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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 3, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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enough of governments talking about power—sharing but ignoring the fact that every elected unionist in northern ireland rejects the irish sea border. we have also had enough of sinn fein preaching equality, yet the sinn fein culture minister want to provide funding to mark her majesty the queen's platinum jubilee. the longest reigning monarch in our history and we cannot get funding to mark this historic occasion. and sinn fein call this fairness and equality. we have also had enough of sinn fein lecturing us about respect. yet, we have a sinn fein finance minister... we will leavejeffrey have a sinn fein finance minister... we will leave jeffrey donaldson there and go straight to the chancellor rishi sunak, talking about what the government is doing to help the rising cost of energy. feeling anxious. i want to reassure you, the plans i set out in
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parliament today are going to help you and your family. parliament today are going to help you and yourfamily. now, anyone parliament today are going to help you and your family. now, anyone who tells you there is an easy answer to this situation is not being straight with you. the reasons prices are rising our global. a difficult winter last year depleted global gas stores. there has been disruption to other energy sources, like nuclear and wind, and we have seen higher demand for gas in asia. all those factors are outside of the government's control. there is, in truth, nothing the british government could do about a nuclear power plant going off—line in europe or a factory in china deciding to produce more goods. but what we can do is take the sting out of the price shock as we and the world adjust to higher energy prices. without government action, today's increase in the price cap would leave households needing to find, on average, an extra £693 this year.
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that is clearly a very significant sum. so, forthe that is clearly a very significant sum. so, for the vast majority of families, the government is taking direct action to share the burden. today, we are announcing an energy bills rebate worth £350. you will receive that cash support through two different routes. first, all electricity customers will receive an upfront discount worth £200. that discount will then be automatically repaid from people's bills over the next five years in equal instalments of £40 a year starting next april. this is the right way to support people while continuing with our responsible plans to reduce borrowing and debt. second, we will pay a council tax rebate of £150 to
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all households in bands a to d, which covers around four out of every five households in england. the reason for doing this to the council tax system is because it is the quickest way to get money to the families who most need it. if you are eligible, the rebate will be paid in april, and it won't need to be repaid. in total, we are helping the vast majority of families pay their energy bills with £350. 0ur their energy bills with £350. our plan is right. it is fair. and i hope it will help ease the anxiety that millions of people feel about rising energy costs by sharing the burden between us all. thank you. i will be very happy to take some questions, and i think first up, have we gotjonathan from the bbc? jonathan, hi. the support you have announced today is aimed _ the support you have announced today is aimed at— the support you have announced today is aimed at helping households this
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year, _ is aimed at helping households this year. but _ is aimed at helping households this year, but industry experts expect hi-h year, but industry experts expect high gas — year, but industry experts expect high gas prices to persist. isn't the reality— high gas prices to persist. isn't the reality that high braces are here _ the reality that high braces are here to — the reality that high braces are here to stay, and you will have to come _ hereto stay, and you will have to come back— here to stay, and you will have to come back with further support in future _ come back with further support in future if— come back with further support in future. if not, are you willing to roulette — future. if not, are you willing to roulette out? any follow—up, if i max _ roulette out? any follow—up, if i max carr — roulette out? any follow—up, if i max carr i— roulette out? any follow—up, if i may. can i ask we are a reaction to the resignation of the prime minister's head of policy, and whether— minister's head of policy, and whether you agree with her that he should _ whether you agree with her that he should apologise for his comments to keir starmer aboutjimmy savile? keir starmer about jimmy savile? thanks. _ keir starmer about jimmy savile? thanks, jonathan. keir starmer aboutjimmy savile? thanks, jonathan. taking a step back about energy prices, as i have mentioned, the fact is that higher gas prices are global in nature. —— the factors driving high gas prices are global in nature, and i don't have a crystal ball, but i have to be honest with people, higher energy prices are something we are going to have to adjust to income and with other countries around the world, and it would be wrong to pretend otherwise. but what we can do is slow that adjustment to make it more manageable for people's household budgets, and that's what our intervention will do. you are right that energy bills may go up again and that energy bills may go up again in october. the rebate i
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announce today, the money off all energy bills, will kick in in october. but in time, we will have 0ctober. but in time, we will have to see what happens, this is something we will have to get used to, but the interventions they will that adjustment. that in to, but the interventions they will that in regard to the news about munira, first, she was a valued colleague and i enjoyed working with her. i'm sorry to see early government and will miss working with air. with regards to the comments, i would with air. with regards to the comments, iwould not with air. with regards to the comments, i would not have said it, to be honest, i meant that the prime minister clarified what he meant. next, where are you, robert? you have announced the deployment of £9 billion_ you have announced the deployment of £9 billion in— you have announced the deployment of £9 billion in total. everybody will be helped a bit. but there is still going _ be helped a bit. but there is still going to — be helped a bit. but there is still going to be a price rise of 350 quid at least, _ going to be a price rise of 350 quid at least, for— going to be a price rise of 350 quid at least, for everybody, on average. you know _ at least, for everybody, on average. you know that it is the poorest third _ you know that it is the poorest
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third of— you know that it is the poorest third of people who are hurt most by these _ third of people who are hurt most by these energy price rises. why didn't you deploy— these energy price rises. why didn't you deploy that nine billion and simply— you deploy that nine billion and simply help the poorest third? if you believed in levelling up, surely that is— you believed in levelling up, surely that is what you would have done. and i_ that is what you would have done. and i do— that is what you would have done. and i dojust want that is what you would have done. and i do just want to that is what you would have done. and i dojust want to quote a couple of tines _ and i dojust want to quote a couple of lines from munira mirza's resignation letter. she says she beiieves— resignation letter. she says she believes it was wrong for the prime mmister— believes it was wrong for the prime minister this week to imply that keir starmer was personally responsible for allowing jimmy saviie — responsible for allowing jimmy saviie to— responsible for allowing jimmy savile to escape justice. there was no fair— savile to escape justice. there was no fair or— savile to escape justice. there was no fair or reasonable basis for that assertioh — no fair or reasonable basis for that assertion. the prime minister hasn't apologised — assertion. the prime minister hasn't apologised. he has explained, but he hasn't _ apologised. he has explained, but he hasn't said _ apologised. he has explained, but he hasn't said sorry. surely he should say sorry? — say sorry? thanks, robert. so come say sorry? — thanks, robert. so come on your first question, of course, there are choices that we have to make when we are designing a policy like this. my view was that the price rise is so significant that it is notjust those families who are on benefits
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that will feel the pinch, but actually middle income families as well, families that are working hard, that are not on welfare. this will be a significant increase for them, and i wanted to make sure the support we provide and also went to those families. that's why we have decided to go to banks capital a to d, four out of every five households in england, very delicately to help those households in the middle as well. that is a deliberate choice. but if you look at the flat rate, thatis but if you look at the flat rate, that is easily going to mean more to families on low incomes than with lower energy bills, so in that sense, it is a progressive measure that will help those families more, and we have various other interventions that are also targeted at exactly the people you rightly highlight. for example, the captain a warm homes discount is a rebate that exists for energy bills. we have expanded that eligibility, or are in the process of doing that, by are in the process of doing that, by a third, so that what then, 3 million of our most vulnerable
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households, £350 million rebate. 0ver households, £350 million rebate. over the course of this parliament, we are also spending about £3 billion specifically targeted on the people that you mentioned, to help improve energy efficiency of their homes. that's a sensible long—term thing to do, because even though it costs thousands up front, it will save people on average about £300 a year on their energy bills going forward and of course, by cutting the universal credit taper rate, by increasing the national living wage, both of those are really significant interventions which will put more money in the pockets of those who are most vulnerable. so i think if you look at it in the round, i feel confident we are getting help to the people that need it in different ways. with regard to your second question, it is a question for the prime minister rather than me, and there is formally not much more than i can —— that i can add than what i have already said, would i hope you appreciate. next, aired. there you are. you talked a lot during the pandemic of doing whatever it takes to help families going through difficult times. i'm _ difficult times. i'm just wondering i given what you said about — i'm just wondering i given what you said about how difficult this will be to—
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said about how difficult this will be to confront, i'm able to make the same _ be to confront, i'm able to make the same commitment when it comes to their energy bills, —— are you able to meke— their energy bills, —— are you able to make the — their energy bills, —— are you able to make the same commitment, especially— to make the same commitment, especially when it comes to things like looking at our net zero policy and how — like looking at our net zero policy and how it — like looking at our net zero policy and how it feeds into this? and secondin — and how it feeds into this? and secondly, what is your message to people _ secondly, what is your message to people who are looking at their bitisr _ people who are looking at their bills, looking at what you are offering — bills, looking at what you are offering them and saying, this simply— offering them and saying, this simply isn't enough, now they are contemplating a very difficult few months _ contemplating a very difficult few months ahead? i think the first thing to say is, i absolutely recognise this is a difficult time. i know this is probably the number one issue in most families' mines. they are looking at the knees, seen prices go up, they are worried about the cost of living and particularly energy, and that's why we are taking action. i really believe what we're doing, £350 is a significant amount of money and will make a big difference to the vast majority of households and i think people, i hope, actually, will be reassured by us stepping in to provide that support, to ease of the adjustment that this is. so when you ask what is our
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approach, ourapproach is. so when you ask what is our approach, our approach over the last year or two has been to support people through difficult times, to support the economy when it needed it, and i think today's announcement continues in that vein, and as in robert's question, we are support to people who need it most, but i am also being honest with everybody. i can't change global energy prices. your point about our transition to a net zero was a good one, and what we need to do is, we have got to put the right long—term energy policy in place, and for example, we are investing in new nuclear power, something that previous governments had neglected. but we are fixing that, the energy secretary on the getting on with that. we announced money for that in last year's spending review. we are also doing lots of offshore wind where we are a leader. there are sensible things to do. lastly, i want to make sure people acknowledge that we should also exploit our domestic resources, and we have resources in the north sea. we want to encourage investment and that, because you will need natural gas as
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part of our transition to getting to net zero, and in the process of getting from here to there, if we can get investment in the north sea, that supports british jobs and is a good thing, so that has to be part of the mix as well. jason from the daily mail. the bank of england says we are facing _ the bank of england says we are facing the — the bank of england says we are facing the biggest squeeze on living standards on record. isn't this the time _ standards on record. isn't this the time to— standards on record. isn't this the time to think again about that natiohat— time to think again about that national insurance rise that will hit average workers with an extra £250 _ hit average workers with an extra £250 biii— hit average workers with an extra £250 bill this yearand the wider political— £250 bill this yearand the wider political picture, the pm said sorry atrout— political picture, the pm said sorry about some of the parties that took place _ about some of the parties that took piece in _ about some of the parties that took place in this street. some of your mp5 place in this street. some of your mps and — place in this street. some of your mp5 and some of the public are still mps and some of the public are still very angry— mps and some of the public are still very angry with him. you, i think very angry with him. you, ithink are very angry with him. you, i think are still— very angry with him. you, i think are still supporting him. why do you think _ are still supporting him. why do you think... what would you tell people atrout— think... what would you tell people about why — think... what would you tell people about why he would be given a second chance? _ about why he would be given a second chance? -- _ about why he would be given a second chance? —— why he should be given a second _ chance? —— why he should be given a second chance? gn chance? -- why he should be given a second chance?— second chance? on the first question about the health _ second chance? on the first question about the health and _ second chance? on the first question about the health and social— second chance? on the first question about the health and social care - about the health and social care levy, i do believe this is the right thing to do. if you think, what is the number one
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priority when it comes to public services, it's the nhs, and we are faced with a situation where the backlogs are going to unacceptable levels as a result of covid, and i think everyone wants to see action on that. we will get to a point where almost every family will have a family member, grandparent, aunt, uncle, on a waiting list, and that is something we did not want to see happen, and at the same time, we wanted to do what other governments have not done, the prime minister deserves credit for this, and that is grappling with the challenges in fixing social care. both of those things are big challenges to take on, and they do require a serious amount of funding. we wanted to do this difficult decision. of course, it's a difficult decision to introduce a new levy. not something we wanted to have to do, but confronted with a once in 300 year economic shock to deal with and taking on these two big challenges, i thought it was right, is that the prime minister and government, to introduce a new levy to help fund the people's number one priority, notjust the people's number one priority, not just today, the people's number one priority, notjust today, but the people's number one priority, not just today, but four years the people's number one priority, notjust today, but four years into the future, and i think people could
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be reassured that every pound of that levy is going to go on the thing they care most about, which is the nhs and social care. in the way we are doing it, i believe, is progressive. there is with the broadest shoulders will bear the biggest burden from it, the top 15% of taxpayers contributing around half of the revenues from that. and as i say, it is dedicated and specific so people will know that all the money is going to the thing they care most about. and on your second question, again, it's a question for the prime minister. i think he was right to say what he said in parliamentjust recently, and before. he has apologised for that and said he will fix it. he has acknowledged some of the, or all of the recommendations from sue gray's report, and you can expect to hear more from him about the changes he is planning to make, so that's what he has my support and i'm glad he's doing what he's doing. —— that's why he has my support. lucy from the telegraph.
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hello. when you look at the levies on energy— hello. when you look at the levies on energy bills, the looming council tax risesr _ on energy bills, the looming council tax rises, increasing national insurance, the income tax, pressure and the _ insurance, the income tax, pressure and the phrases and here the bank of england _ and the phrases and here the bank of england ever warning today that the public _ england ever warning today that the public face the biggest fall in living — public face the biggest fall in living standards in 30 years, is there — living standards in 30 years, is there a — living standards in 30 years, is there a point as a conservative chanceiior _ there a point as a conservative chancellor that you step in and say, people _ chancellor that you step in and say, people are — chancellor that you step in and say, people are paying too much tax? wellr _ people are paying too much tax? weiir you — people are paying too much tax? well, you are right to list some or many of the challenges that people are facing, and i very much acknowledge that we are grappling with some of them, families are grappling with those challenges. but i think you can point to some things on the other side of the ledger as well that will make a difference. 0bviously well that will make a difference. obviously the announcement today, £350 for the vast majority of families is a significant amount and will make a difference to people. the national living wage is a significant amount and will make a difference to people. the national living wages going up by 6.6 in april to £9 50 an hour. that's quite a significant increase. as with about £1000 a year for someone earning the national living wage as millions of people do. the universal
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credit taper rate cut we announced last year which is essentially a tax cut for those in the lowest incomes, again, for a single mother working full—time on the national living wage, that's with about £1200 extra a year in their pocket, so that will help. we have frozen fuel duty, and as i discussed, we have lots of other schemes to help people in need in energy costs. so i think when i look at the picture, of course, there are challenges, but there are things we are doing to help people and jason's question earlier, we are making sure that we also address the other thing that they care about, which is having an nhs that is well funded, that can make sure they don't wait years and years of the treatment they desperately want for them and their families. treatment they desperately want for them and theirfamilies. i think people care about that as well. going forward, i will point you to what i said at the budget in autumn last year. my goal, my mission over the remainder of this parliament is to cut people's taxes. that's what i want to deliver. i think that's what people would like to see. we have
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gone through a 300 year economic shop there was shock, borrowing going to the highest level since world war ii, and we do need to fix that, but we are on the way to rebuilding our economy. if you look at what is happening with people in work and wages, business investment, all of those signs are really positive, so there is a lot we can feel confident about. i know there is we have made a start to that by cutting taxes for those in the lowest paid last autumn, and that's a sign of where we want to go in the future as well. david from reuters, good evening. future as well. david from reuters, good evening-— good evening. good evening. chancellor, _ good evening. good evening. chancellor, earlier _ good evening. good evening. chancellor, earlier today, - good evening. good evening. j chancellor, earlier today, the good evening. good evening. - chancellor, earlier today, the bank of england — chancellor, earlier today, the bank of england raised interest rates and said that _ of england raised interest rates and said that was not just to do with higher— said that was not just to do with higher energy costs but also gross cost pressures and also wage pressures on the economy that some businesses _ pressures on the economy that some businesses think might need to go up to 5%_ businesses think might need to go up to 5% this _ businesses think might need to go up to 5% this year. i know that last year. _ to 5% this year. i know that last year. you — to 5% this year. i know that last year, you and the prime minister taiked _ year, you and the prime minister talked of— year, you and the prime minister talked of the need for high wage economy~ — talked of the need for high wage economy. but in the short term, is wage _ economy. but in the short term, is wage restraint something you would
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welcome _ wage restraint something you would welcome in the private sector if it needs— welcome in the private sector if it needs to — welcome in the private sector if it needs to be in the public sector? monetary— needs to be in the public sector? monetary policy is independent for the bank of england, so i will leave and the governor to deal with that. with regard to wages, it's not my job to set wages in the private sector, and all i would say is, yes, of course i want a high wage economy. who doesn't? the way to get there is to drive productivity, rightly reckon we want to make sure there is wages reflect on the fact we are producing more, doing more, and the best way to get that productivity increases to get businesses to invest, that's why we have interventions like the super deduction, very generous tax incentive for companies to invest, we know companies are sitting on a good bit of cash, we know will be good bit of cash, we know will be good for the economy if we can invest in that, and if you look at all the surveys, whether it is the cbi, deloitte, ernst & young, all of them .2 business intention investment levels being at high levels, and that is a promising
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sign. the other part is by investing in people, in their skills, and the spending review last year, we announced, i think a £3.5 billion increase in the amount we spend on skills, 26% real increase, almost unprecedented for a parliament to spend that much more on skills, but is very important. if you're an aduu is very important. if you're an adult he doesn't have a level three qualification, for example, equivalent to any level, and there are about nine or 10 million adults in a country you don't, for the first time, actually, the government at any age you are, will fully fund you to get one of those qualifications. that cost about £3000, but we know will make an enormous difference to your chance of getting a job, or earning more if you are in work as a result of new skills you acquire, that's just one of the many things we're doing with traineeships, apprenticeships, sector —based work academies, skilled boot camps, all sorts of things, our new interventions that will help people get the skills they need to get higher productivity, higher wagejobs. that's
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need to get higher productivity, higher wage jobs. that's the need to get higher productivity, higher wagejobs. that's the right long—term approach for us to get there. of course, it doesn't happen overnight, but i'm confident we can do all the right things that put us on the path to getting there over time. thomas from business insider. the plan to give rebates to certain councii _ the plan to give rebates to certain council tax — the plan to give rebates to certain council tax bands means people on the lowest — council tax bands means people on the lowest incomes won't automatically benefit, whereas many of those _ automatically benefit, whereas many of those in _ automatically benefit, whereas many of those in the highest household incomes— of those in the highest household incomes may benefit. do you accept it as a _ incomes may benefit. do you accept it as a poorly targeted tax —based elan property values from 30 years ago? _ elan property values from 30 years ago? and _ elan property values from 30 years ago? and secondly, just a follow—up, would _ ago? and secondly, just a follow—up, would you _ ago? and secondly, just a follow—up, would you welcome a full apology from the — would you welcome a full apology from the prime minister regarding his comments to keir starmer earlier this week? _ this week? on - this week? on your second question, i this week? — on your second question, i haven't anything to add to what i said to the previous answers, but on your first question, i probably don't accept that. there is no perfect way when you design policy that has to work on the scale for it to be perfectly targeted, so there is no way to perfectly do it. i can't sit
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here and figure out the individual circumstances of all 28 million households we are trying to get support to, so i accept that nothing is perfect. but to your point specifically about lower income households to happen to live in higher council tax bands, that is a reasonable question and we have looked at that specifically, that's why we've created a discretionary fund of about £150 million that will be given to local authorities specifically to help exactly those people. by our estimates, there are around 300,000 people, actually, for example, who are on low income or benefits who happen to live in council tax bands higher than band d, so actually given more than the money needed for them so that there is a bit of extra cushion, so that local authorities can find those people and get them the support they need. i think that's very fair, but we made a provision for that through this discretionary fund. 0ther we made a provision for that through this discretionary fund. other than that, i think the council tax system is a good way to deliver support. it's the only other part of our entire sacks there were tax system
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that works in a household basis, gp energy as a household, so that is a sensible way to think about people. the other way is, it is quick. lots of things take a long time to figure out, for instance the rebate, which will kick in in october, when there is time for statutory consultations and things to work through. the councils have done a brilliantjob for us, the system is setup so people will feel that £150 in april and that's really good, i think, actually, and that's one of the benefits of using the system to do that. and i think i have a better time to take a couple more if i am not being carried out. i don't know who we have here. as natasha hear? do you have a question? sorry to press you on the question of munira — sorry to press you on the question of munira mirza, but do you think the prime — of munira mirza, but do you think the prime minister should say sorry for his— the prime minister should say sorry for his comments came a code you think— for his comments came a code you think it _ for his comments came a code you think it would help to move on from the whole _ think it would help to move on from the whole situation? i can ijust ask you. — the whole situation? i can ijust ask you, some of your colleagues have _ ask you, some of your colleagues have said — ask you, some of your colleagues have said that you are a labour
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iightr _ have said that you are a labour tight and — have said that you are a labour light, and un—conservative, giving people _ light, and un—conservative, giving people money to pay their energy bills _ people money to pay their energy bills do — people money to pay their energy bills. do you agree with them? thank— bills. do you agree with them? thank you _ bills. do you agree with them? thank you. on your first question again, i must repeat what i have said before. 0bviously, that's for the prime minister to decide, but i'm glad he clarified what he meant earlier today. as i said, i will miss working with munira. to your second question, for me being a conservative, part of that is about being responsible with people's money and responsible with the public finances. that's really important to me and i think is what people expect from a conservative government, a conservative chancellor. i think i would hope people understand we were faced with an enormous shock and that meant the borrowing skyrocketed up to levels we haven't seen since world war ii, and it is going to take us a little bit of time to fix that, but fixing it is the right and responsible thing to do. it's not always easy to do all these different things, but as long as i have thisjob, i am going to do what i believe to be right in the long—term interests of
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the country, and this energy situation is a good example of why it is important, because i have made the case previously to you and others, we need to have the resilience to respond to future shocks, and if you think, in the last ten years, we have had to supposedly once of the century events, with the financial crisis, which robert spent every minute covering, and ed and others, and then obviously coronavirus. they happened in the space of a decade. i was really fortunate that because my predecessors had taken some difficult decisions when they have this job, difficult decisions when they have thisjob, i was able difficult decisions when they have this job, i was able to respond comprehensively and generously to support the country, families, businesses, through that crisis, and now, once again, we are faced with another thing for energy. because we've taken some difficult decisions are ready to get things in a better place, i can do that, but i want to have risen thisjob in place, i can do that, but i want to have risen this job in the future to hopefully have benefited from the top things that i did say that they can support the country when the time comes again, and i think there is a deeply conservative thing to do. i think people understand we
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have to live within our means, and i think they would expect that from us, and that's what are the liver as long as i am doing this. george, i saw you had your hand up. you will see analysts saying they think— you will see analysts saying they think it's — you will see analysts saying they think it's possible the energy price cap couid — think it's possible the energy price cap could go up as high as £2400 in october _ cap could go up as high as £2400 in october. could you exclude the 0ctober. could you exclude the possibility will have to do even more — possibility will have to do even more in — possibility will have to do even more in the autumn to help families? and secondly, again on munira mirza, you said _ and secondly, again on munira mirza, you said you _ and secondly, again on munira mirza, you said you enjoyed working with her. you said you enjoyed working with her~ i_ you said you enjoyed working with her. i wonder if you would just say what _ her. i wonder if you would just say what you thought she brought to the government? so _ government? so come on your first question, as government? — so come on your first question, as i said before, there are globalforces that drive up gas prices at the moment, and i don't have a crystal ball. you are right, the current energy markets are forecasting that prices go up further in october, before falling quite significantly next spring, but again, i don't have a crystal ball, and these things are uncertain. i think the interventions we have done today are designed to last and provide support to people
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over the year. we are front loading it so the £150 of the 350 comes in one go at the beginning, but then in october, let's say the price cap 0ctober, let's say the price cap goes up again, that's when the £200 rebate will also kick in at that moment, so they will be help at that time if that is indeed what happens. so i think over the course of a year is the best way to think about it. there's £350 of support for the vast majority of families to help them over the year with this, and again, i would go back to what i said, i have to be honest, i don't want to pretend we don't have to adjust for higher energy prices if that's what the world is having to do, but what we can do isjust the world is having to do, but what we can do is just slow the pace of that down make it more manageable for people's household finances. i'm not going to get into a big thing about munira. she is a valued colleague who brought a lot to the job, and i will miss working with her. great. yes. 0ne job, and i will miss working with her. great. yes. one more? right, go on, yeah. simon from pa. ijust want
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on, yeah. simon from pa. i just want to get on, yeah. simon from pa. ijust want to get my head around — simon from pa. ijust want to get my head around this... i'm not going to call it— head around this... i'm not going to call it a _ head around this... i'm not going to call it a bailout, but i think some people _ call it a bailout, but i think some people have called it back. energy firms— people have called it back. energy firms were — people have called it back. energy firms were asking for a similar package — firms were asking for a similar package for quite a few months. we have known— package for quite a few months. we have known the energy prices would io have known the energy prices would go up _ have known the energy prices would go up for— have known the energy prices would go up for quite some time. back thenr _ go up for quite some time. back then it — go up for quite some time. back then, it was rejected. i think 20 billion— then, it was rejected. i think 20 billion was— then, it was rejected. i think 20 billion was the number that was put on it by— billion was the number that was put on it by the — billion was the number that was put on it by the firms. what changed that meant now you have decided it was the _ that meant now you have decided it was the right call to make? and the other— was the right call to make? and the other question i wanted to ask was around _ other question i wanted to ask was around national insurance. you are giving _ around national insurance. you are giving households the opportunity to delay their payments on their energy bills. delay their payments on their energy bills why— delay their payments on their energy bills. why not give them the opportunity to delay their payments for national insurance? sor _ for national insurance? so. i_ for national insurance? so, i think in terms of... they are two very different things. we are putting in place a new dedicated health and social care levies so that people can feel reassured that every pound of that is going to the thing they care most about, the nhs, and it means we can make a start on tackling the backlog is as quickly
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as possible is that reforming social care. i think that's the right and responsible thing to do, as i've outlined. where we can make a difference on these energy prices, we are, and part of the responses to smooth the impact and that is a very deliberate policy approach, because we can't pretend that we don't have to adjust to it, but we can do is much manageable, and that's without policy does. with regard to your first question, i wouldn't describe it as a bailout, and i think there was something quite different. we are not providing loans to energy companies, but discounting people's bills by £200, using their bill as a means to do that, but in no way, shape orform is means to do that, but in no way, shape or form is as a bailout of energy companies. it's absolutely not. this is a help to families and households, just delivered through their energy bills, and ultimately recovered through their energy bills in the future, so i think it's very different to what some people were calling for and i think it's the right intervention, and many of call for some smoothing mechanism, and
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the sensible thing for governments to do is not pretend this doesn't exist, but help ease the burden of it by spreading it over some years. but thank you all very much. that has been helpful, and i will see you all again soon. so there is the chancellor, rishi sunak in downing street. just going through some of the details of what he has announced today already in the commons in terms of help for people facing much higher energy bills, and he said that it will soften the blow, because the government is offering a £200 rebate on energy bills and a £150 council tax rebate. for many households as well, £9 billion package altogether. let's get some reaction to that. joining me now is labour's nick thomas—symonds, the shadow international trade secretary. the chancellor saying they�* re the chancellor saying they're what we can do is take the sting out of a significant price shock for millions of families. has he succeeded in
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doing that, do you think?- of families. has he succeeded in doing that, do you think? know, i think what — doing that, do you think? know, i think what the _ doing that, do you think? know, i think what the chancellor - doing that, do you think? know, i think what the chancellor has - doing that, do you think? know, i i think what the chancellor has really announced is underwhelming, frankly. —— no. we have a chancellor whojust doesn't grasp the scale of living prices that we have in this country, which has been caused by his decisions. we have had the universal credit card, the rise now in interest rates, inflation projected to go over 7%, the chancellor saying he will continue with the rise in national insurance contributions. sorry, but energy prices, which we are talking about specifically, are not due to his decisions, they are due to global pricing forces. weill. due to global pricing forces. well, there are global— due to global pricing forces. well, there are global forces, _ due to global pricing forces. well, there are global forces, but - due to global pricing forces. in there are global forces, but the uk is in a uniquely weak position as a consequence of government decisions over the last 12 years, whether it is the cuts to gas storage, their failure to do the work required to insulate our homes properly, the slowness and progress on renewable
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energy. all these things are the fault of this government, and that's why, by the way, what we needed today was something far more ambitious. we heard yesterday from shell, that their profits of £20 billion, talking about a momentous year, while households up and down the country are struggling with their energy bills. what we should be doing is having a windfall tax on north sea oil and gas, then we can actually provide the help on a scale required, including up to £600 a year to those households that most need it. i know that is the labour position, windfall tax on the oil and gas companies, but let me put the opposite view in. from the big companies. they say, firstly, they make big profits so they will be paying more tax to the exchequer anyway, there will be a windfall tax to those forces anyway, and they need that money to invest in greener
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forms of energy. if you take the money away from them, they would not be able to invest in energy.— be able to invest in energy. nobody is sa in? be able to invest in energy. nobody is saying that _ be able to invest in energy. nobody is saying that they _ be able to invest in energy. nobody is saying that they should _ be able to invest in energy. nobody is saying that they should not - be able to invest in energy. nobody is saying that they should not make j is saying that they should not make a profit, but we are talking about excess profits, $20 billion is what shell had spoken about yesterday. what we are talking about is a windfall tax is not going to produce at the chancellor is suggesting this huge disincentive for investment, when you have profit on that scale. the truth is, the chancellor has made the wrong choice. and as a consequence of leaving this excess profits, doing nothing about that, what the chancellor has come up with by now, pay later scheme, where he is offering not the amount of money, the amount of help that people need, but even worse, he wants to prevent a be paying that back. giving with one hand and taking away with the other in the future. the chancellor just does not understand the scale,
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the cost of living crisis, that this government is responsible for. but ma be on government is responsible for. but may be on energy, maybe we just have to get used to it. it's a hard fact but maybe we just have to get used to higher energy prices, paying more for our gas and electricity, and we cannot go running to the government every time the bills go up. what cannot go running to the government every time the bills go up.— every time the bills go up. what the government — every time the bills go up. what the government needs _ every time the bills go up. what the government needs to _ every time the bills go up. what the government needs to have - every time the bills go up. what the government needs to have is - every time the bills go up. what the government needs to have is a - government needs to have is a long—term plan for the energy sector. labour's position is that we would invested £28 billion year on year. our climate investment fund will drive forward the insulation to our that we need to come to come to drive forward that investment in renewables. the problem is, this government, having created an enormous problem over the past 12 years, isjust not enormous problem over the past 12 years, is just not showing that long—term plan we need for our energy sector, particularly urgent at this moment, when we see the £693 increase in the energy cap. flan at this moment, when we see the £693 increase in the energy cap. cami increase in the energy cap. can i ask ou increase in the energy cap. can i ask you about — increase in the energy cap. can i ask you about what _ increase in the energy cap. can i ask you about what the - increase in the energy cap. can i ask you about what the chancellor was also asked a lot about, during a
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news conference? and that is the resignation of one of the prime minister's most senior aides, minera mears, who has resigned from her post —— munira mirza, who is stepping down after she said that the... over stepping down after she said that the... 0verthe stepping down after she said that the... over the claims that the prime minister made that keir starmer did not prosecutejimmy savile when he was director of public prosecutions. keir —— rishi sunak said that he would not have said that. what is the labour position on that? i said that. what is the labour position on that?— said that. what is the labour position on that? i am hugely disappointed _ position on that? i am hugely disappointed that _ position on that? i am hugely disappointed that the - position on that? i am hugely i disappointed that the chancellor position on that? i am hugely - disappointed that the chancellor did not feel able to say that the poor minister should apologise. let's be clear what the prime minister did. 0n clear what the prime minister did. on monday in the house of commons,
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the prime minister repeated a far right conspiracy theory that keir starmer was personally responsible for not prosecuting jimmy savile. it is appalling, it is untrue. the prime minister didn't even seem to understand the effect of that he was saying on the victims of those awful acts. this prime minister has completely trashed his own office. he should be apologising absolutely. but frankly, we have a prime minister who should be resigning. he is not fit to hold the office. he shook his head of policy has resigned... to shook his head of policy has resigned- - -_ shook his head of policy has resigned... to be clear, boris johnson did — resigned... to be clear, boris johnson did not _ resigned... to be clear, boris johnson did not apologise - resigned... to be clear, boris johnson did not apologise for| resigned... to be clear, boris - johnson did not apologise for those remarks today but he did clarify that he didn't hold keir starmer personally responsible for that decision, he said he was in charge of the department.— of the department. today is thursday- — of the department. today is thursday. the _ of the department. today is thursday. the prime - of the department. today is | thursday. the prime minister of the department. today is - thursday. the prime minister made his remarks in the house of commons on monday. it's taken him three days to clarify, so he has clarified. he
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then hasn't even had the decency to apologise for repeating that dreadful slur. apologise for repeating that dreadfulslur. it apologise for repeating that dreadful slur. it is a quite appalling thing for the prime minister to have done, he absolutely should apologise. his former head of policy is quite right to say that. and she has been very, very clear that the prime minister still can apologise. he hasn't, he should, but frankly, this is a prime minister who has trashed standards in public life and isn't fit to hold office. thank you very much indeed for times a day. let's stay with that story and the resignation of the head of policy, minera mears —— a group minera . there is a clarification today from borisjohnson a little bit
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earlier today. i from boris johnson a little bit earlier today.— from boris johnson a little bit earlier today. i am talking not about the _ earlier today. i am talking not about the leader _ earlier today. i am talking not about the leader of _ earlier today. i am talking not about the leader of the - earlier today. i am talking not - about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. i was making a point about responsibility for the organisation as a whole. mas about responsibility for the organisation as a whole. was boris johnson plasma — organisation as a whole. was boris johnson plasma clarification. - organisation as a whole. was boris johnson plasma clarification. the l johnson plasma clarification. the chancellor as you have just been hearing in the last few minutes, was asked about the resignation of the prime minister's because of those comments that borisjohnson made about keir starmer in the commons the other day. rishi sunak said he would not have made the comments made by the prime minister accusing sir keir starmer of failing to prosecutejimmy savile. istofith sir keir starmer of failing to prosecute jimmy savile. with regard to that news. _ prosecute jimmy savile. with regard to that news, she _ prosecute jimmy savile. with regard to that news, she was _ prosecute jimmy savile. with regard to that news, she was a _
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prosecute jimmy savile. with regard to that news, she was a valued - to that news, she was a valued regret— to that news, she was a valued regret ball honest, i would not have said it _ regret ball honest, i would not have said it and _ regret ball honest, i would not have said it and i— regret ball honest, i would not have said it and i am glad that the promise _ said it and i am glad that the promise to clarified what he meant. let's _ promise to clarified what he meant. let's go _ promise to clarified what he meant. let's go to— promise to clarified what he meant. let's go to our political correspondent. quite interesting even for the chancellor to say, i would not have said it. a mild rebuke perhaps for the prime minister? . . rebuke perhaps for the prime minister? . , ., ., minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes _ minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes not _ minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes not go _ minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes not go as - minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes not go as far - minister? yes, interesting to note that well wishes not go as far as l minister? yes, interesting to note| that well wishes not go as far as to say that the premise should apologise, he said he would not have said it himself. and i think this taps into a point coming across from both supporters and critics of the prime minister, just a rewind to the context of this was said, at the time the prime minister was under pressure from not taking responsibility, in the words of his opponents, for the things that happened under his watch in downing street, in some cases at his house during lockdown. if by a stretch by
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the logic was to hit back at sir keir starmer and say, sir keir starmer, as he said in that clip, had not immediately taken responsivity for the organisation as a whole when he was director of prussic group director of public positions. this was at best a stretch of logic, and at worst, making a claim without any evidence to back it up. the resignation of munira mirza, one of his top and closest political allies, shows how much some of the criticism that has been levelled at borisjohnson over the last week is notjust among some of those more predictable voices, some of those who have been long—standing critics of boris johnson but very much within the heart of his own government as well. whoa she is notjust any equity in downing street, he has been with her for a long time and he has relied on
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her —— because she is notjust any aide? yes, she worked with him when he was the mayor of london, she is one of her long —— his longest serving political advisers. 0ne one of her long —— his longest serving political advisers. one of the interesting point in her resignation letter was so disappointed in the prime minister, you can sense that this was not a decision she was taking lightly. she went on to say in the letter that he should have gone on to apologise to sir keir starmer, also said that the prime minister had been wrong to make the initial remarks, given that there was no fair or reasonable basis for that a session. she said it was not the child and —— cut and thrust of the usual politics but an inappropriate reference. to make resignation like this, not only a strongly worded as it was but also public servants are very clear signal that she wanted to make this criticism known, that also this is a
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criticism known, that also this is a criticism right from the heart idea logically of his own government as well. ., ~ logically of his own government as well. . ,, , ., logically of his own government as well. . ~' , ., , logically of his own government as well. . ,, i. , . well. thank you very much indeed. northern ireland's.... _ in the last hour, northern ireland's first minister paul givan has announced he's resigning, meaning the deputy first minister must also resign, or the power sharing executive is suspended. the democratic unionist party is protesting against the rules which govern post—brexit trade. those arrangements were thrown into confusion after a unionist minister ordered his staff to stop checks on food and farming goods entering northern ireland from britain. here's mr givan making the announcement. 0ur institutions are being tested once again. our institutions are being tested once again-— our institutions are being tested once arain. . ., . once again. and the delicate balance created by the _ once again. and the delicate balance created by the belfast _ once again. and the delicate balance created by the belfast and _ once again. and the delicate balance created by the belfast and st - created by the belfast and st andrews agreement has been impacted by the agreement made by the united kingdom government and the european union. that created the more ireland
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protocol. the consent principle —— the northern ireland protocol. the consent principle is a cornerstone of the belfast agreement and it is my earnest desire that all sections of the community will soon be able to give consent to the restoration of a fully functioning executive, through a resolution to the issues that have regrettably brought us to this point. so what's behind all this? why is the northern ireland protocol still so controversial? our correspondent chris morris is here. let's go back to the beginning, reminders of the protocol is. it is reminders of the protocol is. it is deahnr reminders of the protocol is. it is dealing with _ reminders of the protocol is. it is dealing with the _ reminders of the protocol is. it is dealing with the fact that the land border— dealing with the fact that the land border on — dealing with the fact that the land border on the island of ireland, as we can— border on the island of ireland, as we can see — border on the island of ireland, as we can see here, is now the only land _ we can see here, is now the only land border— we can see here, is now the only land border between the uk, northern irelandr _ land border between the uk, northern ireland, and the european union, the blue and _ ireland, and the european union, the blue and yellow flag which is
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ireland~ _ blue and yellow flag which is ireland. and to keep that land border— ireland. and to keep that land border open, without any checks, or broader— border open, without any checks, or broader networks of any kind, you need _ broader networks of any kind, you need to— broader networks of any kind, you need to have checks somewhere else, to monitor— need to have checks somewhere else, to monitor goods going into and out of the _ to monitor goods going into and out of the eu _ to monitor goods going into and out of the eu single market. that was part of— of the eu single market. that was part of the — of the eu single market. that was part of the eu's condition. what that means is, the dotted line, which — that means is, the dotted line, which is — that means is, the dotted line, which is in _ that means is, the dotted line, which is in effect the trade border which _ which is in effect the trade border which has — which is in effect the trade border which has been established between great britain and northern ireland, so within— great britain and northern ireland, so within the uk, now, back at the last election, the prime alyssa said categorically there would be no checks — categorically there would be no checks between great britain and northern — checks between great britain and northern ireland. —— the prime minister — northern ireland. —— the prime minister it— northern ireland. —— the prime minister. it wasn't true then and it still doesn't — minister. it wasn't true then and it still doesn't appear to be true today— still doesn't appear to be true today because despite what was said by the _ today because despite what was said by the dup last night, we understand the checks— by the dup last night, we understand the checks have been continuing to today _ the checks have been continuing to today so _ the checks have been continuing to toda . ., , , the checks have been continuing to toda . .,, , , , today. so the uk has been pushing for changes- _ today. so the uk has been pushing for changes. what _ today. so the uk has been pushing for changes. what is _ today. so the uk has been pushing for changes. what is it _ today. so the uk has been pushing for changes. what is it saying, - today. so the uk has been pushing| for changes. what is it saying, what does it want to change? it for changes. what is it saying, what does it want to change?— does it want to change? it wants to chan . e does it want to change? it wants to chanre a does it want to change? it wants to change a lot- _ does it want to change? it wants to change a lot. when _ does it want to change? it wants to change a lot. when it _ does it want to change? it wants to change a lot. when it looks - does it want to change? it wants to change a lot. when it looks at - does it want to change? it wants to change a lot. when it looks at the i change a lot. when it looks at the northern— change a lot. when it looks at the northern ireland protocol, it signed up northern ireland protocol, it signed up to— northern ireland protocol, it signed up to it. _ northern ireland protocol, it signed up to it. it— northern ireland protocol, it signed up to it, it pretty much it wants to
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change _ up to it, it pretty much it wants to change it— up to it, it pretty much it wants to change it radically, sweeping change _ change it radically, sweeping change. it's not quite rip it up and start— change. it's not quite rip it up and start again — change. it's not quite rip it up and start again but not far from that. the main — start again but not far from that. the main thing is it is saying it does _ the main thing is it is saying it does not — the main thing is it is saying it does not want any checks on goods going _ does not want any checks on goods going between britain and northern ireland~ _ going between britain and northern ireland. it's also saying that within— ireland. it's also saying that within that, that broad remit of no checks— within that, that broad remit of no checks at— within that, that broad remit of no checks at all, if things go from britain — checks at all, if things go from britain to— checks at all, if things go from britain to northern ireland and its established they are not then going to continue across the border into the eu. _ to continue across the border into the eu, then those goods should not have to _ the eu, then those goods should not have to follow any eu standard at all, have to follow any eu standard at all. only— have to follow any eu standard at all, only british standards. it's really— all, only british standards. it's really quite a radical change to the way the _ really quite a radical change to the way the protocol was originally written — way the protocol was originally written. and of course, there is the stick— written. and of course, there is the stick which — written. and of course, there is the stick which goes with that from the uk sider _ stick which goes with that from the uk side. it— stick which goes with that from the uk side, it hasn't yet ruled out the possibility— uk side, it hasn't yet ruled out the possibility of using article 16 of the protocol which allows one decide to unilaterally suspend part of what it does— to unilaterally suspend part of what it does which presumably would include — it does which presumably would include the cheques taking place. if the uk _ include the cheques taking place. if the uk did — include the cheques taking place. if the uk did make that unilateral mover — the uk did make that unilateral move, the eu would be responding and that would _ move, the eu would be responding and that would be a difficult place for both sides. but
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that would be a difficult place for both sides. �* . that would be a difficult place for both sides-— that would be a difficult place for both sides. �* , ., " , both sides. but the eu is not likely to rive both sides. but the eu is not likely to give london _ both sides. but the eu is not likely to give london everything - both sides. but the eu is not likely to give london everything it - both sides. but the eu is not likely| to give london everything it wants? no, it won't. the one thing it has made _ no, it won't. the one thing it has made clear— no, it won't. the one thing it has made clear from the start, since the summer— made clear from the start, since the summer and — made clear from the start, since the summer and negotiations began, you are not— summer and negotiations began, you are not going to rewrite the protocol _ are not going to rewrite the protocol. we are not going to start rewriting _ protocol. we are not going to start rewriting something which has only 'ust rewriting something which has only just become a treaty. their argument is, we understand the practicalities perhaps— is, we understand the practicalities perhaps need to change. maybe we have been— perhaps need to change. maybe we have been a bit too severe. they say that many— have been a bit too severe. they say that many of— have been a bit too severe. they say that many of the cheques can be removed — that many of the cheques can be removed. their argument is, that many of the cheques can be removed. theirargument is, the plan may put— removed. theirargument is, the plan may put forward to remove 80% of checks _ may put forward to remove 80% of checks on — may put forward to remove 80% of checks on food products, compared what might— checks on food products, compared what might happen if the protocol was incremented in full. their overall— was incremented in full. their overall argument is this is an international agreement, a treaty you have — international agreement, a treaty you have signed up to, you have got to respect— you have signed up to, you have got to respect a — you have signed up to, you have got to respect a legal obligation. those of the _ to respect a legal obligation. those of the broad arguments the two sides are looking _ of the broad arguments the two sides are looking at. liz truss had another— are looking at. liz truss had another conversation today with the eu negotiator, she said it was a good _ eu negotiator, she said it was a good meeting that they always said that. good meeting that they always said that and _ good meeting that they always said that. and she said she looks forward to him _ that. and she said she looks forward to him coming to the uk to continue discussions — to him coming to the uk to continue discussions next week. i think of
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the dup— discussions next week. i think of the dup has done is up the ante. briefly. _ the dup has done is up the ante. briefly, one unionist minister was saying, we are stopping the cheques, unilaterally. and how they actually stopped, there trade checks? trio. unilaterally. and how they actually stopped, there trade checks? no, we understand that _ stopped, there trade checks? no, we understand that they _ stopped, there trade checks? no, we understand that they have _ stopped, there trade checks? no, we understand that they have not. - stopped, there trade checks? no, we understand that they have not. we i stopped, there trade checks? no, we | understand that they have not. we do understand _ understand that they have not. we do understand that they have not. we do understand that there has been an all staff— understand that there has been an all staff communication to people within the agricultural department in northern ireland saying, we are reviewing — in northern ireland saying, we are reviewing what the minister has said and further— reviewing what the minister has said and further communication will follow — and further communication will follow. the eu response is very simple — follow. the eu response is very simple if— follow. the eu response is very simple. if you unilaterally stop these — simple. if you unilaterally stop these checks, you are in effect breaking — these checks, you are in effect breaking international law. thank ou ve breaking international law. thank you very much — breaking international law. thank you very much indeed. _ the bank of england has put up interest rates for the second month in a row, to try to counter inflation. the main rate has increased to half of 1% — from a quarter of 1%. this report from our economics correspondent, andy verity. in hatfield, naomi and her husband are renting after selling their house. they want to buy another one, but the cost of the mortgages they are being offered keeps rising.
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meanwhile, they are living in a smaller house than before but her monthly energy bills have more than doubled. in this cost of living crisis... her household finances, like many of us, are being clobbered by bills she has no choice but to pay. we are looking at a rise in our energy bills, fuel bills and mortgage repayments which altogether will contribute to probably £300 a month more in our monthly bills, particularly at the moment we are trying to buy a house and the rise in mortgage rates have had a big impact on what we can afford. today, naomi and others have the bank of england to thank for turning up the heat even further by making new variable rates more expensive. the committee narrowly voted five in favour and four against to double the official interest rate from 0.25% to 0.5%. they're now predicting inflation might get as high as 7.25% by april.
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here is why... as this report 20 press... —— pecco went to press... sterling oil prices are almost 90% above their level is at the end of 2020. uk household gas prices were almost 400% higher. wholesale electricity price rises had risen by more than 300%. the idea is by making it more expensive to borrow it will slow down the inflationary temperature. but rising gas bills will have much more impact on what people can spend. a rate rise looks a lot less scary when you look back in time. it is important to put this historic rate rise in its historic context. if you look back in the early 90s, rates got above 14%, then after the global financial crisis they dropped to what is supposed to be emergency levels of 0.5% and they stayed there ever since more or less,
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dropping and rising just a little bit. the markets are now predicting the official rate will get up to one percentage point byjune, the highest it has been for 13 years. it is the first time interest rates have risen twice in a row since 2004, but that is only because since the financial crisis they have been at emergency lows. it's your energy bill, not your mortgage bill that you need to steal yourself most to open. andy verity, bbc news. well, the governor of the bank of england has told the bbc that workers negotiating their pay this year should not ask for too high a rise in order to help bring inflation under control. mr bailey said he was concerned that rising inflation would become ingrained in the economy. he's been speaking to our economics editor, faisal islam. we have seen food commodity prices going up. it's worth remembering that for some food, some basic foodstuffs, last summer was a very
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bad harvest in some parts of the world. if you look at wheat prices, for instance, those sharp increases in wheat prices. we have had a number of different shocks going on here, and we need to help and do all we can to help get through those as quickly as possible. and then start to relieve the burden on households. but what can interest rates to to the price of gas on a massive tanker arriving from america, or the wheat harvest, where we get our wheat from, how can interest it rises effect? ~ from, how can interest it rises effect? . ., from, how can interest it rises effect? ., . effect? we cannot affect those rices, i effect? we cannot affect those prices, i readily _ effect? we cannot affect those prices, i readily accept - effect? we cannot affect those prices, i readily accept that. i effect? we cannot affect those l prices, i readily accept that. but what we can do is try to prevent it becoming committed to spreading and inflation spreading, and inflation becoming more in the system. you need to get — becoming more in the system. you need to get in _ becoming more in the system. you need to get in peoples heads and ask them to ask for not too high pay rise? �* , , , ., rise? broadly, yes, i would say that. in rise? broadly, yes, i would say that- in the _ rise? broadly, yes, i would say
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that. in the sense _ rise? broadly, yes, i would say that. in the sense of _ rise? broadly, yes, i would say that. in the sense of saying, i rise? broadly, yes, i would say| that. in the sense of saying, we need to see a moderation of wage rises. that's painful. i don't want to, in any sense, sugar that, rises. that's painful. i don't want to, in any sense, sugarthat, it rises. that's painful. i don't want to, in any sense, sugar that, it is painful. but we need to see that in order to get through this problem more quickly. order to get through this problem more quickly-— order to get through this problem more quickly. isn't the pain already there? your— more quickly. isn't the pain already there? your own _ more quickly. isn't the pain already there? your own report _ more quickly. isn't the pain already there? your own report shows i more quickly. isn't the pain already there? your own report shows that| there? your own report shows that there? your own report shows that the squeeze on household incomes is the squeeze on household incomes is the worst since 1990. so, what more, there is no party here for you to take away the drinks bowl from, this is a grim situation for households. that's why it's a different situation to what you might call a typical inflation situation. the party that you refer to is when demand in the economy gets too great for the capacity to supply it and the prices go up because people are bidding for staff. that's not the case here. the good news is that growth has recovered now broadly to where it was before covid. but it's not a question of us having too much
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demand in the economy, we have got send their constraint on some of the things that we buy in the. gas being the obvious point. the things that we buy in the. gas being the obvious point.— the obvious point. the governor of the obvious point. the governor of the bank of _ the obvious point. the governor of the bank of england. _ president biden has been giving details about the us special forces operation in north—eastern syria which targeted the leader of the islamic state group, abu ibrahim al—hashimi al-qurayshi. this image — released by the white house — shows the president and vice president harris together with military chiefs — monitoring the raid from the situation room. president biden said the islamic state leader detonated an explosive device, killing himself and his family. here'sjoe biden describing the operation — a short while ago. last night, operating on my orders, the united states military forces successfully removed a significant terrorist threat to the world, the global leader of isis, known as haji abdullah,
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who took over as leader of isis in 2019 after the united states' counterterrorism operation killed al—baghdadi. since then, isis has directed terrorist operations targeting americans, our allies and partners and countless civilians in the middle east, africa and in south asia. he oversaw the spread of isis—affiliated terrorist groups around the world, savaging communities and murdering innocents. he was responsible for the recent brutal attack on a prison in north—east syria, holding isis fighters, which was swiftly addressed by our brave partners in the syrian democratic forces. he was a driving force behind the genocide of the yazidi people in north—western iraq in 2014. we remember the gut—wrenching stories of mass slaughters that wiped out entire villages, thousands of women and girls sold into slavery, rape used as a weapon of war. thanks to the bravery of our troops,
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this terrorist leader is no more. 0ur forces carried out the operation with their signature preparation and precision, and i directed the department of defence to take every precaution to minimise civilian casualties. knowing he'd surrounded himself with families, including children, we pursued a special forces raid at a much greater risk to our own people, rather than targeting him with an air strike. we made this choice to minimise civilian casualties. our team is still compiling the report, but we do know that, as our troops approached to capture the terrorist, in a final act of desperate cowardice, with no regard to the lives of his own family or others in the building, he chose to blow himself up, blow up that third floor, rather than face justice for the crimes he committed, taking several members of his family
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with him, just as his predecessor did. i am grateful for the courage and skill and determination of our forces, who skilfully executed this incredibly challenging mission. president biden. the nominations for this year? bafta form —— microfilm awards have been announced with sir kenneth branagh's belfast in the running for best film and best screenplay. it got six nominations. benedict cumberbatch's got eight and june got 11. leading the way the science fiction epic dune. it was one of the first post—pandemic blockbusters and is up for best film and ten other awards in behind—the—camera categories, reflecting the skill that went
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into making the movie. there are eight nominations for the 1920s western the power of the dog, including best actor for benedict cumberbatch and best supporting actor for kodi smit—mcphee. oh, well, do pardon me. good, justice really is possible. jane campion is also nominated for best director, one of three women on the six strong shortlist. these are the british academy awards and there is good representation for british films. belfast is up for six awards that include best film, and supporting performer nominations for katrina balfe... women are very mysterious... and for ciaran hinds. wives becomes less mysterious over the years. do you really like her? when i grow up, i want to marry her. it's a semi—autobiographical film by kenneth branagh about growing up in belfast during the troubles. the young star is 11—year—old jude hill who is overwhelmed
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by the movie's reception. it feels like i'm having some sort of dream and there has been a lot of pinch—me moments where i'm stilljust questioning everything i look at. but with all these really nice people saying so much good things about the film and saying all the stuff about awards, it is all pretty surreal, but, yeah... it's very crazy. i can't remember much, actually. some will be surprised to see a few big names not being nominated, like the lost daughter's 0livia coleman, kristin stewart who plays princess diana in the film spencer and denzil washington who plays the lead in the tragedy of macbeth. but stars like lady gaga may well be on the red carpet. she is up for best actress for her role in house of gucci... goodbye, 1930s, hello 80s, huh?
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..in a year when hollywood blockbusters and smaller, more personal films may well be sharing the limelight. let's get the word now with sarah. hello. now they are therefore most of us today, a fair bit of dry weather around as well but things are about to change —— it has been a fairly mild day for most of us. but there is a cold are streaming into behind it and where the air masses meet there is a cold front. that is bringing wet and windy weather over the next 24 and was. the cold front is moving in from the north—west, in the past few hours, rain across northern ireland, some of the turning to snow the higher ground. 0vernight we have a band of rain tracking south and east across the uk and it will turn to snow on the
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back edge. so for the higher ground of scotland and for instance as we head towards the pennines, they could be some wintriness on the band of rain. it would be pushing its way over night down across wales, heavy bursts here for a time, could be some snow for the likes of snowdonia, the peak district and in the early hours of friday morning, we are sitting across the south—east of england. a cold start to the day for another northern part of the uk. wintry showers piling in on cold surfaces. cold and icy start with brisk wind in the north, in the south—east we start under the band of rain which will clear away. then it will leave all of us in the cold air with a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers. the shower is falling as sleet and snow across the higher ground of scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, even to relatively lower levels further north. three degrees in lerwick, 9
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degrees in plymouth by the afternoon. feeling colder than it has done recently. moving further ahead looking towards the weekend, the next area of low pressure coming in from the atlantic. that will be the dividing line between the colder air in the north to the milder air towards the south. a picture of a weekend of mixed fortunes in terms of weather. the rain initially in scotland and northern ireland on saturday, becoming light and patchy as it sinks south across england and wales. ten or 11 degrees in the south—east. five or six in scotland. what wintry showers in parts of scotland. —— more wintry showers. milder in the south and outbreaks of rain. things are turning colder and also windier than they have been lately.
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at six, a huge rise in your energy bills from april — the chancellor sets out measures to help as the cost of living crisis intensifies. the typical bill in britain will hit £2,000 a year — after the limit on what energy suppliers can charge customers was raised. it's worrying and difficult at a time when everything seems to be rising at the same time. i don't have a crystal ball as to what exactly the future holds, but i want to be honest with people. higher energy prices are something that we're going to have to adjust to. inflation is on the up too — the bank of england warns by april it could hit its highest rate for more than 30 years. also on the programme tonight:
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one of the prime minister's longest serving members of staff,

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