now, a little more than a0 years after his death, his legacy is being celebrated, with an extensive exhibition featuring unseen photographs, rare concert footage and platinum discs, all overseen by his eldest daughter, cedella. going through every room, i think you leave with a little piece of daddy.
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you can see the accomplishments of this little boy from nine mile, you know, who grew up in poverty, struggled with identity, you know? and just still overcoming it all. # we'rejammin'. # see, i want to jam it with you.# but staging an exhibition of bob marley's life presented a unique problem. the musician wasn't someone who held on to mementos and memorabilia. have you made, say, millions of dollars? i no. are you a rich man? when you mean rich, what do you mean? do you have a lot of possessions, a lot of money in the bank? - possession make you rich? i know i don't have that type of richness. my richness is life, forever. there wasn't tonnes of concert ticket stubs and other traditional exhibit material, so you needed to create these environments for people to be able to have a multi—sensory experience
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where they could really feel what bob marley was all about. one such experience comes in the rainforest room, designed as a place to hang out and imbibe bob's music. i love the forest. it's like we brought a little bit ofjamaica to cold london, you know? yeah! and there's a pair of his football boots? i brought them in with me. yeah. just yesterday? yeah. oh, wow! so they've literally been put in the case. where were they before that? in my closet. do you have a lot of memorabilia, just at home? no. that was like the only piece of dad's stuff that i actually held on to. were you a fan of his music growing up, or did you come to it later in life? no, i like michael jackson and shalamar... ..eh, cyndi lauper. yeah, because it's almost like, say, when when you cook rice and peas every day, you're not — you don't go, "oh,
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rice and peas," you know? you're kind of used to it. was there a rivalry? did he want you to like him as much as you liked michaeljackson? no, because he's my dad. yeah. nobody ever respects their dad, do they? yeah, i mean, come on! you know, it's my dad! # no woman, no cry.# why do you think his music continues to have the impact it does today? because the message is still relevant. i would think being a child that was born in the late '60s, i was hoping that the world would have changed in some way that i would feel safe for my black sons to leave the house and go about their business. but it's not. so bob marley still has work to do.
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# stir it up # little darlin' # stir it up.# as the head of the bob marley foundation, it's cedella's job to ensure his legacy. and after this exhibition spends ten weeks in london, it will tour the world to spread his message further. # stir it up, woh.# i love that philosophy of life, rich in life. its. i love that philosophy of life, rich in life. �* . , i love that philosophy of life, rich in life. . . , . , i love that philosophy of life, rich inlife.�* . , . , ., in life. a really nice bit of tv. i ho -e in life. a really nice bit of tv. i hope you _ in life. a really nice bit of tv. i hope you enjoyed _ in life. a really nice bit of tv. i hope you enjoyed that. - in life. a really nice bit of tv. i hope you enjoyed that. we i in life. a really nice bit of tv. i | hope you enjoyed that. we told in life. a really nice bit of tv. i i hope you enjoyed that. we told you earlier that lenny henry would be here at 7:50am, he will be here at 8:20am. if you just turned and thought you missed it, is on his way and he will be in a boxing ring talking about comic relief. just not uuite talking about comic relief. just not quite ready — talking about comic relief. just not quite ready for— talking about comic relief. just not quite ready for us. _ stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. a pledge to close the gap between between rich and poor communities — the government sets out its levelling up plan. it includes improvements to transport, education and life expectancy — but labour says there's a lack of funding and new ideas. good morning from wolverhampton market. this is one of the cities that could benefit from that new funding. i'll be finding out what people here make of the new proposals. the duchess of cambridge will be the new figurehead of british rugby, becoming the patron for both codes of the game. with just two days to go until the opening ceremony, the winter olympics torch relay kicks off in beijing.
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comic relief is back. sir lenny henry willjoin us with the details of the highlights. good morning. quite a lot of cloud around, patchy rain. brightening up in the south. breezy and still mild. details coming up. good morning. the government will today set out its long—delayed manifesto plan to level up the lives of millions of people across the uk. the proposals include a series of pledges to improve education, public transport and housing in some of the most disadvantaged areas of the country. labour have dismissed the project as more "slogans and strategies". our political correspondent jessica parker reports. we are a government committed to levelling up. it is absolutely what levelling up is all about. what we're doing is levelling up.
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level up across the whole of the uk. ministers have talked about it a lot. i'm here to talk about levelling up. michael gove will talk about it more today. levelling up was at the heart of the conservatives' 2019 election campaign. plans to be outlined today include creating more regional mayors with london—style powers in areas of england that want them, bringing public transport closer to london standards, giving the large majority of the country access to sg broadband, and eliminating illiteracy in primary—school leavers. if we are really genuine about levelling up, and i don't think that this white paper will do what we — want it to do, but if we were it would be about addressing regional inequalities such as health conditions, life expectancy, educational, skills levels, job opportunities and certainly transport connectivity, and that's not what this paper does but it does offer some opportunities for areas _ that haven't got devolution.
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many of these ideas may sound familiar, and labour says it amounts to shuffling the deckchairs, while a report by the national audit office spending watchdog says the government hasn't always properly monitored how well its local spending plans have worked. the department hasn't always got a very good grasp of what it's trying to deliver with the money it's pouring in. and, you know, this is taxpayers' money — we want to see outcomes. for that, outcomes means — in economic terms — jobs and thriving business areas, and we're not really clear that that's going to happen. so there's a long way to go to prove that this money is being spent as well as the government tells us it is. the government plans to give these national missions status in law, with a system to measure progress, and says it wants to work with devolved governments to achieve its aims across the uk. for borisjohnson, who's been fighting for hisjob, he may want to show he still has
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an eye on a longer—term agenda. jessica parker, bbc news, in westminster. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent adam fleming. we will get onto some of those distractions in a moment. but the government quite clearly today keen to talk about the levelling up agenda which we have spoken about a lot in the last election? yes. agenda which we have spoken about a lot in the last election?— lot in the last election? yes, let's be clear about _ lot in the last election? yes, let's be clear about what _ lot in the last election? yes, let's be clear about what is _ lot in the last election? yes, let's be clear about what is happening. the government is unveiling a big document, — the government is unveiling a big document, three had written 50 pages, — document, three had written 50 pages, with lots of ideas and plans. -- three _ pages, with lots of ideas and plans. -- three and — pages, with lots of ideas and plans. —— three and 50 pages. it will get the government and civil service ready— the government and civil service ready to — the government and civil service ready to deliver the levelling up over the — ready to deliver the levelling up over the next ten years. it is about setting _ over the next ten years. it is about setting these 12 national nations about— setting these 12 national nations about what levelling up could look like in _ about what levelling up could look like in terms of health, skills, transport, _ like in terms of health, skills, transport, technology, setting those targets, _ transport, technology, setting those targets, setting how they will be measured and putting some processes in place _ measured and putting some processes in place. the big processes going to be introducing more mayors with more powers— be introducing more mayors with more powers in— be introducing more mayors with more powers in more areas having that.
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but michael gove, the levelling up secretary, — but michael gove, the levelling up secretary, it's pretty clear this is a decade—long mission, so everybody is going _ a decade—long mission, so everybody is going to _ a decade—long mission, so everybody is going to have to be pretty patient _ patient. i- patient. i don't think anyone patient. — idon't think anyone quarrels with i don't think anyone quarrels with or challenges _ i don't think anyone quarrels with or challenges the _ i don't think anyone quarrels with or challenges the importance i i don't think anyone quarrels with or challenges the importance of i or challenges the importance of levelling — or challenges the importance of levelling up _ or challenges the importance of levelling up. or, _ or challenges the importance of levelling up. or, i— or challenges the importance of levelling up. or, i don't - or challenges the importance of levelling up. or, i don't think. levelling up. or, i don't think anyone — levelling up. or, i don't think anyone would _ levelling up. or, i don't think anyone would say— levelling up. or, i don't think anyone would say that - levelling up. or, i don't think anyone would say that these | anyone would say that these ambitions _ anyone would say that these ambitions are _ anyone would say that these ambitions are anything - anyone would say that these | ambitions are anything other anyone would say that these i ambitions are anything other than noble _ ambitions are anything other than noble and — ambitions are anything other than noble and right. _ ambitions are anything other than noble and right. what _ ambitions are anything other thani noble and right. what government will be _ noble and right. what government will be judged _ noble and right. what government will be judged by— noble and right. what government will be judged by is _ noble and right. what government will be judged by is our— noble and right. what government will be judged by is our ability- noble and right. what government will be judged by is our ability to l will be judged by is our ability to deliver— will be judged by is our ability to deliver over _ will be judged by is our ability to deliver over the _ will be judged by is our ability to deliver over the course - will be judged by is our ability to deliver over the course of- will be judged by is our ability to deliver over the course of the i will be judged by is our ability to . deliver over the course of the next two years. — deliver over the course of the next two years. and _ deliver over the course of the next two years, and then _ deliver over the course of the next two years, and then onto - deliver over the course of the next two years, and then onto 2030. i deliver over the course of the next . two years, and then onto 2030. that is why— two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we _ two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we are — two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we are laying _ two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we are laying out _ two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we are laying out the - two years, and then onto 2030. that is why we are laying out the basis i is why we are laying out the basis on which — is why we are laying out the basis on which we — is why we are laying out the basis on which we can _ is why we are laying out the basis on which we can be _ is why we are laying out the basis on which we can be judged - is why we are laying out the basis on which we can be judged on i is why we are laying out the basis on which we can be judged on the basis _ on which we can be judged on the basis on — on which we can be judged on the basis on which _ on which we can be judged on the basis on which future _ on which we can be judged on the basis on which future spending i on which we can be judged on the basis on which future spending ofi basis on which future spending of use can _ basis on which future spending of use can be — basis on which future spending of use can be judged _ basis on which future spending of use can be judged as— basis on which future spending of use can be judged as well. - basis on which future spending of use can be judged as well. you i basis on which future spending of use can be judged as well. use can be 'udged as well. you can 'ust use can be judged as well. you can just imagine _ use can be judged as well. you can just imagine michael _ use can be judged as well. you can just imagine michael gove - use can be judged as well. you can just imagine michael gove saying i use can be judged as well. you can i just imagine michael gove saying the same thing in the election campaign for the _ same thing in the election campaign for the next general election. because _ for the next general election. because you can totally see the conservatives saying, we have started — conservatives saying, we have started levelling up, give us another— started levelling up, give us another five years to finish it. that— another five years to finish it. that is— another five years to finish it. that is on— another five years to finish it. that is on the agenda from the government point of view —— government point of view —— government point of view. there is still talk about parties during
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lockdown?— still talk about parties during lockdown? , ,, , lockdown? yes, downing street is refusin: lockdown? yes, downing street is refusing to _ lockdown? yes, downing street is refusing to talk _ lockdown? yes, downing street is refusing to talk about _ lockdown? yes, downing street is refusing to talk about newspaper| refusing to talk about newspaper reports _ refusing to talk about newspaper reports that boris johnson was at more _ reports that boris johnson was at more of— reports that boris johnson was at more of the parties that took place in downing — more of the parties that took place in downing street during the lockdown. they say they are not going _ lockdown. they say they are not going to — lockdown. they say they are not going to give a running commentary. one of— going to give a running commentary. one of the _ going to give a running commentary. one of the prime minister, over the past day— one of the prime minister, over the past day or— one of the prime minister, over the past day or so, has given his strongest _ past day or so, has given his strongest pledge yet to publish all the details of what a sue gray finds — the details of what a sue gray finds. and also, he has given an interview— finds. and also, he has given an interview to _ finds. and also, he has given an interview to the sun waited he says, it probably _ interview to the sun waited he says, it probably won't stay secret for very long — it probably won't stay secret for very long if he is issued by a fine for the _ very long if he is issued by a fine for the police because he personally has found _ for the police because he personally has found to have broken the lockdown _ has found to have broken the lockdown rows. still talking about downing — lockdown rows. still talking about downing street parties, as we will do until— downing street parties, as we will do until the met police investigation is complete. and sue gray can— investigation is complete. and sue gray can deliver her full report. the one — gray can deliver her full report. the one we _ gray can deliver her full report. the one we got the other day was 'ust the one we got the other day was just a _ the one we got the other day was just a halfway point. gk. the one we got the other day was just a halfway point.— the one we got the other day was just a halfway point. police have until later today to either charge or release manchester united footballer mason greenwood, over allegations of rape and assault. he was further arrested yesterday, on suspicion of sexual assault and making threats to kill. our reporter dave guest is at
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old trafford for us this morning. what is the latest? mason greenwood has sent a what is the latest? mason greenwood has spent a third _ what is the latest? mason greenwood has spent a third night _ what is the latest? mason greenwood has spent a third night in _ what is the latest? mason greenwood has spent a third night in police i has spent a third night in police custody— has spent a third night in police custody after three days of questioning by detectives. he was arrested _ questioning by detectives. he was arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and _ arrested on sunday, on suspicion of rape and assault. his arrest followed _ rape and assault. his arrest followed a social media postings by a woman _ followed a social media postings by a woman who claimed that she had been _ a woman who claimed that she had been assaulted by the 20—year—old footballer~ — been assaulted by the 20—year—old footballer. and yesterday came that further _ footballer. and yesterday came that further development. greater manchester police said he had been further— manchester police said he had been further arrested on suspicion of making — further arrested on suspicion of making threats to kill and sexual assault — making threats to kill and sexual assault. now when the allegations against _ assault. now when the allegations against him first became public on sunday. _ against him first became public on sunday, manchester united said he would _ sunday, manchester united said he would not _ sunday, manchester united said he would not be training with or playing — would not be training with or playing for the club until further notice — playing for the club until further notice at — playing for the club until further notice. at the time it issued a statement saying it did not condone any form _ statement saying it did not condone any form of— statement saying it did not condone any form of violence, a position reiterated — any form of violence, a position reiterated yesterday. on monday, the sportswear _ reiterated yesterday. on monday, the sportswear manufacturer nike said it was suspending its relationship with
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the player— was suspending its relationship with the player because it was deeply concerned about these allegations. and yesterday, the computer video games— and yesterday, the computer video games developer ea sports said that it was— games developer ea sports said that it was removing mason greenwood from its products. _ it was removing mason greenwood from its products, including fifa 2022. now, _ its products, including fifa 2022. now, magistrates have given the police _ now, magistrates have given the police extra time to continue questioning the footballer. that time _ questioning the footballer. that time is — questioning the footballer. that time is due to run out later today. what _ time is due to run out later today. what happens next, of course, is as yet unknown. and so far, there has been _ yet unknown. and so far, there has been no _ yet unknown. and so far, there has been no public statement on behalf of the _ been no public statement on behalf of the footballer himself. thank— of the footballer himself. thank you. the russian president has accused the us of trying to draw russia into war with its neighbour. tension is high over troop build—up close to the ukraine border, but mr putin has denied he is planning an invasion. vladimir putin has denied he is planning an invasion. this comes as borisjohnson visited ukraine yesterday. let's speak to james waterhouse. what has been the reaction to the prime minister visit? how did it go down? , .. ., ,
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down? pretty well, actually. the news channels _ down? pretty well, actually. the news channels yesterday - down? pretty well, actually. the i news channels yesterday described it as a big _ news channels yesterday described it as a big day of diplomacy for ukraine _ as a big day of diplomacy for ukraine and they said britain had decisively— ukraine and they said britain had decisively chosen to be on the side of kyiv— decisively chosen to be on the side of kyiv in— decisively chosen to be on the side of kyiv in the face of these russian aggression. we have been talking about— aggression. we have been talking about ukraine wanting to go down the diplomatic— about ukraine wanting to go down the diplomatic path and cool tensions because _ diplomatic path and cool tensions because they say it plays into moscow's hands. we have seen more urgency— moscow's hands. we have seen more urgency in— moscow's hands. we have seen more urgency in the language. president zelensky— urgency in the language. president zelensky talked about 200,000 men and women who would be willing to fight _ and women who would be willing to fight he _ and women who would be willing to fight. he said it would notjust be a small— fight. he said it would notjust be a small incursion, grabbing of territory— a small incursion, grabbing of territory like last time, it would be a _ territory like last time, it would be a full—scale war, not just territory like last time, it would be a full—scale war, notjust in ukraine — be a full—scale war, notjust in ukraine but in europe, a full hybrid war~ _ ukraine but in europe, a full hybrid war~ so _ ukraine but in europe, a full hybrid war~ so very— ukraine but in europe, a full hybrid war. 50 very urgent language. ukraine but in europe, a full hybrid war. so very urgent language. boris johnson _ war. so very urgent language. boris johnson hinted at possible more help from the _ johnson hinted at possible more help from the uk. but we also learned what _ from the uk. but we also learned what president putin is making of the situation. he says his main concerns— the situation. he says his main concerns about ukraine potentially being _ concerns about ukraine potentially being allowed to join
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concerns about ukraine potentially being allowed tojoin nato, the alliance — being allowed tojoin nato, the alliance, as well as it continuing to expand — alliance, as well as it continuing to expand in eastern europe, he says those _ to expand in eastern europe, he says those concerns are being ignored. he says it _ those concerns are being ignored. he says it is _ those concerns are being ignored. he says it is about containing russia and making moscow feel threatened. so that— and making moscow feel threatened. so that was very much what he makes of the _ so that was very much what he makes of the situation. on the ground there _ of the situation. on the ground there is— of the situation. on the ground there is still tension. we still have — there is still tension. we still have thousands of troops along the border~ _ have thousands of troops along the border. 30,000 more russian troops, the us— border. 30,000 more russian troops, the us say. _ border. 30,000 more russian troops, the us say, are expected to arrive in belarus — the us say, are expected to arrive in belarus for these joint exercises. russian backed militants say a _ exercises. russian backed militants say a soldier was killed last night in a ukrainian drone strike. no word yet from _ in a ukrainian drone strike. no word yet from the — in a ukrainian drone strike. no word yet from the government yet on that. there _ yet from the government yet on that. there are _ yet from the government yet on that. there are grains of positivity in the sense _ there are grains of positivity in the sense that all sites have hinted that they— the sense that all sites have hinted that they want talks to continue. james _ that they want talks to continue. james waterhouse, thank you very much. that is the latest for you live from kyiv on the situation in ukraine. carol is the weather. good morning. some of us were lucky enough to see the northern lights last night. as you can see from our
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weather watchers picture taken in aberdeenshire before the cloud moved across. we have got some clear skies this morning across parts of southern england, as you can see from cell c in west sussex. thank you for those pictures. there is a lot of cloud drifting northwards through patchy light rain. murky conditions on the west coast. it should brighten up quite nicely across parts of wales, southern england, the south and south—east. these white circles represent the average wind speeds today. nowhere near as windy as it was yesterday. it will still be breezy. it will be mild. temperatures ten to 12 degrees. a bit nippy across the northern isles, still in the cold air. through this evening and overnight, some rain pouring down across parts of scotland. some spots of rain in england, wales and northern ireland. again, a lot of cloud. a mild night. by again, a lot of cloud. a mild night. by the and of the night of the wind will be strengthening across the
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north west. tomorrow, we start on a fairly cloudy note, with some spots of rain, a lot of which will peter out. some sunshine. this next weather front would bring some out. some sunshine. this next weatherfront would bring some rain. it will be heavy and persistent. squally winds. the air will turn colder. the showers will turn wintry. ahead of it we are still in milder conditions with a little bit of sunshine. good to know. thank you. three years ago, student libby squire vanished on a night out in hull. she was murdered and raped by a serial sex offender. now libby's mother lisa has said she needs to know what happened to her daughter. lauren moss has been speaking to lisa. she was amazing. she was funny and sarcastic and witty, everything you'd want in a daughter, was libby. and we had an incredibly close bond. three years ago, philosophy student libby squire was turned away from a nightclub in hull.
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she was then lured into a car by pavel relowicz, who had been prowling the streets searching for a vulnerable student. libby was raped and murdered, and her body was found weeks later in the humber estuary. i still think i should have been able to save her. and that's just, yeah, that's horrible. because i can't change it. and that's really hard. libby's mother lisa and the rest of her family will mark her anniversary by visiting her bench at the beauty spot she used to spend time with, with friends. it's 12 months since relowicz was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 27 years. lisa still has questions only he can answer. i don't know how he got her in the car. i don't know how she died. i don't know whether she was dead when she went into the water or not. there's so many questions. and i reconcile one of the questions but then another one takes its place. why is it important for you to know those details do you think? i think it's my make up.
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i need to know what's going on with my children. i like to know what's going on with my children. my children are as a part of my life, obviously. and not knowing what happened to her, just for me is not acceptable. it later emerged relowicz committed a string of offences before murdering libby, including stealing women's underwear and watching them through windows. lisa is to meet with the prime minister to discuss tougher measures for noncontact sexual offences, which currently carry a maximum two—year sentence. people still think these noncontact sexual offences are harmless, but they are not harmless. and we can't say that all people who commit a noncontact sexual offence are going to go on to become rapists and murderers. but i think we can probably say that most rapists, murderers, started off with noncontact sexual offences. and i also think these people need help. there should be some sort of help facility for them and they should be forced to go into treatment or have therapy for what they've done. libby's murder bears stark similarities to the kidnap of sarah everard in clapham in march last year.
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her killer, then a serving police officer, wayne couzens, was sentenced to life without parole. lisa says she wants borisjohnson to consider her plea that life should mean life. if you go out and commit a crime of choice, so rape and murder is a crime of choice, you therefore spent the rest of your life in prison, because your victim doesn't get to come back after 27 years, so it's justice for the family, proper justice for the family. and libby and sarah's murders were very, very similar. so why the difference in, you know...? does what you do as a job mean that you are going to get a different sentence? well, obviously it does. lisa continues to grieve her daughter, with a promise. i think i want her legacy to be something, you know, change for women. you know, i want her, because of what happened to her, i want other women to feel safer. and i will honour her until i take my last breath.
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you know, iwill spend my life honouring her and making sure she's not forgotten. lauren moss, bbc news. joining us now is nazir afzal, who is former chief prosecutor for the north west of england. good morning. a dreadful case that we have just seen a report on there. i am just interested to know, what do you make of the families of victims requesting this type of redress? how does it work? l victims requesting this type of redress? how does it work? i have been very privileged _ redress? how does it work? i have been very privileged to _ redress? how does it work? i have been very privileged to meet i redress? how does it work? i have been very privileged to meet with l been very privileged to meet with lots of— been very privileged to meet with lots of bereaved families over the years _ lots of bereaved families over the years and — lots of bereaved families over the years and they all deal with their grief— years and they all deal with their grief in _ years and they all deal with their grief in different ways. what libby's — grief in different ways. what libby's mother is talking about is what _ libby's mother is talking about is what we — libby's mother is talking about is what we call restorative justice. it is extremely rare for homicide cases — is extremely rare for homicide cases. there are three things you have _ cases. there are three things you have to _ cases. there are three things you have to be — cases. there are three things you have to be conscious of. one is that the offender— have to be conscious of. one is that the offender has to admit responsibility. in libby's case there — responsibility. in libby's case there was— responsibility. in libby's case there was a trial. he was convicted. i don't _ there was a trial. he was convicted. i don't know— there was a trial. he was convicted. i don't know whether it accepts
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response — i don't know whether it accepts response ability. that is number one _ response ability. that is number one the — response ability. that is number one. the first obstacle. the second is that _ one. the first obstacle. the second is that he _ one. the first obstacle. the second is that he has to agree to a meeting _ is that he has to agree to a meeting. you can'tjust throw him in the room _ meeting. you can'tjust throw him in the room. the likelihood of that happening is, iwould imagine, quite rare _ happening is, iwould imagine, quite rare and _ happening is, iwould imagine, quite rare. and the third thing is the facilitator, _ rare. and the third thing is the facilitator, whoever organises it, has to _ facilitator, whoever organises it, has to be — facilitator, whoever organises it, has to be sure it is good for the mental— has to be sure it is good for the mental health of the parties. sol think— mental health of the parties. sol think it _ mental health of the parties. sol think it is — mental health of the parties. sol think it is going to be extremely unlikely. — think it is going to be extremely unlikely, from what i know in relation — unlikely, from what i know in relation to— unlikely, from what i know in relation to libby's case, every tragic— relation to libby's case, every tragic case, but she wants closer, she wants — tragic case, but she wants closer, she wants to understand what happened. the whole prop process should _ happened. the whole prop process should be — happened. the whole prop process should be about trying to help to .et should be about trying to help to get to _ should be about trying to help to get to that point and i hope she is getting _ get to that point and i hope she is getting the support she needs. as you getting the support she needs. you say, the getting the support she needs. 33 you say, the only getting the support she needs. is you say, the only thing is, asking those questions to somebody who doesn't want to give you the answers, or might give you misleading answers, could be more painful? misleading answers, could be more ainful? ' :: :: , ,, ., , misleading answers, could be more ainful? f. ,, . , ., misleading answers, could be more ainful? ' :: f. ,, . , ., ~ ., painful? 100%. she wants to know whether her— painful? 10096. she wants to know whether her daughter _ painful? 10096. she wants to know whether her daughter was - painful? 10096. she wants to know whether her daughter was alive i painful? 10096. she wants to know i whether her daughter was alive when she went _ whether her daughter was alive when she went into the river. he could say all— she went into the river. he could say all sorts _ she went into the river. he could say all sorts of things. then she has to— say all sorts of things. then she has to live — say all sorts of things. then she has to live with whatever she hears from _ has to live with whatever she hears from him — has to live with whatever she hears from him. at the moment whatever she's— from him. at the moment whatever she's heard —
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from him. at the moment whatever she's heard in the trial is all she knows — she's heard in the trial is all she knows that _ she's heard in the trial is all she knows. that is a witty dangerous position — knows. that is a witty dangerous position i— knows. that is a witty dangerous position. i totally understand why she would — position. i totally understand why she would want to do that. —— a dangerous— she would want to do that. —— a dangerous position. i understand why bereaved _ dangerous position. i understand why bereaved families would not want to bereaved families would not want to be in the _ bereaved families would not want to be in the same room, the same country. — be in the same room, the same country. is _ be in the same room, the same country, is the person who harms their— country, is the person who harms their child — country, is the person who harms their child. at but we have to find a way— their child. at but we have to find a way to— their child. at but we have to find a way to get some kind of closure. sometimes — a way to get some kind of closure. sometimes it is by correspondence, actually _ sometimes it is by correspondence, actually it — sometimes it is by correspondence, actually. it doesn't have to be a meeting — actually. it doesn't have to be a meeting. allow her to write to him in the _ meeting. allow her to write to him in the hope — meeting. allow her to write to him in the hope that he response with some _ in the hope that he response with some of— in the hope that he response with some of the fact that she wants. again, _ some of the fact that she wants. again, it— some of the fact that she wants. again, it has to be done very carefully _ again, it has to be done very carefully-— again, it has to be done very carefull . . , ., , , ., ., carefully. have you seen restorative 'ustice, carefully. have you seen restorative justice. have _ carefully. have you seen restorative justice. have you — carefully. have you seen restorative justice, have you seen _ carefully. have you seen restorative justice, have you seen it _ carefully. have you seen restorative justice, have you seen it work? i i justice, have you seen it work? i had one. it was a young man who was trolling _ had one. it was a young man who was trolling me _ had one. it was a young man who was trolling me several years ago. i discovered he was a 14—year—old boy. i discovered he was a14—year—old boy. i didn't— discovered he was a14—year—old boy. i didn't want— discovered he was a 14—year—old boy. i didn't want him prosecuted. i said i didn't want him prosecuted. i said i would _ i didn't want him prosecuted. i said i would happily sit down with him for half— i would happily sit down with him for half an— i would happily sit down with him for half an hour. i did. he cried for half an hour. i did. he cried for 30 — for half an hour. i did. he cried for 30 minutes. at the endif which i am sure _ for 30 minutes. at the endif which i am sure he — for 30 minutes. at the endif which i am sure he will trl anybody ever when _ am sure he will trl anybody ever when he — am sure he will trl anybody ever when he discovers the impact. the
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evidence _ when he discovers the impact. the evidence tells you it can work in the right— evidence tells you it can work in the right circumstances. you have to be very— the right circumstances. you have to be very careful about what the circumstances you select. | be very careful about what the circumstances you select. i am intriaued circumstances you select. i am intrigued by — circumstances you select. i am intrigued by that _ circumstances you select. i —n intrigued by that conversation. obviously he agreed, his parents or guardians are great. was it good for you due 100%. in guardians are great. was it good for you due 10096-— you due 10096. in his case it meant he wouldn't — you due 10096. in his case it meant he wouldn't be _ you due 10096. in his case it meant he wouldn't be prosecuted. - you due 10096. in his case it meant he wouldn't be prosecuted. there i you due 10096. in his case it meant i he wouldn't be prosecuted. there was an incentive _ he wouldn't be prosecuted. there was an incentive for him to be in that room _ an incentive for him to be in that room from _ an incentive for him to be in that room. from my perspective, absolutely, to explain the impact, notjust— absolutely, to explain the impact, notiust on— absolutely, to explain the impact, notjust on me, because my children were _ notjust on me, because my children were seeing — notjust on me, because my children were seeing the stuff he was posting _ were seeing the stuff he was posting. they would think, why is this person — posting. they would think, why is this person saying this stuff about you? _ this person saying this stuff about you? once — this person saying this stuff about you? once he became aware of the impact _ you? once he became aware of the impact on — you? once he became aware of the impact on my children as much on me, i can assure _ impact on my children as much on me, i can assure you, i would be very surprised — i can assure you, i would be very surprised if— i can assure you, i would be very surprised if he is going online right— surprised if he is going online right now— surprised if he is going online right now and saying nasty things about— right now and saying nasty things about black people. you right now and saying nasty things about black people.— right now and saying nasty things about black people. you have vast experience — about black people. you have vast experience working _ about black people. you have vast experience working in _ about black people. you have vast experience working in the - about black people. you have vast experience working in the north i about black people. you have vast experience working in the north of ingle. i know one of the cases you are involved in was thejimmy savile case. —— north of england. you defended sir keir starmer after the
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prime minister's comments on monday in the house of commons. what do you make of what sabac —— borisjohnson said about keir starmer in relation to thejimmy savile case? like said about keir starmer in relation to the jimmy savile case?- to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, _ to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, i— to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, iwill— to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, i will stick - to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, i will stick to i to the jimmy savile case? like a michael gove, i will stick to the | michael gove, i will stick to the facts _ michael gove, i will stick to the facts. every prosecutor is independent and operate applying the code for— independent and operate applying the code for prosecutors. what happened in the _ code for prosecutors. what happened in the savile case was the police... the critical— in the savile case was the police... the critical decision that was wrong in that— the critical decision that was wrong in that case — the critical decision that was wrong in that case, the original investigation, was the police told each _ investigation, was the police told each of— investigation, was the police told each of the victims there is no other— each of the victims there is no other victim. they did not know they three _ other victim. they did not know they three others. of course each of them said. _ three others. of course each of them said. i— three others. of course each of them said. i don't— three others. of course each of them said, i don't want to stand in a witness — said, i don't want to stand in a witness box i am facing jimmy savile — witness box i am facing jimmy savile. the prosecutor, whoever it was in _ savile. the prosecutor, whoever it was in cps— savile. the prosecutor, whoever it was in cps south, said of these women — was in cps south, said of these women aren't prepared to give evidence. _ women aren't prepared to give evidence, that was the view taken by the police _ evidence, that was the view taken by the police i— evidence, that was the view taken by the police. lam not going evidence, that was the view taken by the police. i am not going to prosecute. that was a critical decision— prosecute. that was a critical decision taken before keir starmer was even _ decision taken before keir starmer was even dpp. i didn't know it, keir starmer— was even dpp. i didn't know it, keir starmer didn't know it, it was dealt with it _ starmer didn't know it, it was dealt with it locally, as it should be, as it always — with it locally, as it should be, as it always is — with it locally, as it should be, as it always is. as soon as he became aware _ it always is. as soon as he became aware of— it always is. as soon as he became aware of it. — it always is. as soon as he became aware of it, which we only did after the death— aware of it, which we only did after the death of savile, keir starmer
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changed — the death of savile, keir starmer changed everything. literally he put me in— changed everything. literally he put me in charge of child sexual abuse nationally — me in charge of child sexual abuse nationally. we brought the new guidelines, new policy. we trained everybody — guidelines, new policy. we trained everybody. and in the three years that followed, when keir starmer left and _ that followed, when keir starmer left and i — that followed, when keir starmer left and i left the cps, we have the highest _ left and i left the cps, we have the highest conviction rate for child sexual— highest conviction rate for child sexual abuse in our history. that is keir starmer's legacy. boris johnson. _ keir starmer's legacy. boris johnson, more recently, said that prosecuting or investigating child sexual— prosecuting or investigating child sexual abuse was money badly spent. there _ sexual abuse was money badly spent. there are _ sexual abuse was money badly spent. there are two different views. keir starmer— there are two different views. keir starmer was not responsible for decisions — starmer was not responsible for decisions taken in the savile case. that is— decisions taken in the savile case. that is the — decisions taken in the savile case. that is the facts. the decisions taken in the savile case. that is the facts.— decisions taken in the savile case. that is the facts. the other element to this is while _ that is the facts. the other element to this is while this _ that is the facts. the other element to this is while this is _ that is the facts. the other element to this is while this is being - to this is while this is being discussed in parliament, there is a thought for the victims ofjimmy savile who are still out there? flan savile who are still out there? can i even share _ savile who are still out there? can i even share something with you now? one of— i even share something with you now? one of the _ i even share something with you now? one of the victims contacted me yesterday— one of the victims contacted me yesterday ofjimmy one of the victims contacted me yesterday of jimmy savile. one of the victims contacted me yesterday ofjimmy savile. she had spent _ yesterday ofjimmy savile. she had spent 24 _ yesterday ofjimmy savile. she had spent 24 hours crying, traumatised by remembering what savile had done to her— by remembering what savile had done to her all— by remembering what savile had done to her all those years ago, because it was— to her all those years ago, because it was back— to her all those years ago, because it was back in the public eye and
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because — it was back in the public eye and because we —— she had heard what the prime _ because we —— she had heard what the prime minister had said. we have to be immensely careful. we traumatise people _ be immensely careful. we traumatise people. going back to an earlier conversation, people are trying to close _ conversation, people are trying to close off — conversation, people are trying to close off what happened to them. you brin- close off what happened to them. you bring it _ close off what happened to them. you bring it up. _ close off what happened to them. you bring it up, they suffer again. the prime _ bring it up, they suffer again. the prime minister, weatherly apologises to keir— prime minister, weatherly apologises to keir starmer or not, needs to apologise — to keir starmer or not, needs to apologise to those victims. this is not about politics. _ apologise to those victims. this is not about politics. but _ apologise to those victims. this is not about politics. but when i apologise to those victims. this is not about politics. but when you i not about politics. but when you heard michael gove say he shouldn't apologise. it is heard michael gove say he shouldn't aoloaise. . . heard michael gove say he shouldn't aoloaise. , ., ., heard michael gove say he shouldn't aoloaise. , . ., ., apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament _ apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament is _ apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament is an _ apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament is an odd _ apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament is an odd place. i apologise. it is a matter for him. parliament is an odd place. you | apologise. it is a matter for him. i parliament is an odd place. you can say things— parliament is an odd place. you can say things that are true and nobody does anything about it. but in the real world — does anything about it. but in the real world we have got at least 250 victims _ real world we have got at least 250 victims of _ real world we have got at least 250 victims ofjimmy savile. one contacted me. several have contacted me. contacted me. several have contacted me they— contacted me. several have contacted me. they are traumatised again by what _ me. they are traumatised again by what has _ me. they are traumatised again by what has happened in the last couple of days _ what has happened in the last couple of da s. , ., what has happened in the last couple ofda s. , ., ., ., , of days. they need an apology. appreciate _ of days. they need an apology. appreciate your _ of days. they need an apology. appreciate your time. - of days. they need an apology. appreciate your time. 22 i of days. they need an apology. l appreciate your time. 22 minutes past eight. for more than 30 years comic relief has been transforming lives right here in the uk and across the world — all while making us laugh along the way.
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next month, a host of celebrities, including dame joanna lumley and david tennent, will take part in the telethon that has now become an annual event. lets take a look at some of the highlights from last year's show. ladies and gentlemen, - this is red nose day 2021. please welcome your host... three, two, one, go! thanks, everyone. have a great night. marlow. shakespeare. are you all right? just adjusting. are you all right? yeah, just trying to keep busy, you know. so, prav, have we broken the world record? with a total of 12... yes... yes, clara has broken the record. yes! wow!
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it's unbelievable! yes! how does that feel? we can speak to comic relief co—founder, sir lenny henry. he joins us from a centre in south london which has benefited from the work of the charity. loosening up this morning. there he is! good morning.— is! good morning. having the work out of my life _ is! good morning. having the work out of my life here. _ is! good morning. having the work out of my life here. going - is! good morning. having the work out of my life here. going very - out of my life here. going very hard. out of my life here. going very hard- very _ out of my life here. going very hard. very impressive. - out of my life here. going very hard. very impressive. let's i out of my life here. going very l hard. very impressive. let's talk about this year's red nose day. another whopper. what can we look forward to? it is another whopper. what can we look forward to? , ., ., , forward to? it is going to be fantastic — forward to? it is going to be fantastic. all _ forward to? it is going to be fantastic. all kinds - forward to? it is going to be fantastic. all kinds of - forward to? it is going to be fantastic. all kinds of things forward to? it is going to be - fantastic. all kinds of things going on. fantastic. all kinds of things going on me. _ fantastic. all kinds of things going on. me, david tennant and various other_ on. me, david tennant and various other people are hosting. paddy mcguinness. we have got a fantastic
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make _ mcguinness. we have got a fantastic make up— mcguinness. we have got a fantastic make up thing happening. we have got the comic_ make up thing happening. we have got the comic relief opera again where we send _ the comic relief opera again where we send hapless celebrities off to sin- we send hapless celebrities off to sing opera in a day and they sing live on_ sing opera in a day and they sing live on the — sing opera in a day and they sing live on the night. i am sure there will be _ live on the night. i am sure there will be corks _ live on the night. i am sure there will be corks supplied for bottoms all the _ will be corks supplied for bottoms all the way through the process. we have got— all the way through the process. we have got fundraising things happening across the country. i am here at— happening across the country. i am here at this — happening across the country. i am here at this amazing place in south london _ here at this amazing place in south london called fight for change, one of the _ london called fight for change, one of the many projects comic relief suriports — of the many projects comic relief supports. they teach young people and supports. they teach young people ahd older— supports. they teach young people and older people how to box as a way of coping _ and older people how to box as a way of coping with mental health issues. we support things like this, as well as food _ we support things like this, as well as food share, which is about providing _ as food share, which is about providing food for people who can't afford _ providing food for people who can't afford it. _ providing food for people who can't afford it, as well as domestic abuse. — afford it, as well as domestic abuse, homelessness, comic relief supports— abuse, homelessness, comic relief supports all of these things and it always— supports all of these things and it always has and it always will. what we want _ always has and it always will. what we want to — always has and it always will. what we want to stress is it is about the public— we want to stress is it is about the public at _ we want to stress is it is about the public at home. it is about people at home _ public at home. it is about people at home giving a little bit, or a large. — at home giving a little bit, or a large, whatever they can give, to help people worse off than themselves. since 2020, we have helped _
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themselves. since 2020, we have helped over 20 million people worldwide and in the uk, which is extraordinary. was it 20, or was it teh? _ extraordinary. was it 20, or was it teh? ll! _ extraordinary. was it 20, or was it teh? ll! ll — extraordinary. was it 20, or was it ten? 11! 11 million people we have helped _ ten? 11! 11 million people we have helped since 2020. which is still brilliant — helped since 2020. which is still brilliant. we raised over £61 million _ brilliant. we raised over £61 million last year. we hope to raise much _ million last year. we hope to raise much more — million last year. we hope to raise much more but we can't do it without the publio _ much more but we can't do it without the public. we have to get involved. watch _ the public. we have to get involved. watch our— the public. we have to get involved. watch our audition film where people like john— watch our audition film where people like john collins and these other people _ like john collins and these other people are auditioning for their big role in _ people are auditioning for their big role in the — people are auditioning for their big role in the night, we stress in the film, _ role in the night, we stress in the film. eveh — role in the night, we stress in the film, even though it is funny, that it is you _ film, even though it is funny, that it is you that — film, even though it is funny, that it is you that counts at home. please — it is you that counts at home. please support us. march the 18th, red nose _ please support us. march the 18th, red nose day, it is going to be great — red nose day, it is going to be great. and dan, rememberthis? red nose day, it is going to be great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovel . i'm great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovely- i'm not — great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovely- i'm not a _ great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovely. i'm not a fighter, _ great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm _ great. and dan, remember this? yeah, lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm a - lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm a dancer, baby! _ lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm a dancer, baby! nicola - lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm a dancer, baby! nicola adams? | lovely. i'm not a fighter, i'm a - dancer, baby! nicola adams? she was .reat dancer, baby! nicola adams? she was great lrut— dancer, baby! nicola adams? she was great but you were brilliant on strictly~ —
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great but you were brilliant on strictly. you were great. we talking strictly again? _ strictly. you were great. we talking strictly again? i _ strictly. you were great. we talking strictly again? i haven't _ strictly. you were great. we talking strictly again? i haven't brought - strictly. you were great. we talking strictly again? i haven't brought it i strictly again? i haven't brought it u -. strictly again? i haven't brought it u. i'm strictly again? i haven't brought it up- i'm going _ strictly again? i haven't brought it up- i'm going to — strictly again? i haven't brought it up- i'm going to get _ strictly again? i haven't brought it up. i'm going to get you _ strictly again? i haven't brought it up. i'm going to get you back - strictly again? i haven't brought it up. i'm going to get you back on | up. i'm going to get you back on toic. up. i'm going to get you back on topic- when _ up. i'm going to get you back on topic. when we _ up. i'm going to get you back on topic. when we watch _ up. i'm going to get you back on topic. when we watch the - up. i'm going to get you back on topic. when we watch the night | up. i'm going to get you back on - topic. when we watch the night there as i was a magic moment. there is a little bit of magic on the night, really special moments. do you think because of the difficult times we have had in the last couple of years, it matters even more now? i know you say it is about people helping people, but it has been so tough. we needed even more, don't we? ., tough. we needed even more, don't we? . ., , ., ., , we? yeah, we really needed. that was rovin: to we? yeah, we really needed. that was proving to me — we? yeah, we really needed. that was proving to me by _ we? yeah, we really needed. that was proving to me by the _ we? yeah, we really needed. that was proving to me by the last _ we? yeah, we really needed. that was proving to me by the last comic- proving to me by the last comic relief— proving to me by the last comic relief and also this idea that when everybody is not seen their mums and dads and _ everybody is not seen their mums and dads and grans, and everybody are struggling — dads and grans, and everybody are struggling because of the pandemic, the fact— struggling because of the pandemic, the fact there is something they can plu- the fact there is something they can plug into _ the fact there is something they can plug into that is familiar, that has people _ plug into that is familiar, that has people they know, that has heart and love and _ people they know, that has heart and love and comedy and its core, we all love and comedy and its core, we all love to _ love and comedy and its core, we all love to watch and we all love to laugh — love to watch and we all love to laugh. comic relief provides a space
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where _ laugh. comic relief provides a space where we _ laugh. comic relief provides a space where we can gather together. we can watch _ where we can gather together. we can watch things and go, things aren't so bad, _ watch things and go, things aren't so bad, and — watch things and go, things aren't so bad, and go to help out with that _ so bad, and go to help out with that on — so bad, and go to help out with that. on the night for me, just the 'oy that. on the night for me, just the joy of— that. on the night for me, just the joy of watching the comic relief pantomime, orthose joy of watching the comic relief pantomime, or those guys singing opera _ pantomime, or those guys singing opera when i have never sung it before, — opera when i have never sung it before, caroline quentin's face when she went _ before, caroline quentin's face when she went to— before, caroline quentin's face when she went to sing, all of these things— she went to sing, all of these things are extraordinary to me. they make _ things are extraordinary to me. they make me _ things are extraordinary to me. they make me want to give. that is what comic— make me want to give. that is what comic relief has always been about. moments— comic relief has always been about. moments of true sincerity where you are moved _ moments of true sincerity where you are moved to do something that you wouldn't _ are moved to do something that you wouldn't normally do, like reach into your— wouldn't normally do, like reach into your pocket and give £1, £2, three. _ into your pocket and give £1, £2, three. four, _ into your pocket and give £1, £2, three, four, five. that is i was been — three, four, five. that is i was been the _ three, four, five. that is i was been the case. the public's generosity in times of great hardship, when they see summary worse _ hardship, when they see summary worse off— hardship, when they see summary worse off than themselves theyjust want to— worse off than themselves theyjust want to help. they help in places like this— want to help. they help in places like this and in the third world. and it's — like this and in the third world. and it's something that we should be very proud _ and it's something that we should be very proud of. | and it's something that we should be very proud of-— very proud of. i think that's the amazin: very proud of. i think that's the amazing thing. _ very proud of. i think that's the amazing thing. when _ very proud of. i think that's the amazing thing. when you - very proud of. i think that's the amazing thing. when you think| very proud of. i think that's the - amazing thing. when you think about the year that everybody has had and despite all that they watch red nose day and somehow you raised over 50
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million quid. for you, day and somehow you raised over 50 million quid. foryou, that day and somehow you raised over 50 million quid. for you, that must be quite an emotional night? it’s quite an emotional night? it's really emotional. it's always emotional on the night. it is not 'ust emotional on the night. it is not just about — emotional on the night. it is not just about the money. the money is important _ just about the money. the money is important because it helps these amazing — important because it helps these amazing projects like fight for change — amazing projects like fight for change in vauxhall. it helps for things— change in vauxhall. it helps for things like domestic abuse and homelessness. but the great thing is this outpouring of love and people wanting _ this outpouring of love and people wanting to help. it's that thing off, wanting to help. it's that thing of if— wanting to help. it's that thing of if this _ wanting to help. it's that thing off, if this is happening on your street. — off, if this is happening on your street. you _ off, if this is happening on your street, you cross the street to help. _ street, you cross the street to help. and — street, you cross the street to help. and i think on the night everybody goes, i am going to help those _ everybody goes, i am going to help those guys. that is embodied in people — those guys. that is embodied in people like marcus rashford and everybody who contributes to comic relief _ everybody who contributes to comic relief it _ everybody who contributes to comic relief it is — everybody who contributes to comic relief. it is the sense that we want to help _ relief. it is the sense that we want to help people worse off than ourselves. i think if you want to know— ourselves. i think if you want to know more _ ourselves. i think if you want to know more about it, go to the bbc website _ know more about it, go to the bbc website where there is loads of information about how to give, what to do. _ information about how to give, what to do, having a bake sale, shaving your— to do, having a bake sale, shaving your eyebrows, wearing your clothes backwards. — your eyebrows, wearing your clothes backwards, lying in a bath full of baked _ backwards, lying in a bath full of baked beans, we have all been there,
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'ust baked beans, we have all been there, just to _ baked beans, we have all been there, just to raise _ baked beans, we have all been there, just to raise some money to help people _ just to raise some money to help people worse off than yourselves. before _ people worse off than yourselves. before we — people worse off than yourselves. before we let you go, we spend our lives listening to politicians very carefully on this programme and challenging some of the figures, you challenge yourself on your own figures today. you got them right. thank you. i figures today. you got them right. thank ou. ., , figures today. you got them right. thank ou. .,, i. figures today. you got them right. thank you-— figures today. you got them right. thank ou. .,, i. thank you. i hope you en'oy red nose da . thank thank you. i hope you en'oy red nose nay. thankyou. h thank you. i hope you en'oy red nose day. thank you. we _ thank you. i hope you en'oy red nose day. thank you. we are — thank you. i hope you enjoy red nose day. thank you. we are going - thank you. i hope you enjoy red nose day. thank you. we are going to - thank you. i hope you enjoy red nose day. thank you. we are going to have| day. thank you. we are going to have a great _ day. thank you. we are going to have a great time — day. thank you. we are going to have a great time. it is going to be a blast _ a great time. it is going to be a blast tune _ a great time. it is going to be a blast. tune in, marks the 18th. you know ou blast. tune in, marks the 18th. you know you love _ blast. tune in, marks the 18th. you know you love it. _ blast. tune in, marks the 18th. rim. know you love it. thank you. he also answered the questions.— time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. around 35 people had to be evacuated from their homes last night— after a fire broke out near acton town tube station. around 70 firefighters were called to the blaze at the car garage, which they said contained a number of gas cylinders. they say nobody was hurt, and an investigation's underway to find out how it started.
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gatwick airport bosses say there's been a dramatic rise in the number of passengers since further easing of covid restrictions. carriers including easyjet expect to be back to pre—pandemic levels this summer. passengers who are fully vaccinated no longer need to take a test before coming into the uk, and from next friday they also won't need a test two days after arrival. a woman who went to work for the nhs blood and transplant service during the pandemic says the experience made such an impression on her she's now donated one of her kidneys to a stranger. sasha cooke used to be an actor, but when work dried up in lockdown she retrained as a carer. i wouldn't be doing what i'm about to do if i wasn't doing thisjob, you know — i'm meeting donors that are coming in through nothing other than goodwill, and that's so inspiring to me. but if i can comfortably give someone something that could get them off dialysis, and i'm eligible, then...
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you know, why not? and you can see more on that story on we are england — that's tonight at 7.30 here on bbc one. let's take a look at the travel now. this is how the tube is running this morning. because of the fire in acton, the district line has no service between turnham green and ealing broadway, and the northern line still closed for works between moorgate and kennington. for all the latest travel news, tune into your bbc local radio station. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start this morning. temperatures mid to high single figures celsius. now we should get a bright start with a bit of sunshine — patchy cloud, however, perhaps a little bit of mistiness over higher ground. so we should see some sunny spells — decent ones — through this morning, the patchy cloud coming and going. a moderate breeze today, but temperatures are still mild —
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we're looking at a maximum of 12 celsius later on this afternoon. now, overnight tonight we've still got a bit of cloud — some clearer spells, but that cloud, you can't really rule out the odd spot of rain. nothing more significant overnight, and the temperature — it's still mild, the minimum between six and eight celsius. so another mild start tomorrow morning. for thursday it's looking dry. some sunny spells, patchy cloud. it is going to get breezier, though, as we head overnight. this cold front heads towards us, a spell of potentially quite heavy rain for a time. those isobars squeezing together, as well — so getting windier — but also behind it, represented by this blue colour, some colder air. so once that rain clears on friday morning, it is going to get chilly. we'll see some sunshine, though, to end the week, and temperatures on friday a little cooler — around eight or nine celsius. i'm back in around half an hour — plenty more over on our website. now it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with dan walker and sally nugent. rip—off britain live follows breakfast on bbc one — let's find out what's coming up on today's programme withjulia, angela and gloria. good morning. good morning. thanks, dan and sally. and thanks again to all you lovely breakfast viewers for getting in touch with your thoughts and comments while we were live on air yesterday. you sent loads of them, and i hope you'll do the same again today, when it's all about holidays! if you're wondering what restrictions will be in place this summer, or what will happen if you test positive while you're away, then our travel guru simon calder will do his best to answer your questions. so, do send them in — address coming up in a moment. also today, imagine needing to call an ambulance only to find your landline is down and you've got no mobile phone signal either. well, that nightmare scenario was the reality for some of the residents of one welsh village, all because of a big change that's coming
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to the way the uk's telephone system works. itjust worries me it just worries me that sooner or later— it just worries me that sooner or later someone _ it just worries me that sooner or later someone could _ it just worries me that sooner or later someone could end - it just worries me that sooner or later someone could end up- it just worries me that sooner or. later someone could end up dying through— later someone could end up dying through not— later someone could end up dying through not being _ later someone could end up dying through not being able _ later someone could end up dying through not being able to- later someone could end up dying through not being able to make . later someone could end up dyingl through not being able to make an emergency— through not being able to make an emergency call _ we'll have everything you need to make sure your connections to the outside world stay safe. plus, for those of you fed up with companies offering better deals to new customers, than to their loyal existing ones, then we've got some big, albeit belated, good news. and our technology expert david mcclelland will be . here with advice on how you can use tech to save you money. _ so if you've got questions for him, or holiday questions _ for simon, email us right now. we're also on facebook. lots to look forward to. see you at 9.15. we will see you then. thanks very much. hormone replacement therapy could be made available over the counter —
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without the need for a prescription. the medicines regulator, the mhra, has said the final decision will be taken after a public consultation. joining us now is one of our regular gps dr nighat arif. morning to you, great to see you this morning. morning to you, great to see you this morning-— morning to you, great to see you | this morning._ this morning to you, great to see you i this morning._ this is this morning. good morning. this is surely progress _ this morning. good morning. this is surely progress. this _ this morning. good morning. this is surely progress. this is _ this morning. good morning. this is surely progress. this is definite - surely progress. this is definite - ro . ress surely progress. this is definite progress and — surely progress. this is definite progress and l _ surely progress. this is definite progress and i have _ surely progress. this is definite progress and i have to - surely progress. this is definite progress and i have to say - surely progress. this is definite progress and i have to say hats| surely progress. this is definite i progress and i have to say hats off to bbc breakfast because this started from the wake up to the menopause campaign, spearheaded by louise and dan, as well. a lot of change has come because of that and significantly that divina mccall documentary by kate and linda sanz, who directed that, and that also i think we were talking about to be subject. women would whisper if they were on hrt but it was seen almost shameful because you couldn't "cope
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with your symptoms" by yourself. that documentary also highlighted to everybody that the different types of hrt. hormone replacement therapy. within that now we are so lucky, we have natural hormones, we have transdermal hormones, that go through your skin as a patch or a gel or a nasal spray. we also have localised hormones, so hormones, oestrogen cream, which go around the volvo or to prevent vaginal atrophy. 75% of my patients will suffer from that at some point around their life —— it goes around the vulva. you will have conditions of splitting of the vulval, difficulty having smear tests, difficulty having sex. we
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know that not all oestrogens are the same so having it over the counter will be so much more important. what will be so much more important. what difference will — will be so much more important. what difference will it _ will be so much more important. what difference will it make _ will be so much more important. what difference will it make if it is available over the counter? is the difficulty that some gps don't recognise how important it can be for some women? j recognise how important it can be for some women?— recognise how important it can be for some women? i don't think that is the case. — for some women? i don't think that is the case. i _ for some women? i don't think that is the case, i think— for some women? i don't think that is the case, i think it _ for some women? i don't think that is the case, i think it is _ for some women? i don't think that is the case, i think it is the - is the case, i think it is the classification of oestrogen. if i go back to the whi study, oestrogen was thought to be a carcinogenic, it caused cancer, but that is simply not true. research and data has shown, and not all oestrogen is the same. i will show you something. this is vaginal oestrogen. this is localised and only works in and around the volvo tissue and doesn't get absorbed further. it does not cause breast cancer, it does not worsen symptoms of it, because that was always a worry we had. having this declassified by the mr ha...
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when you open up a leaflet with this box that it comes in, so this is vagifem. it shows you side effects thatis vagifem. it shows you side effects that is not applicable to all types of oestrogen. oestrogen is important. and mr ha can change that commitment you can have it over the counter. we have the progesterone only pill, which get over there counter and also the emergency contraceptive pill which women have access to, which drove down unplanned pregnancies and the rate of abortion. for men, viagra has also been available for many years over the counter and it was about time we were able to treat women over the county to county because women are intelligent enough to ask the pharmacist, i want to try vaginal oestrogen because the
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napper. you start the treatment once a night for two weeks then you go to twice a week and if you can do that over the counter, fabulous. r ,we , we love having you on the programme. you have campaigned passionately about this. you are somebody who has these conversations with people that some find really uncomfortable and embarrassing but can really help with people's health. , j~ ,':ii ., health. look, the fact it is 8:30am and we are — health. look, the fact it is 8:30am and we are talking _ health. look, the fact it is 8:30am and we are talking about _ health. look, the fact it is 8:30am and we are talking about the - health. look, the fact it is 8:30am | and we are talking about the regina oestrogen just shows how much we have moved on. we have conversations —— we are talking about the vagina oestrogen. current urinary infectious people suffer our horrific. it takes a lot of time and money and effort. women are able to treat if they have vagina oestrogen over the counter. patches and gels, you might still need a consultation so empowering women is so important that we have done so much work with
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that. last october i went to the select committee with professor heather currie. we were discussing how the impact of the menopause has ever superseded in relationships, your whole body is affected. your work is affected, your income. more women leave the workplace in and around the primarily perimenopausal time. this is a step in the right direction and what has been set up on the of all this data dragged forward to. on the of all this data dragged forward to-_ forward to. nighat, always a pleasure- — forward to. nighat, always a pleasure. that _ forward to. nighat, always a pleasure. that is _ forward to. nighat, always a pleasure. that is dr - forward to. nighat, always a pleasure. that is dr nighat i forward to. nighat, always a - pleasure. that is dr nighat arif. part of the levelling—up agenda is addressing regional inequalities across the uk. ben is in wolverhampton this morning, one of the places set to benefit from the government's proposals. he is back in the market. good morning. ma; he is back in the market. good morninu. g ., ., , he is back in the market. good morninu. g . ., , morning. my favourite place! good mornin: morning. my favourite place! good morning from _ morning. my favourite place! good morning from wolverhampton -
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morning. my favourite place! good - morning from wolverhampton market, and i'm not the only one here. there is early morning shoppers out looking for a good deal. a good deal is what the city itself is after because it has long been recognised that when it comes to investment and opportunity, there are big differences between what different parts of the uk get. london and the south—east are getting a much bigger share than places like wolverhampton, for example stop i'd better put those back, partly because i haven't paid for them and maybe because someone will want them for their tea later. this is what the government calls levelling up and that means spending money on infrastructure, transport, housing and so on, in areas that need it most. the reason we are in wolverhampton because, along with sheffield, it is my 20 places chosen to share £1.5 billion to make all of that happen. let me introduce you to chris, who has been on this store for 15 years. if you are in charge of that money for wolverhampton, what would you spend it on? i of that money for wolverhampton,
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what would you spend it on? i would emlo what would you spend it on? i would employ more _ what would you spend it on? i would employ more road _ what would you spend it on? i would employ more road sweepers, - what would you spend it on? i would employ more road sweepers, get. what would you spend it on? i would| employ more road sweepers, get the roads— employ more road sweepers, get the roads and _ employ more road sweepers, get the roads and pavements clean! you employ more road sweepers, get the roads and pavements clean!- roads and pavements clean! you are talkin: roads and pavements clean! you are talking about _ roads and pavements clean! you are talking about shop _ roads and pavements clean! you are talking about shop fronts. _ roads and pavements clean! you are talking about shop fronts. i - roads and pavements clean! you are talking about shop fronts. i am - roads and pavements clean! you are talking about shop fronts. i am get i talking about shop fronts. i am get the shots in the centre open and thrive, we will thrive. at the moment... bells are the thoughts of chris that i was wondering what other people out and about make the new money and what they would spend it on. i took a stroll through the city centre to find out. once a thriving centre of production and manufacturing, wolverhampton is now a city in need of investment. is there anything that has been invested in here in wolverhampton that you think is a good example of where money can be spent well, and can have a real benefit to people who live here? it's quite telling that it takes you a long time to even think of an example. well, yeah! darrell, who's 30, is an entrepreneur and youth worker. he's pleased that wolverhampton is getting an extra slice of government money, but... we don't get again a situation in five years, whereby they say, "the levelling up money went into all of this, and look, that's failed" — in fact, we can say, "you know what? as an onus, as a community,
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we helped decide where this million goes." so what exactly do people here think the money for wolverhampton should be used for? i think wolverhampton need to spend the money on more youth environment engagements, just so that the youth have something to go to. we've got the trams, but, - idon't know, there seems to be delays after delays after delays on the trams _ i mean, up until around christmas. there weren't working for six weeks. the trams were off for six weeks at a vital part of the season. - and so that means obviously it needs more investment. - a lot of people travel to birmingham, because most shops in birmingham are open. you get me? so, i like birmingham myself, but i can't give away wolverhampton, you get what i mean? so, around here is quite nice. we just need to get some of the shops open, and that. car parking is a real problem, the cost of parking. and also a lot of the competition with the outside retailers in the outside retail parks, where they can offer free parking.
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so if we could do something about that, that would be great. and also, just to encourage some of the main shop fronts to look a lot nicer, because when people come into the town, they want to come somewhere where it's nice, a nice feeling. and certainly in this area here, there's quite a lot of shops that are closed down and empty, so it'd be great if we could sort of bring those back into the town. the money will be spent on things like improving housing, high street, transport and broadband. but the question is, will that be enough to make wolverhampton thrive once again? it is not just it is notjust fruit it is not just fruit and it is notjust fruit and veg here, there are some eggs for sale. perhaps more suitable for breakfast. let's find out more about this money coming this way. we will speak to ian brookfield, the council leader is wolverhampton city council. what is wolverhampton city council. what is your reaction to this announcement? i is your reaction to this announcement?- is your reaction to this announcement? . . ., , announcement? i am certainly leased, announcement? i am certainly pleased. on — announcement? i am certainly pleased, on behalf— announcement? i am certainly pleased, on behalf of- announcement? i am certainly pleased, on behalf of the - announcement? i am certainly pleased, on behalf of the city. j announcement? i am certainly - pleased, on behalf of the city. we have _ pleased, on behalf of the city. we have seen — pleased, on behalf of the city. we have seen bits of the white paper,
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we have _ have seen bits of the white paper, we have seen the good intentions it has, but _ we have seen the good intentions it has, but as— we have seen the good intentions it has, but as always the devil is in the detail — has, but as always the devil is in the detail. what does it actually mean _ the detail. what does it actually mean for— the detail. what does it actually mean for places like wolverhampton? we have _ mean for places like wolverhampton? we have needed this money and these intentions _ we have needed this money and these intentions for over a decade. of course — intentions for over a decade. of course it— intentions for over a decade. of course it is— intentions for over a decade. of course it is welcome from myself. i have course it is welcome from myself. have been course it is welcome from myself. i have been trying to find out how much money exactly wolverhampton will get. do you know? it much money exactly wolverhampton will get. do you know?— will get. do you know? it will be surprising. _ will get. do you know? it will be surprising. i— will get. do you know? it will be surprising, i don't. _ will get. do you know? it will be surprising, i don't. i— will get. do you know? it will be surprising, i don't. iwas- will get. do you know? it will be surprising, i don't. i was sat - will get. do you know? it will be| surprising, i don't. i was sat with the secretary of state michael gove last week, — the secretary of state michael gove last week, he was very tight—tipped. the devil— last week, he was very tight—tipped. the devil is — last week, he was very tight—tipped. the devil is in the detail. we don't know _ the devil is in the detail. we don't know we — the devil is in the detail. we don't know. we don't know what powers the devolution _ know. we don't know what powers the devolution of powers, they are looking — devolution of powers, they are looking to pass down to local leaders _ looking to pass down to local leaders. good intentions but we will see when— leaders. good intentions but we will see when we see the full report. | see when we see the full report. i am see when we see the full report. am glad see when we see the full report. i am glad you mention that because a big part of this plan is to give greater powers to local decision makers. how important is that in actually getting things done that people who live in wolverhampton actually want and need? it is robabl actually want and need? it is probably one _ actually want and need? it is probably one of _ actually want and need? it is probably one of the - actually want and need? it is probably one of the most important
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things— probably one of the most important things that we have got schemes that have been— things that we have got schemes that have been in training for years and of course — have been in training for years and of course the problem is going backwards and forwards, asking for permissions, asking for help with grants. _ permissions, asking for help with grants, always down to london. and that is— grants, always down to london. and that is a _ grants, always down to london. and that is a problem. people want to see action — that is a problem. people want to see action now and i suspect if you .ive see action now and i suspect if you give the _ see action now and i suspect if you give the local leaders, the local mayors, — give the local leaders, the local mayors, those devolution powers, we can get— mayors, those devolution powers, we can get things done differently. actually— can get things done differently. actually because it is our area, we know _ actually because it is our area, we know about — actually because it is our area, we know about it. we actually because it is our area, we know about it.— actually because it is our area, we know about it. we have spoken to a lot of people _ know about it. we have spoken to a lot of people in _ know about it. we have spoken to a lot of people in wolverhampton - know about it. we have spoken to al lot of people in wolverhampton over the last day or so. so many things people want to see money spent on. it can't go on everything. what do you think you will be able to deliver this money when it arrives? this money specifically we have heard _ this money specifically we have heard is — this money specifically we have heard is what brownfield, to build houses, _ heard is what brownfield, to build houses, infrastructure, and that is welcome — houses, infrastructure, and that is welcome. we are already on the journey— welcome. we are already on the journey to— welcome. we are already on the journey to bring investment to the city. journey to bring investment to the city we _ journey to bring investment to the city. we brought £4.5 billion worth in already— city. we brought £4.5 billion worth in already so it is important but of
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course _ in already so it is important but of course i_ in already so it is important but of course i would like to see more spent _ course i would like to see more spent on — course i would like to see more spent on people, to equalise the very real— spent on people, to equalise the very real divide. gk. spent on people, to equalise the very real divide.— very real divide. 0k. ian brookfield, _ very real divide. 0k. ian brookfield, council- very real divide. 0k. ian i brookfield, council leader, very real divide. 0k. ian - brookfield, council leader, thank you. that is it from me at the market. let me show you over here, the board. you get seven bowls, you get one free. i don't know what would be a better incentive. i always enjoy your wonders around the market. good to see you. time for the sport and we are... i was going to see the because they warming up for the winter olympics. you because they warming up for the winter olympics.— because they warming up for the winter olympics. you don't like the coal. rubbish _ winter olympics. you don't like the coal. rubbish in _ winter olympics. you don't like the coal. rubbish in the _ winter olympics. you don't like the coal. rubbish in the cold. _ winter olympics. you don't like the | coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaued coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaged me _ coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaged me saying _ coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaged me saying india _ coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaged me saying india has - coal. rubbish in the cold. somebody messaged me saying india has a - messaged me saying india has a curling team. i am beyond useless. would be eligible for team gb, if
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they are really... we are talking about killing because that is how the winter limits will start today. team gb are in action just after midday our time in the curling. bruce mouat and his playing partner jen dodds will be competing in the mixed doubles. they're the world champions, so good prospects for a medal. they face sweden, and will also compete in the men's and women's team events in the second week. next to scotland, where many raith rovers fans stayed away from their championship game last night after the club signed striker david goodwillie, who was ruled to be a rapist in a civil case in 2017. he neverfaced a criminal trial and always maintained it was consensual. raith say the signing was made for football reasons. the club's manager was booed by some supporters before kick off. two directors and the captain of the women's team have quit in protest, whilst the crime author val mcdermid says she'll withdraw her sponsorship of the club. mcdermid said on social media she's ending her lifelong support of raith rovers over the signing of goodwillie, and has cancelled next season's shirt sponsorship over what she's called a disgusting and despicable move.
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the duchess of cambridge has been named the new patron of the rugby football league and the rugby football union. kate has taken on a role previously held by the duke of sussex. the self—confessed sports fan was given the royal patronages by the queen. prince william is the patron of the welsh rugby union. rugby football league chief executive ralph rimmer says... we appreciate how precious her time is. there are lots of calls on her time. we'll work with her team. we're going to speak with them later on today, and we'll work out exactly how she fits in. we would hopefully see her at some world cup events towards the end of the year — it would give us a great lift. today gives us a great uplift, so as i say, it's a big day for us after weathering a couple of very difficult years, which everybody has, of course.
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more injury problems for england ahead of the six nations opening. forwards courtney lawes and jonny hill are both out of the game. lawes is recovering from concussion, while hill has a foot injury. skipper owen farrell is already out of the tournament. utility backjoe marchant recently tested positive for covid, which has left him doubtful. plenty of tributes to tom brady online. one of the greatest players in nfl history — has confirmed his retirement at the age of 44. the tampa bay buccaneers quarterback has won seven super bowls in an astonishing career spanning 22 seasons. brady won six titles with the new england patriots before his final triumph with the buccaneers last year daniel kelly usa in playing golf... i am looking for my tom brady stat sheet. every single stat in nfl, he leads the way. an incredible career. the favourite in the bookies is a film career sign ok! like an action
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hero? can he act? does it matter? you need to? he hero? can he act? does it matter? you need to?— hero? can he act? does it matter? you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he — you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he so _ you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he so fit? _ you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he so fit? sleeps _ you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he so fit? sleeps in - you need to? he is in his mid-40s. how is he so fit? sleeps in a - how is he so fit? sleeps in a diamond _ how is he so fit? sleeps in a diamond encrusted - how is he so fit? sleeps in a diamond encrusted best... i how is he so fit? sleeps in a i diamond encrusted best... he how is he so fit? sleeps in a - diamond encrusted best... he takes care of everything. diamond encrusted best. .. he takes care of everything.— diamond encrusted best... he takes care of everything.- write i care of everything. avocado. write that down- — care of everything. avocado. write that down. thank _ care of everything. avocado. write that down. thank you, _ care of everything. avocado. write that down. thank you, chetan, - care of everything. avocado. write | that down. thank you, chetan, nice to see you. it's been the ultimate in binge tv, and if you haven't already watched it all online, the final episode of the responder, airs on bbc one tonight. the crime drama, set in liverpool, follows police officer chris and his partner rachel across five night shifts. rachel? hi, chris. yeah, i'm up the ball. at the moment, mate. right. eh, no. yeah, course, that's fine. sorry. so what's up? you still there? rach? yeah.
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what's going on? nothing. you sound a bit echoey there, mate. are you ok? yeah, yeah, i'm fine. are you sure? yeah, just, eh... i don't think i'm used to... i don't think i'm used to the nights yet, so... we're joined now by adelayo adedayo, who plays rachel. lovely to see you this morning. newcomer to.— lovely to see you this morning. newcomer to. ,, , , , newcomer to. quite distressed there. what is going — newcomer to. quite distressed there. what is going on _ newcomer to. quite distressed there. what is going on with _ newcomer to. quite distressed there. what is going on with your— newcomer to. quite distressed there. what is going on with your character. what is going on with your character rachel? i know people might not have caught up to where we are at the moment but she is an interesting character. . , ., moment but she is an interesting character. ,, , ., , moment but she is an interesting character. ,, , . , , character. she is a very interesting character. she is a very interesting character. that _ character. she is a very interesting character. that clip _ character. she is a very interesting character. that clip is _ character. she is a very interesting character. that clip is from - character. that clip is from tonight's episode, episode five. i don't want to spoil too much. that is the final — don't want to spoil too much. that is the final one. _ don't want to spoil too much. that is the final one. the _ don't want to spoil too much. that is the final one. the final - don't want to spoil too much. that is the final one. the final episode, es. i is the final one. the final episode, yes- i guess _ is the final one. the final episode, yes- i guess we — is the final one. the final episode, yes. i guess we get _ is the final one. the final episode, yes. i guess we get to _ is the final one. the final episode, yes. i guess we get to see - is the final one. the final episode, yes. i guess we get to see a - is the final one. the final episode, yes. i guess we get to see a little| yes. i guess we get to see a little bit more of what has been going on
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behind closed doors for rachel and how she has been trying to balance so many things alongside the job. the interesting thing that lots of people come to watching the programme is that we are dynamic. not weird but interesting. you come into the programme with high hopes of how thejob into the programme with high hopes of how the job will be and martin freeman's character has quite an impact on how you end up in the series. , impact on how you end up in the series. . , ., series. the way he polices and the wa she series. the way he polices and the way she wants _ series. the way he polices and the way she wants to _ series. the way he polices and the way she wants to police _ series. the way he polices and the way she wants to police are - way she wants to police are completely different and the people they meet, the relationships that they meet, the relationships that they start building, with the different characters kind of... i guess she has an awakening and she enters as this upstanding rookie cop who wants to do everything right, has to do everything right, desperate to do everything right. and she just keeps getting shut down and it is difficult to see and watch that realisation that you can't control people. it
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that realisation that you can't control people.— that realisation that you can't control people. it all comes from the mind of— control people. it all comes from the mind of the _ control people. it all comes from the mind of the writer _ control people. it all comes from the mind of the writer tony - the mind of the writer tony schumacher, from his own lived experience. watching it, as a drama, it feels— experience. watching it, as a drama, it feels so— experience. watching it, as a drama, it feels so real. what was it like to film? — it feels so real. what was it like to film? , ., to film? even before it filming when i read the first _ to film? even before it filming when i read the first script, _ to film? even before it filming when i read the first script, i _ to film? even before it filming when i read the first script, i was - to film? even before it filming when i read the first script, i was like, - i read the first script, i was like, this feels human. reading the conversations in the script, i would like, ifeel like i can hear these conversations in real life. maybe not the topic but the way people relate to each other. getting on set was a dream because it was the most natural thing, was a dream because it was the most naturalthing, i was a dream because it was the most natural thing, i always think if you get lines and don't struggle to learn them where they come naturally it is because whoever has written them is very good at creating human conversation and i think tony is unreal about that. he conversation and i think tony is unreal about that.— conversation and i think tony is unreal about that. he was here a coule of unreal about that. he was here a couple of weeks _ unreal about that. he was here a couple of weeks ago, _ unreal about that. he was here a couple of weeks ago, the - unreal about that. he was here a couple of weeks ago, the night l couple of weeks ago, the night before the first episode, talking about the importance of the mental health discussion around this series, as well. he said he wanted it to be true to life, things he had
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been through, what some of his colleagues had been through. the stress of the job impacts how you feel. he stress of the 'ob impacts how you feel. ., «a stress of the 'ob impacts how you feel. ., ., stress of the 'ob impacts how you feel. . . ., stress of the 'ob impacts how you feel. . ., ., ., ., feel. he talks a lot about how he was feeling _ feel. he talks a lot about how he was feeling and _ feel. he talks a lot about how he was feeling and reaching - feel. he talks a lot about how he was feeling and reaching out - feel. he talks a lot about how he was feeling and reaching out and feel. he talks a lot about how he i was feeling and reaching out and he needs help and that is really evident in chris' character, how he was very much functioning on the outside and getting up every day and doing thejob but breaking down on the inside. the same with rachel, on the inside. the same with rachel, on the outside she is almost kind of, i guess, and upstanding cup. she is trying to do everything right but she is silently does microlight, there is a vulnerability there and you can kind of see the desperation and when she loses control she really loses control and you can see that she needs help and she is calling out for it, i guess i am most of the filming took place in a locked down liverpool, didn't it? most of at night. what was that like? _ most of at night. what was that like? lt— most of at night. what was that like? ., , , ,
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most of at night. what was that like? , , r, like? it was very different! because liverool like? it was very different! because liverpool is — like? it was very different! because liverpool is like _ like? it was very different! because liverpool is like the _ like? it was very different! because liverpool is like the most _ like? it was very different! because liverpool is like the most buzzing, l liverpool is like the most buzzing, from the city, especially at night. it comes alive and is so much fun so it was kind of weird, like... it was kind of a ghost town full stop i was like, where is the liverpool that i love? it was really weird but i guess from the filming point of view it was perfect because there were no interruptions or anything, so yes. we were talking yesterday about the return of bbc three. we had larry lamb on, the start of gavin and stacey and was some girls and bbc three? how are you feeling about the return? larry was talking about moving from bbc three to bbc two to bbc one and it became this massive hit, and stacey. it is a place where you can try things out, be a bit off the wall and see what happens. exactly that. what people will have access to content that they might not have otherwise had access to. there is more opportunities for
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people too, as you say, like, try new things, people might not be sure about and you can find beautiful, brilliant programmes from that kind of opportunity, so... i don't know, i think it's brilliant sigh and i'm going to ask you a tricky one now. final episode tonight. while we going to see a second series? i5 final episode tonight. while we going to see a second series? is it neatly tied — going to see a second series? is it neatly tied up? — going to see a second series? is it neatly tied up? give a tiny hint if you can — neatly tied up? give a tiny hint if you can i— neatly tied up? give a tiny hint if ou can. .., �* neatly tied up? give a tiny hint if oucan. �* ._ neatly tied up? give a tiny hint if oucan. �* -.y .., you can. i can't say anything ma'or but i think— you can. i can't say anything ma'or but i think there is d you can. i can't say anything ma'or but i think there is scope. i you can. i can't say anything ma'or but i think there is scope. ok. h you can. i can't say anything major but i think there is scope. ok. are | but i think there is scope. ok. are ou but i think there is scope. ok. are you watching _ but i think there is scope. ok. are you watching it — but i think there is scope. ok. are you watching it with _ but i think there is scope. ok. are you watching it with friends, - you watching it with friends, family, are you looking at social media at the same time? i have finished it _ media at the same time? i have finished it already. _ media at the same time? i have finished it already. i— media at the same time? i have finished it already. i had - media at the same time? i have finished it already. i had only i media at the same time? i have i finished it already. i had only seen the first two episodes so as soon as everything was available on iplayer i was like, on my laptop, bingeing. what is it like watching yourself? it is weird but such a brilliant
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show! he hart, marco and casey, this is great so i binged it, differently than definitely. and you can catch the final episode of the responder at 9 o'clock tonight on bbc one or catch up with all the whole series on bbc iplayer. she is in it and has already you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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welcome to bbc news. the headlines at 9am: the government unveils details of one of its election pledges — trying to reducing the gap between richer and poorer areas by 'levelling up' the country. plans include improvements to public transport, broadband and education, along with more town and city mayors across england. what government will be judged by is our ability to deliver over the course of the next two years and then on to 2030, and that is why we are laying out the basis on which we can bejudged on the basis on which a future spending reviews can be judged as well. if you live in a neglected area, what do you want? is it more mayors,

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