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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 3, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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within hours of each other. dan rosenfield quit as chief of staff, martin reynolds as principal private secretary, jack doyle as head of communications and munira mirza as head of policy. president biden says the leader of the islamic state group abu ibrahim al-qurayshi has been killed during a raid by us special forces in the syrian province of idlib. reports say he detonated a bomb at the start of the operation. the us says the kremlin were planning to broadcast fake images of the ukrainian army shooting russian sympathisers, as a pretext for an invasion. the first minister of northern ireland has resigned in protest at post—brexit trade rules which his democratic unionist party bitterly opposes.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us in the next few hours. with me arejohn stapleton, who is a broadcaster, and kate proctor, who is the editor of politicshome and the house magazine. welcome to you both. what a busy past few hours. let's have a look at what's already in. borisjohnson and his now former policy chief, munira mirza, are on the front of the guardian. four of the pm's senior aides have quit after controversy around lockdown parties and borisjohnson�*s false claim that sir keir starmer failed to prosecute jimmy savile. two perfect storms on the front of the metro — one, those downing street resignations, and the second, the impact of rising bills and interest rates. the same mix in the sun,
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saying chancellor rishi sunak has �*taken a dig' at the prime minister over his savile comments. the chancellor also in the telegraph, alongside a huge red line showing the increase to the energy price cap, highlighting that cost of living crisis. the paper claims senior cabinet ministers want a rethink of net—zero plans to help with rising household bills. the ft also covers the rising cost of living and the warning from the bank of england of the worse squeeze on disposable incomes for at least 30 years. that's next to a worried—looking mark zuckerberg, after more than $225 billion were wiped off the market value of facebook parent company meta. right, let's start. welcome to you both again. kate, which way do you look at this clear out of downing street aids?
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strength by the prime minister or a moment of perilfor strength by the prime minister or a moment of peril for him? strength by the prime minister or a moment of perilfor him? i strength by the prime minister or a moment of peril for him?— moment of peril for him? i think it's a show— moment of peril for him? i think it's a show of— moment of peril for him? i think it's a show of strength _ moment of peril for him? i think it's a show of strength because i it's a show of strength because naturally, he's having to reorder his top team. this is in the first time you got to do this. we've already had the departure of lee cain and dominic cummings, so it's alla cain and dominic cummings, so it's all a short space of time. i think what happened was things were brought forward much quicker than had been expected. the prime minister said he wants to have a reset because of party gate, and that's just been such terrible news for him, but i think the trigger for this clear out in one go was the departure of his policy director, munira mirza. she wrote a very strong letter to the prime minister, very personal, about why she wanted to go. she didn't think he was making the right choices, particularly his recent slur of keir starmer, linking him tojimmy
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savile. so i do think munira mirza decided to go today, she kick started everything. i think all the rest of the people tried to mask the fact and make it look as if there was something coordinated here, but i don't think the fellow the prime minister planned on it —— that's how the prime minister. it minister planned on it -- that's how the prime minister.— the prime minister. it was that, 'ust the prime minister. it was that, just before _ the prime minister. it was that, just before the _ the prime minister. it was that, just before the general - the prime minister. it was that, just before the general election| just before the general election before... ,, �* , ., just before the general election - before. . .— what before... the sun's headline. what ou think before... the sun's headline. what you think is — before... the sun's headline. what you think is going _ before... the sun's headline. what you think is going on? _ before. .. the sun's headline. what you think is going on? i _ before... the sun's headline. what you think is going on? i think - before... the sun's headline. what you think is going on? i think we i you think is going on? i think we should distinguish _ you think is going on? i think we should distinguish between - you think is going on? i think we | should distinguish between these departures. i think the foreign gentlemen involve... departures. i think the foreign gentlemen involve. . .- departures. i think the foreign gentlemen involve... three men, one woman. gentlemen involve... three men, one woman- sorry- _ gentlemen involve... three men, one woman. sorry. boris— gentlemen involve... three men, one woman. sorry. borisjohnson - gentlemen involve... three men, one woman. sorry. boris johnson wants. gentlemen involve... three men, one| woman. sorry. boris johnson wants to restructure the _ woman. sorry. boris johnson wants to restructure the place. _ woman. sorry. boris johnson wants to restructure the place. i _ woman. sorry. boris johnson wants to restructure the place. i don't - woman. sorry. boris johnson wants to restructure the place. i don't know- restructure the place. i don't know whether_ restructure the place. i don't know whether they voluntarily resigned,
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but he _ whether they voluntarily resigned, but he was going to go after two years— but he was going to go after two years anyway. but i think this is a different— years anyway. but i think this is a different class altogether. this is a lady— different class altogether. this is a lady in — different class altogether. this is a lady in the first person from her college _ a lady in the first person from her college to— a lady in the first person from her college to go to oxford. being with boris _ college to go to oxford. being with borisjohnson for 14 college to go to oxford. being with boris johnson for 14 years, she's gone _ boris johnson for 14 years, she's gone because she, like many others, is disgusted — gone because she, like many others, is disgusted by his references in the house of commons to the jimmy savile _ the house of commons to the jimmy savile case — the house of commons to the jimmy savile case. that case never crossed keir starmer's desk. terrible slur, he called — keir starmer's desk. terrible slur, he called back on that today, but he hasn't _ he called back on that today, but he hasn't apologised. you he called back on that today, but he hasn't apologised.— he called back on that today, but he hasn't apologised. you don't buy his excuse that — hasn't apologised. you don't buy his excuse that keir _ hasn't apologised. you don't buy his excuse that keir starmer _ hasn't apologised. you don't buy his excuse that keir starmer was - hasn't apologised. you don't buy his excuse that keir starmer was the i hasn't apologised. you don't buy his l excuse that keir starmer was the man in charge of the organisation, that was the point he was trying to make. in the house of commons, he said all
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he did _ in the house of commons, he said all he did was— in the house of commons, he said all he did was prosecute terrorist and failed _ he did was prosecute terrorist and failed to— he did was prosecute terrorist and failed to prosecute jimmy savile. i don't _ failed to prosecute jimmy savile. i don't buy— failed to prosecute jimmy savile. i don't buy his argument. the case never_ don't buy his argument. the case never came — don't buy his argument. the case never came across his desk and he could _ never came across his desk and he could not— never came across his desk and he could not he — never came across his desk and he could not be held responsible. on behalf_ could not be held responsible. on behalf of— could not be held responsible. on behalf of the department, he played no part— behalf of the department, he played no part in_ behalf of the department, he played no part in the decision. let's go to the guardian. pm hit buy number ten accidents. —— exodus. munira mirza was with him when he was mayor, and i think in that interview, he said she was one of the most important women in his life as well. do you think the other resignations we need to wait for what they save and put in writing? as far as i can see, we haven't got any detail. as far as i can see, we haven't got any detail-— any detail. now, i think they have lost someone _ any detail. now, i think they have lost someone of _ any detail. now, i think they have lost someone of intellectual- any detail. now, i think they have lost someone of intellectual heft l lost someone of intellectual heft with munira mirza going. she wrote the last manifesto which was so
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popular, that he gave borisjohnson his 80 seat majority. it really can't be... we can't say enough how much of a loss that is to him in terms of the thinking of the party. it was news to me that jack doyle was going to leave after two years anyway. ijust haven't heard that before. and the other two, the confusion that perhaps the public has is are you leaving because there is an ongoing police investigation into party gate? are you leaving because there's more perhaps that sue gray has? we know that one of those individuals, martin reynolds, was the person who allegedly sent out this e—mail to say bring your own booze to the garden. some of the people who have left for people that were going to be part of investigations. their names would probably come out. perhaps it would've been even more embarrassing, so i assume they've
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gone now, but i'd be really surprised if you get any statements from them why they left, because i'm sure it willjust be saying it was their honour to serve the prime minister, etc.— their honour to serve the prime minister, etc. ~ ., ~ ., ., ., minister, etc. munira mirza, another key downing — minister, etc. munira mirza, another key downing street _ minister, etc. munira mirza, another key downing street aide _ minister, etc. munira mirza, another key downing street aide as - minister, etc. munira mirza, another key downing street aide as well. - key downing street aide as well. dougie smith. i wondered what might happen there. do you think downing street is brace for more of these are not? . , ., are not? dominic cummings... you miaht are not? dominic cummings... you might well— are not? dominic cummings... you might well say _ are not? dominic cummings... you might well say it — are not? dominic cummings... you might well say it looks _ are not? dominic cummings... you might well say it looks that - are not? dominic cummings... you might well say it looks that way. i might well say it looks that way. the other— might well say it looks that way. the other thing that caught my attention and is perhaps further evidence — attention and is perhaps further evidence is whether or not the chancellor, when he was talking about _ chancellor, when he was talking about energy price hikes and what he's doing — about energy price hikes and what he's doing to help people. he was asked _ he's doing to help people. he was asked directly what he thought about downing _ asked directly what he thought about downing street's remark —— the prime minister's _
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downing street's remark —— the prime minister's remarks, and he said he wouldn't _ minister's remarks, and he said he wouldn't have said it. when he was asked _ wouldn't have said it. when he was asked should he apologise, he said quite _ asked should he apologise, he said quite rightly, thus the for the prime — quite rightly, thus the for the prime minister. i was watching that today, _ prime minister. i was watching that today, thinking i'm looking at the next leader of the conservative party— next leader of the conservative party and — next leader of the conservative party and perhaps the next prime minister~ — party and perhaps the next prime minister. he was absolutely self assured — minister. he was absolutely self assured. he had allthe assured. he had all the facts and figures at his fingertips. he didn't make claims that he couldn't... it was a _ make claims that he couldn't... it was a very— make claims that he couldn't... it was a very impressive performance. on a _ was a very impressive performance. on a day— was a very impressive performance. on a day like — was a very impressive performance. on a day like this, a lot of backbenchers will remember. let's go on to the telegraph. _ they've got the resignation below that, kate. it's interesting, the chancellor pointing out that the government can't pay for everything. the nation needs to confront this huge rise in wholesale energy prices, but we are looking at the biggest fall in living standards, i
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think, since records began. yeah, this is the — think, since records began. yeah, this is the figure _ think, since records began. yeah, this is the figure that _ think, since records began. yeah, this is the figure that people - think, since records began. yeah, this is the figure that people will. this is the figure that people will have less disposable income for their first time in 30 years. have less disposable income for theirfirst time in 30 years. so, all the nice things that make life a bit bearable, it's going to be a real squeeze on people's personal finances. it's awful, really, and you can't underestimate the impact that these bills are going to have. i think the government stepped in today with some very logical solutions to try and help people, cushion some of this enormous hike in bills, when it comes to gas and electric. the idea that you'll get council tax money back and there'll be a discount on your energy bill, £200, you do have to pay that back, but it mightjust take some of the edge off. even still, if people are going to have these hikes of up to
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£700 or so, even with some of this is financial support, people are still looking at an extra 400 — £500. it'sjust still looking at an extra 400 — £500. it's just too still looking at an extra 400 — £500. it'sjust too much still looking at an extra 400 — £500. it's just too much for people. i think the government, the country is going to be really worried about this. i guess they're gambling on prices coming down. although they have given a warning that prices will go up in the autumn even further, i think the thinking is long term, they'll go down. this is happened before, so perhaps they can put enough measures and to help people as much as they can. this country has to do something about its energy mix where it gets things from. we can't be in the situation going forward. the government needs to really grasp it. you going forward. the government needs to really grasp it-_ to really grasp it. you accept rishi sunak's argument _ to really grasp it. you accept rishi sunak's argument that _ to really grasp it. you accept rishi sunak's argument that the - to really grasp it. you accept rishi - sunak's argument that the government can't afford to keep on keeping energy prices low?— can't afford to keep on keeping energy prices low? they could've something _
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energy prices low? they could've something else. _ energy prices low? they could've something else. they _ energy prices low? they could've something else. they could've i something else. they could've imposed — something else. they could've imposed a windfall tax on some of the energy— imposed a windfall tax on some of the energy companies. ironically announced today that they made a profit _ announced today that they made a profit of _ announced today that they made a profit of $20 billion. now, many people _ profit of $20 billion. now, many people will say conservative ministers don't impose windfall... | ministers don't impose windfall... thought it ministers don't impose windfall... i thought it was a $19.3 billion earnings, but i might be wrong. i stand corrected. talk _ crosstalk billions going in dividends. i think that was the figure i saw. maw; that was the figure i saw. many eo - le that was the figure i saw. many people would — that was the figure i saw. many people would say _ that was the figure i saw. many people would say if— that was the figure i saw. many people would say if they're - that was the figure i saw. many people would say if they're making profit _ people would say if they're making profit like — people would say if they're making profit like that, why shouldn't they help out? — profit like that, why shouldn't they help out? the point i was going to make _ help out? the point i was going to make his — help out? the point i was going to make his people would say the government won't impose a windfall
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tax on _ government won't impose a windfall tax on primus companies. don't forget _ tax on primus companies. don't forget margaret thatcher imposed on the banks _ forget margaret thatcher imposed on the banks. ,, ,, �* the banks. crosstalk sor , the banks. crosstalk sorry. let _ the banks. crosstalk sorry, let kate - the banks. crosstalk sorry, let kate come i the banks. crosstalk. sorry, let kate come in. the banks. crosstalk i sorry, let kate come in. i the banks. crosstalk - sorry, let kate come in. i saw the banks. crosstalk _ sorry, let kate come in. i saw the argument — sorry, let kate come in. i saw the argument today — sorry, let kate come in. i saw the argument today that _ sorry, let kate come in. i saw the argument today that energy - sorry, let kate come in. i saw the - argument today that energy companies are already paying 40% and corporation tax. i think he feels they had has to be a point where you can't be coming after these companies because you want them to invest in the country. they might not agree with that, but that's where sunak is coming from, they already had the energy companies coming hard. they want to keep things as they are.— things as they are. staying with this story. _ things as they are. staying with this story. do — things as they are. staying with this story, do you _ things as they are. staying with this story, do you think - things as they are. staying with this story, do you think the - this story, do you think the government should be doing more to push those green initiatives? they could, for example, take away the green levy from the bill and put that into general taxation. but the fact is we do need to stop using as much energy as we do at the moment.
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we do, but... innocence, it's fortunate— we do, but... innocence, it's fortunate that it's coming now because — fortunate that it's coming now because we are getting towards the end of— because we are getting towards the end of the — because we are getting towards the end of the winter —— in a sense. these— end of the winter —— in a sense. these harrowing stories of people who are _ these harrowing stories of people who are sitting in flats with no heating — who are sitting in flats with no heating because they can't afford it. heating because they can't afford it people — heating because they can't afford it. people are skimping on their food _ it. people are skimping on their food because they simply can't afford — food because they simply can't afford to — food because they simply can't afford to buy the food they would naturally— afford to buy the food they would naturally want and require. this is a real crisis — naturally want and require. this is a real crisis. we saw this headline about— a real crisis. we saw this headline about heating or eating, i don't think— about heating or eating, i don't think it's — about heating or eating, i don't think it's an exaggeration on. —— at all. think it's an exaggeration on. —— at all most _ think it's an exaggeration on. —— at all most of— think it's an exaggeration on. —— at all. most of us moderately well. people — all. most of us moderately well. people up — all. most of us moderately well. people up and down the country will suffer— people up and down the country will suffer very— people up and down the country will suffer very badly, and anything that can he _ suffer very badly, and anything that can be done to alleviate that i think— can be done to alleviate that i think they should think about seriously. i think they should think about seriousl . , ,., ~' think they should think about seriousl . , ., ., ., ,
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seriously. i spoke to someone early on who was — seriously. i spoke to someone early on who was on _ seriously. i spoke to someone early on who was on universal _ seriously. i spoke to someone early on who was on universal credit. - on who was on universal credit. these price rises will make a massive difference to her and she hasn't had the heating on all winter, she said. let's go on to the ft. we've been discussing that. in terms of the rebate for council tax, is that proportionate? because these bands of council tax or set up in 1991, and in some areas, you'll have pretty affluent people living in properties in the a — d band. it would be a matter of researching the entire... . v , would be a matter of researching the entire... ., �*, , ., ., entire... that's been long overdue. decades-old _ entire... that's been long overdue. decades-old discussion. _ entire... that's been long overdue. decades-old discussion. i - entire... that's been long overdue. decades-old discussion. i did - entire... that's been long overdue. decades-old discussion. i did this | decades—old discussion. i did this in a—levels politics. the system doesn't reflect warehouse prices are
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today.

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