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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  February 3, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. a this is outside source. major blow for borisjohnso two a major blow for borisjohnson as two of his top aides in downing street quit, one directly criticising him for hisjimmy savile attack on keir starmer. any the past few minutes, his director of communications jack doyle has resigned, following munira mirza. in other news, the us says it's killed the leader of the islamic state group in a special forces raid in syria. he was responsible for the recent present attack on a prison and north—east serie a holding ices
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fighters —— in syria. the white house says he blew himself up during the raid on his home in idlib. 13 people died — 6 were children. the average energy household could see bills rise by £700. and there is a rare adopting about captain cook's ship in devonshire after it is claimed the wreck has been found. —— a row brewing. let's start with the latest blow to boris johnson's let's start with the latest blow to borisjohnson�*s leadership. jack doyle quits, following munira mirza are resigned today. she doyle quits, following munira mirza are resigned today. she said today... it is a reference to the
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false accusation that sir keir starmer was responsible for failing to prosecute the child abuserjimmy savile. why has the director of communications gone? we savile. why has the director of communications gone?- savile. why has the director of communications gone? we do not have a full explanation. _ communications gone? we do not have a full explanation. what _ communications gone? we do not have a full explanation. what we _ communications gone? we do not have a full explanation. what we have - communications gone? we do not have a full explanation. what we have at - a full explanation. what we have at the minute is at the confirmation that jack doyle has resigned. the minute is at the confirmation thatjack doyle has resigned. he has been there as the director of communications, as you say, the man basically behind the scenes marshalling the prime minister's message, as it were. and he, confirmation a short time ago that he has quit and has gone. there has been this pressure on borisjohnson, pressure on his staff on this issue of downing street parties that has been investigated by the police now and the multiple different explanations and accounts we have had coming from downing street, so it has been a very difficult period for downing street in terms of
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communications. against that backdrop, he has decided to go. so the communications chief has gone and earlier in the day, the policy chief has gone. she and earlier in the day, the policy chief has gone.— and earlier in the day, the policy chief has one. ,, . , ., chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons. chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons- yes. _ chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons. yes, they _ chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons. yes, they are _ chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons. yes, they are both - chief has gone. she has detailed her reasons. yes, they are both figures| reasons. yes, they are both figures who would not _ reasons. yes, they are both figures who would not be _ reasons. yes, they are both figures who would not be in _ reasons. yes, they are both figures who would not be in the _ reasons. yes, they are both figures who would not be in the public- reasons. yes, they are both figures| who would not be in the public eye, but are pretty significant cogs in the machinery that boris johnson but are pretty significant cogs in the machinery that borisjohnson has around him. munira mirza, the head of policy has been with mrjohnson for m years. his longest serving adviser. she was there all the way through his time for mayor of london and now brought into downing street. what she said in her statement as it was those comments you are referencing, that mrjohnson made at the beginning of the week under pressure in the debate where he was being questioned about the downing street parties, he rounded on the opposition leader sir keir starmer and what mrjohnson said was that sir keir starmer, a former director of public prosecutions, in charge of
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the uk's official prosecutions service, back into their is a name, spent his time prosecuting journalists and a feeling to prosecute jimmy savile, journalists and a feeling to prosecutejimmy savile, high—profile prosecute jimmy savile, high—profile entertainer, prosecutejimmy savile, high—profile entertainer, personality, he was on the bbc a lot, police investigated him and did not prosecute, but after his death he was found to be a serial abuser. his death he was found to be a serialabuser. mr his death he was found to be a serial abuser. mr starmer was not involved any decision, had no part any decision not to prosecute him so what the advisor today, said as she urged the prime minister to apologise, when he did not today, she took the step of resigning. she said this was not the usual cut and thrust of politics, it was inappropriate partisan reference to a horrendous case of child six abuser. she said despite merging, you did not apologise —— chance
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so so the policy chief has gone, becomes chief has gone, who has left? does mrjohnson have a full team at the moment? presumably not. the have team at the moment? presumably not. they have already _ team at the moment? presumably not. they have already moved _ team at the moment? presumably not. they have already moved to _ team at the moment? presumably not. they have already moved to fill - team at the moment? presumably not. they have already moved to fill that - they have already moved to fill that role of the policy chief with another figure. role of the policy chief with anotherfigure. there role of the policy chief with another figure. there are, role of the policy chief with anotherfigure. there are, of course, all of the other oppressed people because it's a big machine. there is the chief of staff, other policy people any team, so there are people around him, but i think what some tory mps and the tory party are saying, they are pointing to this and saying for his closest, longest serving adviser to have gone in this way, publicly criticising mrjohnson as she left the door, shows, they say, that some of those closest to him are starting to lose faith in him are starting to lose faith in him and significantly, i think, what we saw this evening was his chancellor, the finance minister,
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basically the second most powerful person in government, any press conference this evening asked about this resignation of the policy chief and whether he agreed with her that mrjohnson should have apologised, he was pretty blunt, he said, i would not have said those comments, i'm glad the prime minister has clarified it. so distancing himself there from the prime minister. again a saying, i think of was real destabilisation i read mrjohnson that we continue to see. thank you for taking us through it, damien. let's turn to northern ireland now — and the first minister of the assembly has resigned in protest over border controls that were introduced as part of the uk's brexit deal. checks on goods entering northern ireland from the rest of the uk began in january last year. the arrangement is meant to ensure that goods can continue to move
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between the land border of northern ireland and ireland, an eu state. the northern ireland protocol, as its called, is deeply unpopular amongst unionist politicians who don't want any barriers between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. political paralysis returns to stormont, something the dup have been threatening since last year. today the first minister stepped down, it was delivered. our institutions are being tested once again, and the delicate balance created by the belfast and st andrews agreements has been impacted by the agreement made by the united kingdom government and the european union, which created the northern ireland protocol. it means the power—sharing executive in northern ireland will cease to function. decision—making affecting thousands of people's lives on hold. for some time, this storm has been on the horizon. the new border checks on goods
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which cross the irish sea represent for unionist parties, a deep betrayal and a threat to their position in the uk. last night, the dup ordered civil servants to stop carrying out these checks, but there is disagreement over whether that order is lawful. ideally businesses, we don't want any checks on goods coming from great britain into northern ireland and we want minimal administration as well. we are calling for the eu and the uk to come to a negotiated outcome. wejust hope there is no rash reactions to this from either side. this kind of political crisis is not new in northern ireland. when something similar happened in 2017, there was no government for three years. this time, different departments will continue to function but what they can do will be limited. for example, northern ireland's budget cannot now be approved meaning planning ahead for many public services will be on hold. what will happen with the remaining covid restrictions is not clear, and a planned apology to victims
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of historical abuse is now also likely to be postponed. it is very clear there are catastrophic impacts in terms of the dup's actions today and many casualties, not least the victims of historical institutional abuse. this is being seen as a tactical move by the dup in the run—up to the may elections. the orange order, which has significant influence, has been collecting tens of thousands of signatures of people opposing the northern ireland protocol, and it is voters like this the dup wants to keep onside. that election the dup has in its sights may now happen even earlier. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. lets bring emma live from belfast. what strategy are the unionists pursuing here? what action do they think this will trigger from the european union and the uk government?— european union and the uk
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government? ., ., , ., government? you are right, it is a strate: . government? you are right, it is a strategy- any _ government? you are right, it is a strategy- any dup _ government? you are right, it is a strategy. any dup has _ government? you are right, it is a strategy. any dup has been - government? you are right, it is a strategy. any dup has been underj strategy. any dup has been under pressure for a while because of that new border in the irish sea which effectively happened, some critics say, on their watch. they were in a position of power in westminster for a while when theresa may's government was in power and then they were given promises by boris johnson. they then feel he betrayed them and that is how we ended up with this irish sea border, so what are they thinking? for some time they have been ramping up the rhetoric on this, saying to voters, we are doing everything to oppose at the irish sea border, there was a threat last year by the party leader jeffrey donaldson, ministers would need to pull out if it came came to this. as we get closer to an election, having made that threat, if you like, the party made a calculation they could not be credible any longer unless they followed through on it, otherwise they will look like they are crying wolf. a lot of the opposition political opponents of the dup say
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it as a stunt to garner support from their core supporters in the run—up to an election. really, they hope it will bring perhaps a wavering dup voters back on the side and see them as the party that is really standing up as the party that is really standing up to the eu. over what they do not like. what it will have on negotiations over the eu is not going to make it any worse than they. it means the uk government can effectively say to the uk, look, there was instability at stormont i know you have the dup effectively undermining things further —— the uk government can effectively say to the... the dup have made a calculation, they needed to strike and they have done it. so i understand that a bit further, if it is a stunt or political mover and it works and voters turn to the dup and do well, would they then be in a formal position to place themselves between the eu and uk art the unable
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to apply pressure from the outside of that negotiation? they are really applying pressure from the outside, they? there have been dup representatives with their negotiations any joint committee representatives with their negotiations anyjoint committee in the past, but this is really between liz truss, the foreign secretary and the eu. they must come to this agreement and they have been at a really critical point trying to nail this down. this is, yes, pressure exerted from the outside, and of course there is a precursor to this last night, the dup minister in charge of the department operates the czechs instructed them to simply heart that, which again is not going to be making a very happy —— which operates these checks instructed them to simply stop that. it is pressure applied from the outside, the dup felt they could not continue any further without following through on what they promise to do. all right, emma, thank you very much indeed.
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joe biden says that the leader of the islamic state group has been killed in an overnight raid in northwest syria. idlib province is close to the turkish border. us special forces reportedly stormed a building in the town of atme. this image was released by the white house. the president and vice president together with military chiefs watching a live feed of the operation. here'sjoe biden. last nights operation took a major terrorist of the field and sent a message that we will come after you. the white house also said that qurashi detonated a bomb during the raid on the house — which killed him and members of his family. this is the aftermath. it's estimated at least 13 people were killed, including six children. let's hear from an eyewitness. translation: in the middle of the niaht, we translation: in the middle of the night. we felt _
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translation: in the middle of the night, we felt to _ translation: in the middle of the night, we felt to win _ translation: in the middle of the night, we felt to win storm, - translation: in the middle of the night, we felt to win storm, we - translation: in the middle of the | night, we felt to win storm, we went out and sell planes above us. ten minutes later, we heard screams, surrender, the house is surrounded. we heard a fire, shelling from aeroplanes and machine guns. here's what we know about al-qurayshi. he became the leader of is in october 2019. he played a major role in the 2014 jihadist campaign to kill and enslave the yazidi religious minority in iraq. he also oversaw the terror group's global operations. here is the pentagon'sjohn kirby. here is the pentagon'sjohn kirby. he was a very hands—on leader and very involved in many day—to—day operations of isis and certainly keenly interested in restoring the lethality and the higher up the tempo that isis once enjoyed, so his
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death we believe dealt a significant blow to isis. death we believe dealt a significant blow to isle— here's our middle east correspondent anna foster in beirut. this was a late—night raid in the town of atme, which is very close to the border with turkey, and what we're told is that us special forces moved in using multiple helicopters. people who were living in the area reported hearing loudspeakers with messages in arabic telling women and children to leave the area. what is also interesting to note is the amount of fighting that clearly happened on the ground. this was a well—fortified position, and we're told that when us special forces troops moved in that there were fighters ready to try and repel them on the ground. those fighters had vehicles with anti—aircraft guns mounted on them and they put up stiff opposition to that us raid. now, we were told very early in the morning by the pentagon that raid had been a success. we didn't know immediately exactly what that meant.
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they said that none of the us special forces had been killed or injured in that raid. what we do know, though, is that 13 civilians lost their lives. the syrian white helmets, who do humanitarian work in the area, told us that they had recovered 13 bodies, including six children and four women, and they'd also ferried various people to hospital who were involved in what was going on there. and then a few hours later, it was confirmed by the us president, joe biden, that they had killed the leader of the islamic state group, abu ibrahim al-qurayshi. he's been in charge of the group since 2019, since the previous leader, abu bakr al—baghdadi, was killed in an almost—identical raid to this one by coalition forces in syria. let's bring gary o'donoghue in washington. we heard they are from and talking about coalition in syria. what isjoe biden�*s degree of
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commitment there. it is syria. what is joe biden's degree of commitment there.— syria. what is joe biden's degree of commitment there. it is now limited to trainin: commitment there. it is now limited to training and _ commitment there. it is now limited to training and support. _ commitment there. it is now limited to training and support. there - commitment there. it is now limited to training and support. there has . to training and support. there has been a formal end to us involvement in iraq and syria over the last couple of years but there are trips there doing that kind of thing. this operation demonstrates there is a clear commitment to carry out these counterterrorism activities. particularly when they get reliable information, they have had this apparently since december and been planning it since then and joe biden gave the go—ahead for it on tuesday. i think it is interesting because if you cast your mind back, joe biden was against a similar kind of red to take out osama bin laden in pakistan backin take out osama bin laden in pakistan back in 2011—— similar kind of raid. a different country and different similar circumstances but he has clearly now be persuaded these type of incursions are a good idea when the focus of us foreign policy is no on great power
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politics, china, russia now, what is happening in ukraine, ratherthan what is happening in the islamic state group. it what is happening in the islamic state grow-— what is happening in the islamic state group. what is happening in the islamic state u-rou. , , , state group. it will be presented as an achievement _ state group. it will be presented as an achievement for _ state group. it will be presented as an achievement for his _ an achievement for his administration. has he offered any broader thoughts to a assyria, finding any long—term peace and stability? == finding any long-term peace and stabili ? ., ., ., , stability? -- two syria finding any long-term — stability? -- two syria finding any long-term peace _ stability? -- two syria finding any long-term peace and _ stability? -- two syria finding any long-term peace and stability. i long—term peace and stability. pretty silent on all of that right now. the american focus is not really that part of the world as you know. the idea of not being involved in endless wars, asjoe biden always puts it, is quite a big one here in washington, so i don't think there's a lot of us involvement in that. they are, as i say, helping to cooperate and train the syrian democratic forces and the kurdish forces in those parts of northern syria and northern iraq and that border area, syria and northern iraq and that borderarea, but syria and northern iraq and that border area, but beyond that, i do not think there is a lot of involvement right now and a lot of
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focus. but obviously, when something like this comes along, and a high—value target like al-qurayshi presents himself, they can take that limited action to go in there and do it, get out, and they have had success this time around. gary, thank you _ success this time around. gary, thank you very _ success this time around. gary, thank you very much _ success this time around. gary, thank you very much indeed. i rising energy prices are causing a major squeeze on incomes across the world. in the uk, the energy regulator today announced big rises in bills that will affect millions of households. the average household bill for gas and electricity will go up by nearly £700 as the energy price cap. rises to nearly £2,000. this is a huge challenge for families and for the government — which has announced financial
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support to ease the impact — totalling £350 for the average household. our business editor simonjack reports. for households like suzanne's, the news today on energy prices was every bit as bad as feared. from april, fuel bills will rocket and tighten one of the biggest squeezes on household incomes in decades. it's worrying and difficult a time when everything seems to be rising at the same time. and it's everything that you have to use, whether it be utilities, interest rates, petrol, food, everything's going up at the same time. suzanne pays just over £1100 a year for her energy. from april, that will rise by over 50%. and for a household using an average amount of energy, the annual price cap will rise from £1277 to £1971 — a rise of £693, nearly £60 a month. thank you, mr speaker. given the sheer size of the shock, the government felt it had little
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option but to provide some financial support. for me to stand here and pretend we don't have to adjust to paying higher prices would be wrong and dishonest. but what we can do is take the sting out of a significant price shock for millions of families by making sure the increase in prices is smaller initially and spread over a longer period. a rise of nearly £700 in average annual energy bills is a massive hit to household incomes. the chancellor wants to try to soften it in two ways. first, in april, homes in council tax bands a to d, that's over 80% of households, will get a £150 rebate funded by central government. and then, in october, £200 will be knocked off everyone's bills, but that money will have to be repaid — £40 a year for the next five years.
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now, the hope is that, by then, the sky—high gas prices which have created this crisis may have fallen. but even the person who sets the price cap says that is far from certain. the head of ofgem told the bbc there was no reason to think high prices would be short—lived. it's a very hard to predict energy prices at the moment, so the market is incredibly volatile. so it's very hard to say what will happen at the end of this year or early next year, but right now we are not seeing signs that these prices are coming down. visiting a community centre in bletchley today, the labour leader thought the measures were inadequate. it's a dodgy sort of buy now, pay later deal that doesn't come anywhere near meeting the cost or the increase in costs of energy bills, and it's really such a small response to a very, very big problem, and it's on the minds of so many people. gas, even when liquefied and carried in tankers like this, is the subject of a global bidding war which could yet intensify — precisely why even energy retailers say we must invest in alternatives.
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the more we build uk energy independence energy independence through renewables — wind and solar — the cheaper our energy gets. every windmill means we use less gas and will bring our prices down. but here and now, energy prices are sucking money out of household incomes, government coffers, and the economy as a whole. simon jack, bbc news. countries across europe are grappling with this issue too. in germany, the government has cut a green surcharge on bills which supports renewable energy projects, as well as offering 130 million euros in one—off grants, to low income households. spain has also cut taxes on energy bills, covering the cost by introducing a windfall tax on utility companies worth about 2 billion euros. let's get more on the response elsewhere from our correspondents in the netherlandsand in france. i'm hugh schofield in france, where what gives the energy price rises added bite is the fact that
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we're just two months off a presidential election. the last thing that emmanuel macron wants now is another bout of yellow vest—style rioting, so he's doing all he can to soften the blow to consumers. that's meant two separate handouts of 100 euros each to poorer households, but more significantly, a cap on the rise in the price of electricity this year of just 4%, where if the market were truly free, the price rise would be more like 50%. who's going to pay the price for that? well, it's the largely state—owned electricity provider edf, and as a result, its share price has, not surprisingly, fallen sharply. i'm anna holligan, and here in the netherlands, we're highly dependent on gas for heating, electricity and industrial production. so about 40% of dutch energy is generated from gas,
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and about 92% of dutch households depend on gas to keep cosy. the dutch government was pretty fast to react, so when the energy prices started to soar on the wholesale markets back in october, they announced a range of measures — a 3.2 billion euro package to try to shield customers from the impact. among those — energy tax cuts, which should save homeowners about 400 euros a year. this country, though, actually has among the lowest share of renewables in europe, and they're trying to change that, trying to shift away from the fossil fuels to cleaner, greener alternatives things like green hydrogen and electro or e—fuels instead. and, of course, the environmental and financial incentives are becoming increasingly clear. in the second half we will turn back
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to the maelstrom in westminster, borisjohnson losing to advisers in one day. we will have more on that. good evening, today has been another mild day, the same cannot be said for tomorrow because kildare has been lying in wait up to the north—west and is now making its move south eastwards. the cold air being brought in our direction by this weather front. being brought in our direction by this weatherfront. a being brought in our direction by this weather front. a cold front, this weather front. a cold front, this generating heavy bursts of rain through tonight and, indeed, a little bit of wintry weather on its back edge. wintry showers pushing on across scotland and northern ireland and quite strong and gusty winds, but let's follow this progress of the weather front as it sinks across england and wales overnight, some very heavy bursts of rain through the pain in square peak district, hills of wales, even at the moors of south—west england. we could see
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some snow mixing and because of the air tucking some snow mixing and because of the airtucking infor some snow mixing and because of the air tucking in for the night. still mild, six were norwich, seven in london behind it much colder with wintry showers and ice likely to cause issues across parts of scotland as northern ireland tomorrow. i weather front bringing some much needed rain into the south—east. of any high ground, potential wintriness mixing in. it will then clear and by the afternoon, it has a sunshine and showers study, some of the showers wintry in the north and northern scotland, even to quite a low levels for a time. the wind gusts widely 30, 40, 50 miles perany for a time. the wind gusts widely 30, 40, 50 miles per any north. nothing extreme, but it will add to a cold feel. temperatures are the afternoon between four and 9 degrees. through friday night, a brief, drier interlude, but into the weekend it is this weather front that will dominate the weather, pushing in from the west, bringing outbreaks of rain anticipating the cold air which will cling on in the north from something milder, which will attempt to stage a return in
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the south. i weather front will bring a pics of rain across parts of northern ireland, scotland into northern england and wales, strong winds across northern areas, wintry showers into scotland, sting was that i don't wear these out what it will be mild, ten or 11 degrees, but colder air across the northern half of the uk. it looks like the weather front will move further south waits without pics of rain allowing more idiots to get back into the cold air with a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers. it will be another wintry showers. it will be another wintry day. much colder further north, just four in north—west scotland.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. another blow for boris johnson another blow for borisjohnson as two of his top aides in downing street have quit, when directly criticising him for savile attack on keir starmer. the director of communications jack doyle has also resigned telling staff the recent weeks have taken a terrible toll on his family. he follows the policy chief minerva mercer who quit only one. in other news, the leader of the islamic state group was killed in an overnight raid. last the islamic state group was killed in an overnight raid.— in an overnight raid. last night's o eration in an overnight raid. last night's operation took _ in an overnight raid. last night's operation took a _ in an overnight raid. last night's operation took a major - in an overnight raid. last night's operation took a major terrorist | operation took a major terrorist leader off the world and send a
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strong message to terrorists around the world, we will come out and find you. the world, we will come out and find ou. ., ., , you. the pentagon said he blew himself up _ you. the pentagon said he blew himself up in — you. the pentagon said he blew himself up in his _ you. the pentagon said he blew himself up in his home - you. the pentagon said he blew himself up in his home in - you. the pentagon said he blew himself up in his home in italy. | you. the pentagon said he blew. himself up in his home in italy. 13 people died. three were his children. new zealand is reopening its borders two years after imposing some of the world's strict border controls like many kiwis to work. moving to a new city in the middle of a pandemic in america is definitely not the easiest thing to do on phone calls on skype and facetime and all of that have been testing but nothing being home. find testing but nothing being home. and a row has erupted over the final resting place of captain cook's endeavour shipped after australian researchers claim they found the wreck. boris johnson's policy chief has resigned. because, on monday, the prime minister made this false claim.
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this lead at the opposition, a former director of public prosecutions, mr speaker, spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and notjimmy savile. there's no evidence to support what mrjohnson said. and in her resignation letter, munira mirza writes... "i believe it was wrong for you to imply this week that keir starmer was personally responsible for allowing jimmy savile to escape justice." "there was no fair or reasonable basis for that assertion." and munira mirza's says her resignation isn'tjust about the allegation. it's about what's happened since. this was the deputy prime minister on tuesday describing what happened the day before. this is the cut and thrust of parliamentary debates and exchanges. in response, munira mirza writes... "this was not the usual cut and thrust of politics; it was an inappropriate and partisan reference to a horrendous case of child sex abuse." and on wednesday, the prime minister was challenged by keir starmer. now their leader stands in the house of commons parroting the conspiracy theories of violent fascists to try and score cheap political points. to which borisjohnson replied... i am informed that in 2018 the right
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honourable gentleman apologised and took full responsibility for what had happened on his watch and i think, mr speaker, that was the right thing to do. keir starmer was director of public prosecutions for five years. he did commission a report that was published in 2013. the bbc reported its finding that... "opportunities to prosecute jimmy savile for sex offences were missed because police and prosecutors did not take allegations seriously." and at the time keir starmer said... "i would like to take the opportunity to apologise for the shortcomings in the part played by the crown prosecution service in these cases." but this is not, as the prime minister alleged, keir starmer failing to prosecutejimmy savile. indeed, the crown prosecution service has told the bbc: "there is no reference within the 2013 report to any involvement from the director of public prosecutions in the decision—making in the case." no known involvement at the time. no involvement detailed in the report. and, remember, borisjohnson
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said keir starmer had... spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecute jimmy savile! also on wednesday, tory mp tobias elwood called for mrjohnson to resign — and referenced the allegation. here we havejimmy savile mentioned in the very, very debate that's the response to the sue gray report. that's not showing the contrition i think the nation want to see. other tory mps were critical too. but on thursday, ministerjames cleverly continued the defence. keir starmer himself ex... so it's a smear? no, no. it's a smear. it's a criticism. not a smear, a criticism says james cleverly. also on thursday, borisjohnson decided he had more to say on this. i want to be very clear about this because a lot of people have got very hot under the collar and i understand why. it seems unlikely anyone getting hot under the collar came as a surprise. sebastian payne from the ft reported...
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johnson was "strongly advised" not to use thejimmy saville quip by some advisors inside number 10. the prime minister would, though, go ahead. and here's more from his clarification. let's be absolutely clear. i'm talking not about the leader of the opposition�*s personal record when he was dpp and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. the prime minister then elaborated on his point. i was making a point about his responsibility to the organisation as a whole, and i think people can see that and i really do want to clarify that because it is important. not all people �*see that'. certainly not munira mirza.|n her letter she writes: "you tried to clarify your position today but, despite my urging, you did not apologise for the misleading impression you gave."and with that, she was gone. after working with the prime minister for years. the spectator broke the story — and tells us: "she is someone who has been vital to borisjohnson�*s remarkable political journey from city hall to vote leave to downing street."
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the bbc�*s laura kuenssberg quotes a former colleague of them both, predicting this is the end game: the source adds: "the apocalypse is preceded by all sorts of things you never expect to happen. the moon turns red and the sun goes black. and while this controversy has gathered pace, senior tories have been taking their positions. the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg has drawn a parallel — between keir starmer�*s apology on behalf of the cps and borisjohnson�*s apology for lockdown gatherings in number 10. or, as mr rees—mogg puts it... what is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander, and that the geese and the gander should not complain one or the other. they are perfectly fair and reasonable points of political debate. fair and reasonable, says jacob rees—mogg. chancellor rishi sunak has a different perspective. you know, being honest, iwouldn�*t have said it and i'm glad that the prime minister clarified what he
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meant. but as we've heard that clarification wasn't enough for munira mirza. in response to her resignation: downing street says: "we are very sorry munira has left no 10 and are grateful for her service and contribution to government." and so continued a day that had started with mrjohnson telling the sun. "we are focused on the job in hand remorselessly." right now the focus on his leadership is remorseless too. in march 2020, new zealand imposed some of the world's toughest covid—19 border rules. nearly all foreigners were banned from entering. the strict rules even prevented many of its own citizens from returning.
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two years on and the government is shifting strategy. this is prime minister jacinda ardern. today i'm announcing that the fully—vaccinated kiwis and other currently eligible travellers from australia will be able to travel to new zealand from 11:59pm sunday 27th february, and instead of going into miq, will be able to self—isolate. so, new zealand is opening up. it'll happen in five stages. fully—vaccinated new zealanders living in australia and residents of february and must isolate for 10 days. new zealanders in the rest of the world can return from mid—march. then final border restrictions are due to end in october. here's jacinda ardern again. overall, opening back
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up in this managed way up in this managed way balances inflows of of travellers so people can reunite and fulfil our workforce shortages, also ensuring our health care system can manage increased cases. after all, our strategy with omicron is to slow the spread, and our borders are a part of that strategy. this is a major shift in policy. there are 5 million new zealanders in new zealand. and 1 million abroad. apologies, that is a quote from an earlier story. the citizens currently, citizens who want to return do so via a lottery system to secure a spot in a state—run quarantine facility. this is new zealander a in san francisco. really mixed. i had actually decided only two weeks ago that i was going to stop even looking at updates around the border situation because ijust couldn't handle the emotional roller coaster any longer, it was too hard and was starting to really get at me because it's... i miss home. a lot. um, yeah.
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moving to a new city in the middle of a pandemic in america is definitely not the easiest thing to do, and phone calls and and skype and facetime and all that are fantastic, but nothing replaces being home. there are limited spaces in m10. to get a spot, citizens must enter what's called the virtual lobby where theyjoin an online queue. quarantine rooms are released at specific times, however this doesn't guarantee you a spot. if your case is an emergency, you can apply in a another way, however not all of them are granted. all of this was put in the spotlight this week when journalist, charlotte bellis, who is pregnant said she wasn't able to fly to new zealand to give birth and said she turned to the taliban for help. after a huge outcry, she was allocated a place in m10. there are many other stories of new zealanders stranded abroad. grounded kiwis is a group helping them. this is its founder. every day we receive so many emails into our email box, messages via facebook, other social media platforms. there are people living in cars because they've
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lost their homes, lost theirjobs, people that aren't able to say goodbye to their relatives who are dying. it's literally constant. you know, from a mental health perspective, that's been a massive impact. you know, i've had people reach out to me who i've had to refer to mental health services in their current country because i'm genuinely concerned for the state that they're in. and yet they can't get back to new zealand to get the support they need. tudor clee is a barrister who has been helping players good new zealanders and has grown in mexico city. ten results of the cases
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you've been working on. the cases, obviously miss _ you've been working on. the cases, obviously miss ballast's _ you've been working on. the cases, obviously miss ballast's case - you've been working on. the cases, obviously miss ballast's case is - obviously miss ballast's case is most well known. i have helped over 30 couples to either get the mother back to new zealand or the partner back to new zealand or the partner back on the problem of the cases is that people who are assessing these emergency applications for pregnancy reasons have no medical qualifications and in every single place i've dealt with they have overruled the medical advice of an obstetrician, a doctor, a midwife of a hospital so we are essentially having women put in incredibly dangerous medical situations and it is clear that the government has no interest in fixing it and come again, this border announcementjust again, this border announcement just leave again, this border announcementjust leave some of the women i am representing in dangerous situations.— representing in dangerous situations. , situations. i'm sure the government would say it — situations. i'm sure the government would say it is _ situations. i'm sure the government would say it is concern _ situations. i'm sure the government would say it is concern for— situations. i'm sure the government would say it is concern for every - would say it is concern for every new zealander who is abroad but it would also point to the fact it need to protect the whole country from the threat that covid—19 can pose. do you think they should be any bolder rules in place at this stage?
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that is a separate issue. personally, i don't think there should be but the ever with what you are asserting is to suggest that there are only in limited number of spacesin there are only in limited number of spaces in these pregnant women. in the same way i had to sue the government five times in the high court to obtain access to pregnant women who have been a client coming back, the government green lit eight united kingdom citizen djs to new zealand and takes spots in mit. so it is not an issue that there isn't space. that is simply in issue that the government cares more about summer concerts with foreign djs thanit summer concerts with foreign djs than it does about its own citizens. i'm sure the government would very much a feat that. you i'm sure the government would very much a feat that.— much a feat that. you anticipate, thou~h, much a feat that. you anticipate, though. that _ much a feat that. you anticipate, though. that in — much a feat that. you anticipate, though, that in the _ much a feat that. you anticipate, though, that in the next - much a feat that. you anticipate, though, that in the next few - much a feat that. you anticipate, i though, that in the next few months as more and more new zealanders are able to get home the need for services you are offering will diminish —— refute that. the services you are offering will diminish -- refute that. the problem is that there's _ diminish -- refute that. the problem is that there's no _ diminish -- refute that. the problem is that there's no guarantee - diminish -- refute that. the problem is that there's no guarantee the - is that there's no guarantee the borders are even opening. i understand there is a further announcement. but, just be clear,
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when i ran to high—profile court cases in october against the government refusing the partners of pregnant women to come every major maternal organisation in new zealand from the royal royal of obstetricians and gynaecologists to the midwife council, nurses, counsellors, psychiatrists, but open letter stating that this policy did not serve women and babies and risks the lives of women and babies. largest killer of women in new zealand who have had a baby as maternal suicide and putting them through a degrading process like this of which only 17% of applicants obtain a spot, the only possible result would be to increase our already dismal maternal death numbers. despite that, the government to refuse to deal with it. ~ ,., ., _ it. well, the government would say it. well, the government would say it is very much _ it. well, the government would say it is very much putting _ it. well, the government would say it is very much putting a _ it. well, the government would say it is very much putting a policy - it. well, the government would say it is very much putting a policy in i it is very much putting a policy in place that is for the consideration of all new zealanders, of course. tudor clee, thank you very much for joining us from mexico. stay with us on outside
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source — still to come. inafew in a few minutes we are going to takea in a few minutes we are going to take a look at the vow over specify�*s most popular podcast, from joe rogan who is a media phenomenon but it is of missing taxi misinformation. —— promoting vaccine misinformation. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? lots of disappointment here in the city that people haven't been able to participate in the olympic games and the way they would have loved to have had there not been the coronavirus. however, people sitting at home and watching on television in big numbers, a loss of focus,
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though, on the coronavirus more generally hear that the games —— a lot of focus. we have had the highest number of athletes and team members testing positive, not only at the airport but also inside the giant olympic bubbles. there is daily testing and it has been picking up dozens of people. today, in total, 55, we are told, 55 new cases added to the tally and that can mean that an athlete is not able to compete here that the games. it must be devastating if that is the case after all those years of training. however, officials are hoping that by having this daily testing they can pick up any of these outbreaks and that covid—19 won't spread throughout the olympic venues and, well, put a cloud over the entire event. we also have the head of the ioc today warning that
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the game should not be political. we have had similar warnings from chinese officials. i think of course they are worried given the criticism of chinese record of human rights they might take the opportunity to take something of a stand especially in the middle podium. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? there have been a further series of blows to borisjohnson are two of his top aide in downing street have quit. one has directly criticised him for hisjimmy savile attack on keir starmer. every week we make an in depth report for the bbc news website and,
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for the those of you in the uk, for iplayer too. this week it's the controversy surrounding the music streaming giant spotify — and their most popular podcast host. joe rogan is a media phenomenon. in 2019, his podcast — thejoe rogan experience — was reportedly downloaded 190 million times in a month. he has over 11 million youtube subscribers, and in 2020, joe rogan�*s podcast was signed in an exclusive deal by spotify for $100 million. the format is simple — a vast array of guests talk with him about a vast array of subjects, sometimes for hours. and joe rogan and his guests can also sometimes cause controversy. in december, one guest, the virologist dr robert malone made a number of misleading claims about vaccines during the podcast, which prompted this reaction. having people on there giving opinions about the vaccines that are not based in science is just not... it's counter to public health right now, and it is just not the right thing to do. dr wallace was one of 270 health care professionals who wrote an open letter to spotify, urging it to act on misinformation
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injoe rogan�*s podcast. but it was the intervention of one of rock music's original rebels that made this story go global. neil young threatened to pull his music from spotify, saying they can have rogan or young, not both. well, spotify chose rogan and young's music has been removed at his request. a few days later, another canadian legend —joni mitchell — followed suit, and joe rogan has responded to the entire furore with a video on instagram. so, my pledge to you is that i will do my best to try to balance out these more controversial viewpoints with other people's perspectives so we can maybe find a better point of view. spotify also responded. it released a statement saying... "the company is working to add a content advisory to any podcast episode that includes a discussion about covid—19". so, rogan stays, but with a warning, and we can't understand that decision without understanding the finances behind this. really, the bottom line for spotify is that if you play a joni mitchell
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or a neil young song, 70% of the money that that generates has to go to the artists and their record labels and their publishers. when one person plays thejoe rogan podcast, spotify keeps all of that money, and that will very much be behind the business decision here. exclusive podcasts are lucrative — they draw in subscribers and advertisers. but spotify has taken a hit with thisjoe rogan controversy. shares slumped before recovering slightly after the company projected lower profit margins, and the head of spotify has addressed what's happened in a call to investors. we're trying to balance creative expression with the safety of our users. it is a balance, but if you shift from music streaming to content creation, that comes with new responsibilities. spotify now find themselves in a similar position to the big social media platforms have done in recent years, where they're constantly trying to deny that they should have any responsibility because they don't want to be regulated like a publisher.
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spotify�*s daniel ek has made his position on content clear, writing... "it's important to me that we don't take on the position of being content censor". but every content company takes positions on what it will and won't publish. that's not censorship, that's taking an editorial position. some, though, argue you need to listen tojoe rogan to understand what's happening here. jemima kelly, writing in the financial times this week, said ifjoe rogan�*s critics listen to his podcast, they would know that the presenter is a genuinely open—minded host who seeks out all sorts of opinions, rather than blindly following those of a particular tribe. for his part, joe rogan says he explores ideas that are controversial but can later become mainstream, like the wuhan lab leak theory on covid—19. and batya ungar—sargon from newsweek argues he's meeting a need. joe rogan is producing content for people who want to see their own skepticism reflected in what he's saying. they're not going to him for medical advice.
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they're going to him to hear how other people think. they are, but on occasion, they will also hear, sometimes unchecked, opinions that are not rooted in available evidence. and for some, that's a problem. the notion that he has such a large audience being constantly confused, fed disinformation isjust too much. it is harmful to our ability to, if not end, at least diminish the impacts of this pandemic as soon as possible. both spotify and joe rogan know that he and his guests are what make the show. the podcast is different, and that difference is hugely popular. butjust asjoe rogan has the right to talk to who he wants, so musicians and scientists have the right to urge spotify not to give a platform to covid advice that isn't rooted in available evidence. a row has erupted over the final resting place of english explorer captain cook's famous ship. hms endeavour was used
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by captainjames cook during his great voyage of exploration of 1768— 1771. captain cook discovered new zealand, before finding south—eastern australia in april 1770. the vessel, was sunk off rhode island in august 1778 — but no—one was sure where. peter moore is a historian and author. tell us what this is about. they've been looking for the final resting place of hms endeavour and there is a disagreement about some of the bodies involved in a search and firstly there is a marine archaeology project in rhode island where we know there is a question on the day and then there's the australian national maritime museum goal museum which is collected to the australian government have course and they've been working together for about 20 years in the search for hms endeavour which i have to say is probably the most
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significant ship in the history of british maritime exploration, let's put it that way. it is a very important ship in the history of australia and their foundational story. it also has connections to american history, too, and so this project has been going on for long time and essentially australians got scott point where they think that they can make a conclusive statement that they have found this on the americans are not quite so first goal sure. americans are not quite so first goal sure-— americans are not quite so first coal sure. ., ., i. goal sure. how do you 'udge whether the boat is the h goal sure. how do you 'udge whether the boat is the one i goal sure. how do you judge whether the boat is the one we're _ goal sure. how do you judge whether the boat is the one we're looking i the boat is the one we're looking for not? it the boat is the one we're looking for not? , ., , ., for not? it is a good question. it de-ends for not? it is a good question. it depends what — for not? it is a good question. it depends what your _ for not? it is a good question. it depends what your burden i for not? it is a good question. it depends what your burden of i for not? it is a good question. it i depends what your burden of proof is. only about 15% of vessel remains. portsmouth harbour... they have fragments and we know from archival research and other later...
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this ship was sunk as parliament, part of a cluster of five ships and there are various things about the position of the ship, the size of hms endeavour. we can look at the plans which still survive today in the national maritime museum in greenwich. the australians have got to a point where they think actually, listen, we're never going to pull captain cook's hat out of the water and say he years but you have to make a call. what makes it interrupt. i might�*ve against the end of the programme but thank you very much for talking to us and we should talk about that more. that is peter moore is a moore and historian and author. me peter moore is a moore and historian and author. ~ ., peter moore is a moore and historian and author. ~ . ., peter moore is a moore and historian and author-— and author. we have had news in the last 30 seconds _ and author. we have had news in the last 30 seconds of _ and author. we have had news in the last 30 seconds of more _ and author. we have had news in the last 30 seconds of more high-profile| last 30 seconds of more high—profile resignations in downing street. the prime minister 's chief of staff and is principal private secretary are both departing as well. this is now a full—blown crisis in number ten with four of the most significant people who would work with the prime minister all residing within a few hours of themselves. of course you
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would see on the of this here on bbc news. cold there has been lying in wait towards the north—west and is now making its way south eastwards, brought our way by this weather front, cold front generating heavy bursts of rain through tonight and indeed a little bit of wintry weather on its back edge, wintry showers putting on across parts of ireland and some quite strong gusty winds but that follow the progress of this weather front as it sinks south eastwards across england and wales over night. some very heavy bursts of rain on its leading edge, back edge through the pennines, peak district, hills of wales and even the mothers of south—west england.
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we could see some snow mixing and because of the cold air tucking in for the north. ahead of our weather front still miles, 6 degrees from norwich, seven in london, behind it much colder with wintry showers and ice likely to cause issues across much of scotland and northern ireland tomorrow morning. weather front bringing some much needed rain into the south—east over any high ground, potentially that of winter mixing—iness in and that will then clear, clear by the afternoon it is sunshine and showers. in northern scotland those showers are wintry even to quite low levels in east for time. these are the wind gusts, widely gusts of 30—40— 50 mph in the north, nothing extreme that it will add to a cold feel with temperatures through the afternoon between four and 9 degrees. now, through friday night, a brief, dry interlude with this ridge of high—pressure but into the weekend it is this weather front that will dominate the weather, pushing in from the west and bringing outbreaks of rain and separating the cold air which will cling on in the north and something milder which will attempt to stage a
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return in the south and our weather front will bring outbreaks of rain across parts of northern ireland, scotland, then into england and wales, really strong winds especially because northern areas, wintry showers into scotland staying mostly dry down towards the south where it will males, 10—11 , a colder air across the northern half of the uk and as we get to sunday looks like that weather front will move a little bit further south was with its outbreaks of rain allowing more areas to get back into the cold air with a mix of sunny spells in wintry showers. it is going to be another windy day. miles on the south, 11 or 12, much colderfurther north, just four in scotland.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... a quadruple blow for the primitive stress four of his most senior advisers quit. dan rosenfield and martin reynolds are the latest departures, just hours after another left her position over boris johnson's false claims that six years starmer failed to prosecute. —— sir kier starmer. the soaring cost of energy: typical household bills are going up by almost 700 pounds a year the chancellor unveils measures to soften the blow, but says we will need to get used to higher energy prices. i dont�* have a crystal ball as to what exactly the future holds but i want to be honest with people higher energy prices are something we are going to have to adjust to.

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