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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 3, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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pretty surreal, but, yeah... it's very crazy. i can't remember much, actually. some will be surprised to see a few big names not being nominated, like the lost daughter's olivia like the lost daughter's olivia coleman, kristin stewart who plays princess diana in the film spencer and denzil washington who plays the lead in the tragedy of macbeth. but stars like lady gaga may well be on the red carpet. she is up for best actress for her role in house of gucci... goodbye, 1930s, hello 80s, huh? ..in a year when hollywood blockbusters and smaller, more personal films may well be sharing the limelight. time for a look at the weather, here's ben rich.
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it is turning. yes, we can extend most of us dry afternoon, certainly in england and wales. more cloud and rain in northern ireland and western scotland and increasingly gusty winds, 50 mph or more. 30 critics of the brain and on the back edge over high ground, on the
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pennines, the peak district, snowdonia and the brecon beacons, may be part of the west midlands, we could see a little bit of snow mixing in on the back edge as the cold air digs its way down from the north. some brisk winds but an increasingly cold feel as those chilly conditions are spread down from the north. ice likely in northern ireland and parts of scotland. rain and snow over high ground, clearing the south—east corner. there will be some in the southeast with that weather feature. as it clears we will be back to sunshine and showers tomorrow, some of them wintry over high ground in the north. gusty winds, 30, 40, maybe 50 miles an hour in the final. that cold air that went much chillier in temperature nine. this big, long weatherfront chillier in temperature nine. this big, long weather front is working its way in from the atlantic and
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making a big position of the weather front. it will move around over the weekend. to the north cold enough for wintry showers. to the south those temperatures are climbing again. it looks like our weather front might think a little bit to the south on sunday with outbreaks of rain here and wintry showers in the north and the return of something colder. split, but before we get all of us. a reminder of our top story... the soaring cost of energy, average household bills are going up by almost £700 a year. but the government moves to soften the blow.
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good afternoon. it's 1:30pm and here's your latest sports news. raith rovers say striker david goodwillie will not play for them and apologised to fans after his signing sparked a huge backlash from supporters, sponsors and sections of the club itself. raith's chairman says they got it wrong and have learned a hard but valuable lesson. jane dougall has been telling me the latest. clearly this backlash has forced the board and the chairman to reconsider their decision to sign david goodwillie. raith rovers released a statement on behalf of the chairman think they got it wrong and that following a meeting of the board, the player will not be selected by raith rovers. we listened...
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this comes after the club announced they had sign david goodwillie on transfer deadline day and many criticised the club's models because they have signed a player who was ruled to have raped a woman he denied the allegation and no criminal charges were brought however the shirt sponsor ended their association over the signing and the woman's captain quit the club. also the women's team announced yesterday that they would be breaking away from the club entirely and several board members resigned in protest. it has prompted the club to re—address this issue, look at the anger and they have completed a u—turn. mcdermott has reacted, saying she welcomed the statement and that it was a victory of sorts for the hundreds who make the club but she said the same people who made that decision were
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still in charge. west bromwich albion are in talks with steve bruce about becoming their new manager. bruce is favourite to replace valerien ismael, who was sacked yesterday. bruce himself has been out of work after being dismissed by newcastle in october. next to cricket, england won't be bringing the women's ashes home, after australia won the opening one dayer in canberra by 27 runs. england put in a good performance but couldn't follow it up with the bat. they can now only draw the series with australia, keeping hold of the ashes. fix, series with australia, keeping hold of the ashes-_ series with australia, keeping hold of the ashes. a must win game for encland of the ashes. a must win game for england to — of the ashes. a must win game for england to keep — of the ashes. a must win game for england to keep their _ of the ashes. a must win game for england to keep their ashes - of the ashes. a must win game for england to keep their ashes hopes i england to keep their ashes hopes alive. having won the toss and opted to bowl, england started fast. an early wicket. england's bowlers started to find their range. two balls later, sent packing for a duck. beth mooney rescued the
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innings, steering australia to a total of 205. england's innings got off to a terrible start. tammy beaumont dismissed for three and immediately afterwards the captain out for zero. england needed a steady head. 45 was added before she succumbed. after everyone claps,... succumbed. after everyone claps, . . . australia succumbed. after everyone claps,... australia got their final breakthrough. the better team on the day and in the series, the ashes retained. tom curry has been named england captain for their six nations opener against scotland this weekend. with owen farrell out of the tournament, injured, and courtney lawes suffering concussion, the wales back row will lead england for the first time at murrayfield. aged 23, he's the youngest england captain since will carling. at the winter olympics today, in the women's moguls, it was a day to forget for team gb�*s
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leonie gerken schofield. she failed to finish her first qualification run, after falling during her attempt. a better run for her sister makayla, who finished in 12th place. both will get a second chance to qualify for the final on sunday in the second qualification run. william feneley finished 23rd in the men's event. the mixed double in curling. it is all square against switzerland. you can follow that alive. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. let me bring you up—to—date with a new breaking story. president biden has said that american special forces have been taking part in a counterterrorism rate in north—west syria. last night, this tweet said... thanks to the bravery of our
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armed forces, we have removed from the battlefield the leader of isis. and he is also said that all americans have returned safely from that operation and a senior us administration official is saying that he was killed in the air raid. at the beginning of the operation the terrorist target exploded a bomb which killed him and members of his own family, including women and children. we will bring you more on that. they killed, they are saying, the leader of the islamic state in an operation in north—west syria. we will bring you more details as they come in.
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the price cap set above the average household in england, scotland and wales will pay for energy if they are not on a fixed deal with their supplier. we can talk now to the labour shadow chancellor at rachel reeves. we heard from the chancellor rishi sunak a package of measures which he says are going to take the sting out of these energy price rises. do you think they will have that effect?— that effect? families are facing a cost of living _ that effect? families are facing a cost of living crisis _ that effect? families are facing a cost of living crisis right - that effect? families are facing a cost of living crisis right now. - cost of living crisis right now. inflation at its highest level for 13 years, national insurance contributions coming up in april. today we learn and almost £700 increase in the energy price build paid by families across the country. and today's response by government was pretty underwhelming. £200 for bill payers, but that is on aid by
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now, pay laterscheme bill payers, but that is on aid by now, pay later scheme so £200 of bills from autumn this year, but then £40 added to build for the five years after that. and for people on the most modest incomes, families and pensioners, just £350 off their bills against a £700 increase. where are people going to find the money from? the chancellor couldn't answer the question today. but from? the chancellor couldn't answer the question today.— the question today. but these energy rice rises, the question today. but these energy price rises. they _ the question today. but these energy price rises, they are _ the question today. but these energy price rises, they are due _ the question today. but these energy price rises, they are due to _ the question today. but these energy price rises, they are due to global - price rises, they are due to global forces. the government cannot be expected to basically pay everybody�*s rising bills, can it? there is a global spike in energy prices, but in britain we are uniquely exposed. but there is a different way of doing this. labour have set out a plan for a one—off windfall tax on the big profits being made by the north sea oil and gas companies stop we heard just
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today that shell's profits have increased $20 billion this year. labour have set a one—off windfall tax on those profits to keep bills down for everyone else, that is the right way to do this. how much would that windfall tax raise? after the profits today, more than we originally expected but it could raise money from that, keep bills down for everybody else. labour's package of measures uses those excess profits and also the higher vat receipts that have been received over the last few months, as prices have been so high, to keep bills low. it will take £200 of the bills of everybody and £600 off the bills of everybody and £600 off the bills of the one third of families in this country on the lowest incomes. so that will mean of the 609 t3 pounds
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increase, £600 of would be found not to a buy now pay later scheme but through eight properly, fully funded scheme, asking those who have done well from higher energy prices to pay more tax to keep bills low for everybody else. that is a fair approach to help families and pensioners. approach to help families and pensioners-— approach to help families and pensioners. approach to help families and ensioners. ., ., , ., ., pensioners. you only mention part of what rishi sunak _ pensioners. you only mention part of what rishi sunak is _ pensioners. you only mention part of what rishi sunak is offering - pensioners. you only mention part of what rishi sunak is offering to - pensioners. you only mention part of what rishi sunak is offering to do - what rishi sunak is offering to do because he promises £200 upfront rebate, but he did also promised £150 council tax rebate and that will help people as well. that £150 council tax rebate and that will help people as well.- £150 council tax rebate and that will help people as well. that is my whole point- _ will help people as well. that is my whole point. labour's— will help people as well. that is my whole point. labour's package - will help people as well. that is my whole point. labour's package is i whole point. labour's package is £200 for everybody but £600 for those families and pensioners who need the most help. the government, because they are refusing to go ahead with the windfall tax, are only offering £350 to those who need the most help. and he can't ask the question, how can people on the
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lowest incomes already struggling with the universal credit code, national insurance going up, how will they find the additional £350 that they are going to see on their bills from april this year? they can't answer the question. it needs to go back to the drawing board. there are people who are saying that we just need to get used to paying more for our energy, and that is the world we live in post covid. there are a number love global forces behind it but we will have to get used to higher energy bills. in the short term--- _ used to higher energy bills. in the short term... we _ used to higher energy bills. in the short term... we need _ used to higher energy bills. in the short term... we need a - used to higher energy bills. in the i short term... we need a short-term short term... we need a short—term plan of action, but we also need the investment in solar, tidal and wind energy. investment in nuclear energy and crucially support to people to help insulate their homes, because that would help with bills notjust for one year but for years to come, but there was nothing from the government today in how we better
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protect people for the future with a proper plan to ensure that we are not reliant on russia and qatar for our energy needs. the truth is that we are uniquely exposed in britain because of that dither and delay from the government over the last decade to make the investments that are needed, to insulate people two homes and how to properly regulate our energy market. we have seen more than 20 firms go bust. we haven't seen that in any other country so thatis seen that in any other country so that is why we are exposed to the increases we are experiencing and it is ordinary working people and pensioners who are paying a price for this government's failures. another interest rate rise today. is that the right decision by the bank of england to help try to fight inflation, which we know is getting worse? i inflation, which we know is getting worse? , ., ., ~ ., ~ ., worse? i used to work at the bank of encland worse? i used to work at the bank of england and — worse? i used to work at the bank of england and l — worse? i used to work at the bank of england and i know _ worse? i used to work at the bank of england and i know today _ worse? i used to work at the bank of england and i know today they - worse? i used to work at the bank of england and i know today they say i england and i know today they say that in april it is going to be the biggest hit you people's living
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standards in 30 years, so i share their concerns about what is happening to living standards. inflation is at the highest level for 30 years. not helped by the increases in energy prices but interest rates are also going to add to people's costs right now. that is why i say that the government must do more to help people with the cost of living. mn; do more to help people with the cost of livin. g , ., do more to help people with the cost oflivinu. y , ., do more to help people with the cost oflivin. g , ., of living. my question was, was the bank of england, _ of living. my question was, was the bank of england, where _ of living. my question was, was the bank of england, where they - of living. my question was, was the bank of england, where they rightl of living. my question was, was the | bank of england, where they right to raise interest rates as a tool to fight that inflation?— raise interest rates as a tool to fight that inflation? there is no wa that fight that inflation? there is no way that a _ fight that inflation? there is no way that a chancellor _ fight that inflation? there is no way that a chancellor or - fight that inflation? there is no | way that a chancellor or shadow chancellor should interfere in the independence of the bank of england. they make their decisions based on the data that they see, but the government need to do much more to help people with the cost of living. a national insurance contribution price in april is the wrong tax at the wrong time. the package of measures today to help people with their bills is insufficient. it is a buy now pay later scheme, a big gamble on what is going to happen to
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energy prices in the future. and not enough support for those people who need it most. the government should have done what labour has proposed, a windfall tax on the big profits being made by oil and gas companies and use that money to keep bills low for everybody else. you and use that money to keep bills low for everybody else.— for everybody else. you have made that point- — for everybody else. you have made that point. thank _ for everybody else. you have made that point. thank you _ for everybody else. you have made that point. thank you for _ for everybody else. you have made that point. thank you forjoining i that point. thank you forjoining us. and at 3.30 this afternoon we'll be answering your questions on energy prices following ofgem's announcement. get in touch with the hashtag bbcyourquestions — or you email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk the prime minister has been speaking about the new energy price gap. let's have a listen to what he has to say. you have got to do everything you can at once and as we come out of covid we face a real cost of living crunch caused largely by the inflationary spikes we are seeing around the world, particularly in energy and the government has to help people. we are helping people.
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we have helped people throughout the pandemic and so what rishi sunak has announced today is a £9 billion package to help people with the cost of their energy. very considerable support for people. and then 27 million households will benefit from council tax rebate worth £250 and a £200 loan on top of that, so a lot of money going in now to help people with the cost of living on top of what we are doing with the living wage, with the effective tax cut for people on universal credit. but all this investment, all this helping people is only going to work if we have a sustainable long—term economic recovery with high wage, high—skilledjobs. so what we are doing today is putting in the investment here in blackpool, £22 million going into the tram network. and that is driving thousands more jobs. private sector jobs.
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because we think, i think that levelling up is a fantastic mission for our country and it's about recognising there is genius and talent everywhere, and you need to unleash it, but you've got to have that private sector leading it. nearly £700 a year more in energy costs. that is going to be a huge hit for many people. shouldn't the government be doing even more to help people with those bills that are coming down the line? for people who are facing particular hardship, of course we have abatements, things to help with the cost of energy, cold weather payments, warm homes, discounts and so on. but this is a mega package. a mega package of £9 billion on top, which i think is necessary, but is huge. and that is there to help people with this particular spike
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we are seeing right now. what i hope and believe is that eventually, as the world economy get its momentum back, the inflationary pressures will start to subside. a vital think you have got to do in order to keep inflation under control is ease those problems in the supply chains, get people into work in the jobs where they are needed. that is where we are also giving our way to work programme. nearly half a million people off welfare and into work to help ease the blockages in the uk economy, get things working more smoothly and that is another way that you can get inflation under control. would you look again at the national insurance rise, given the scale of the price rises that families are going to be facing? you have got to remember also, as we come out of covid, our covid recovery plan has got to involve dealing with the colossal backlog that we have got in our nhs.
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the nhs was amazing and it is amazing. it has dealt magnificently with the pandemic, but there are huge numbers. one in ten of the uk population currently waiting on an nhs waiting list, and that is going to go up, i'm afraid. it is going to go up. we have got to put in the money to fix it. 50,000 more nurses, building the hospital capacity that we need. it is the number one priority of the british people. and we have got to fund it. so i know it is not what anyone wants to do. it is not what rishi sunak wants to do, it is not what i want to do, but we have got to do it. on northern ireland, on the protocol, will you ensure that checks on goods are carried out, which is part of the international agreement that you agreed and signed? i hope that we can... i know that liz truss is seeing him today. it is great that the conversations are continuing. what we have got to do is get to a sensible solution that will recognise that it is crazy to have checks on goods that
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are basically circulating within the single market of the united kingdom. what you could have, of course, is a commonsensical, practical step to weed out, to check on things that might be at risk of circulation, as they say in brussels, at risk of circulation in ireland as well as northern ireland. we can do that, but without having a full panoply of checks on the gb, ni coast and at the airport. and that is the way forward. practical common sense is what is needed. is that not going back on what you agreed? actually, if you look at the protocol, which i am sure you have studied in detail, there is plenty about uninterrupted east—west trade. on your leadership, your chancellor said today that the parties in downing street has damaged public trust in politicians. one of the people who put a letter
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in of no confidence said that they wanted the tone of debate not lowered. and yet, you made an allegation in the commons about keir starmer not prosecuting jimmy savile. does that not bring the tone down? so why did you make that allegation? look, i want to be very clear about this because a lot of people have got very hot under the collar. and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear, i'm talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. i was making a point about his responsibility for the organisation as a whole. and i think people can see that. i really do want to clarify that because it is important. but on your wider point, you know, i think what people want is for us to focus on the issues that really matter for them.
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i'm not saying that other issues don't matter, but above all we've got to focus on cost of living and on taking the country forward. and i think we can tackle both things together with our programme of support for people now, getting the covid recovery plan really humming, getting people back into work. and, you know, the british record on this, our country's record on this, is absolutely amazing when you consider what we have been through, as the chancellor was saying this morning. unemployment is far, far lower than where it was predicted to be, we have got record low youth unemployment. what we need to do now is really a turbo charge that and put in the measures through levelling up that can drive a long—term, sustainable, high wage, high skilljobs led recovery. the point about levelling up — we think there is talent everywhere, we want to unleash it.
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on the issue of your character, the former chief of the defence staff said today people look at you and they're not sure that they can trust you. in terms of ukraine and sort of foreign issues, that is a problem, isn't it? no, i think the uk has played a very important role so far in bringing together the west and making sure that our partners understand the severity of the threat that the ukrainians face. and i think if you look at what we have been doing for the last two or three months, the uk has been way out in front in making sure that people respond. so we have been putting together the right package of economic sanctions, that's got to be tough enough. and we've got to make sure that people understand that it has got to be automatic. so that there is no sort of argument if and when there is a russian invasion, that those sanctions come in automatically. and as you know, we have changed
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the law so that the uk will apply sanctions both personally but also on any company of strategic russian interest. number two, the uk has been out in front in supporting the ukrainians through contribution of lethal defensive weaponry. and that is really important work. we are one of a handful of countries to do that, along with the united states, lithuania. and that is something that is greatly appreciated by ukraine. it helps to fortify their defence. but i think where the uk has possibly been the most useful of all is in just trying to get over to the world what a tragedy it would be if such an invasion were to take place. a tragedy for russia as well. now it's time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. after what has been a mild start to february, the weather is set to change.
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there is something colder on the way. that cold air are currently waiting in the winds up to the north—west. and that cold air is going to be brought southwards across the uk by this cold front, which will bring some outbreaks of rain, some brisk winds, and potentially a little bit of snow for some of us as well. ahead of that, staying mostly dry through the rest of the day across england and wales. lots of cloud, some clear spells, but our weather front bringing rain into scotland, northern ireland. some snow over the high ground in scotland, potentially to lower levels — particularly on the back edge of that weather front. and that will be a theme through tonight. our frontal system will work its way southwards, and on the back edge of it — so across the high ground of the pennines, the peak district, the staffordshire moorlands, the hills of wales, the west midlands, perhaps even into the moors of the south—west, we could well see a little bit of snow mixing and on the back edge of that weather front as a some colder air starts to dig in. so those are the temperatures by the end of the night. frequent wintry showers across northern and north—western parts of the uk, and ice likely to be an issue for parts of scotland and northern
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ireland tomorrow morning. the remnants of that weather front clearing the south—east corner, and then tomorrow is a sunshine and showers stay, but some of the showers will be wintry over high ground in the north, potentially too quite low levels in northern parts of scotland. and it is going to be a windy day. widely gusts of 30, 40, 50 mph, perhaps a little stronger than that in the most exposed spots in the north. so, with those strong winds, with that cold air in place, a very different feel. those are the afternoon temperatures. 3—8, maybe 9 degrees in the far south—west. now, as we head into the weekend, we see this frontal system hurtling in from the atlantic, and this really will be the weekend weather maker. it will bring some wet, some windy weather, and it will also continue to divide our cold air in the north from some milder air down towards the south. so here comes our weather front on saturday, a band of rain — still some uncertainty about the exact northwards or southwards positioning of this front. to the north of it, cold with some wintry showers. to the south, things turning a bit milder again. 10 or 11 degrees. now, it looks like that front will push a little further southwards into sunday with some
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outbreaks of rain. windy weather once again. to the south of the weather front, we have the mild air in place. to the north of it, cold with some wintry showers. temperatures for 12 degrees.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the soaring cost of energy: typical household bills are going up by almost £700 a year. the chancellor unveils measures to soften the blow, including a £200 discount on bills. what we can do is take the sting out of a significant price shock for millions of families by making sure the increase in prices is smaller initially and spread over a longer period. this energy crisis has not happened overnight. it's a decade of dither and delay from the party opposite that has brought us to this point. the bank of england raises interest rates again to 0.5%. amid a new row over post brexit trade arrangements in northern ireland,
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the first minister is set to announce his resignation later today.

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