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tv   Context  BBC News  February 2, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. tackling regional inequality across the uk — the government sets out its plans to level up. the idea is, more housing, jobs, better transport and education — to help overlooked communities. three thousand us troops are deployed to eastern europe — the latest move in the ukraine crisis. the tension in ukraine adding to energy costs around the world — here in the uk we're expecting the biggest ever rise in energy bills to be announced tomorrow. tonight with the context, political editor of the daily mirror,
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pippa crerar and daily mail columnist sarah vine. hello and welcome. at the 2019 election, borisjohnson captured a slew of northern constituencies in england with the promise to �*level up�* the country. the government said it would rebalance the economy, share the prosperity of london, to address long standing underinvestment in the regions. and now we have the policy, a bill published today by the levelling up secretary michael gove which, finally, spells out how they aim to achieve it. this white paper lays out a long—term economic and plan to make opportunity more equal. it shifts power and opportunity towards the north end midlands, scotland, wales and northern ireland. it guarantees increase investment in overlooked and undervalued communities. in research and development, in education and skills, and transport and broadband, in urban parks and decent homes, and grassroots ports and local culture and in fighting crime and tackling anti—social behavior.
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it gives local communities the tools to tackle rogue landlords, dilapidated high streets and neglected green spaces. it demonstrates that is peoples government is keeping faith with the working people of this country by allowing them to take back control of their lives, the communities and their futures and i commend this statement to the house. crucially what the bill does is set down in law, how the government will measure success. they have established 12 �*missions�* which mr gove says will underpin how future spending decisions are made. power devolved to metro mayors, will be a large part of the plan. among the key iniatives, the mission to improve education and skills, by significantly increasing standards in 55 areas across england. by 2030, there's a target to narrow the gap for people across the uk on pay, employment and crucially their life expectancy. among other things there is a commitment to skills and life long learning, innovation centres that will receive more funding for research and development and a pledge to improve public transport outside london, the pledges on spending
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in this white paper are rather limited, reflecting the fiscal one of the criticisms towards leveling up is that it meant everything and nothing. did the white paper address finally what it is? . . , white paper address finally what it is? . , ., , white paper address finally what it is? . , ., i. is? that was the beauty of the slo . an, is? that was the beauty of the slogan, leveling _ is? that was the beauty of the slogan, leveling up _ is? that was the beauty of the slogan, leveling up in - is? that was the beauty of the slogan, leveling up in terms i is? that was the beauty of the | slogan, leveling up in terms of is? that was the beauty of the - slogan, leveling up in terms of the election because the government was able to promise this big life—changing experience for people. ultimately what that meant two people meant different things up and down the country. i think today with the white papers, the first serious attempt that we've seen of the government two years into start to put flesh on the bones of what that might mean. so that's a white paper so it's hard to be a set in the direction travel map than the nitty—gritty. this certainly wasn't much concrete in there but to me what it showed overall is the extreme inequality that does exist in our country. much of it sort of
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structural in terms of imbalance, economic and the rest and the rest of the country. some of it much more detailed in increasing areas that got worse over the last decade or so. i think it's a good starting point, i think there's lots to be discussed. i think politically it can be very difficult for the government because people have this expectation that things will change by the next election. some lent their vote to borisjohnson on the basis that they will receive direct tangible improvements to their communities and the quality of life for that and two years isn't very long to achieve that. not least because it's a fairly amorphous document with lots of noble aims but very little tangible detail about how they're actually going to get there. . . ., . , how they're actually going to get there. . _, . , ., there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason — there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it _ there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it was _ there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it was delayed _ there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it was delayed so - there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it was delayed so long . there. yeah. the concern is, sarah, the reason it was delayed so long is that michael gove spent a lot of time trying to get more money out of the treasury for the bold aims as
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peppa says. but does he have the money to fulfil the ambition he set out today? i money to fulfil the ambition he set out toda ? ., �* ~ ., money to fulfil the ambition he set outtoda ? ~ ., , , money to fulfil the ambition he set outtoda? ~ ., ,, �*, out today? i don't know because it's a long-term — out today? i don't know because it's a long-term ambition. _ out today? i don't know because it's a long-term ambition. this - out today? i don't know because it's a long-term ambition. this is - out today? i don't know because it's a long-term ambition. this is the i a long—term ambition. this is the whole _ a long—term ambition. this is the whole point — a long—term ambition. this is the whole point about the white paper to be a vision — whole point about the white paper to be a vision. i think you need a vision, — be a vision. i think you need a vision, you _ be a vision. i think you need a vision, you need long—term strategy, medium—term strategy and short—term strategy _ medium—term strategy and short—term strategy. and this is a long, long term _ strategy. and this is a long, long term strategy. it's very unlikely that it _ term strategy. it's very unlikely that it will — term strategy. it's very unlikely that it will be a conservative government see it through. who knows what will_ government see it through. who knows what will happen in 2030. money, again— what will happen in 2030. money, again very— what will happen in 2030. money, again very hard to nail down figures at this— again very hard to nail down figures at this stage because you just don't know_ at this stage because you just don't know how— at this stage because you just don't know how much these are just to get end up— know how much these are just to get end up costing. we've seen with a choice _ end up costing. we've seen with a choice to— end up costing. we've seen with a choice to how these things can become — choice to how these things can become enormous in price. what the government— become enormous in price. what the government of trying to do this to say took. — government of trying to do this to say look, we have long—term vision for this— say look, we have long—term vision for this country. that is something that has— for this country. that is something that has been lacking in politics for quite — that has been lacking in politics for quite a long time. everybody talks— for quite a long time. everybody talks about the immediate things we can do. _ talks about the immediate things we can do. the — talks about the immediate things we can do, the quick fixes and actually
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politics— can do, the quick fixes and actually politics is— can do, the quick fixes and actually politics is not about quick fixes it's about — politics is not about quick fixes it's about infrastructure and laying down _ it's about infrastructure and laying down good, solid foundation that will take — down good, solid foundation that will take the country into the future — will take the country into the future in _ will take the country into the future in a positive way. i do think for a _ future in a positive way. i do think for a long — future in a positive way. i do think for a long time there's been a huge inequality— for a long time there's been a huge inequality between the self in the north _ inequality between the self in the north. london seems to be a black hole that _ north. london seems to be a black hole that sucks everything into it money, — hole that sucks everything into it money, people, etc. it is time that we tried _ money, people, etc. it is time that we tried to — money, people, etc. it is time that we tried to move those things the rest of— we tried to move those things the rest of the — we tried to move those things the rest of the country so that everybody can enjoy the same prosperity that people in the south and the _ prosperity that people in the south and the southwestern easternjoy. it's and the southwestern easternjoy. it's a _ and the southwestern easternjoy. it's a good — and the southwestern easternjoy. it's a good point that governments come and go. is the plan to develop the decision—making to the local level, to give more money to metro males, to make the uk less centralised, it is one of the most centralised, it is one of the most centralised countries in the oecd. does that take away some of that short—term is him at the centre and handed to the regions in the hope that actually the plan can be seen
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through? i that actually the plan can be seen throu~h? ~' ., ., ., , through? i think he to all of this and whether— through? i think he to all of this and whether it _ through? i think he to all of this and whether it ends _ through? i think he to all of this and whether it ends up - through? i think he to all of this and whether it ends up being i through? i think he to all of this i and whether it ends up being able through? i think he to all of this - and whether it ends up being able to be transmitted back translated from vision to reality on the ground is the body in on local leaders was up whether that's leaders that exist at that moment of it is a series of different code but not political complexions and or local leaders or the new plan set out in the white paper for mayors, elected the new plan set out in the white paperfor mayors, elected county mayors in areas right across the uk giving them lending plea london style powers. that powers can be crucial. it doesn't matter how much a change from the top, if you don't have the support of the people who are actually going to be delivering it's just like it happened. are actually going to be delivering it'sjust like it happened. that are actually going to be delivering it's just like it happened. that i think also extends to getting the buy—in from cross party opposition. as sarah rightly says, if this is a ten year project, which it looks like it is, at least a ten year
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project, lots of these promises as big as they are due to come in too course until the next decade. that has to have, given the political uncertainties we go through as a country and has to have the support of the opposition. because there will come of time where some of these measures put in place but it's a different government. if they don't support them now they've got absolutely no requirement, no incentive for them to stick with the plans that the conservatives put in place. michael gove is very good at reaching cross party amongst the top team at the moment he is generally seen at west minister is one of the more consensual politicians. you'd like to think that he's got big ideas that can reach across the house and if anybody can do it he can do it. on the labour side, this is absolutely her terrain. and i
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think that they will be a good match in terms of thrashing this out. i hope all sides recognise there are very serious structural inequalities that exist in our country economic and social. which metric you measure them by. and if they are genuine about wanting to achieve they have to work together to do that. some on the labour side _ to work together to do that. some on the labour side who _ to work together to do that. some on the labour side who have _ to work together to do that. some on the labour side who have welcomed l the labour side who have welcomed the labour side who have welcomed the governments plans... tracy brabin the labour mayor of west yorkshuire said there was a lot to be pleased about. but like others expressed concerns about the funding. jim o'neill, vice chairman of the northern powerhouse partnership said "as a framework" and as means to help the government measure its performance — it was quite impressive". but lisa nandy said the treasury has written off more money in fraud this past few weeks, than it has handed to michael gove. what this is really about, it's about getting good jobs back into towns that have lost them over the last 40 years. so that too many young people have
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to get out to get on. so we just don't have the spending power and the local powers to sustain our high streets and our town centres and support our local businesses. that's why we've said that spending money on green investment would be our priority, we pledge 28 billion a year every year in the next parliament. in order to ensure that those coastal industrial towns that within living memory powered the world can do so again. and young people can stay and get those apprenticeships, get those jobs and make a contribution like their parents and grandparents did. well one project that seeks to do just that, is the eden project north in morecambe. they have just had the green light to begin construction on a project similar to the one in cornwall. the aim is to build these mussel shaped pavillions on a derelict area in morecambe bay, which they hope will attract further investment to the region. i'm joined by eden project's ceo, dave harland. would this have got off the ground
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without the governments renewed focus on the north? i without the governments renewed focus on the north?— focus on the north? i think what ha--ens focus on the north? i think what happens is _ focus on the north? i think what happens is there's _ focus on the north? i think what happens is there's been - focus on the north? i think what happens is there's been this - focus on the north? i think what| happens is there's been this idea focus on the north? i think what i happens is there's been this idea of leveling out that it's been quite useful for the funding. leveling out that it's been quite usefulfor the funding. i come leveling out that it's been quite useful for the funding. i come from cornwall originally, a whole county affected by deprivation issues and when i was growing up down here it's a play she will likely to leave. i think it's a positive step that the government is recognising the inequalities that are notjust in the southwest but in the northwest in somewhere like morecambe. we think there is a wealth of talent and potential in the regions and they don't necessarily need hand—outs, what they need his investment to ensure her very much that the growth and prosperity can be shared across generations. aha, be shared across generations. a project like eating will do that. i'm really interested in that. if you look at something like silicon valley or the city of london, they grew organically, they were almost an accident. they grew in a group. can you put something shiny like the
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eden project north in morecambe and recreate that growth and how does that create social growth, socials stimulation, how does it stimulate growth in society aside from the manufacturing that goes into the project? manufacturing that goes into the ro'ect? , , ., ., manufacturing that goes into the ro'ect? , ., project? this is a long-term vision and it's been _ project? this is a long-term vision and it's been said _ project? this is a long-term vision and it's been said already - project? this is a long-term vision and it's been said already these i project? this is a long-term vision | and it's been said already these are long—term plans. we want to invest into the northwest and the north for the long—term. they think in doing what we do which is we buy at least 80% of services in the region, we invest into those supply chains, we've already started a 25 year education plan that morecambe can scale up youngsters so they've got the right skills for the 21st century. we've already invested in health in a project of the bay which is about subscribing to hundred percent to eight people already benefiting from us. as this goes on it's a brilliant example so
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environmental, social and economic investment coming together to really move in area forward. and i'm not claiming that all that we will act as a catalyst to investors around us which is what's happening cornwall and why we had an impact. you would counter the — and why we had an impact. you would counter the point _ and why we had an impact. you would counter the point that _ and why we had an impact. you would counter the point that the _ and why we had an impact. you would counter the point that the institute i counter the point that the institute for physical studies made today that the governments failed to learn lessons about other projects out of work was that he would say actually, we have learned the lessons in cornwall and we can apply that to other regions in the country? i other regions in the country? i think there's been lessons learned in cornwall. i think eden is a good example where the government put it right. we've had subsidies and european funds. i think it's been difficult over the last couple years is to identify the root to fundraing. ithink is to identify the root to fundraing. i think what today does is it sets out at least a root towards the pots of money going to be available for investment across departments. one of the problems with projects like eden is we touch education, health, tourism and culture and arts and so on and it's
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very difficult to find a champion. i think what this paper does is it suggests all the way through to funds of prosperity, to general leveling up funds.— funds of prosperity, to general leveling up funds. there is no car arkin: leveling up funds. there is no car parking spaces — leveling up funds. there is no car parking spaces at _ leveling up funds. there is no car parking spaces at this _ leveling up funds. there is no car parking spaces at this new i leveling up funds. there is no car| parking spaces at this new project in morecambe so you have to get there on a train. we note the trains out there. we've got the scars to show for it. this is part of the signalling, isn't it? i hope your chairs are better. have you just fall off your chair, dave? seriously. that interconnected projects, that's the key thing is in a? pro'ects, that's the key thing is in a? , , ., �* , pro'ects, that's the key thing is in a? , , ., �*, ., �*, pro'ects, that's the key thing is in a? , , ., a? yes, it is. that's what's going to make these _ a? yes, it is. that's what's going to make these things _ a? yes, it is. that's what's going to make these things said. i a? yes, it is. that's what's going to make these things said. as i a? yes, it is. that's what's going l to make these things said. as you said. you — to make these things said. as you said, you can'tjust plop us in the middle _ said, you can'tjust plop us in the middle of— said, you can'tjust plop us in the middle of nowhere and expect them to change _ middle of nowhere and expect them to change the _ middle of nowhere and expect them to change the world. you've got to build _ change the world. you've got to build infrastructure around them actually allows people to enjoy them and take _ actually allows people to enjoy them and take part in them. that's what they're _ and take part in them. that's what they're going to try and do. if his point about— they're going to try and do. if his point about the mayors on board and
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like say, _ point about the mayors on board and like say, they are quite happy with this idea _ like say, they are quite happy with this idea they like it. and the idea of this— this idea they like it. and the idea of this cross party consensus on how we should _ of this cross party consensus on how we should improve the countries general— we should improve the countries general infrastructure is a good run, _ general infrastructure is a good run. i_ general infrastructure is a good run, i think. general infrastructure is a good run, ithink. ithink general infrastructure is a good run, i think. i think is hopefully what _ run, i think. i think is hopefully what will— run, i think. i think is hopefully what will try to get out of this. okay. we will talk len more about it. this is context on the bbc. still to come... borisjohnson is under fresh pressure as another three tory mps join efforts to oust him as prime minister. we will discuss all that in the next half hour. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines today. the agriculture minister has directed his official to stop heading out checks from goods to know ireland for the rest of the uk. subjects are part of the norland protocol. mr poots is a member of the democratic unionist party, which is opposed to the protocol. just over 3 million people
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in the uk tested positive for covid last week — according to the latest estimate from the office for national statistics — that's a small rise on the week before. the number of people testing positive in england and scotland remained unchanged. but it rose in wales and northern ireland. the growing backlash against raith rover�*s decision to sign david goodwillie has led scotland's first minister to urge footballing authorities to step in. a civil court found the player had raped a woman and ordered him to pay damages. the crime writer val mcdermid withdrew her sponsorship yesterday and now says she intends to work with the women's teams instead. the club, meanwhile, has defended its position. michael gove's otherjob as besides levelling up the country, is to preserve the union. today he said the uk government would be working with the scotland to make the country a �*science superpower�*. glasgow one of the cities that will share £100 million of westminster funding to encourage
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innovation and research. the snp less than enamoured by that. they say they have not been properly consulted and spending in scotland on areas that interact with devolved issues should be a decision for them, not westminster. lets bring in brian taylor, columnist for the herald. and political commentator. a lot of the areas where the uk government are already devoted to the scottish government. education, transport, how will they include scotland? how they make sure scotland? how they make sure scotland doesn�*t feel left out was that it�*s very, very much the case with subscales, schools, trail sport is all devolved bob those college the next scottish parliament and there are no males in scotland. that doesnt there are no males in scotland. that doesn't fly- — there are no males in scotland. that doesn't fly. imagine _ there are no males in scotland. trust doesn't fly. imagine the innovation doesn�*t fly. imagine the innovation centre from glasgow sharing 100 million from three centres, around civilly small announcement but significant. the fact behind this, this is not about the money. as with the north of england, this is about politics. but in this scotland it�*s
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almost purely in politics. as ever in scotland this dispute is about the fall liar of scottish politics which is independence versus a union. what is happening here is that michael gove, scott himself from aberdeen charged with defending that union as far as possible seize the fact that scott�*s are linked more and more to that scottish parliament on the domestic issues and he is reminding them, almost physically this projects being supported by the uk government as the eu used to do in the days when we are a member of that organisation. badging them as belonging to the uk government, he is reminding people in scotland that they had two governments, notjust evolved in edinburgh but the union won in london. if you set this in the context of eight union conductivity review, talking about transport, efforts to establish reports in scotland with the very reluctant scottish government. beginning negotiations, efforts to enhance in there is the idea of
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innovation in science. what is happening here is that the uk government is saying, hey, where in the game as well, we have a dog in the game. we are players in this. so the game. we are players in this. so the not quite trying to usurp the scottish parliaments powers but they are said they placing a challenge to them. do are said they placing a challenge to them. , ., are said they placing a challenge to them. ,, ~ are said they placing a challenge to them. i. ~ , them. do you think the investment them. do you think the investment the ut them. do you think the investment they put into _ them. do you think the investment they put into the _ them. do you think the investment they put into the north _ them. do you think the investment they put into the north and - them. do you think the investment they put into the north and the i they put into the north and the northwest of england which will be in the eye line of the smp, is that one—way they will try to point out to the scottish public that was minister can make a difference? if they are able to do so. we've heard they are able to do so. we�*ve heard scepticism through the whole of today as to whether the money will follow these projects and where the projects are bit of a dream. you see the nature of the announcements made from the north of england. those have political context as well as economic. what is happening is that michael gove is saying explicitly that he wants to do the same sort of thing but he understands that given the devolved structure he has to do it in tandem
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government. he says all i want to do is cooperate. of course the two governments are smp and conservative, they are mutually suspicious of each other. they have completely different views of the future of the uk. they will work together to a certain degree but there will always be that suspicion of motives of the other. suspicions from michael gove that the matter are constantly trying to project independence and suspicion that mr gove is trying to counter that and project values as he sees the union. brian, stayed with us. i want to talk about the political risk for the conservatives. the plan they have just set out is timed to deliver by 2030. some of it will land earlier, but the chances are people won�*t see it, it won�*t be changing their lives in time for the next election. what they will feel is the squeeze on the cost of living. tomorrow the energy regulator ofgem will set the new price cap on home energy bills, which are predicted to rise from an average of £1277 this winter to somewhere nearer £2000, something around a 50% rise.
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there are 22 million households in britain that are on an energy deal linked to the price cap. sarah, iwant sarah, i want to bring you in on this because i know the mail has been running a campaign on the cost—of—living and is lobbying the government to drop the rising income tax and national insurance. when you look at that, is that a much greater risk? when you 20 with the spending for leveling up in the cost of living, is that what unsettles a lot of people in the traditional heartlands of the conservative party? heartlands of the conservative pa ? , ~ , heartlands of the conservative pa ? , “ , , party? yes, i think these energy rices party? yes, i think these energy prices are _ party? yes, i think these energy prices are going _ party? yes, i think these energy prices are going affect _ party? yes, i think these energy prices are going affect lots i party? yes, i think these energy prices are going affect lots of. prices are going affect lots of people — prices are going affect lots of people i_ prices are going affect lots of people. i think the government really— people. i think the government really has — people. i think the government really has got to think very carefully about that. our readers are feeling by and large conservative voters and they also really _ conservative voters and they also really badly hit which is why we do this campaign. we talk about
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short—term, long—term, medium—term politics. _ short—term, long—term, medium—term politics. this _ short—term, long—term, medium—term politics. this is — short—term, long—term, medium—term politics, this is the urgent issue for the — politics, this is the urgent issue for the government and i don't think they are getting it right. especially if you look at it against the backdrop of all the spend we have _ the backdrop of all the spend we have recently and all of the ways. we had _ have recently and all of the ways. we had theatre agnew last week and your viewers may remember the fact that the _ your viewers may remember the fact that the fraudulent loan scheme that went on— that the fraudulent loan scheme that went on through the pandemic is not being _ went on through the pandemic is not being properly prosecuted. i think you have — being properly prosecuted. i think you have to show that you get there, that you _ you have to show that you get there, that you have the right priorities. so it's— that you have the right priorities. so it's a — that you have the right priorities. so it's a problem. brian, the so it�*s a problem. brian, the government setting out today with the coley rebate and claw—back scheme. they are not ditching vat on fuel bills, they are going to lend money to the few companies. many up in scotland. and then they are hoping that will temper the price
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rising for consumers was a bit over the long—term they�*ll get the money back. is that a plan that is welcomed in scotland? i5 back. is that a plan that is welcomed in scotland? is a plan that's being _ welcomed in scotland? is a plan that's being looked _ welcomed in scotland? is a plan that's being looked at _ welcomed in scotland? is a plan that's being looked at in - welcomed in scotland? is a plan | that's being looked at in scotland that�*s being looked at in scotland but there is huge concern and huge exasperation, fury frankly about the few bills as i�*m sure there is across the whole of the uk. we actually have balmy weather in scotland for the last few weeks. it's scotland for the last few weeks. it�*s been the area of the uk that�*s been topping the charts as far as celsius is concerned. that�*s not always the case. the cost of fuel and warm homes is a huge topic in scotland particularly in the north of scotland. this programme will be looked at extremely closely, it will be looked at inc. in comparison with the extent of the changes that come with the new price caps being announced tomorrow. it is of course very much about concern for individualfamilies, concerned for individual families, concerned for people individualfamilies, concerned for people struggling to heat their homes but it�*s also very much, as you rightly do is getting on.
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we should just talk, before we head to the break, about partygate. we did almost get to the break without talking about it. three more conservative mp�*s have today called on the prime minister to go. backbenchers anthony mangnall and sir gary streeter have submitted letters of no confidence as well as the ex—minister tobias ellwood, chair of the defence select committe. impossible to know how many letters have gone in. but where do you sense the mood of the conservative party is gone now? it is impossible. it feels to me like it's a _ is impossible. it feels to me like it'sa drip. drip, _ is impossible. it feels to me like it's a drip, drip, drip— is impossible. it feels to me like it's a drip, drip, drip of- it's a drip, drip, drip of conservatives- it's a drip, drip, drip of conservatives but- it's a drip, drip, drip of conservatives but no i it's a drip, drip, drip of- conservatives but no letters in. it's a drip, drip, drip of— conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority — conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority of _ conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority of people _ conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority of people i— conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority of people i speak- conservatives but no letters in. the vast majority of people i speak to, i vast majority of people i speak to, including _ vast majority of people i speak to, including those _ vast majority of people i speak to, including those that _ vast majority of people i speak to, including those that think- vast majority of people i speak to, including those that think boris i including those that think boris johnson — including those that think boris johnson isn't _ including those that think boris johnson isn't going _ including those that think boris johnson isn't going to - including those that think boris johnson isn't going to be - including those that think boris johnson isn't going to be the i including those that think boris i johnson isn't going to be the leader that takes— johnson isn't going to be the leader that takes him _ johnson isn't going to be the leader that takes him into _ johnson isn't going to be the leader that takes him into the _ johnson isn't going to be the leader that takes him into the next - that takes him into the next election— that takes him into the next election still— that takes him into the next election still don't— that takes him into the next election still don't think i that takes him into the next election still don't think the | that takes him into the next i election still don't think the time is right— election still don't think the time is right to push _ election still don't think the time is right to push them out - election still don't think the time is right to push them out right. election still don't think the time i is right to push them out right now. primarily— is right to push them out right now. primarily because they— is right to push them out right now. primarily because they want - is right to push them out right now. primarily because they want to i is right to push them out right now. primarily because they want to seel primarily because they want to see what comes— primarily because they want to see what comes of— primarily because they want to see what comes of the _ primarily because they want to see what comes of the met _ primarily because they want to see what comes of the met police i primarily because they want to see l what comes of the met police inquiry and whether— what comes of the met police inquiry and whether the _ what comes of the met police inquiry and whether the prime _ what comes of the met police inquiry and whether the prime minister- what comes of the met police inquiry and whether the prime minister is. and whether the prime minister is found _ and whether the prime minister is found guilty— and whether the prime minister is found guilty or _ and whether the prime minister is found guilty or found _ and whether the prime minister is found guilty or found to _ and whether the prime minister is found guilty or found to broken i and whether the prime minister isl found guilty or found to broken the law. found guilty or found to broken the law 0r— found guilty or found to broken the law or the — found guilty or found to broken the law. or the full— found guilty or found to broken the law. or the full souk _ found guilty or found to broken the law. or the full souk great - found guilty or found to broken the law. or the full souk great report l law. or the full souk great report when _ law. or the full souk great report when that — law. or the full souk great report when that comes _ law. or the full souk great report when that comes out. _ law. or the full souk great report when that comes out. the - law. or the full souk great reportl when that comes out. the second law. or the full souk great report i when that comes out. the second is who takes— when that comes out. the second is who takes over _ when that comes out. the second is who takes over for— when that comes out. the second is who takes over for him? _ when that comes out. the second is who takes over for him? it's - when that comes out. the second is who takes over for him? it's not i when that comes out. the second is who takes over for him? it's not in i who takes over for him? it's not in the greek—
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who takes over for him? it's not in the greek consensus _ who takes over for him? it's not in the greek consensus over - who takes over for him? it's not in. the greek consensus over successor in the _ the greek consensus over successor in the conservative _ the greek consensus over successor in the conservative party. _ the greek consensus over successor in the conservative party. that- the greek consensus over successor in the conservative party. that is. the greek consensus over successor in the conservative party. that is a. in the conservative party. that is a thing _ in the conservative party. that is a thing keeping _ in the conservative party. that is a thing keeping boris _ in the conservative party. that is a thing keeping borisjohnson - in the conservative party. that is a thing keeping borisjohnson goingi thing keeping borisjohnson going for now _ thing keeping borisjohnson going for now it's — thing keeping borisjohnson going for now. it's not _ thing keeping borisjohnson going for now. it's not an _ thing keeping borisjohnson going for now. it's not an heir— thing keeping borisjohnson goingj for now. it's not an heir apparent, there _ for now. it's not an heir apparent, there are — for now. it's not an heir apparent, there are names, _ for now. it's not an heir apparent, there are names, trust— for now. it's not an heir apparent, there are names, trust amongst. for now. it's not an heir apparent, i there are names, trust amongst them, but until— there are names, trust amongst them, but until there — there are names, trust amongst them, but until there is _ there are names, trust amongst them, but until there is an _ there are names, trust amongst them, but until there is an obvious _ but until there is an obvious successor— but until there is an obvious successor and _ but until there is an obvious successor and a _ but until there is an obvious successor and a campaign . but until there is an obviousj successor and a campaign in but until there is an obvious - successor and a campaign in place to try and _ successor and a campaign in place to try and get— successor and a campaign in place to try and get that _ successor and a campaign in place to try and get that person _ successor and a campaign in place to try and get that person into - successor and a campaign in place to try and get that person into posed i try and get that person into posed should _ try and get that person into posed should boris— try and get that person into posed should borisjohnson_ try and get that person into posed should borisjohnson fall, - try and get that person into posed should boris johnson fall, lots i try and get that person into posed should boris johnson fall, lots of. should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp— should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp wanted _ should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp wanted to _ should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp wanted to sit _ should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp wanted to sit back- should borisjohnson fall, lots of tory mp wanted to sit back and i should boris johnson fall, lots of i tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see _ tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how— tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how it— tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how it all— tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how it all plays _ tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how it all plays out. - tory mp wanted to sit back and wait and see how it all plays out. me i and see how it all plays out. we will leave it _ and see how it all plays out. will leave it there. still want to watch. brian thank you forjoining us. good to get the view north of the border in such an important day for the regions. coming up president biden is sending 3000 troops to ukraine with fears of russian invasion to ukraine. don�*t forget you can get in touch with me and some of the team on twitter — i�*m @cfraserbbc
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good evening. our very mild spell of february weather is set to continue at least for the next 2a hours or so. things eventually will turn colder later this week. this is how we ended the day on wednesday, beautiful sunset. we�*ve got a few clear spells lasting through the course of tonight but most of us reasonably cloudy, certainly saying mild and frustrated i put the rain moving into the northwest was up without a warm front today which is moved its way gradually eastwards across the uk so we are all in this warm sector, mild air with us, low cloud producing patchy drizzle here and there particularly close to coast and hills in the west with a more persistent rate for another western scotland for times for the showers into northern ireland for the further south and east most places drive perhaps a few shelves close to the english channel and
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temperature stay between about seven to 9 degrees into thursday morning. thursday starts on that reasonably mild, mostly dry note. probably a little bit more in the way of sunshine breaking through the cloud more widely compared to what we had on wednesday but still a few showers. perhaps some of scotland, northern england, into wells for the morning. most places dry and five for a good part of the day but the breeze ahead of this cold front moving into the northwest. could see gusts of 50 or 60 miles per hours, squally wins with the arrival of the front, 20 to 30 miles an hour further south. front, 20 to 30 miles an hour furthersouth. it�*s front, 20 to 30 miles an hour further south. it�*s earning increasingly breezy later on thursday, still mild with temperatures for most in double figures by turning colderfrom the northwest later on. we�*ve got that rain on this cold front which is getting sick its way southward and eastward as we had through thursday night and onto friday. a plunge of colder air moving it behind that to start off your friday morning. we�*ve still got the rain and perhaps a bit of sleet and snow on the rear edge of sleet and snow on the rear edge of the efforts time, clearing away from the southeast and more wintry
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flurries from the northwest. sunny spells and wintry showers and some sleet and snow even down to lower levels in the northwest. dryer a further south and east particles a day across the board with temperatures between about four to 9 degrees for most of us. looking ahead towards the weekend and we are going to see high—pressure city to the south of the uk. whether france tried to chaplain from the north but this looks like it will sit across the central swathes of the uk as we head into sunday. it�*s the dividing line between milder and drier conditions for the style of a thing still looking rather unsettled and turning a little bit colder further north. bye for now.
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hello, i�*m christian fraser. you�*re watching context on bbc news. the united states is sending 3000 military personnel to eastern europe. the pentagon said it is responding to the continued build—up of russian forces on the ukrainian border. whoopi goldberg is suspended from her talk show over comments that the nazi genocide of the jews was "not about race". and there will be six more weeks of winter — if you trust the predictions of punxsutawney phil, that is. groundhog day is with us, once again. tonight with the context, political editor of the daily mirror, pippa crerar and daily mail columnist sarah vine.
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president biden says 3,000 american troops will deploy to europe to bolster nato�*s eastern flank, in what is the first major movement of us forces since the crisis in ukraine began. mr biden is sending roughly 2,000 troops from fort bragg to poland and germany this week and repositioning 1,000 troops from germany to romania. the white house says it would stop referring to a russian invasion as imminent, in which case why are the us troops deploying now. why now, here�*sjust a couple of factors. mr putin continues to add forces, combined arms, offensive capabilities, even over the last 2a hours he continues to add, in western russia and in belarus and as i said, the mediterranean and the north atlantic, has shown no signs of being interested or willing
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to de—escalate the tensions. and it�*s notjust the united states that�*s noticed this, our nato allies have notices and we have been in constant communication and consultation with them and they have expressed their concerns. we have shared our perspectives on what we�*re seen with them, they have shared their perspective with what they are seeing with us. it is likely the the pentagon is seeing images like these, from the maxar satellite company, which show a further military build up in western russia, belarus and in these images, crimea. you see on the left there — a picture taken in september of an empty field and on the right a picture from yesterday showing the military hardware that has been moved in. today the borisjohnson did finally speak to the russian president — telling him any further incursion into ukrainian territory would be a tragic miscalculation. we will start tonight in kyiv. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is there. how have they reacted to that the announcement that 3000 us troops will be heading to nato�*s eastern flank? brute
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will be heading to nato's eastern flank? . ., �* will be heading to nato's eastern flank? . . �* , ., , will be heading to nato's eastern flank? . �* , ., , ., flank? we haven't seen any reaction et, flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet. christian. _ flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet, christian, but— flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet, christian, but i _ flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet, christian, but i can _ flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet, christian, but i can say - flank? we haven't seen any reaction yet, christian, but i can say that i yet, christian, but i can say that just before, there was the announcement byjohn kirby, the pentagon spokesperson that was an hour—long press conference at the ukrainian foreign minister in which he made it clear that expressions like invasion by russia could be imminent. they didn�*t really understand the word m&ms and the ukrainian. so there was a bit of difficulty, a lost in translation idea, but as far as he was concerned, what they saw building up on the borders of ukraine did not lead them to believe that an attack, that russia was ready for an attack. they are mainly concerned with what�*s happening on their borders inside their country. they accused russia of destabilising. they were very grateful for nato�*s ray public supports with that defensive weapons being sent to ukraine, the very public signalling by the visits. so what happens with romania, germany, poland, for them is the
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strengthening of nato, and even though they are not a member of nato, a stronger nato, they feel, is good for them. nato, a stronger nato, they feel, is good for them-— good for them. that term, even income that _ good for them. that term, even income that the _ good for them. that term, even income that the white - good for them. that term, even income that the white house i good for them. that term, even i income that the white house today was speaking about, say they are dropping it from their language. is that in response to pressure they have had from tf? who that in response to pressure they have had from tf?— that in response to pressure they have had from tf? who can say it with any certainty. _ have had from tf? who can say it with any certainty. -- _ have had from tf? who can say it with any certainty. -- they - have had from tf? who can say it with any certainty. -- they have i have had from tf? who can say it i with any certainty. -- they have had with any certainty. —— they have had from kyiv? there seems to be no certainty everywhere —— anywhere. tens of thousands of forces, not just on the border in eastern ukraine, but where they have been, it has to be set, for some time, but also the new ones. on the border between ukraine and belarus where there will be military exercises this month. it is the united states looking at the russian positions again and thinking, well, maybe it's not so him the names, maybe they see a glimmer of light in the diplomacy, thatis a glimmer of light in the diplomacy, that is certainly happy ukrainian foreign minister and did his hour—long press conference saying,
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we still believe in diplomacy and we hope it succeeds. it is widely believed that thatis succeeds. it is widely believed that that is what president putin believes as well, but as always, in these conflicts, everyone is talking peace but preparing possible war. thank you very much for that. let's bring in brigadier general, kevin ryan, a seniorfellow bring in brigadier general, kevin ryan, a senior fellow at their belford centre. thank you for being with us. what do you make of the build up that you are seeing at the moment around ukraine? the russian build-u moment around ukraine? the russian build-up gives — moment around ukraine? the russian build-up gives president _ moment around ukraine? the russian build-up gives president put - moment around ukraine? the russian build-up gives president put in - moment around ukraine? the russian build-up gives president put in some. build—up gives president put in some military— build—up gives president put in some military options that he didn't have 12 months— military options that he didn't have 12 months ago. the build—up began in march _ 12 months ago. the build—up began in march and _ 12 months ago. the build—up began in march and april of last year, he's moved _ march and april of last year, he's moved units in, moved some back, not all back_ moved units in, moved some back, not all back more _ moved units in, moved some back, not all back more units and western russia _ all back more units and western russia than we had a year ago. those could _ russia than we had a year ago. those could participate some sort of
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invasion— could participate some sort of invasion of ukraine, but it's not certain— invasion of ukraine, but it's not certain what they are going to deal. frankly. _ certain what they are going to deal. frankly, there is some debate about how many— frankly, there is some debate about how many are actually out there. the ukrainians _ how many are actually out there. the ukrainians have a lower number in their_ ukrainians have a lower number in their estimation, the us seems to be tracking _ their estimation, the us seems to be tracking a _ their estimation, the us seems to be tracking a higher number. this deployment of 3000 troops, this is separate _ deployment of 3000 troops, this is separate to the half thousand troops president biden announced last week. i mean. _ president biden announced last week. i mean. the _ president biden announced last week. i mean, the decision to send them to eastern _ i mean, the decision to send them to eastern europe, does that mean that the pentagon can that not rule out the pentagon can that not rule out the possibility that president putin would _ the possibility that president putin would make a move into another european — would make a move into another european country? | would make a move into another european country?— would make a move into another european country? i think we should look at the 3000 — european country? i think we should look at the 3000 troops _ european country? i think we should look at the 3000 troops now - european country? i think we should look at the 3000 troops now as - european country? i think we should look at the 3000 troops now as a i look at the 3000 troops now as a show of support for nato allies. that's where the troops are going. about of italian worth of combat going to force going out of germany
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into romania, that is probably from our second armour calgary regiment in germany. then there are about 300 orso in germany. then there are about 300 or so that shoulder is going into germany probably has support people, so, those troops are not going to ukraine, they are not helping ukraine, they are not helping ukraine in any way other than supporting neighbouring nato allies. 8500 that you mentioned earlier, they are not moving yet. they are part of the american's immediate response team for its own problems and also on the hunt for going to support nato's immediate response or reaction for us if that is called into service.— reaction for us if that is called into service. why up to the nato resonse into service. why up to the nato response force. _ into service. why up to the nato response force. there _ into service. why up to the nato response force. there are - into service. why up to the nato i response force. there are 40,000 troops that nato has on standby for any one time. why does it need to be
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any one time. why does it need to be a bilateral agreement, why would it not be done through nato? well. a bilateral agreement, why would it not be done through nato?- not be done through nato? well, i don't think— not be done through nato? well, i don't think i _ not be done through nato? well, i don't think i don't _ not be done through nato? well, i don't think i don't think _ not be done through nato? well, i don't think i don't think nato - not be done through nato? well, i don't think i don't think nato and i don't think i don't think nato and united states want to elevate to that level if we can say that. this could end with diplomacy and peacefully the signs are getting worse with each passing day. but we don't need to follow up the —— call at the rapid response force until the last moment. i think we still have some time.— the last moment. i think we still have some time. general, thank you ve much have some time. general, thank you very much for— have some time. general, thank you very much for being _ have some time. general, thank you very much for being with _ have some time. general, thank you very much for being with us - have some time. general, thank you very much for being with us this - very much for being with us this evening. we are grateful for your input. the russians have not been very polite, sarah, about boris johnson and his foreign secretary today. they say they will talk to anybody when it comes to diplomacy, even people who are confused and don't know what they are talking about. the russian foreign ministry spokeswoman, she had to point out
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today that the baltic states of estonia, latvia and lithuania are located off the baltic sea and black sea which doesn't help. maura. sea which doesn't help. now, doesn't. sea which doesn't help. now, doesn't- l'm _ sea which doesn't help. now, doesn't. i'm not _ sea which doesn't help. now, doesn't. i'm not sure - sea which doesn't help. now, - doesn't. i'm not sure foreign-policy doesn't. i'm not sure foreign—policy is necessarily borisjohnson's doesn't. i'm not sure foreign—policy is necessarily boris johnson's for tap is necessarily borisjohnson's for tap moment, is necessarily boris johnson's for tap moment, isn't it because is necessarily borisjohnson's for tap moment, isn't it because maggie has so much going on at home. at this is a very important situation. it it seems to me that he is doing what he always does, which is to insult his adversaries, which he likes to do, and, you know, so that everybody can go ho, ho, ho, putin got one of her boris. he likes that sort of, you know, banter. the fact is that we are talking about people's lives here. so, i think they are doing the only thing they can do. you cannotjust be seem to be doing nothing. they cannot disband the end, you know, the full thing. they've got to make some sort of move. this seems to me like the most sensible one available to them.
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whatever the insults are, it is right that boris johnson whatever the insults are, it is right that borisjohnson picks up the phone, because what we don't want this miss communication or miscalculation on the part of the russians because they are not talking. but it doesn't look good, doesn't, when the chair of the defence committee is handing in a letter of no confidence in the prime minister when we are on the brink of war. h0 minister when we are on the brink of war. ., . ., minister when we are on the brink of war. ., _, ., , �* minister when we are on the brink of war. ., ., , �* ~ ., war. no commit doesn't. and as sarah sa s, the war. no commit doesn't. and as sarah says. the prime _ war. no commit doesn't. and as sarah says, the prime minister— war. no commit doesn't. and as sarah says, the prime minister has - war. no commit doesn't. and as sarah says, the prime minister has an - says, the prime minister has an awful— says, the prime minister has an awful lot — says, the prime minister has an awful lot on his plate domestically and notjust awful lot on his plate domestically and not just domestically but within his own _ and not just domestically but within his own party, which is inevitably taking _ his own party, which is inevitably taking up— his own party, which is inevitably taking up his time and distracting him from — taking up his time and distracting him from big international issues. yet, you're — him from big international issues. yet, you're absolutely right, it is important — yet, you're absolutely right, it is important that he continues to speak to putin. _ important that he continues to speak to putin, not least because the roles— to putin, not least because the roles that _ to putin, not least because the roles that nato leaders other than america _ roles that nato leaders other than america can play is one of trying to keep— america can play is one of trying to keep that dialogue open to remind putin— keep that dialogue open to remind putin that — keep that dialogue open to remind putin that there is still that option— putin that there is still that option for a diplomatic solution to all this _ option for a diplomatic solution to allthis. numberten option for a diplomatic solution to all this. number ten says that the prime _ all this. number ten says that the prime minister spearheading nato response — prime minister spearheading nato response certainly to the britain's contribution to the nato response in
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europe _ contribution to the nato response in europe is— contribution to the nato response in europe is one of the larger ones from _ europe is one of the larger ones from european allies, but let's not kid ourselves, american and russia, moscow. _ kid ourselves, american and russia, moscow, washington will thrash this out~ as— moscow, washington will thrash this out as we _ moscow, washington will thrash this out. as we saw from the written agreement is that were leaked between the two sides. there is some very. _ between the two sides. there is some very. very— between the two sides. there is some very, very faint glimmers of hope that some — very, very faint glimmers of hope that some deal can be done, for example — that some deal can be done, for example in— that some deal can be done, for example in the escalation of the amount— example in the escalation of the amount of— example in the escalation of the amount of missiles that the us has in eastern — amount of missiles that the us has in eastern europe and also in terms of personnel where they are not trudging — of personnel where they are not budging is on ukraine's right to 'oin budging is on ukraine's right to join nato, _ budging is on ukraine's right to join nato, and that is the big sticking _ join nato, and that is the big sticking point for russia as well. they— sticking point for russia as well. they haven't been able to reach a solution _ they haven't been able to reach a solution on that. so that's the context— solution on that. so that's the context it _ solution on that. so that's the context it is build—up that is continuing. you know, it's brinkmanship is what it feels like him at _ brinkmanship is what it feels like him at what point does that brinkmanship that boris johnson and emmanuel— brinkmanship that boris johnson and emmanuel macron, if that dialogue lrreaks— emmanuel macron, if that dialogue breaks down completely come at what point does _ breaks down completely come at what point does that bring them one step further— point does that bring them one step further and turn into conflict? he can sit further and turn into conflict? can sit there further and turn into conflict? he: can sit there as long as he wants because it's working. this is context on the bbc.
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still to come on the programme: we'll discuss whoopi goldberg's comments on the holocaust that sparked controversy, and what she's said since then. more than a dozen schools in wales are taking part in trial to extend the school week by five hours, and offer pupils more activities like art, music and sport. it's to support disadvantaged pupils and schools affected during the pandemic. the trial will last for ten weeks. but teaching unions have expressed concerns. hywel griffith reports how much impact can more school time have? for the next ten weeks, these children in abertillery will spend an extra five hours a week doing sessions in taekwondo, music, cookery and ceramics, to see if it helps them learn. the school is in one of wales' most deprived areas, where activities like this would be beyond the budget of many families. they shouldn't be disadvantaged by poverty. so for us to be able to offer those
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opportunities now can only be a positive thing for the future. the idea is to build confidence — notjust academic achievement. but how will ten—year—olds like william deal with the workload? ithink i'll be ok, but if i do get tired, i guess i'd have to get up a bit later or go to bed earlier. that might be welcome news for william's mum, lucy, but the extra hour a day is going to mean changes to the whole family's timetable. it means that i've got to go home with my littlest and then come back to get my eldest. but, personally, that's a small sacrifice to give my eldest child an opportunity to be involved in the provisions. changing the school day will impact on every family's routine but picking up an hour later won't be a huge shift for most. however, the welsh government is also considering changing the school year, potentially doing away with the long summer holidays that have been part of life for over a century. traditional school terms come from a time when some children
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now we're going to go backwards with our hands. teaching unions are sceptical about some of the reforms and warn schools aren't there for childcare. in ten weeks, we'll see whether stretching out the school day really works. hywel griffith, bbc news, abertillery. abc news has suspended the talk show host, whoopi goldberg, for two weeks — after she made controversial on—air remarks about the holocaust. ms goldberg was part of a panel that was discussing a school board decision to ban maus a pulitzer prize—winning novel about the experiences of a holocaust survivor and this is what she said. the holocaust is not about race. no. no, it's not about race. well, they considered jews a different race. i it's not about race, it's not about race. what's it about? it's about man's inhumanity to man. the comedian david baddiell,
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author of the bookjews don't count in 2021 accepted her apology. and gave this explanation. racists who don't likejews, he said, never ask thejew they are abusing how often they go to synagogue. they just see the jewish name and they know. which is why it's racism. one's jewishness, just like one's skin colour, is an accident of birth, and as far as racists are concerned you can never lose either. other groups had accepted the apology but by tuesday night, kim godwin, president of abc news, announced that ms. goldberg would be suspended for her "wrong and hurtful comments." she went on to say... let's bring in eric deggans, tv critic at national public radio in the us. the reason i wanted to get this
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straight, clearly she made a mistake, she should've been better brief, she's on a talk show, but she apologised, then issued a written apology, she apologised again and then was suspended. was that right? well, it seems to me what they may be trying to do is get her off the airfor a while to be trying to do is get her off the air for a while to allow the controversy to die down, because one of the things that we've seen happen is her political opponents and people who don't like her have been using this misstep as an excuse to air a lot of other criticisms of her, so megan mccain, who was a co—host on the view and laughed saying that she felt pressure for her beliefs. she's been denouncing whoopi goldberg for other things that would be has set on the show and other people have been doing that on social media as well. so it seems to me that this was an effort to sort of take a timeout, hopefully theissue
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to sort of take a timeout, hopefully the issue will die down from abc news's perspective, and give will be some time to rehabilitate her image a little bit and come back after people's initial passions have cooled a little bit.— people's initial passions have cooled a little bit. according to abc staffers. _ cooled a little bit. according to abc staffers, there _ cooled a little bit. according to abc staffers, there were - cooled a little bit. according to abc staffers, there were some j cooled a little bit. according to - abc staffers, there were some who were saying you cannot punish ignorance can he should welcome an apology when people say they are wrong, but there are other people within a company who are saying that if that had been anybody else that had said that, they would've been out in their ear, one rule for what and one rule for us, so maybe the ceo of abc was in a tough bind air. she definitely was. the president of abc news. but what i would also say is that we are and i'd media environment, where there are people who say incendiary things and things that are rooted in prejudice because they haven't had the illogical focus. and sometimes those apologists are necessarily genuine. i don't think that what whoopi
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goldberg was doing here, she made what seemed to be a relatively honest mistake. in america in particular, we often see racial issues through colourised lenses, we think of that has differences in skin colour because that's how it's played out throughout our history, particularly our connection to the way african—americans who were enslaved. so, it's understandable that she might have been confused about that, and once she learned that she was wrong, she admitted fully what she did wrong and promised not to do it again and lead a discussion about the issue on the view that explored why she got it wrong and then she was suspended. so, you know, that is sort of how you would want things to work, you would want someone to admit that exactly what they did wrong and honestly try to do better, the problem that we have with some ideologies is when they say they are apologising, they are apologising...
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but they are not really... what they are saying, you can still have a sense that there is a prejudice or a stereotype behind what they said that they are not willing to admit to and not willing to apologise for. that was not the case for will be. not trying to deny anti—semitism or deny the holocaust, and i think that to me is the most important point. thank you very much indeed for that. that is really useful context. sarah, what do you think of this? i sarah, what do you think of this? i don't think whoopi goldberg was intending to offend anybody. i think she didn't _ intending to offend anybody. i think she didn't realise what she was saying — she didn't realise what she was saying what upset people. i don't think— saying what upset people. i don't think that — saying what upset people. i don't think that was her intention. i sort of think— think that was her intention. i sort of think her— think that was her intention. i sort of think her apology rings quite true here — of think her apology rings quite true here because of the distinction that she _ true here because of the distinction that she put her foot in it. but true here because of the distinction that she put her foot in it.— that she put her foot in it. but is it a progression? _ that she put her foot in it. but is it a progression? the _ that she put her foot in it. but is it a progression? the start - that she put her foot in it. but is it a progression? the start of. it a progression? the start of cancel culture? it it a progression? the start of cancel culture?— cancel culture? it is. if she is uuil cancel culture? it is. if she is guilty of _ cancel culture? it is. if she is guilty of anything, she's - cancel culture? it is. if she is| guilty of anything, she's guilty cancel culture? it is. if she is - guilty of anything, she's guilty of an unconscious bias, which is something that we talk about a lot,
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and its— something that we talk about a lot, and it's when people don't realise that they— and it's when people don't realise that they have a bias and make a mistake — that they have a bias and make a mistake in— that they have a bias and make a mistake. in the case of will be, i think— mistake. in the case of will be, i think a _ mistake. in the case of will be, i think a lack— mistake. in the case of will be, i think a lack of previous guests were saying. _ think a lack of previous guests were saying, sorry, i didn't want to miss name' _ saying, sorry, i didn't want to miss name. is _ saying, sorry, i didn't want to miss name, is correct, it's that a lot of people _ name, is correct, it's that a lot of people this narrative suits their agenda — people this narrative suits their agenda. she apologised once, twice, you have _ agenda. she apologised once, twice, you have probably a good idea to take a _ you have probably a good idea to take a couple of weeks. if i had made _ take a couple of weeks. if i had made that sort of blunder, i would take a _ made that sort of blunder, i would take a couple of weeks off to. people — take a couple of weeks off to. people who genuinely get it wrong, genuinely apologising to get what eric is saying, sometimes people apologise and they don't really need yet —— mean it, and you know they don't because it's yet —— mean it, and you know they don't because its deep down in deep—rooted. i don't think this was the case. if people can't apologise for their ignorance, we then have to suspend them or cancel them because
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they got it wrong. i suspend them or cancel them because they got it wrong-— they got it wrong. i don't know why abc has suspended _ they got it wrong. i don't know why abc has suspended her. _ they got it wrong. i don't know why abc has suspended her. is - they got it wrong. i don't know why abc has suspended her. is that - abc has suspended her. is that the punishment to her? or is it as eric was suggesting and sarah as well, it takes the _ was suggesting and sarah as well, it takes the heat out of the situation a hit? _ takes the heat out of the situation a hit? that— takes the heat out of the situation a bit? that you can understand it. it quite _ a bit? that you can understand it. it quite clearly was a genuine mistake _ it quite clearly was a genuine mistake and a genuine apology, and i think what— mistake and a genuine apology, and i think what happens next is quite important — think what happens next is quite important in terms of how she has educated — important in terms of how she has educated yourself but also how they use this _ educated yourself but also how they use this opportunity as a news channel— use this opportunity as a news channel to educate their viewers. i've looked — channel to educate their viewers. i've looked into this a little bit and it's— i've looked into this a little bit and it's an _ i've looked into this a little bit and it's an organisation called pew research _ and it's an organisation called pew research centre which did some surveys — research centre which did some surveys of— research centre which did some surveys of americans on their knowledge levels of the holocaust. it's astonishing, only 62% of americans according to this research recognised _ americans according to this research recognised that the holocaust was about— recognised that the holocaust was about the — recognised that the holocaust was about the extermination of the jewish— about the extermination of the jewish faith and.—
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about the extermination of the l jewish faith and._ only jewish faith and. only 6096. only 6096, so there _ jewish faith and. only 6096. only 6096, so there is _ jewish faith and. only 6096. only 6096, so there is a _ jewish faith and. only 6096. only 6096, so there is a huge - jewish faith and. only 6096. only 6096, so there is a huge issue i jewish faith and. only 6096. only i 6096, so there is a huge issue about 60%, so there is a huge issue about lack of— 60%, so there is a huge issue about lack of education, and if they can use this, — lack of education, and if they can use this, abc can use this genuine mistake _ use this, abc can use this genuine mistake to — use this, abc can use this genuine mistake to help educate people about better, _ better, than actually maybe this attention is not such a bad thing. i don't _ attention is not such a bad thing. i don't think— attention is not such a bad thing. i don't think this cancel culture, someone _ don't think this cancel culture, someone saying something controversial for the purposes of being _ controversial for the purposes of being controversial and everybody else piling income i think this was a genuine — else piling income i think this was a genuine mistake and they should not use _ a genuine mistake and they should not use the opportunity to try and educate _ not use the opportunity to try and educate people a little bit better. 0k. educate people a little bit better. 0k~ two — educate people a little bit better. 0k. two weeks of leave,. it is groundhog day — no, i don't mean partygate, it really is groundhog day — in the united states and canada. the day the universe turns to punxsutawny phil, a groundhog in pennsylvania, that is dragged from its deep sleep, to pronounce on the weather. the superstition goes that if he sees his shadow as he emerges from the burrow there will be six more weeks of winter. and today's revelation is — don't put away the big coat, not just yet.
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the thing is, we have looked back atjust how good phil — or however many reincarnations of phil there have been — how good he has been over the years at predicting the weather. and the answer is, not very. this is an annual fraud perpetrated on the american people. in 135 years he has been rightjust 40 per cent of the time — which is worse than a coin flip. you could literally flip a coin and get it right more times than him. and the thins it there are better pundits out there — animals that are at, the very top of their game. who remembers paul the octopus? he predicted the results in the 2008 euros and in 2010 world cup and he got it right 85% of the time. eight tentacles, nine brains — far far superior to a posh squirrel.
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fla p flap posh squirrel is cuter, right? yes, you don't want to lift out the act bus every year and hold it up, who knows, it might stick to your face. i who knows, it might stick to your face. :, :, , who knows, it might stick to your face. :, ., , ., ., face. i love that they are mad men and hats. face. i love that they are mad men and hats- why _ face. i love that they are mad men and hats. why are _ face. i love that they are mad men and hats. why are they _ face. i love that they are mad men and hats. why are they wearing . face. i love that they are mad men i and hats. why are they wearing those hats? it's so weird! you and hats. why are they wearing those hats? it's so weird!— hats? it's so weird! you know what is weird or? _ hats? it's so weird! you know what is weird or? this _ hats? it's so weird! you know what is weird or? this information - hats? it's so weird! you know what is weird or? this information came | is weird or? this information came from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration that he got it wrong so many times. they have a stake in this, because they read the weather. they ask people, who do you trust mark? whether presenters are the groundhog? i4% of people in america who believe the posh squirrel rather than the weather presenters. i4%! the it's very telling. i'm afraid can i have to say, when i was told we were talking about this item earlier, i was kind of like as in the film, i think i watched groundhog day for the first time when i was a teenager. i had no idea that this is actually real thing. there we go, i
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have learned something new today, whether or not he's an active predictor of the whether or not he's an active predictor of the weather or not. we will do this again tomorrow and then the day after, and then the day after. thank you to my guests for your time. lovely to have your company this evening. good night. hello. the weather has been very mild over the past couple of days. we've seen temperatures up in the mid—teens. there was a little bit of sunshine here and there on wednesday, particularly towards the south. this was the picture in dorset. but we have got a lot of cloud around in general across most parts of the uk. we're going to keep that cloud over the next 24 hours or so, but things are going to turn colder and windier later on thursday and on into friday too. we've got a weather front on the way. if we take a look at the rainfall expected over the next few days, we're all going to be receiving some wet weather, particularly the north—west of scotland, where rainfall totals will be mounting up — close to 100mm falling in the next three days — and some of it may be falling as snow as well as rain. but before we get there,
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to start off thursday morning, still quite a dry, cloudy picture for most areas. one or two showers moving their way eastwards. a little bit more sunshine on thursday compared to wednesday, because the breeze is picking up, turning particularly windy with the arrival of this rain in the north—west late in the day. so we could see gusts about 60mph for the west of scotland. that area of rain pushes south overnight into friday. there could be some snow on the back edge of that as that colder air digs in, so a chilly start to friday for most places, just a little bit milder in the south—east, where we'll be sitting underneath that cold front, so cloud and outbreaks of rain on this frontal system initially in the south—east on friday. that should clear away and then we're left with this north—westerly breeze. that's going to be driving in some showers and they will be quite wintry, even down to quite low levels across parts of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. fewer showers further south and east on friday, a little bit more in the way of sunshine here. still quite a breezy feel to the weather, and colder than it has been recently, most of us about 5—9 celsius. we could just see double figures down towards the far south—west and the channel isles, too. now, moving towards the weekend, we've got an area of high pressure that will be sitting down
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to the south and south—west, weather fronts trying to move in from the north—west, so on saturday it's quite a breezy day in the north. we've got some rain preceded by some mountain snow across scotland. a little bit more cloud and drizzly rain for northern ireland, northern england and wales, whereas further south and east, you should keep some sunny spells, with temperatures about 7—11 celsius on saturday. and then heading through into the second half of the weekend, what we'll see is this frontal system and that's going to be the dividing line between milder air in the south and colder air in the north. so i think where those two air masses meet on that front, a bit of rain through the central swathe of the uk on sunday, largely dry to the far south, sunny spells and wintry showers across parts of scotland, and quite a contrast in temperature. we're looking at only 4 celsius in lerwick, up to about 12 in plymouth on sunday. and then as we move ahead through sunday night and on into monday, we are going to be starting to wave goodbye to that frontal system, high pressure still sitting towards the south, quite a few isobars on the map, so it's going to be quite a breezy picture to start the new working
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week, and with fronts moving into the north and west, some rain, mainly again for scotland and northern ireland, whereas further south and east, across parts of england and wales, it should be mild and dry. so 14 celsius or so in the south—east, turning a little bit colder in the north behind that weather front. further ahead, then, early part of next week, we've got that high pressure to the south keeping the weather fronts at bay, still quite unsettled weather with outbreaks of rain on low—pressure systems moving into the north and west. further ahead, let's take a look at the air mass. it does look like that milder weather will start to drift a little bit further north across the uk as we head towards the end of next week, but where those air masses meet, once again a fairly unsettled spell of weather and the wind coming in largely from a westerly direction. bye for now.
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tonight at ten, ofgem, the energy regulator, is set to announce the biggest ever rise in energy bills. from april, households could face the prospect of gas and electricity prices rising by as much as 50%. single mum with limited income, it's very difficult to even turn the button on just now for central heating. the ofgem announcement is due tomorrow and ministers are considering offering financial help to some energy firms. also tonight: in northern ireland, ministers say there'll be no more checks on goods coming from the rest of the uk from midnight tonight. this young man ended his life having found a website with suicide advice — a bill going through parliament is said to be too weak to tackle the online threat. and as the six nations championship
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approaches, the duchess of cambridge starts her new role as the patron of england's rugby

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