Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  February 3, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

quote
6:00 pm
at six, 3 huge rise in your energy bills from april — the chancellor sets out measures to help as the cost of living crisis intensifies. the typical bill in britain will hit £2,000 a year — after the limit on what energy suppliers can charge customers was raised. it's worrying and difficult at a time when everything seems to be rising at the same time. i don't have a crystal ball as to what exactly the future holds, but i want to be honest with people. higher energy prices are something that we're going to have to adjust to. inflation is on the up too — the bank of england warns by april it could hit its highest rate for more than 30 years. also on the programme tonight:
6:01 pm
one of the prime minister's longest serving members of staff, munira mirza, has quit downing street over borisjohnson�*sjimmy savile attack on keir starmer. and northern ireland's minister resigns in a protest over brexit arrangements. and curling kicks off the winter olympics in beijing. and coming up in sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel, there's more misery for england's cricketers — the women, just ike the men, failing to regain the ashes from australia. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the cost of living crisis
6:02 pm
will intensify for millions of people this spring after the regulator 0fgem confirmed an increase in what energy companies can charge their customers. millions of households will now face soaring energy bills from april, with the average energy bill rising by almost £700 a year. that's because the energy price cap, which is what the average household in england, scotland and wales pays for energy if they're not on a fixed deal with their supplier, was increased to almost £2,000. the changes will affect around 22 million households in england, wales and scotland. interest rates have also doubled to 0.5%, as the bank of england tries to curb the rapid increase in cost of living. and inflation, which is the rate at which prices are rising, is expected to peak at 7.25% in april, well above the bank's target of 2%. we'll have the latest on that inflation prediction in a moment. but first here's our business editor, simonjack.
6:03 pm
for households like suzanne's, the news today on energy prices was every bit as bad as feared. from april, fuel bills will rocket, and heighten one of the biggest squeezes on household incomes in decades. it's a worrying and difficult a time when everything seems to be rising at the same time, and it's everything that you have to use, whether it be utilities, interest rates, petrol, food, everything's going up at the same time. suzanne pays just over £1100 a year for her energy. from april, that will rise by over 50%. and for a household using an average amount of energy, the annual price cap will rise from £1277 to 1971, a rise of £693 — nearly £60 a month. thank you, mr speaker. given the sheer size of the shot, the government felt it had little option but to provide
6:04 pm
some financial support. for me to stand here and pretend we don't have to adjust to paying higher prices would be wrong and dishonest. but what we can do is take the sting out of a significant price shock for millions of families by making sure the increase in prices is smaller initially and spread over a longer period. a rise of nearly £700 in average annual energy bills as a massive hit massive hit to household incomes. the chancellor wants to try and soften it in two ways. first, in april, homes in council tax bands a to d, that's over 80% of households, will get a £150 rebate funded by central government. and then, in october, £200 will be knocked off everyone�*s bills, but that money will have to be repaid — £40 a year for the next five years. now, they hope is that, by then,
6:05 pm
the sky high gas prices which have created this crisis may have fallen. but even any person who sets the price cap says that is far from certain. the head of 0fgem told the bbc there was no reason to think high prices would be short—lived. it's a very hard to predict energy prices at the moment, so the market is incredibly volatile. so it's very hard to say what will happen at the end of this year or early next year, but right now we are not seeing signs that these prices are coming down. visiting a community centre in bletchley today, the labour leader thought the measures were inadequate. it's a dodgy sort of buy now, pay later deal that doesn't come anywhere near beating at the cost or the increase in costs of energy bills, and it's really such a small response to a very big problem, and it's on the minds of so many people. gas, even when liquefied and carried in tankers like this, is the subject of a global bidding war, which could yet intensify — precisely why even energy retailers say we must invest in alternatives.
6:06 pm
the more we build uk energy independence through renewables — wind and solar, the cheaper our energy gets, every windmill means we use less gas, and will bring our prices down. but here and now, energy prices are sucking money out of household incomes, government coffers, and the economy as a whole. simon jack, bbc news. interest rates have risen for the second time in three months, to 0.5%, as the bank of england tries to curb a rapid rise in the cost of living. the bank warned that price rises could speed up with inflation predicted to hit more than 7% in april — the highest rate for more than 30 years. the governor of the bank of england, andrew bailey, has told the bbc that workers shouldn't ask for a high pay rise in order to bring inflation under control. he was speaking to our economics editor, faisal islam. prices rising everywhere —
6:07 pm
in our bills for food, in the price of used cars and, of course, so much of it brought in on record shipments of tankers full of imported natural gas, piped straight into our bills. today, the bank of england forecast that within weeks, the rate of inflation will hit 7.25% before falling, driven by those energy price hikes. that's well above the bank of england's target, the highest level in a generation. so today, the bank again raised interest rates to 0.5% to try to temper the rise in inflation. it's the second in what will be a series of rate rises this year though rates remain low by pre—financial crisis standards. those rate rises are having a real impact, for example on naomi mellor, trying to get a mortgage to buy a house as incomes are generally squeezed. it's been a long and drawn—out process since last year, and it's looking likely that we're probably going to end up paying £100—200
6:08 pm
more a month for the mortgage than we would have done prior to a rate rise, and when you couple that with rising energy bills, we've had a doubling of our energy bills in the last two months. at the bank, what they are trying to do is stop expectations of rising prices becoming self—fulfilling, filtering longer term into prices and wages. they very nearly raised rates even higher today. normally we get interest rate hikes like this to calm down a booming economy. the bank of england's job is to take the drinks bowl away from the party. but there is no party here, nor in millions of households up and down the country. the bank of england has lowered its forecast for the economy this year and next. and rising energy prices and food prices, and taxes too, are outweighing the rise in wages. this is a black day for living standards. the bank's forecast showed that factoring in prices and taxes, the average take—home pay of households, which normally goes up, was going down by the largest amount since these figures began in 1990. and yet, it is high rises in wages that
6:09 pm
the bank of england is most concerned about. what we can do is try to prevent it becoming, inflation spreading, becoming more ingrained. so you're trying to get into people's heads and ask them not to ask for too high pay rises? is that what you're trying to do? well, broadly, yes. really? in the sense of saying that we do need to see moderation of wage rises. ., ., , ~ rises. now, that is painful. an unusually _ rises. now, that is painful. an unusually blunt _ rises. now, that is painful. an - unusually blunt acknowledgement of tricky balancing act for a bank trying to tame inflation and for households trying to make ends meet. our business editor, faisal islam, joins us now to discuss all this. worrying times for people. how long could this last?— could this last? ordinarily, when ou aet could this last? ordinarily, when you get an _ could this last? ordinarily, when you get an energy _ could this last? ordinarily, when you get an energy price - could this last? ordinarily, when you get an energy price shock. could this last? ordinarily, when. you get an energy price shock like this, it goes up quickly and comes down fairly quickly. now, this is also the result of the freakish aftermath of the pandemic situation, and we are getting some signs that
6:10 pm
there was factory ray openings are beginning to catch up with the spike up beginning to catch up with the spike up in demand. so some tentative signs that it might be sorting itself out. not really from the energy market, and elsewhere in my interview with governor andrew bailey, he pointed out that factors between russia and ukraine could yet put up energy prices again, and he reflected some fears that have been around that, ordinarily when you get high prices, the gas and oil companies respond to that by investing more, getting more of the stuff out of the ground. but because of the backdrop of a variety of factors related to net zero and climate change, they don't seem to be doing that quite as much, and he said to me that there was a case to invest in gas to help the transition. that suggests that might be a factor that could keep gas prices higherfor be a factor that could keep gas prices higher for longer. be a factor that could keep gas prices higherfor longer. it's not that interest rates are going to deal with this issue alone. fiur deal with this issue alone. our economics _ deal with this issue alone. our economics editor, _ deal with this issue alone. 0ur economics editor, faisal islam, thank you. if you have any questions about today's announcement
6:11 pm
on energy prices, you can find more information on the bbc news website. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has told the bbc borisjohnson has his full support, but acknowledged controversy over downing street parties had damaged the public�*s confidence in the government. he said he believed the prime minister had always told the truth about parties held at number ten. mr sunak also dismissed talk of replacing mrjohnson as conservative leader, saying he was focused on his currentjob. he's been talking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg. everyone pays the bills, everyone will face the cost. but why is the chancellor offering taxpayers help from the bottom all the way to the top? with respect, you don't need an extra £200 to help with your bills — why is this going to everyone, rather than focusing more help on people who really, really need it? well, we are doing both of those things. the £200 is universal, and that's the bit that's repayable over time. this is a price shock which is significant enough that even those on middle incomes will feel the pinch of this. i wanted to make sure that we could do something to help them. in the longer term, though,
6:12 pm
do you think we are just going to have to get used to energy prices? well, it would be wrong, dishonest, for me to sit here and pretend that we don't have to adjust to higher energy prices — we do, but what government can do is take the sting out of that adjustment and make sure its smaller initially and spread over many more years. i mean, we've got rising inflation, we've got workers worse off in real terms than a year ago, interest rates also going in one direction. people are going to feel the pinch in the next few months, aren't they? can you be honest about that today? yes, and i know people are worried about this, and it's people's number one concern is the cost of living, and in particular rising energy prices. but what they'll see today is a government that's listened to that. the government's grappling not just with the economy but with what happened in number ten during lockdown. here was the chancellor, socially distanced, in the now famous downing street back garden. rishi sunak says he knew nothing of what his number ten neighbours were doing. for the record, chancellor, you knew of nothing, of any of these gatherings,
6:13 pm
even the one that happened outside that window, you knew nothing? as i said, people think i'm standing out here looking outside that window. i spend half my time in the treasury, as well as working here. but what i was focused on at that time, as were many people, is making sure that we could help the country through a period of enormous anxiety. and it was incredibly busy. you walked into the cabinet room at the end of borisjohnson�*s birthday celebration. did that not happen? i'm in the cabinet room for a covid meeting, much like the other 100, 200 covid meetings... but what did you see? you were there, what did you see? you're asking me about something that happened over two years ago, i walked into a meeting with a group of people, as i do all the time. do you worry, though, that this has damaged the public�*s confidence in the government that you're part of? yes, i think it has, and, you know, i can appreciate people's frustration, and i think it is now thejob of all of us in government, all politicians, to restore people's trust. but i think the best way for me to play a part in that
6:14 pm
is by delivering on the things that people expect me to do. some of your colleagues want the prime minister to go. if that were to happen, would you run to replace him? no, that's not what i'm focused on... that's not my question — would you do it? some mps want you to. well, it's very kind of them to suggest that, but what i think people want from me, what your viewers will want from me, is to focus on myjob. i think it is a hypothetical situation... it's not a hypothetical situation. no, it is, laura, i knowa few of my colleagues have said that. the prime minister has my full support. yet not everyone in the conservative party wants this double act to carry on. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, downing street. one of the prime minister's longest serving members of staff, munira mirza, the head of policy at downing street, has resigned over boris johnson's attack this week on the labour leader overjimmy savile. mrjohnson falsely claimed in the commons that sir keir starmer was personally responsible for failing to prosecute savile
6:15 pm
a claim widely criticised this week. today, boris johnson finally backtracked but failed to apologise. a short time ago, the chancellor said he would not have said what the prime minister said aboutjimmy savile. damian grammaticas reports. beset by crises, borisjohnson�*s troubles have often seen self inflicted when his veered off course. his remarks about sir keir starmer on monday met with dismay on all sides said today he tried to row back a bit. all sides said today he tried to row backa bit. i’m all sides said today he tried to row back a bit. �* . ~ ., ., back a bit. i'm talking not about the leader— back a bit. i'm talking not about the leader of _ back a bit. i'm talking not about the leader of the _ back a bit. i'm talking not about the leader of the opposition's i the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dbp, and i totally understand he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. i was making a point about his responsibility for the organisation as a whole. for munira
6:16 pm
mirza though. _ organisation as a whole. for munira mirza though. it _ organisation as a whole. for munira mirza though, it was _ organisation as a whole. for munira mirza though, it was too _ organisation as a whole. for munira mirza though, it was too much, - organisation as a whole. for munira mirza though, it was too much, and it prompted her to quit. she has been on borisjohnson�*s side for a decade but said it was wrong to link sir keir starmer with the factjimmy savile was not prosecuted. her resignation reported by the spectator said... resignation reported by the spectatorsaid... 0n resignation reported by the spectator said... on monday in the commons, under pressure over downing street parties, the prime minister had gone on the attack. this leader ofthe had gone on the attack. this leader of the opposition, _ had gone on the attack. this leader of the opposition, a _ had gone on the attack. this leader of the opposition, a former - had gone on the attack. this leader| of the opposition, a former director of the opposition, a former director of public prosecutions, mr speaker, spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecute jimmy savile as far as i can make out. in jimmy savile as far as i can make out. :: :: ' jimmy savile as far as i can make out. $1 $1 ' ,, jimmy savile as far as i can make out. :: :: ' ,, ,, ., out. in 2009, sir keir starmer oversaw the — out. in 2009, sir keir starmer oversaw the prosecution - out. in 2009, sir keir starmer i oversaw the prosecution service out. in 2009, sir keir starmer - oversaw the prosecution service but had nothing to do with the decision not to bring charges againstjimmy savile. he told mps it was another
6:17 pm
reason they should consider changing their leader. , , , ., their leader. theirs is the party of winston churchill. _ their leader. theirs is the party of winston churchill. now _ their leader. theirs is the party of winston churchill. now their - their leader. theirs is the party of i winston churchill. now their leader stands here parroting conspiracy theories of violent fascists to try to score cheap political points. while some cabinet ministers have defended mrjohnson, the chancellor today distanced himself. being honest, i wouldn't _ today distanced himself. being honest, i wouldn't have - today distanced himself. being honest, i wouldn't have said i today distanced himself. being honest, i wouldn't have said it| honest, i wouldn't have said it and i'm glad the prime minister clarified what he meant. this evenin: clarified what he meant. this evening downing _ clarified what he meant. this evening downing street said it was sorry to see munira mirza go what some in the tory party have said the resignation of borisjohnson�*s longest serving adviser is a sign that even those closest to him are starting to lose faith. damian grammaticas, bbc news. the time is 6:17. our top story this evening: the energy price cap goes up by 54%. the average gas and electricity bill in britain will hit almost £2,000 a year. and coming up — bafta announces its nominations for this year's awards, dune leads the way with 11. coming up in sportsday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel,
6:18 pm
we'll look ahead to rugby union's six nations championship which starts this weekend with the home nations naming their teams for the opening matches. northern ireland's first minister paul givan has resigned in protest at the northern ireland protocol. the protocol governs how goods travel between great britain and northern ireland and was negotiated as part of the brexit deal. it means goods crossing the irish sea into northern ireland are subject to new checks on entry. the idea was to avoid the need for checks on goods which travel into the irish republic. but unionists view this as effectively creating a border between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. his resignation means the deputy first minister michelle 0'neill of sinn fein also loses her position. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy is in belfast.
6:19 pm
when it comes to first and deputy first ministers in northern ireland, you can't have one without the other, so this ends the power sharing partnership at the top of government here. it is a calculated strike by the dup over the brexit arrangement but it puts policy—making in a whole range of other areas in jeopardy. political paralysis returns to stormont, something the dup have been threatening since last year. today the first minister stepped down, it was delivered. fiur down, it was delivered. our institutions _ down, it was delivered. our institutions are _ down, it was delivered. oi" institutions are being tested down, it was delivered. cl" institutions are being tested once again, and the delicate balance created by the belfast and st andrews agreements has been impacted by the agreement made by the united kingdom government and the european union, which created the northern ireland protocol. it union, which created the northern ireland protocol.— ireland protocol. it means the power-sharing _ ireland protocol. it means the power-sharing executive - ireland protocol. it means the power-sharing executive in i ireland protocol. it means the - power-sharing executive in northern power—sharing executive in northern ireland will cease to function. decision—making affecting thousands of lives on hold. for some time,
6:20 pm
this storm has been on the horizon. the new border checks on goods which cross the irish sea represent four unionist party is a deep betrayal and a threat to their position in the uk. last night, the dup ordered civil servants to stop carrying out these checks, but there is disagreement over whether that order is lawful. . , disagreement over whether that order islawful. . , ,, ,,, is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want _ is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want any _ is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want any checks _ is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want any checks on - is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want any checks on goods | don't want any checks on goods coming from great britain and northern ireland and we want minimal administration. we are calling for the eu and the uk to come to a negotiated outcome. wejust hope there is no rash reactions to this from either side. for there is no rash reactions to this from either side.— from either side. for example, northern ireland's _ from either side. for example, northern ireland's budget - from either side. for example, l northern ireland's budget cannot from either side. for example, - northern ireland's budget cannot now be approved meaning planning ahead for many public services will be on hold. what will happen with the remaining covid restrictions is not clear, and a planned apology to victims of historical abuse is now also likely to be postponed. it is also likely to be postponed. it is very clear _
6:21 pm
also likely to be postponed. it is very clear there _ also likely to be postponed. it 3 very clear there are catastrophic impacts in terms of the dup�*s actions today and many casualties, not least the victims of historical institutional abuse. this not least the victims of historical institutional abuse.— institutional abuse. this is being seen as a tactical _ institutional abuse. this is being seen as a tactical move - institutional abuse. this is being seen as a tactical move by - institutional abuse. this is being seen as a tactical move by the l institutional abuse. this is being i seen as a tactical move by the dup in the run—up to the may elections. the orange 0rder, in the run—up to the may elections. the orange order, which has significant influence, has been collecting tens of thousands of signatures of people opposing the northern ireland protocol, and it is voters like this the dup wants to keep onside. that election the dup has on its sides may now happen even earlier. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. the latest daily figures show more than 88,000 new cases recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, 88,500 new cases were reported per day in the last week. the number of people in hospital with covid has fallen to 111,816. 303 deaths were reported in the latest 24—hour period — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, though there will be some amongst this number who won't have died from covid. on average in the past week,
6:22 pm
256 deaths were announced every day. the scottish football club raith rovers has announced that david goodwillie will not play for them and said they "got it wrong" by signing him_ it follows widespread protests about the decision to sign the striker earlier this week, because of a court ruling in a civil case five years ago that he had raped a woman. club chairmanjohn sim apologised to fans for the "anger and anguished" caused. the 2022 winter olympics are getting under way in beijing. almost 3,000 athletes from 91 nations will compete with over 100 gold medals on offer across seven sports. team gb has already been in action in the curling. 0ur sports correspondent laura scott was watching. a bumpy day for britain in beijing — before the games have even begun. but remembering the summer of 2008 might help. rebecca adlington, two gold medals! christine 0huruogu takes the gold medal!
6:23 pm
now it's the olympics for those who prefer it a little colder, hoping to ski, skate and slide their way to their own golden moments. yes! fresh from his world cup slalom heroics, dave ryding's been selected as one of team gb's flag bearers, alongside curling skip eve muirhead. it will be a fourth 0lympics for them both. to get the honour to carry the flag for team gb is something really, really special, and it's definitely going to be a moment that i'll neverforget. widespread allegations of crimes against humanity in china and recent concern over the whereabouts and wellbeing of chinese tennis star peng shuai means that competing here at all doesn't sit well for some athletes, including american—turned—british skier gus kenworthy. in my opinion, i don't think any country should be allowed to host the games if they have appalling human rights stances and with china, i mean, there's a genocide happening in the country. i think the ioc should take a stance
6:24 pm
against a lot of these atrocities and stand up for important issues, but it's all about money, it seems like. uk sport believes the team should bring back between three and seven medals, with contenders across the board. we bring here a super talented team, more competitive across more disciplined than ever before, and ijust want to see them get out disciplines than ever before, and ijust want to see them get out onto the field of play, enjoy themselves, have a great experience, and i think the results will come as a consequence of that. if snowboard—cross wasn't so dramatic, charlotte banks would be considered a banker. and in the curling, mixed doubles pair bruce mouat and jen dodds are hoping to sweep their way to success. the world champions have already got their campaign under way here at the ice cube, winning two of their first three matches. focusing solely on the sport will be impossible for some athletes. but on the snow and the ice, they know the targets they've been set. laura scott, bbc news, beijing. the duchess of cambridge has carried
6:25 pm
out a rare joint engagement with the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall. the royal trio were visiting the prince's foundation's trinity buoy wharf, a training site for arts and culture in east london's docklands, where they met photography and animation students from the prince's foundation school of traditional arts. prince charles invited his daughter—in—law on the engagement because of her interest in and longstanding support for the arts and creative industries. this year's bafta nominations for the film awards are out. the sci—fi epic dune is leading the way with 11 nominations including best film. but the power of the dog — a 1920s western starring benedict cumberbatch — is also in the running for eight awards. and belfast — sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographical coming—of—age film — is up there too. 0ur entertainment editor katie razzall is in belfast where she has been talking to one of the film's youngest stars. my ma says if we went across the water, they wouldn't
6:26 pm
understand the way we talk. belfast is bafta's most garlanded british film, with six nominations, including for best film. we all have a story to tell. this story is kenneth branagh's — set in the city he grew up in, though some will see it as a snub that branagh himself has missed out on best director. when i grow up, i want to marry her... jude hill stars as nine—year—old buddy, on a set that recreated bra nagh's own street. it's just pretty cool to be here! we took him to the real street — the original houses long gone. it is new, and it looks a lot different than it did on set. taking on being the young ken could have been a challenge, but it clearly worked out. i don't think a lot of other 11—year—olds can say that kenneth branagh and judi dench and ciaran hinds are my best friends. today, hinds gets a nomination, as does 0utlander's caitriona balfe, in a film set against the backdrop of the troubles.
6:27 pm
i didn't know what they were, and a kid my age probably wouldn't know about them either, unless their parents or grandparents were affected by the troubles in any way. so this city has its moment in the sun. for a film about the troubles, yes, but through the eyes of a child focused on family and love. belfast has taken an impressive £7 million at the box office so far. but it's a blockbuster, dune, that has the highest number of bafta nominations — 11, primarily celebrating the creative and technical teams behind the sci—fi epic. i wonder, what little lady made these? period western the power of the dog has eight nominations, including best actor for benedict cumberbatch and best directorforjane campion. half the baftas' directing nominees are women this year. it's great that bafta is really acknowledging her work now. i have to say, it's personally a real thrill to see so many women recognised across so many fields, and particularly, for example, in the best director category.
6:28 pm
this baftas aims to put rows over diversity behind it. will smith is nominated for the first time ever in king richard. but there are upsets too — nothing for 0livia colman, nicole kidman or denzel washington. why don't you and my mom act like brother and sister? the youngest nominee is another 11—year—old, woody norman, for best supporting actor in indie road movie c'mon c'mon. it was like the biggest rush when he said woody norman, so me and mum just started screaming and jumping in the air, it was amazing. as for this 11—year—old, he's just enjoying the ride. if it ends up getting some 0scar nominations, what will your face look like then? probably the exact same as it did when i found out that i got the role! katie razzall, bbc news, belfast.
6:29 pm
whether in a moment built some breaking news, there hasjust been another resignation from the prime minister's top team in downing street tonight. just in the last few minutes we have confirmed reports that director of communications, a very importantjob in downing street, jack doyle has resigned this evening. we all know that downing street has been under significant attack in recent weeks and there had been an expectation that mr doyle might be one of the casualties because one of the things thatis casualties because one of the things that is seen to have gone wrong is how the prime minister has been explaining himself in the face of all those allegations about things that went on behind closed doors in downing street during lockdown. but if you put together mr doyle's resignation tonight with the surprise departure of his policy head, munira mirza, which really is a significant thing, she has been by his side for so long, it certainly adds to the sense of instability
6:30 pm
around boris johnson's adds to the sense of instability around borisjohnson's leadership around boris johnson's leadership tonight. around borisjohnson's leadership tonight. this could be, his allies may well suggest, the start of him trying to reboot and reset, but for his enemies and those who want him gone, it may be more evidence that things are deeply shaky and it could be time for the conservative party to rethink. ., ., be time for the conservative party to rethink. . . , , , to rethink. laura kuenssberg with that breaking _ to rethink. laura kuenssberg with that breaking news, _ to rethink. laura kuenssberg with that breaking news, thank - to rethink. laura kuenssberg with that breaking news, thank you. i to rethink. laura kuenssberg with i that breaking news, thank you. now the weather forecast. here's sarah keith—lucas. this was the picture earlier on in cornwall, but things are about to change in terms of the weather forecast. we have a cold front moving in which will usher in colder air, and wetter conditions. we have the rain in scotland and northern ireland, on the rear edge for a time it is turning to snow over higher ground as it moves further south. windy conditions with gales overnight, and with that rain and some sleet and hill snow on the northern edge of that will be
6:31 pm
sitting across

75 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on