Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 3, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

8:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm... a quadruple blow for the primitive stress four of his most senior advisers quit. dan rosenfield and martin reynolds are the latest departures, just hours after another left her position over boris johnson's false claims that six years starmer failed to prosecute. —— sir kier starmer. the soaring cost of energy: typical household bills are going up by almost 700 pounds a year the chancellor unveils measures to soften the blow, but says we will need to get used to higher energy prices. i dont�* have a crystal ball as to what exactly the future holds but i want to be honest with people higher energy prices are something we are going to have to adjust to.
8:01 pm
inflation is on the up too, the bank of england warns by april it could hit its highest rate for more than 30 years. —— northern ireland first minister, paul givan, announces his resignation amid a new row over post—brexit trade arrangements. hey, watch out for that traffic there. i'm watching it now marmee, it's ok. and coming up this hour, we'll be taking a look at the bafta nominations and speaking to nominee and �*belfast�* star caitriona balfe the prime minister has lost four members of his top team in downing street. in the past the minutes,
8:02 pm
it's been confirmed that dan rosenfield resigned this morning, martin reynolds that pm's senior civil servant has also quit and along with the departure of the director of communications jack doyle. let's get more in this breaking news in the last few minutes with damien who has been following the latest resignations. a mass exodus dacula yes, these have been falling like dominoes since late this afternoon, early this evening, now, as you say committees four seniorfigures and evening, now, as you say committees four senior figures and when you look at them, they are four figures at the heart of borisjohnson�*s downing street all around him and really important roles so that the latest two we had, martin reynolds, principal private secretary he latest two we had, martin reynolds, principal private secretar- principal private secretary he was brou:ht in principal private secretary he was brought in and — principal private secretary he was brought in and he _ principal private secretary he was brought in and he came - principal private secretary he was brought in and he came in - principal private secretary he was brought in and he came in into i principal private secretary he was l brought in and he came in into that role after dominic cummings,
8:03 pm
remember, borisjohnson�*s chief remember, boris johnson's chief adviser quit remember, borisjohnson�*s chief adviser quit and walked out. martin reynolds, former diplomat was brought into this role, having to run the show for the prime minister. he is the one who had sent that e—mail that had come out, and e—mail that had come out about a garden party in downing street of may 2020 when the country was in lockdown, and inviting, thought to be intended for a 100 staff, the e—mail saying, "hi all, after an incredibly busy period can it would be nice to make the most of the lovely weather and have socially distanced drinks and the number ten garden this evening. pleasejoin us and the number ten garden this evening. please join us and bring your own beliefs." so he has been at the heart of some of these predicate allegations, the investigations into downing street parties. he has offered his resignation to the prime minister earlier today, number ten saying it's been accepted. also dan rosenfield, so the chief of staff to
8:04 pm
borisjohnson. he only came in a year ago to steady the ship. he's a former banker, was brought from outside. he too is on his way out now. what we see then is that two along with the head of press, the director of communications, that is, jack doyle, resigning a little earlier, and a little earlier than that, the head of number ten policy unit, so munira mirza and so all of these fourfigures now unit, so munira mirza and so all of these four figures now leaving, recruitment under way. munira mirza's position has been failed, the other recruiters are under way. just looking at munira mirza's resignation letter, it was damning, wasn't to? as far as her opinion of the prime minister. they is somebody who had been a key aide i think with him right from his days as mayor of london, once described by boris johnson is one of the most important women in his life.—
8:05 pm
women in his life. yes, that was a comment that he _ women in his life. yes, that was a comment that he had _ women in his life. yes, that was a comment that he had made. - women in his life. yes, that was a - comment that he had made. someone who had inspired him name five women who had inspired him name five women who had an expired him in an interview, he named her as one. that is an adviser brought in when he was mayor of london are canaan when he was mayor of london, whether it's with him all the way through that time ran arts and culture in london for him and delivering his policies at the heart of government was her role. she quit over the remarks he made on monday in the house of commons to the leader of the opposition, sir kier starmer, where 0pposition, sir kier starmer, where mrjohnson repeated a debunked claim that sir kier starmer, back when he was director of public prosecutions, had failed to prosecutejimmy sabol, entertainer who the police investigated and the prosecution was not brought, sir kier starmer had no
8:06 pm
role in that at all. mrjohnson today under pressure clarified he said, no, he wasn't talking about sir kier starmer�*s personal involvement can adjust the failings involvement can adjust the failings in the department at the time. —— jimmy savile. the fact that he didn't apologise today was what munira mirza highlighted when she said that she had advised him to apologise and he hadn't, so she resigned. apologise and he hadn't, so she resiuned. ~ . , apologise and he hadn't, so she resiuned. ~ ., , ., ., resigned. what is the mood around westminster— resigned. what is the mood around westminster tonight _ resigned. what is the mood around westminster tonight and _ resigned. what is the mood around westminster tonight and made - resigned. what is the mood around westminster tonight and made and amongst tory mps? any outsider would think that this is the number ten bunkerjust imploding. that think that this is the number ten bunkerjust imploding.— bunkerjust imploding. that is certainly what _ bunkerjust imploding. that is certainly what dominic - bunkerjust imploding. that is - certainly what dominic cummings, the prime minister's because it stayed who is now one of his biggest enemies, has said. exactly those words, in fact. enemies, has said. exactly those words, infact. earliertoday. i think what you see is there had been accents and signalling from downing street that they wanted to clear out in the wake of all these predicate
8:07 pm
affair and to try to sort of bring and some fresh faces, but we have had all of these key people offering their resignations and resigning now. so what you see, i think, you are hearing mps very interested, groups of mps meeting this evening, some of those who we know have been submitting letters, the handful who have submitted letters of no confidence for boris johnson, discussing confidence for borisjohnson, discussing and looking at confidence for boris johnson, discussing and looking at the situation what they think of the situation what they think of the situation out. so there is a lot of chatter going on in the background stop borisjohnson said recently that he's had bad advice, didn't he over the party gate issue. potentially in the firing line do over the party gate issue. potentially in the firing [in potentially in the firing line do we know that red _ potentially in the firing line do we know that red -- _ potentially in the firing line do we know that red -- the _ potentially in the firing line do we know that red -- the motivation l know that red —— the motivation behind their resignations? we have any more information on that? fin behind their resignations? we have any more information on that? on the munira mirza's — any more information on that? on the munira mirza's statement _ any more information on that? on the munira mirza's statement but - any more information on that? on the munira mirza's statement but that - any more information on that? on the munira mirza's statement but that in l munira mirza's statement but that in itself was pretty blunt. quite
8:08 pm
revealing, really. given that she had stayed with borisjohnson for 1h years, defended him in the past of controversial comments he had made before and stood by his side and responded to those on his behalf. now, she said this instance with his comments about sir kier starmer, borisjohnson linking sir kier starmer to that failure to prosecute jimmy savile. she said in her statement that it was wrong, there was no fair or reasonable basis for that assertion. it was not the usual cup of politics. it was inappropriate and then in partisan restaurant —— reference to a horrendous case of child sex abuse. so she was very clear there that she did not agree that the primitive on that issue. that is what she has given in the commons that have come out, has her stated reason, they have may have been other things behind it as well, but certainly we
8:09 pm
know that those comments the prime minister made in that debate about parties in downing street at the beginning of the week and it is of around a number in the tory party, including including mps who have come out and said it's it's clear that mrjohnson should retract. there are some cabinet ministers who have defended mrjohnson, the chancellor notably distance himself and said those were not remarks that he would have set himself. qm. he would have set himself. ok, damien, he would have set himself. ok, damien. for _ he would have set himself. ok, damien, for now, _ he would have set himself. ok, damien, for now, thank- he would have set himself. 0k, damien, for now, thank you very much indeed. probably much more from you later on over the next few hours. we will be finding out about how this story story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers our guestsjoining me tonight are the broadcaster john stapleton and kate proctor, editor of politics home and the house magazine. the cost of living crisis will intensify for millions
8:10 pm
of people in britain this spring after the regulator 0fgem confirmed an increase in what energy companies can charge their customers. the chancellor has been setting out measures to try to help millions of households who will now face soaring energy bills from april. the average energy bill will rise by almost 700 pounds a year. that's because the energy price cap which is what the typical household pays for energy if they're not on a fixed deal with their supplier has been increased to almost 2000 pounds. the changes will affect around 22 million households in england, wales and scotland. interest rates have also doubled to 0.5% as the bank of england tries to curb the rapid increase in the cost of living and inflation which is the rate at which prices are rising is expected to peak at more than 7% in april, well above the bank's target of 2%. here's our business editor simonjack for households like suzanne's, the news today on energy prices was every bit as bad as feared. from april, fuel bills will rocket and tighten one of the biggest squeezes on household
8:11 pm
incomes in decades. it's worrying and difficult a time when everything seems to be rising at the same time. and it's everything that you have to use, whether it be utilities, interest rates, petrol, food, everything's going up at the same time. suzanne pays just over £1100 a year for her energy. from april, that will rise by over 50%. and for a household using an average amount of energy, the annual price cap will rise from £1277 to £1971 — a rise of £693, nearly £60 a month. thank you, mr speaker. given the sheer size of the shock, the government felt it had little option but to provide some financial support. for me to stand here and pretend we don't have to adjust to paying higher prices would be
8:12 pm
wrong and dishonest. but what we can do is take the sting out of a significant price shock for millions of families by making sure the increase in prices is smaller initially and spread over a longer period. a rise of nearly £700 in average annual energy bills is a massive hit to household incomes. the chancellor wants to try to soften it in two ways. first, in april, homes in council tax bands a to d, that's over 80% of households, will get a £150 rebate funded by central government. and then, in october, £200 will be knocked off everyone's bills, but that money will have to be repaid — £40 a year for the next five years. now, the hope is that, by then, the sky—high gas prices which have created this crisis may have fallen. but even the person who sets the price cap says that is far from certain. the head of 0fgem told the bbc there was no reason to think high
8:13 pm
prices would be short—lived. it's a very hard to predict energy prices at the moment, so the market is incredibly volatile. so it's very hard to say what will happen at the end of this year or early next year, but right now we are not seeing signs that these prices are coming down. visiting a community centre in bletchley today, the labour leader thought the measures were inadequate. it's a dodgy sort of buy now, pay later deal that doesn't come anywhere near meeting the cost or the increase in costs of energy bills, and it's really such a small response to a very, very big problem, and it's on the minds of so many people. gas, even when liquefied and carried in tankers like this, is the subject of a global bidding war which could yet intensify — precisely why even energy retailers say we must invest in alternatives. the more we build uk energy independence through renewables — wind and solar — the cheaper our energy gets. every windmill means we use less gas and will bring our prices down. but here and now, energy prices
8:14 pm
are sucking money out of household incomes, government coffers, and the economy as a whole. simon jack, bbc news. joining me now is rylee dickinson, and is one of the many people worried about the impact of rising energy bills. what will this mean for you? it's obviousl what will this mean for you? it�*s obviously where food is expensive as well. i may have to skip meals and stuff to pay it. it's just going to mean a lot of struggle financially but it's millions of people all, i want to have three meals a day, but this means i may not be able to do that. ., ., ~' this means i may not be able to do that. ., ., 4' ., this means i may not be able to do that. ., ., ~ ., .., this means i may not be able to do that. ., ., ~ ., ., ,., this means i may not be able to do that. ., ., ~ ., ., ., that. you work and care, and you are on benefits — that. you work and care, and you are on benefits at _ that. you work and care, and you are on benefits at the _ that. you work and care, and you are on benefits at the moment. - that. you work and care, and you are on benefits at the moment. what - that. you work and care, and you are| on benefits at the moment. what are you getting coming in and what are
8:15 pm
you getting coming in and what are you spending at the moment on nag, how much is that likely to increase? so, when i moved into this class, it was 80. since then it's gone up to 120, which was last month's. was 80. since then it's gone up to 120, which was last months. i'm on universal credit which means i get 250 a month at the moment. so once i pay my energy, i pay my wi—fi and i do a food shop. probably around £10 left for the rest of the month. hoar left for the rest of the month. how are ou left for the rest of the month. how are you getting _ left for the rest of the month. how are you getting on? _ left for the rest of the month. how are you getting on? well, - left for the rest of the month. how are you getting on? well, i - left for the rest of the month. how| are you getting on? well, i don't at the moment- _ are you getting on? well, i don't at the moment- i— are you getting on? well, i don't at the moment. i don't _ are you getting on? well, i don't at the moment. i don't cut _ are you getting on? well, i don't at| the moment. i don't cut my heating on. i was sat in this room and i could see my own breath earlier in the winter. so, ijust haven't put it on because i don't wanted to go any higher, really.— it on because i don't wanted to go any higher, really. what you think ofthe any higher, really. what you think of the chancellor's _ any higher, really. what you think of the chancellor's rebate. - any higher, really. what you think of the chancellor's rebate. £200 i of the chancellor's rebate. £200 coming off the bill or is that going to make any difference at all because the figures presumably for you on such a low figure. it will
8:16 pm
take you over the edge right away, isn't it? . ., , ., . isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier- it's _ isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. it's going _ isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. it's going to _ isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. it's going to be - isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. it's going to be quite i isn't it? yeah, i was watching it earlier. it's going to be quite a | earlier. it's going to be quite a struggle. i'm working on finding ways around saving up for it as well to, they said earlier about the tax rebates, but i'm tax exempt until i'm 25. that is not going to affect me. so i wondered what was happening for people like me and who that's going to help and stuff like that as well. , , , . , ., well. these energy prices are risinu. well. these energy prices are rising- it _ well. these energy prices are rising. it would _ well. these energy prices are rising. it would be _ well. these energy prices are i rising. it would be disingenuous to say that that governments could help anyone, people are going to have to tighten their belts, you know, people who are my age, for example it lifted the 70s and 80s where there were real energy shocks there
8:17 pm
as well and people dead not to have the heating on and went cold. can you accept that the government cannot do everything? i you accept that the government cannot do everything?— you accept that the government cannot do everything? i accept, it is hard. what _ cannot do everything? i accept, it is hard. what i _ cannot do everything? i accept, it is hard. what i was _ cannot do everything? i accept, it is hard. what i was going - cannot do everything? i accept, it is hard. what i was going to i cannot do everything? i accept, it i is hard. what i was going to suggest earlier about last year, they introduced the extra £80 a month for universal credit. and obviously where people can wear, and i thought why can't we bring that back. that would obviously held quite a lot, maybe not fully but it would help a lot for people for people in my situation. ,, , , lot for people for people in my situation. , ., , , situation. spring is approaching, thank goodness. _ situation. spring is approaching, thank goodness. say _ situation. spring is approaching, thank goodness. say you - situation. spring is approaching, thank goodness. say you want i situation. spring is approaching, | thank goodness. say you want to situation. spring is approaching, i thank goodness. say you want to have to have the heating on. but cooking and things though, you willjust reliant electricity won't you? you are going to have to watch that presumably. i tried to meanly use
8:18 pm
our microwave because the oven takes up our microwave because the oven takes up a lot our microwave because the oven takes u- a lot , our microwave because the oven takes u. a lo. , , our microwave because the oven takes u- a lot , , , up a lot this is the first time i have had _ up a lot this is the first time i have had this _ up a lot this is the first time i have had this light on - up a lot this is the first time i have had this light on in i up a lot this is the first time i | have had this light on in three up a lot this is the first time i i have had this light on in three days actually. i have the light on my telly and stuff you have to use the oven as much as well. trying to do one load of washing every week or so, just save it all up, just to keep it down. so, just save it all up, 'ust to keep it down.i so, just save it all up, 'ust to kee it down. �* , ., ., ~ keep it down. best of luck. thank ou ve keep it down. best of luck. thank you very much indeed. _ joining me now is tom waters, who is a senior research economist at the instiute for fiscal studies. i don't know if you heard, she is on benefits, universal credit. it is going to make a huge difference to her, but also it's going to make a big difference to middle income families as well, isn't it? energy bills when _ families as well, isn't it? energy bills when the _ families as well, isn't it? energy bills when the prices _ families as well, isn't it? energy bills when the prices go - families as well, isn't it? energy bills when the prices go up, i families as well, isn't it? energy bills when the prices go up, that has a big effect, and it's notjust energy prices going up, but other things as well, and the forecast we have seen from the bank of the bed
8:19 pm
today suggest that we expect wages won't keep up with inflation. serial terms earning will fall on average over the next year.— over the next year. interest rates auoin u- over the next year. interest rates going up as — over the next year. interest rates going up as he — over the next year. interest rates going up as he had _ over the next year. interest rates going up as he had just _ over the next year. interest rates going up as he hadjust said, i over the next year. interest rates going up as he hadjust said, and| going up as he had just said, and that trajectory is going to continue in that direction, isn't that? also when you are looking at wage growth as well, it seems like the perfect storm, and disposable income levels will drop. would that be some internal way of preventing this inevitable rise and inflation do you think? ., , inevitable rise and inflation do you think? . , ., ., , ., think? certainly there are lots of ressures think? certainly there are lots of pressures at _ think? certainly there are lots of pressures at the _ think? certainly there are lots of pressures at the same _ think? certainly there are lots of pressures at the same time, i pressures at the same time, inflation probably because of energy and then at the same time you've got tax coming up in april as well and it does look like we probably will see a decline, unfortunately, and living standards across the country. ultimately that reflects the fact
8:20 pm
that things that we want to buy including energy are getting more scarce and more expensive. so that means that burden has to be shouldered by someone, in fact, it will be shouldered by millions of households. in will be shouldered by millions of households-— will be shouldered by millions of households. . ., . ., , , ,, households. in the chancellors press conference today, _ households. in the chancellors press conference today, the _ households. in the chancellors press conference today, the measures i conference today, the measures announced, do you think they go far enough? the announced, do you think they go far enou~h? ., , , announced, do you think they go far enou~h? , ., announced, do you think they go far enou~h? ,., . ., , enough? the measures are certainly re enough? the measures are certainly pretty significant- — enough? the measures are certainly pretty significant. most _ enough? the measures are certainly pretty significant. most people i enough? the measures are certainly pretty significant. most people in i pretty significant. most people in council tax properties will get £350 certainly not inconsiderable people in lower incomes considerable outlay about 9 billion a year overall it won't go to offset the whole increase in energy prices, and that probably reflects that we are talking about a very big rise. hagar
8:21 pm
talking about a very big rise. how fair is the council _ talking about a very big rise. how fair is the council tax _ talking about a very big rise. how fair is the council tax rebate as well because i think that banding for council tax goes back to the 90s, for council tax goes back to the 905, 1991, i for council tax goes back to the 905,1991, ithink for council tax goes back to the 905,1991, i think it was. so some people would have seen their properties increase in value and probably more affluent, but who still qualify for that rebate and bands adc, i think it is. is a to d. exactly. it is based on a tax system, it is very apt to tax people based on the value of their home 30 years ago, and it does mean that f you own a home in london, for example where prices have gone up a lot over the last 30 years, he may be in a property that is worth an awful lot of money. conversely, someone who is an area that hasn't seen such growth might be in a higher value property and not be eligible for some of this help, but actually, their health price today is a bit lower, so that is exactly
8:22 pm
as he say, a consequence of basing this on these values. {lita as he say, a consequence of basing this on these values.— this on these values. ok, many thanks for— this on these values. ok, many thanks forjoining _ this on these values. ok, many thanks forjoining us _ this on these values. ok, many thanks forjoining us here i this on these values. ok, many i thanks forjoining us here on bbc news. interest rates have risen for the second time in three months to 0.5% as the bank of england tries to curb a rapid rise in the cost of living. the bank warned that price rises could speed up with inflation predicted to hit more than 7% in april the highest rate from more than 30 years. the governor of the bank of england andrew bailey has told the bbc that workers shouldn't ask for a high pay rise in order to help bring inflation under control. he was speaking to our economics editor faisal islam. what we tried to do is stop inflation spreading and inflation becoming more ingrained in the system. you try to get in peoples heads and asked _ you try to get in peoples heads and asked him — you try to get in peoples heads and asked him to not ask for too high a pay rise _ asked him to not ask for too high a -a rise. �* . , asked him to not ask for too high a -a rise. �* . h,
8:23 pm
asked him to not ask for too high a .arise.., ,, pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of sa in: pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it — pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in _ pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in we — pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in we do _ pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in we do need _ pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in we do need to - pay rise. bradley, yes. in the sense of saying it in we do need to see in | of saying it in we do need to see in moderation of inflation rises. that's painful. i don't want to in any sense it is painful but we need to see that to get to this problem more quickly. well, we can speak now to sirjohn gieve, who is a former member of the monetary policy committee of the bank of england. he is now chair of nesta a foundation focused on innovation in areas, including government, education and health. this is the least they could have been, wasn't it? i this is the least they could have been, wasn't it?— been, wasn't it? i think it was. everyone was _ been, wasn't it? i think it was. everyone was expecting i been, wasn't it? i think it was. everyone was expecting it i been, wasn't it? i think it was. everyone was expecting it to l been, wasn't it? i think it was. i everyone was expecting it to move been, wasn't it? i think it was. - everyone was expecting it to move up a quarter of a percent, and also they stop the easing and they are reversing that, so that is 100% expected. what was news today was that four members, four out of nine said they wanted to go further and
8:24 pm
wanted to raise interest rates up to 7.5. �* �* ., , wanted to raise interest rates up to 7.5. ~ g , ., , wanted to raise interest rates up to 7.5.~ , ., wanted to raise interest rates up to 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four — 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of _ 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of his, _ 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of his, it _ 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of his, it was _ 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of his, it was five - 7.5. andrew bailey was one of them. he had four of his, it was five to i he had four of his, it was five to four, his side squeaked through with a more modest increase. i think it's pretty clear to continue go up in future months.— pretty clear to continue go up in future months. ~ , ., , ., future months. when you say they are auoin to no future months. when you say they are going to go up. _ future months. when you say they are going to go up, everybody _ future months. when you say they are going to go up, everybody was - going to go up, everybody was expecting that, but highlight dashed by how much? i remember when the interest rates were 15%. yes. by how much? i remember when the interest rates were 15%.— interest rates were 15%. yes, well, he mentioned the _ interest rates were 15%. yes, well, he mentioned the last _ interest rates were 15%. yes, well, he mentioned the last time - interest rates were 15%. yes, well, he mentioned the last time we i interest rates were 15%. yes, well, he mentioned the last time we had inflation which is what they are expecting in the spring is around 1992 when interest rates for around 10%. so, a lot has changed since then, and at the moment, markets are expecting interest rates to rise to about 1% over this year and may be a bit more beyond that. my own view is
8:25 pm
that it could be further and faster than that. 0nce inflation does get a fault, you find these minor increases don't have as much impact as he would like, and historically, interest rates today even after the rise are exceptionally low. iloathed interest rates today even after the rise are exceptionally low.- rise are exceptionally low. what is our rise are exceptionally low. what is your prediction — rise are exceptionally low. what is your prediction about _ rise are exceptionally low. what is your prediction about how - rise are exceptionally low. what is your prediction about how high i rise are exceptionally low. what is. your prediction about how high they could go? your prediction about how high they could to? ~ ., ., could go? well, i, i would say that between two _ could go? well, i, i would say that between two and _ could go? well, i, i would say that between two and 396, _ could go? well, i, i would say that between two and 396, and - could go? well, i, i would say that between two and 396, and that i could go? well, i, i would say that between two and 396, and that willj between two and 3%, and that will happen if unions and employers don't listen to andrew and do push up wages to compensate for the higher prices. that's really what the bank is worried about. so he is a whole being that the rise in energy prices will reduce real incomes, people will reduce real incomes, people will spend less. that will lead to slightly —— slightly higher in employment lower curve and bring
8:26 pm
inflation back to target. not a very appealing prospect, but that's their that's their main scenario. but they are really worried about is that it can follow prices up and if that happens, then they may well have to raise interest rates a long way further down the markets expect at the moment. further down the markets expect at the moment-— the moment. how does the fall unemployment _ the moment. how does the fall unemployment play _ the moment. how does the fall unemployment play into i the moment. how does the fall unemployment play into all- the moment. how does the fall unemployment play into all of. the moment. how does the fall- unemployment play into all of this, because presumably, workers now feel that they can because employers are wanting to filljobs.— wanting to fill “obs. absolutely. the bank has i wanting to fill jobs. absolutely. the bank has been _ wanting to fill jobs. absolutely. the bank has been surprised i wanting to fill jobs. absolutely. the bank has been surprised by wanting to fill jobs. absolutely. i the bank has been surprised by the strength of inflation and, as had to mark it up a lot over the last two months. it's been surprised by the strength of the labour market and employers in many areas are complaining about shortages and labour shortages, and those are the
8:27 pm
circumstances in which they pay rises start to be given. 0n the second side you've got the whole of the public sector. now, the treasury has keeping the raise they are sort of two to 3%, but that is not going to look very attractive if inflation is at 7% when those wage settlements for nurses, please send someone come up for nurses, please send someone come up for renewal. so a lot of very difficult questions being asked of the government.— difficult questions being asked of the rovernment. . ,, , ., , . the government. thank you very much indeed forjoining _ the government. thank you very much indeed forjoining us _ the government. thank you very much indeed forjoining us here _ the government. thank you very much indeed forjoining us here in _ the government. thank you very much indeed forjoining us here in bbc i indeed forjoining us here in bbc news. a pretty bleak future. northern ireland's first minister, paul givan, has resigned in protest at the northern ireland protocol. the protocol governs how goods travel between great britain and northern ireland and was negotiated as part of the brexit deal. it means goods crossing the irish sea into northern ireland are subject to new checks on entry. the idea was to avoid the need for checks on goods which travel —— his resignation means the deputy first minister,
8:28 pm
michelle 0'neill of sinn fein, also loses her position. 0ur ireland correspondent emma vardy is in belfast. political paralysis returns to stormont, something the dup have been threatening since last year. today, as the first minister stepped down, it was delivered. 0ur institutions are being tested once again, and the delicate balance created by the belfast and st andrews agreements has been impacted by the agreement made by the united kingdom government and the european union, which created the northern ireland protocol. it means the power—sharing executive in northern ireland will cease to function, decision—making affecting thousands of people's lives on hold. for some time, this storm has been on the horizon. the new border checks on goods which cross the irish sea represent, for unionist parties, a deep betrayal and a threat to their position in the uk. last night, the dup ordered civil servants to stop carrying out these checks, but there's disagreement over whether that order is lawful.
8:29 pm
well, ideally businesses, we don't want any checks on goods coming from great britain into northern ireland, and we really want minimal administration as well. what we are calling for is both the eu and the ukjust to come to a negotiated outcome. we just hope that basically there's no rash reactions to this from either side. this kind of political crisis is not new in northern ireland. when something similar happened in 2017, there was no government for three years. this time, different departments will continue to function, but what they can do will be limited. for example, northern ireland's budget now can't be approved, meaning planning ahead for many public services will be on hold. what will happen with the remaining covid restrictions is unclear, and a planned apology to victims of historical abuse is also now likely to be postponed. it's very clear that there - are catastrophic impacts in terms of the dup's action today, | and there are many, many casualties as a result -
8:30 pm
of their political opportunism, not least the victims of historical institutional abuse. _ this is being seen as a tactical move by the dup in the run—up to the may elections. the orange order, which has significant influence, has been collecting tens of thousands of signatures from people opposing the northern ireland protocol, and it's voters like this the dup wants to keep onside. and that election the party has in its sights may now happen even earlier. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. journalist and broadcaster susan mckay from derry in northern ireland is the author of northern protestants 0n shifting ground. shejoins me now from dublin. at the heart of this is the power struggle between the hard and the moderates in the dup. yes. struggle between the hard and the moderates in the dup. yes, obviously for listeners — moderates in the dup. yes, obviously for listeners or— moderates in the dup. yes, obviously for listeners or viewers _ moderates in the dup. yes, obviously for listeners or viewers listening i for listeners or viewers listening to that report will know the dup has said this is about the protocol but i think most other parties in northern ireland are seeing it in
8:31 pm
terms of the dup's panicking with the fact that is extremely badly in a recent opinion polls, standing at 17% in the most recent poll compared to sinn fein's 25%, which means that if in the coming election, it's quite probable that sinn fein will take the first ministry, which unionists are extremely unhappy about. the dup seems to be bidding to get the more hard—line unionist boats which were supposed to be going or were projected to go to traditional unionist voices parties. but the part of —— problem with that is the tuv party is a post of the good friday agreement, so if the dup makes disc cable to get their votes to get a higher proportion of the unionist boats, it will be striking an alliance of the party which is not readily going to agree to...
8:32 pm
your backing up but let'sjust not readily going to agree to... your backing up but let's just wait for a moment. your backing up but let's just wait fora moment. no, i'm sorry, we seem to have lost margaret. just seeing if we can get back to margaret. note, i'm sorry commit we seem to have lost her and will try and get a hold of her. perhaps, margaret, i think you are back but you froze a moment ago but talk us through the scenario now. so edwin poots's orders were not followed through, were they? orders were not followed through, were the ? ., orders were not followed through, were they?— orders were not followed through, were the ? ., , ., ., were they? know, they were not and now the european _ were they? know, they were not and now the european commission i were they? know, they were not and now the european commission vice i now the european commission vice president has us it is up to the british government to make sure the protocol is fully limited because it is its responsibility which is something that the british government has apparently said to the dup it is going to turn a blind eye to. so what has happened is that most of the other parties or all of the other parties across from the tuv are now extremely annoyed and angry and businesses are concerned
8:33 pm
and civil servants don't know where they're supposed to take their direction from and most people see it as being opportunism on the part of the democratic unionists party. so the other thing that sinn fein has raised in connection with this is the prospect that really northern ireland want to start looking towards its constitutional future, which is a reference to the fact that the good friday agreement allows for the british interior state to call for a border poll which could lead to reunification of ireland. he can do that if it looks as if a majority of people would vote for that.— vote for that. and in the short term, normal— vote for that. and in the short term, normal business - vote for that. and in the short i term, normal business paralysed? completely pa ralyse of term, normal business paralysed? completely paralyse of not knowing when that is going to change and there is a lot of legislation which is being worked for very heart of the past period which will now fall, which again is causing people to feel extremely dispirited and quite
8:34 pm
angry. feel extremely dispirited and quite an. _ ., feel extremely dispirited and quite an: , ' ., ., . . ., feel extremely dispirited and quite an: , ., . ., feel extremely dispirited and quite angry. margaret chemical to get you back and thank _ angry. margaret chemical to get you back and thank you _ angry. margaret chemical to get you back and thank you very _ angry. margaret chemical to get you back and thank you very much i angry. margaret chemical to get you | back and thank you very much indeed for speaking to us here on bbc news. let's go back to our main story and thatis let's go back to our main story and that is the resignation of four members of the prime minister's team at downing street. the head of the number ten policy unit and head of the civil service and director of communications. the whitehall editor here at the financial times joins us and that's quite a number. how sniffing is this?— sniffing is this? a bit of a crisis for the boris _ sniffing is this? a bit of a crisis i for the boris johnson government for the borisjohnson government that really went the promise to open the front door tomorrow morning there will not be many people there because chief of staff is gone, treasure of indications is gone, principal private secretary has gone and had a policy has gone, adding to the general sense of chaos. i've been told it's quite of a friendship between departures that murza has
8:35 pm
worker borisjohnson between departures that murza has worker boris johnson for 1h years back to city hall resigned on a point of principle about the comment the premise are made aboutjimmy savo and the leader of the opposition and alleging that he was not prosecuted while he was dpp which i think cert curate denies and she wrote a very critical resignation letter and all these other a's have gone because boris johnson promised to clear out his mps and twitter is full of conservative mps peace movement given a lot to take which is the prime minister promise to clear out and is now happening with that general sense of chaos, that sense of all those letters and going to go in now come the slit is of no confidence? we should be edging more towards that point and of course... and on that point, are you seen the other three were pushed in a greedy resignation before they were sacked, is it the spin was meant the idea if they were going to depart because of
8:36 pm
party way over those parties that broke coronavirus restrictions that we know martin reynolds, who has acquired the nickname in a whitehall of party marty, he wrote that e—mail inviting over 100 people in downing street to a gathering in the garden and almost inevitable he was going to have to go. jack and almost inevitable he was going to have to go-_ to have to go. jack doyle, the remise to have to go. jack doyle, the premise or — to have to go. jack doyle, the premise or director _ to have to go. jack doyle, the premise or director of - premise or director of communications is a very little eight and he was also reported to be at one of those gatherings, so dan rosenfield has overseen the prime minister response to the party gap is not popular with conservative mps either so those three are going for different reasons to munira mirza and there also indications are we more of a clear out in the coming hours as a promise or tries to reset his operation but the immediate question is who is going to feel all these roles was met this feels very abrupt and was not echoed and those are big job to fill to keep the government running.- are big job to fill to keep the government running. where is the -remise government running. where is the premise are _ government running. where is the premise are at _ government running. where is the premise are at the _
8:37 pm
government running. where is the premise are at the moment? is i government running. where is the premise are at the moment? is he going to make any, and by this or is it business as usual? fin going to make any, and by this or is it business as usual?— it business as usual? on a visit to blackool it business as usual? on a visit to blackpool today — it business as usual? on a visit to blackpool today talking up - it business as usual? on a visit to l blackpool today talking up leveling up blackpool today talking up leveling up which came in yesterday and feels an awful long while ago after the events of today and i don't imagine we will hear from him for a while as he tries to figure out how to rebuild his inter—team here and as i said on the one hand, it isjust chaos. not a good thing to lose all of your inner circle but on the other hand, this has been planned and borisjohnson told conservative mps and borisjohnson told conservative mp5 on monday there'll be a big personnel changes within downing street and we knew it was coming but just happening a bit thicker and faster than we thought initially it have done. . �* , faster than we thought initially it have done-— faster than we thought initially it have done. . �* , ., ., have done. that's right, four in one da . have done. that's right, four in one day- thank— have done. that's right, four in one day- thank you _ have done. that's right, four in one day. thank you very _ have done. that's right, four in one day. thank you very much - have done. that's right, four in one day. thank you very much indeed. i now, as we've been reporting, energy bills will go up by nearly £700 a year for an average household from april. that is an increase of more than 50%. the prime minister has pledged government help for those most in need.
8:38 pm
businesses also struggling as well. joining me now is rhona metcalfe, who owns and runs a guesthouse in blair atholl, a village in perthshire in scotland. how is this going to affect you because presumably during covid—19, you have been if not struggling then tightening their belts in terms of the number of people stay with you? yes, very much so, so we have had an incredibly difficult two years. for a lot of small businesses like ours, a lot of small businesses like ours, a lot of hospitality, the winter is a lot of hospitality, the winter is a very quiet time, so you try and do what you can to provide for your winter liabilities. for a lot of businesses like guesthouses and bed and breakfasts, we are coming out of a very lean period of the year. following two years of incredible hardship. so to hear now that energy prices and the general cost of living is going up is a real credible worry for businesses like ours and many small businesses like us. ., . y
8:39 pm
ours and many small businesses like us. ., ., i, , ours and many small businesses like us. how many bedrooms do you have and how much _ us. how many bedrooms do you have and how much have _ us. how many bedrooms do you have and how much have you _ us. how many bedrooms do you have and how much have you been - us. how many bedrooms do you have and how much have you been paying| us. how many bedrooms do you have i and how much have you been paying in energy? we and how much have you been paying in ener: ? ~ . . and how much have you been paying in ener: ? . . ., ., , , energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we — energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we had _ energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we had a _ energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we had a fixed _ energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we had a fixed deal- energy? we are a four bedroom guest house and we had a fixed deal go i house and we had a fixed deal go through with an energy company last year that was £120 a month. because we fixed quite early. but unfortunately that company went bust at the last energy crisis last year, so we have now been moved on to a standard variable rate within the company. at the moment, we arejust finalising that so we are waiting to see what our final bill will be. on a monthly basis. but looking at the energy crisis, there is a chance at whatever we were paying before, the £120 is going to go up another 180— £190 on top of that. £120 is going to go up another 180- mm on top of that.— £190 on top of that. there will be every bit as _ £190 on top of that. there will be every bit as well which _ £190 on top of that. there will be every bit as well which will- £190 on top of that. there will be every bit as well which will soften the blow. , , , ., ., the blow. yes, but if you look at what the federation _ the blow. yes, but if you look at what the federation for - the blow. yes, but if you look at what the federation for small i what the federation for small businesses in scotland have said, it is unlikely that that money is going
8:40 pm
to make small businesses. chances are it is going to go to households, and those that are really, really struggling. very often, we don't get those kinds of rebates and i'm waiting to hear if there is something that's going to help businesses, but unfortunately we have struggled and i'm not sure that that money that's been given calmly by westminster is going to help us. so what are you going to do? people coming in his cleaners and helping out with cooking and thinking about their futures? out with cooking and thinking about theirfutures? ida. out with cooking and thinking about their futures?— their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have _ their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have any — their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have any staff. _ their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have any staff. we - their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have any staff. we run i their futures? no, thankfully, we don't have any staff. we run it i their futures? no, thankfully, we i don't have any staff. we run itjust for ourselves but i cannot imagine a war that must be going through other businesses who do employ staff facing these issues because they are going to have to make those really difficult decisions about redundancies or cutting back some of their staff. 0r reducing their hours and that's a real worry. but for us
8:41 pm
it's just my husband and i, and it's just us and we have got to worry about and our two cats, so... putting your prices up? there is an element of — putting your prices up? there is an element of putting _ putting your prices up? there is an element of putting some _ putting your prices up? there is an element of putting some of - putting your prices up? there is an element of putting some of our i element of putting some of our prices up but you have got to be very careful here. you cannot put your prices up to cover all the raises that are going on through food and energy prices because of the end of the day, everybody is suffering and he put your prices up too much, then nobody will come anyway. so we are having to play it very cannily and we cannot expect everybody in the general public to be able to fund our costs 100% because they got their own worries. we wish you the best and are usually booked tonight? ida. we wish you the best and are usually booked tonight?— booked tonight? no, not at all. rooms available _ booked tonight? no, not at all. rooms available if _ booked tonight? no, not at all. rooms available if anyone i booked tonight? no, not at all. rooms available if anyone is i rooms available if anyone is travelling in your area. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. thank you. this year's bafta nominations
8:42 pm
for the film awards have been announced. the sci—fi epic dune is leading the way with 11 nominations, including best film, but the power of the dog, a 19205 western starring benedict cumberbatch, is also in the running for eight awards. and belfast, sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographical coming—of—age film, is up there, too. our culture editor katie razzall is in belfast, where she has been talking to one of the film's youngest stars. my ma says if we went across the water, they wouldn't understand the way we talk. belfast is bafta's most garlanded british film, with six nominations, including for best film. we all have a story to tell. this story is kenneth branagh's, set in the city he grew up in, though some will see it as a snub that branagh himself has missed out on best director. when i grow up, i want to marry her... jude hill stars as nine—year—old buddy on a set that recreated bra nagh's own street. it's just pretty cool to be here! we took him to the real street,
8:43 pm
the original houses long gone. it is new, and it looks a lot different than it did on set. taking on being the young ken could have been a challenge, but it clearly worked out. i don't think a lot of other 11—year—olds can say that kenneth branagh and judi dench and ciaran hinds are my best friends. today, hinds gets a nomination, as does 0utlander�*s caitriona balfe, in a film set against the backdrop of the troubles. i didn't know what they were, and a kid my age probably wouldn't know about them either, unless their parents or grandparents were affected by the troubles in any way. so, this city has its moment in the sun. for a film about the troubles, yes, but through the eyes of a child focused on family and love. belfast has taken an impressive £7 million at the box office so far. but it's a blockbuster, dune, that has the highest number of bafta nominations — 11, primarily celebrating the creative and technical teams
8:44 pm
behind the sci—fi epic. i wonder, what little lady made these? period western the power of the dog has eight nominations, including best actor for benedict cumberbatch and best directorforjane campion. half the baftas' directing nominees are women this year. it's great that bafta are really acknowledging her work now. j i have to say, it's personally- a real thrill to see so many women recognised across so many fields, and particularly, for example, i in the best director category. this baftas aims to put rows over diversity behind it. will smith is nominated for the first time ever in king richard. but there are upsets, too — nothing for 0livia colman, nicole kidman or denzel washington. why don't you and my mom act like brother and sister? the youngest nominee is another 11—year—old, woody norman, for best supporting actor in indie road movie c'mon c'mon. it was like the biggest rush when he said woody norman,
8:45 pm
so me and mum just started screaming and jumping in the air, it was amazing. as for this 11—year—old, he's just enjoying the ride. if it ends up getting some oscar nominations, what will your face look like then? probably the exact same as it did when i found out that i got the role! katie razzall, bbc news, belfast. he is great. in a moment, we will be speaking to caitriona balfe, who has been nominated for best supporting actress for her role in belfast, but first, let's take a look at the film that got her the nod. what me to move in tomorrow morning? there is a heist that goes with it. we get it rent—free with a chance to own it if things go well. bit bigger than what we have here, i read for each of the boys. pare than what we have here, i read for each of the boys.— than what we have here, i read for each of the boys. are you i do play football in that _ each of the boys. are you i do play football in that garden, _ each of the boys. are you i do play football in that garden, daddy? ifi
8:46 pm
each of the boys. are you i do play football in that garden, daddy? if i sa football in that garden, daddy? [fl say yes football in that garden, daddy? if i say yes commit more football in that garden, daddy? ltl say yes commit more money straightaway and we can start giving them a taste of life. this family is not going to get another chance this time. ~ l, l not going to get another chance this time. ~ . . ., ., ., not going to get another chance this time. ~ ., ., ., time. watch out for that traffic there. time. watch out for that traffic there- i'm _ time. watch out for that traffic there. i'm watching _ time. watch out for that traffic there. i'm watching it - time. watch out for that traffic there. i'm watching it now, - time. watch out for that traffic - there. i'm watching it now, mummy, it's ok. so that they really want you. what do you want? i want my family with me. iwant— what do you want? i want my family with me. i want you. _ and the belfast actress caitriona balfejoins me now from la. i loved it. i thought it was most of her film and i loved it. i thought it was most of herfilm and how i loved it. i thought it was most of her film and how do you feel about being nominated? this her film and how do you feel about being nominated?—
8:47 pm
being nominated? this is my first bafta nomination _ being nominated? this is my first bafta nomination and _ being nominated? this is my first bafta nomination and so - being nominated? this is my first bafta nomination and so exciting. being nominated? this is my first - bafta nomination and so exciting. we all had an amazing time filling this and we are alljust so grateful for ken taking us on this journey and the fact has landed us all here is a really amazing thing. i the fact has landed us all here is a really amazing thing.— the fact has landed us all here is a really amazing thing. i think it was oriainall really amazing thing. i think it was originally intended _ really amazing thing. i think it was originally intended as _ really amazing thing. i think it was originally intended as a _ really amazing thing. i think it was originally intended as a musical, i really amazing thing. i think it was j originally intended as a musical, is that right? originally intended as a musical, is that riuht? ., , ., originally intended as a musical, is that riuht? . , ., ., that right? there was a few more musical elements _ that right? there was a few more musical elements to _ that right? there was a few more musical elements to it. _ that right? there was a few more musical elements to it. i- that right? there was a few more musical elements to it. i think i musical elements to it. i think totally, it all the pieces that were there that you see on the screen were still there, just used to have a bit more fantasy, that a key imagine these moments, but as ken has said, when you start editing a film and when you start watching what you filmed, it starts to tell its own story and decide for you what it should be. you its own story and decide for you what it should be.— what it should be. you are from belfast obviously _ what it should be. you are from belfast obviously get _ what it should be. you are from belfast obviously get in - what it should be. you are from belfast obviously get in much . what it should be. you are from i belfast obviously get in much too young to really recall that much of the troubles about how important do you think it was as a storyteller in that very personal family way and when it did the families who wanted to take their children and their family members away from the
8:48 pm
violence? �* ., ., �* violence? i'm not from belfast, i crew u- violence? i'm not from belfast, i grew upjust _ violence? i'm not from belfast, i grew upjust the _ violence? i'm not from belfast, i grew upjust the other— violence? i'm not from belfast, i grew up just the other side - violence? i'm not from belfast, i grew up just the other side of. grew up just the other side of the border. but i think it's so important to tell this side of the story. i think so often even though they have their place in the very important, a lot of the stories we hear of the north deal with the sectarianism or the violence and this really focuses on unordinary family and people they really did not ask for this and i think that's the majority of the people in the north. and i think when you look at something through the lens of a nine—year—old, it really stripped it down to its most simple and most important things, which is the need for tolerance and the need for kindness and the love of family, which i think this movie, that's the message it sends out there. find which i think this movie, that's the message it sends out there. and how moved was canned _ message it sends out there. and how moved was canned while _ message it sends out there. and how moved was canned while he - message it sends out there. and how moved was canned while he made . message it sends out there. and how| moved was canned while he made this as well? people will be surprised with this background that he comes from an area like that and then made
8:49 pm
this huge career afterwards? this definitel , this huge career afterwards? this definitely. i _ this huge career afterwards? ti 3 definitely, i think can put his heart and soul into the script and the film, and as i said, we are all just so grateful that he brought us with him on thisjourney just so grateful that he brought us with him on this journey and just so grateful that he brought us with him on thisjourney and he just so grateful that he brought us with him on this journey and he was i think equally excited and joyful that he was getting to tell the story as he was also on certain days incredibly moved. he is reliving the traumatic and really emotional and beautiful moments from his childhood, and it's been incredible to watch how that really specific story to him has travelled the world and resonated with people all over the place. and resonated with people all over the lace. ., ., and resonated with people all over the lace. ., . , and resonated with people all over the lace. . . , , , ., the place. ciaran hinds is up for best suworting _ the place. ciaran hinds is up for best supporting actor _ the place. ciaran hinds is up for best supporting actor is - the place. ciaran hinds is up for best supporting actor is well - the place. ciaran hinds is up for. best supporting actor is well that's quite a feat for the film.— quite a feat for the film. when we were filming _ quite a feat for the film. when we were filming at _ quite a feat for the film. when we were filming at kimmitt _ quite a feat for the film. when we were filming at kimmitt we - quite a feat for the film. when we were filming at kimmitt we did i quite a feat for the film. when we l were filming at kimmitt we did not know what it would be what it would do, wejust had an incredible time i can get together and formed us incredibly tight knit bond even though he does not think i would of
8:50 pm
his best friends now, apparently, but i think it's been such a gift. i think when you make something, you just have to know that the making of it was incredible and you put your heart and soul into it every day and you never know what it's going to do afterwards, and the fact that is going on in doing so well, it's really incredible.— going on in doing so well, it's really incredible. they always say don't work _ really incredible. they always say don't work with _ really incredible. they always say don't work with children - really incredible. they always say don't work with children or - really incredible. they always say i don't work with children or animals, but not really the case in this film, is it can only think of the young starjudy? if film, is it can only think of the young starjudy?_ film, is it can only think of the young starjudy? if you get all work with kids who _ young starjudy? if you get all work with kids who are _ young starjudy? if you get all work with kids who are as _ young starjudy? if you get all work with kids who are as credible - with kids who are as credible as jude, we will be doing fine. he was brilliant. incredibly prepared, the most, never heard to complain or flip a line. always eager, always excited and he was amazing, as was we have such an incredible cast. i know ciaran hinds got a nod as well but jamie know ciaran hinds got a nod as well butjamie did an amazing job... find
8:51 pm
but jamie did an amazing “ob. .. and obviously you t but jamie did an amazing job... and obviously you for your nomination as well. this might lead on the oscars as well in terms of the trajectory. you know, you cannot... i don't know. those things are out of our hands. definitely boding well for the film and hopefully the film will get it's not, but we will see. it's a nice conversation to be part of, that's for sure.— that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and — that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and good _ that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and good luck. _ that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and good luck. thank - that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and good luck. thank you - that's for sure. thank you very much indeed and good luck. thank you so| indeed and good luck. thank you so much. every week, we make an in depth report for the bbc news website and, for the those of you in the uk, for iplayer, too. this week, it's the controversy surrounding the music streaming giant spotify and their most popular podcast host. joe rogan is a media phenomenon. in 2019, his podcast, thejoe rogan experience, was reportedly downloaded 190 million times in a month. he has over 11 million youtube subscribers, and in 2020, joe rogan's podcast was signed
8:52 pm
in an exclusive deal by spotify for $100 million. the format is simple — a vast array of guests talk with him about a vast array of subjects, sometimes for hours. and joe rogan and his guests can also sometimes cause controversy. in december, one guest, the virologist dr robert malone made a number of misleading claims about vaccines during the podcast, which prompted this reaction. having people on there giving opinions about the vaccines that are not based in science is just not... it's counter to public health right now, and it is just not the right thing to do. dr wallace was one of 270 health care professionals who wrote an open letter to spotify, urging it to act on misinformation injoe rogan's podcast. but it was the intervention of one of rock music's original rebels that made this story go global. neil young threatened to pull his music from spotify,
8:53 pm
saying, "they can have rogan or young, not both." well, spotify chose rogan, and young's music has been removed at his request. a few days later, another canadian legend, joni mitchell, followed suit, and joe rogan has responded to the entire furore with a video on instagram. so, my pledge to you is that i will do my best to try to balance out these more controversial viewpoints with other people's perspectives, so we can maybe find a better point of view. spotify also responded. it released a statement saying... so, rogan stays, but with a warning, and we can't understand that decision without understanding the finances behind this. really, the bottom line for spotify i is that if you play a joni mitchelll or a neil young song, _ 70% of the money that that generates has to go to the artists and their record labels| and their publishers. when one person playsj the joe rogan podcast,
8:54 pm
i spotify keeps all of that money, i and that will very much be behind the business decision here. exclusive podcasts are lucrative, they draw in subscribers and advertisers. but spotify has taken a hit with thisjoe rogan controversy. shares slumped before recovering slightly after the company projected lower profit margins, and the head of spotify has addressed what's happened in a call to investors. it is a balance, but if you shift from music streaming to content creation, that comes with new responsibilities. spotify�*s daniel ek has made his position on content clear, writing... but every content company takes positions on what it will and won't publish. that's not censorship,
8:55 pm
that's taking an editorial position. some, though, argue you need to listen tojoe rogan to understand what's happening here. jemima kelly, writing in the financial times this week, said ifjoe rogan's critics listen to his podcast, they would know that the presenter is a genuinely open—minded host who seeks out all sorts of opinions, rather than blindly following those of a particular tribe. for his part, joe rogan says he explores ideas that are controversial, but can later become mainstream, like the wuhan lab leak theory on covid—19. and batya ungar—sargon from newsweek argues he's meeting a need. they are, but on occasion they will also hear, sometimes unchecked, opinions that are not rooted in available evidence. and for some, that's a problem.
8:56 pm
both spotify and joe rogan know that he and his guests are what make the show. the podcast is different, and that difference is hugely popular. butjust asjoe rogan has the right to talk to who he wants, so musicians and scientists have the right to urge spotify not to give a platform to covid advice that isn't rooted in available evidence. that is it from me in the team. coming up now, the weather but german on for the papers. good evening, today has been another mild day. the same cannot be said for tomorrow because cold air has been lying in wait up to the north—west, and it is now making its move south—eastwards. the cold air being brought in our direction by this weather front. a cold front, this generating heavy bursts of rain through tonight and, indeed, a little bit of wintry
8:57 pm
weather on its back edge. wintry showers pushing on across parts of scotland and northern ireland and some quite strong and gusty winds, but let's follow this progress of the weather front as it sinks south—eastwards across england and wales overnight. some very heavy bursts of rain on its leading edge. on its back edge, through the pennines, the peak district, hills of wales, even the moors of south west england, we could see some snow mixing in because of the cold air in because of the cold air tucking in from the north. ahead of our weather front, still mild, six degrees for norwich, seven in london. behind it, much colder with wintry showers and ice likely to cause issues across parts of scotland as northern ireland tomorrow morning. our weatherfront bringing some much needed rain into the south east. over any high ground, potentially a bit of wintriness mixing in. that will then clear, and by the afternoon, it's a sunshine and showers story. some of the showers wintry over high ground in the north, and in northern scotland, those showers wintry even to quite low levels for a time. these are the wind gusts. widely gusts of 30, 40, 50 mph in the north.
8:58 pm
nothing extreme, but it willjust add to a cold feel. temperatures through the afternoon between 4—9 degrees. now, through friday night, a brief, drier interlude with this little ridge of high pressure, but into the weekend, it's this weather front that will dominate the weather, pushing in from the west, bringing outbreaks of rain and separating the cold air which will cling on in the north from something milder which will attempt to stage a return in the south. and our weather front will bring outbreaks of rain across parts of northern ireland, scotland, down into northern england and wales. some really strong winds especially across northern areas. wintry showers into scotland. staying mostly dry down towards the south, where it will be mild, 10—11 degrees, but colder air across the northern half of the uk. and as we get into sunday, it looks like that weather front will move a little further southwards with its outbreaks of rain, allowing more areas to get back into the cold air with a mix of sunny spells and wintry showers. it's going to be another wintry day. mild in the south, 11—12. much colder further north, just four in north west scotland.
8:59 pm
9:00 pm
hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. us special forces have killed the leader of the islamic state group in a night time operation in north west syria. the commando's used fingerprints and dna analysis to confirm the identity of al qurayshi, his body was left at the site, another one, said joe biden we've removed from the field of battle. last night's operation took a major terrorist leader off the battlefield. the white house says the kremlin were planning to broadcast fake images of the ukrainian army shooting russian sympathisers, as a pretext for an invasion. joe biden goes to new york to tackle an increase in violent crime, that has rattled democrat leaders in cities across the country. tonight with the context, the former head of central, and, the former director of the cia,
9:01 pm
general david petraeus is with us along with the former mayor of baltimore, stephanie rawlings

24 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on