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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 4, 2022 1:00pm-1:46pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. a senior conservative mp tells the prime minister to �*shape up, or ship out�* as pressure builds on boris johnson following the resignation of five downing street aides. ofgem says it may start reviewing the energy price cap every three months, rather than the current six. the winter olympics are officially under way — the opening ceremony has been taking place inside beijing's bird's nest stadium — we'll be speaking to a team gb gold medallist. new figures show a record number of children in england are being referred to the nhs for specialist mental health care — we'll be getting the thoughts of a headteacher. and scientists are on
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the hunt for sir ernest shackleton�*s shipwreck — dubbed "the most "unreachable in the world". the prime minister must "shape up or ship out" — that's what the senior conservative mp huw merriman told the bbc this morning, as questions continue about boris johnson's leadership. he is looking at how to rebuild his team after the resignation yesterday of four of his top aides. mps supportive of the prime minister are suggesting he's making necessary staff changes, following a damning report by the senior civil servant sue gray into rule—breaking parties at number ten during the pandemic.
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but munira mirza quit because of the prime minister's false claim that sir keir starmer failed to prosecutejimmy savile when he was director of public prosecutions. and this morning a fifth adviser has resigned, another member of the policy unit. our political correspondent, nick eardley reports. another day, another crisis. borisjohnson has lost five members of his team in just 2a hours. including one of his longest serving allies. this is munira mirza, an aide to mrjohnson for m years. she quit yesterday, criticising her boss over incorrect comments suggesting sir keir starmer was linked to the decision not to prosecutejimmy savile. the prime minister's director of communications, his principal private secretary and chief of staff have also left, all three caught up in the parties row, but their departures leave big
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questions over the future direction of number ten. and elena narozanski hung up her gloves today, another member of the prime minister's policy unit. the prime minister was clear in his response to the sue gray update that there would be changes at number ten downing street. four people had served their country fantastically well, some during the whole pandemic, borisjohnson thanked them for their service, they have resigned and he has accepted. but this runs deeper, with the prime minister being criticised by some of his long serving allies. and there was this from the chancellor, a frontrunner to replace mrjohnson. being honest, i wouldn't have said it, and i am glad that the prime minister clarified what he meant. a politician careful with his words, distancing himself from his boss's comments. among tory mps, growing frustration. i am troubled, i find it very upsetting, my constituents are upset. i feel we have lost face and public
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trust and we have to get that back, but i would rather see what the prime minister can do to turn it around rather than acting with haste. we want to see him resign but we do not think he has the scruples to resign, despite all his transgressions. it is up to the conservative party to hear what people like munira mirza say, and act. borisjohnson has tried to get back on the political front foot but it has not worked, there are still questions about his language, judgment and future. the health secretary sajid javid was asked if the prime minister's position was now untenable. the prime minister has been really clear in his response to the reports, the update from sue gray. he came to parliament as he said he would, he apologised, and he set out and said that he will change things. and he started making this changes already.
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he hasn't said sorry for using that slur against keir starmer. should borisjohnson categorically apologise? keir starmer did a good job. sir keir starmer deserves absolute respect for that, but the prime minister has come out and clarified his remarks. would you have used that slur? the prime minister has clarified the remarks, and that is important. and what i will be doing is actually getting on with myjob, which is what i am doing today on world cancer day. does he still enjoy your support? of course he does, absolutely. sonia sodha is the chief leader writer at the observer. she was also a senior adviser to ed miliband when he was labour leader.
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it is friday afternoon, you paper comes out on sunday morning, is it too soon to write a leader? yes, i think it is. who knows where we will be tomorrow morning when i am writing the editorial for sunday. i think it is looking really bad for borisjohnson. it i think it is looking really bad for boris johnson._ i think it is looking really bad for boris johnson. it has since the end of last year— boris johnson. it has since the end of last year when _ boris johnson. it has since the end of last year when these _ boris johnson. it has since the end | of last year when these revelations about partygate started emerging. but to lose four of your advisers, particularly munira mirza, and also the comments of the chancellor, there is a momentum building it now amongst tory backbenchers to get the prime minister out. everyone will remember we saw some momentum a couple of weeks ago. people thought things had settled down and things
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are picking up again. it does look more likely now that borisjohnson might go fairly soon if conservative mps act against him. but when you take a step back and none of the fundamentals of change. whether it happens now, when that happens in a month, whether it happens in a few months, borisjohnson has become an electoral liability for the conservative party.- electoral liability for the conservative party. electoral liability for the conservative pa . ., ., conservative party. you said that ou had conservative party. you said that you had been _ conservative party. you said that you had been an _ conservative party. you said that you had been an adviser- conservative party. you said that you had been an adviser to - conservative party. you said that you had been an adviser to a - you had been an adviser to a previous labour leader. in terms of keir starmer, what should he do now? there is an extent to which the conservatives are in such disarray, there is not too much more to be said, about perhaps providing commentary on that, and holding the government accountable for the staff it is not doing. their big issue that labour has been talking about, but needs to keep talking about, is the cost of living crisis. as well
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as their political shenanigans going on in westminster, we have had some terrible economic forecasts from the bank of england around what is going to be happening to peoples budgets over the next year or two. we have got inflation going up. bad news on energy bills, they will be got inflation going up_ bad news on energy bills, they will be going up by hundreds of pounds per year for many people. wages are stagnant. we had a big cat to universal credit, to the support for low—paid parents at the end of last year. —— a big reduction in universal credit. that is the message that labour needs to keep trying to land. recent history is an imperfect guide, but look at the last two times the conservatives decided to throw out a prime minister, thatcher, may, the replacement then beat labour at the next election, will that be on labour�*s mind? absolutely. if you are leader of the opposition you can never be
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complacent do you have always got to be worried about the government be to you at the next election. it is too early to predict exactly what is going to happen. whether boris johnson goes into the next general election or not, and it is looking less likely, first we have to look at likely successors for boris johnson, they hailfrom at likely successors for boris johnson, they hail from the at likely successors for boris johnson, they hailfrom the right at likely successors for boris johnson, they hail from the right of the conservative party, and i think it is hard to see them doing as well with the former labour voters as borisjohnson did in 2019. there is that you think about. the other thing, looking forward, cost of living and family budgets, the next election, as long as nothing too bad happens and the pandemic now, hopefully we are out of the woods as a result of vaccination etc, hoping there's not another way waiting for us, if we are out of the woods with a pandemic, the next election is very much going to be a cost of living election, about family budgets. that will be difficult for
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the conservatives. because it is hard to make a pitch to the electorate when voters feel like things have got worse. thank you. the conservatives have won the southend west by—election, trigged by the fatal stabbing of the tory mp sir david amess. anna firth got a majority of more than 12,000. the seat was not contested by labour, the liberal democrats or the green party. just 24% of the electorate voted, making it one of the worst turnouts for a by—election since the second world war. not a massive surprise that the conservatives help —— held the seat. but the turnout was amongst the lowest in a by—election since world war ii. there were more spoiled
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ballot this than there were for the candidates who came second. this is what the winner, anna firth, made of that. you would expect a high number of spoilt ballots in an election where there is actually no left—wing candidate standing at all. in batley and spen, because it was a labour mp that was being replaced, you had a left—wing candidate standing and a medley of right—wing candidates. that was not the case here. there are messages on their about boris johnson. are you going to be taking some of these measures to boris johnson when you are and when spinster next week? i johnson when you are and when spinster next week?— johnson when you are and when spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged _ spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged to _ spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged to be _ spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged to be their - spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged to be their mp, - spinster next week? i am so proud and privileged to be their mp, my| and privileged to be their mp, my focus will be delivering on local priorities. anna firth heads to westminster on monday. but there will be no let up. she backs borisjohnson and say she
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will be focusing on making the most of southend's city status. the energy regulator, 0fgem, says it's considering reviewing the energy price cap every three months — to try to cope with the volatility in the market. the cap is currently assessed every six months, limiting what gas and electricity companies can charge a typical household. yesterday it was announced that the cap will rise in april — meaning an average household on a variable tariff will see its bill rise by £693 a year — to nearly £2,000. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. for hussain and halima master, who have three kids, rising energy bills means life is getting tougher. it's gone up again, hasn't it? yeah, to 250 — that's crazy, that. hussain has a full—time job, but they are struggling to make ends meet. we have looked into the local food bank. 0n the weekends, they have it open to the public where you pay a couple of pounds and fill your bags up.
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so we have had a look at that and we have started to kind of use that. for many families like the masters, worse is to come. energy prices for consumers are capped by the regulator 0fgem. but the cap is going up to reflect a big rise in the price suppliers have to pay for the energy they sell to us. 0fgem says some 22 million households will pay more. it is unavoidable in the short term that prices were going to go up. the government will provide £200 towards each household's energy costs in october. but it will have to be paid back through bills later. most households in england will also get a discount of £150 in april. it will be available for homes in council tax bands a to d and won't need to be repaid.
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critics say these measures do not go far enough to help vulnerable people at a time when the cost of living is already rising rapidly and household finances are under pressure. but the energy minister said £141; million was available to local authorities to support those in most need. there is that discretionary fund for local authorities to help those who because of different circumstances might be in a high band council tax property but do not pay council tax. labour has described the government's actions as inadequate and has called for a windfall task on the profits of big energy companies to help bring down bills and address what it calls our broken energy system. and at 3.30 this afternoon we'll be answering your questions on energy prices and how it's impacting your family budget.
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a high courtjudge in belfast has ordered that checks on food and agricultural goods traded between the british mainland and northern ireland must remain in place until a judicial review next month. the ruling comes two days after a minister in the devolved government ordered that the inspections be stopped — a move that has triggered a political crisis. the checks are part of the brexit deal struck between the britain and the eu to prevent the return of a hard border on the island of ireland. joining me now is sam mcbride who is the northern ireland editor of the belfast telegraph. how big a crisis is this? it is an existential crisis for devolution in northern ireland. first minister of dup design yesterday, that automatically put sinn fein�*s deputy minister out of office. we were
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already moving to elections in may anyway, the practical applications of that are not that great at this stage. but getting back into stormont, as they dup want to do, is going to be difficult. they have set out very stringent red lines about changes to the protocol. they cannot be sure whether borisjohnson and the eu are able to agree those. if they cannot it is very difficult for sirjeffrey donaldson to back down. stormont may not be back for quite some time. stormont may not be back for quite some time-— some time. you posted on social media, it some time. you posted on social media. it is _ some time. you posted on social media, it is still _ some time. you posted on social media, it is still not _ some time. you posted on social media, it is still not quite - some time. you posted on social media, it is still not quite clear. media, it is still not quite clear why dup is walking out of stormont at this moment. can why dup is walking out of stormont at this moment.— at this moment. can you explain more? there — at this moment. can you explain more? there was _ at this moment. can you explain more? there was a _ at this moment. can you explain more? there was a statement . at this moment. can you explain i more? there was a statement from paul givan yesterday, and a lengthy speech from jeffrey donaldson, but it did not give any sense of why they had moved so urgently. there are two issues here. edwin poots, dup minister, ordered his officials to stop these checks on irish sea border, at irish sea ports.
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0fficials refused to do so. there's been a stand—off. the courts have intervened. but it was not clear why dup moved so quickly between ensuring that order and toppling the entire edifice of stormont. that is the fundamental misjudgment here. if they were trying to do this, if they were willing to put devolution on the table as a lever, something they could use to try to get concessions from the british government, european union, whoever else, it would make more sense to keep that in reserve, keep that as your last line of defence. they have played all their cards now. there doesn't seem to be anything within threat and at this point. haw seem to be anything within threat and at this point.— and at this point. how does government _ and at this point. how does government work _ and at this point. how does government work at - and at this point. how does government work at the - and at this point. how does - government work at the moment, today? government work at the moment, toda ? . , ~ , ., today? haltingly. we still have ministers and _ today? haltingly. we still have ministers and police _ today? haltingly. we still have ministers and police in - today? haltingly. we still have| ministers and police in belfast. today? haltingly. we still have - ministers and police in belfast. we still have an assembly, a legislature that can pass legislation until it is dissolved in two months�* time. there is no government, no ability for the cabinet, the northern ireland executive, to meet, to come to agreed positions on things. there is limited form of government. because
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northern ireland existed for three years without any government, between 2017 and 2020, there is a sense here, probably a dangerous sense, we have been here before, we can do this. actually, the health service in northern ireland is in a crisis which would be shocking to many of your viewers in other parts of the uk, it is much worse than other parts of the uk. that was going to start to be addressed to a certain extent with a bigger budget, a three year plan, etc. that now is unlikely. there are major practical implications to what has happened here. do implications to what has happened here. , ., implications to what has happened here. , . . ., , implications to what has happened here. ,. . .,, here. do you expect elections in may to shake things _ here. do you expect elections in may to shake things up, _ here. do you expect elections in may to shake things up, get _ here. do you expect elections in may to shake things up, get a _ here. do you expect elections in may| to shake things up, get a government backed moving, or is it too soon to predict? backed moving, or is it too soon to redict? , ~' ., , predict? the big unknown is whether sinn fein emerges _ predict? the big unknown is whether sinn fein emerges as _ predict? the big unknown is whether sinn fein emerges as the _ predict? the big unknown is whether sinn fein emerges as the biggest - sinn fein emerges as the biggest party for the first time in northern ireland�*s 100 year history. surveys consistently suggest that will be the case. if that is the case, there is an extra air of incivility here, because dup as recently as this morning, sirjeffrey donaldson has not clarified whether he would serve
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as deputy first minister to a sinn fein first minister. we have got the problem of the protocol, problem of whether dup will accept the outcome of that election, on top of that, these practical implications. northern ireland has been degrading in terms of public services because of that long period of no government, then into the covid crisis, the protocol crisis, it is not good position. thank you. the opening ceremony of this year�*s winter olympics has been getting under way in beijing. this is is the scene at the main stadium — known as the birds nest. its rim is decorated with the flags of the 91 competing nations and regions. the ceremony is due to last around two hours and it will culminate in the lighting of the olympic cauldron. few global leaders have journeyed to beijing to be at the opening,
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but the russian president vladimir putin is there. and he�*s just held a meeting with his chinese counterpart xijinping. the two countries have put out a long joint statement, describing the talks as "very warm" and agreeing on a raft of policies. it warned against what they called nato�*s cold war ideology. many in the west fear the russian leader is planning to invade ukraine, which wasnt mentioned directly. the meeting is mr xi�*s first in person with a world leader in nearly two years and is yet another public display of mutual support between mrxi and mr putin have met 37 times since taking power, more than any other head of state. vladimir putin told xijinping that the two countries had established an �*unprecedented�* relationship and have a history of trade deals worth hundreds of millions of dollars —
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russia says it�*s prepared to supply china with more oil and gas. it�*s thought mr putin will be looking for diplomatic support, as he builds up troops on russia�*s border with ukraine. 0ur china correspondent, stephen mcdonell is at a pub where people are watching the opening cermoney which is taking placea few miles away in the iconic birds nest stadium. good to see you again. are they enjoying it? absolutely. people are here. there are kids running around. some sitting on their parents laps. there are young couples. it is a community feeling here. people have gathered in the pub tonight, partly because you cannot go into bird�*s nest stadium, you cannot buy tickets. it is only party organisations and members of state owned enterprises that are
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supplying the spectators with everything for these games. this all because of covid, the feeling is you can control a select group better with testing, possibly quarantine. people are disappointed they cannot go into any of those events, best way to have community feeling is to gather some hair like this and watch it altogether. that way, at least you are part of this event. —— to gather somewhere like this. 2008, china�*s arrival is a world power, and now, the winter olympics. people are proud to have another bite at it. it does not have that feeling of 2008. then, china wanted to show itself off to the world, its new transport, awesome buildings, the economy was going off, welcoming
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people from all over the world. this time around, they cannot welcoming tourists from all over the world. teams coming and cannot look at beijing afterwards. they will go into the bubble, and then leave the country after competing. that is the waiters. for many it is a pity, it has put a dampener on the event. the winter olympics are always going to be not quite the same as the summer games, one of the main reasons, it is freezing here in winter. especially today. biting cold. most people who are inside the bird�*s nest stadium will know that. and also not as many countries participating. all of that put together, it is not the same type of thing as the summer games. that said, there is still a lot of excitement about it. people are proud of the great things of this country does offer. 0ne proud of the great things of this country does offer. one of those is all these amazing facilities for
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sport. there is a sliding structure in the old steelworks year. i would imagine you will see athletes flying through the ear with chimneys and odd bits of structure in the background. quite innovative. there will be a lot to see, that the onus can be proud of, despite the allegations of human rights abuses and the like, which in some peoples minds have tainted the games. record numbers of children and young people in england have been referred to specialist nhs mental health services according to new analysis by the royal college of psychiatrists for bbc news. headteachers and a children�*s mental health charity say many more children are still struggling with the return to learning. the creation of 400 mental health support teams for schools in england is ahead of schedule according to the government.
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these last two years have exacerbated some of the challenges that were already there. it is not a surprise that we are seeing these figures. place2be has been working in over 400 schools around the country. we have been doing this now for over 25 years. let�*s speak now to mat carpenter, he�*s headteacher of baxter college school in kidderminster. for kids who might need help, how can they get it? that for kids who might need help, how can they get it?— can they get it? that is a range of mental health _ can they get it? that is a range of mental health services _ can they get it? that is a range of mental health services available | can they get it? that is a range of. mental health services available for young people. when children need to help the most important thing is
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they have trust in adults in their schools, a form tutor or teacher they have a good relationship with. the article on the bbc news website talks about the scale of the issue. finding any adult in the building that they can talk to. we have got a school counsellor, a mental—health lead as well. but for young people, the most important thing is they talk to their friends, and talk to significant adults in their life. for many of us growing up, mental health was not talked about in assembly and so on. when you speak to pupils, is that something that you openly discuss to try to get conversations going?— you openly discuss to try to get conversations going? yes. well-being and mental health _ conversations going? yes. well-being and mental health are _ conversations going? yes. well-being and mental health are more _ conversations going? yes. well-being and mental health are more openly i and mental health are more openly talked about now, within school, but we are also noticing that an appearance community as well, that has got to be a positive thing for young people, to talk about the way that they feel, and if they are struggling, to feel that they can talk about it.— talk about it. that has to be a ositive talk about it. that has to be a positive step _ talk about it. that has to be a positive step forward - talk about it. that has to be a positive step forward for - talk about it. that has to be a positive step forward for us. i talk about it. that has to be a i positive step forward for us. this generation has endured at least a
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year and a half of on, off lockdown is as well, what impact is that meat on them? , ., ., i. , .,, on them? first of all, young people have handled _ on them? first of all, young people have handled the _ on them? first of all, young people have handled the last _ on them? first of all, young people have handled the last two _ on them? first of all, young people have handled the last two years - have handled the last two years brilliantly. they have faced significant challenge from lockdown, home learning, having to cover their faces when they are in school, vaccinations, constant testing, they have handled it brilliantly, but we are seeing a significant rise in anxiety, leading to other computers mental health issues, that we have been reporting on today. share mental health issues, that we have been reporting on today.— been reporting on today. are they able to sit down _ been reporting on today. are they able to sit down and _ been reporting on today. are they able to sit down and talk, - been reporting on today. are they able to sit down and talk, not - been reporting on today. are they able to sit down and talk, notjust to councillors, but to each other, after school, to councillors, but to each other, afterschool, before to councillors, but to each other, after school, before school? yes. babbfinu after school, before school? yes. babbling of _ after school, before school? yes. babbling of year _ after school, before school? yes. babbling of year groups, - after school, before school? jazz babbling of year groups, whilst it was necessary for infection control, was necessary for infection control, was not helpful last year. we are making sure we have got spaces available for students to be able to sit down with their friends and talk, before school. we have opened up talk, before school. we have opened up astroturf for students to play football on before —— at lunchtime.
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in lockdown they were shut away. they did not have opportunity for positivity, and social media fuelled negativity in their lives. what positivity, and social media fuelled negativity in their lives.— negativity in their lives. what is the sinale negativity in their lives. what is the single best _ negativity in their lives. what is the single best thing _ negativity in their lives. what is the single best thing people - negativity in their lives. what is| the single best thing people can negativity in their lives. what is - the single best thing people can do for their mental health? not go on social media?— for their mental health? not go on social media? yes. and get out, and net social media? yes. and get out, and get exercise- — social media? yes. and get out, and get exercise. thank _ social media? yes. and get out, and get exercise. thank you _ social media? yes. and get out, and get exercise. thank you for - social media? yes. and get out, and get exercise. thank you forjoining i get exercise. thank you for “oining us. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. it has turned much colder today. strong winds have been blowing wintry showers to the north—west. temperatures will fall away through the night. frost quite widely. even some snow to lower levels eventually. later, temperatures lift in the north—west ahead of the rain for saturday. initially some snow,
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then rain moving across the bulk of scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales. later, bright conditions, cold air returns to the north, further south and east, not that much rain. milder once again. that weather system pushes through on sunday morning to leave more chilly air and showers.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... a senior conservative mp tells the prime minister to "shape up, or ship out" as pressure builds on boris johnson following the resignation of five downing street aides. my constituents are upset. i feel we�*ve lost faith and the public trust and we have got to gain that back.
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0fgem says it may start reviewing the energy price cap every three months, rather than the current six. the winter olympics are officially under way — the opening ceremony has been taking place inside beijing�*s bird�*s nest stadium. new figures show a record number of children in england are being referred to the nhs for specialist mental health care. sport now command here isjohn watson. straight to beijing, where as you�*ve been hearing the winter olympics are officially under way. the opening ceremony ongoing in the bird�*s nest stadium. and this was the moment team gb made their arrival — led by alpine skier dave ryding and curling�*s eve muirhead. the team has 50 athletes competing in a variety of events, with hopes of exceeding the five medals won in the last two games. everyone involved in the games operating in a bubble system. no tickets for events have been sold to the public, only specially invited guests will attend.
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and two of gb�*s 50 athletes have already started competing — and have maintained their excellent start keeping up their hopes of winning a medal. the team consists of jen dodds and bruce mouat have made it three wins from four after beating australia 8—7 in the curling. gb did lead 6—1 at one stage — but were pegged back to 8—all — and needed an extra end to secure victory. away from the olympics, england cricket�*s chief executive tom harrison insistsjoe root will remain as captain of the test side — despite england�*s poor performance in the ashes. there was no repreive for head coach chris silverwood though — as he was sacked yesterday. england are also looking for a new assistant coach and a director of cricket after graham thorpe and ashley giles both left their roles respectively. sir andrew strauss has taken temporary charge as director of cricket — and admitted change was needed. her ambition with english cricket is not to make up the numbers. 0ur ambition has got to be the number
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one team in all formats. for the last 12 months or so, the test team, it is hard to say we have moved forwards. and i suppose these decisions have been made to try and help that process happen, to move the team forward, to get some fresh voices in there, to get some fresh thinking, to challenge the players in different ways and... it will be a liverpool themed final at the africa cup of nations final on sunday. mohammed salah�*s egypt booked their place in the final after beating cameroon on penalties — this missed spotkick was the key moment. they�*ll now face senegal — who have sadio mane up front. liverpool�*s manager says he�*s looking forward to seeing his two forwards come face to face. it will be exciting. now it is obviously not so easy. because we have _ obviously not so easy. because we have to _ obviously not so easy. because we have to watch the game and one will be definitely really happy after, and the — be definitely really happy after, and the other one much less so. the
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pressure _ and the other one much less so. the pressure in _ and the other one much less so. the pressure in the tournament, the pressure — pressure in the tournament, the pressure they had on their shoulders is massive — pressure they had on their shoulders is massive. and how they are dealing with it. _ is massive. and how they are dealing with it. i'm _ is massive. and how they are dealing with it, i'm really happy with them. wales will begin the defence of their six nations title tomorrow — as they play ireland in dublin. after that, england will try to regain the calcutta cup from scotland at murrayfield — and avenge last year�*s defeat at twickenham. the game will be anthony seibold�*s first six nations match since becoming defence coach — and he can�*t wait to get started. the interest in this game, in the six nations. when i firstjoined england rugby, someone said they were 870 million followers worldwide. 15 million in australian each of those sports. just the extent of the following, the extent of the interest in six nations and the history of the calcutta cup.
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it's the history of the calcutta cup. it�*s going to be a great tournament, isn�*t it? plenty more on our website this afternoon. the very latest as the winter olympic skiers up with plenty over the next 16 days. ministers have promised a new 10—year strategy to improve cancer care in england, but cancer charities have told the government it�*ll be a huge challenge. we spoke to shaun walsh earlier, he�*s head of public affairs at cancer research uk. i should say from the outset, cancer research uk absolutely welcomes the secretary of state�*s ambition on cancer. we and others have been flagging for some time the real challenges this country has faced in relation to access to diagnosis, treatment and care for cancer. that�*s only been exacerbated by the pandemic. it�*s important to note that even before the pandemic we were struggling to hit cancer waiting times. the pandemic has really
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exposed the challenge. what we want to see the secretary of state do, and this is a significant improvement on what has happened with previous plans, we must see the ambition backed by investment and a credible plan for delivery. we have some really strong targets already in place — so there is an ambition that 75% of cancers are diagnosed early by 2028. we are some way off achieving that. there is an ambition that england is smoke—free by 2030. again, we are some way off that. and the reason why is we haven�*t had a credibly funded plan to support those ambitions. 0ur ask of the secretary of state today, on world cancer day, on cancer research uk�*s 20th anniversary i should add, is we need to back the ambition with investment. if we see that, the cancer community will rally around. because all of us have heard harrowing stories of how challenging this period has been for people affected by cancer. and we need to hit
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on a number of levels. we need to make sure that we are investing in prevention. making sure that we support smoking cessation services to help people give up smoking. we think this could be funded through a smoke—free fund which could charge a levy on tobacco manufacturers to support public health. we think the government should maintain its line on tackling obesity. we are concerned that there is a watering down or weakening of ambitions on obesity. these are the two factors that are the biggest preventable causes of cancer, so we need to hit them. 0n early diagnosis and treatment, the big, big challenge facing the nhs as we know is staffing. it�*s capacity and kit. this is felt very much so by those people going through the system with cancer, and when we look overseas and we look to see how we compare to other countries and how much is invested in workforce, when we look at where we are in terms of progress on early diagnosis,
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we are way behind. we also heard from lawrence dallaglio — his mum died of cancer in 2008. he says the issue will only get bigger. cancer hasn�*t gone away because of covid. if anything, we�*re going to have even more people presenting themselves because they haven�*t had access to the hospitals or the care or the diagnosis. so this is an issue that is only going to get bigger and bigger. 100%, fundraising and awareness is hugely important. all the various cancer charities have had their event and fundraising effectively turned off overnight for the best part of two years, so it is vitally important. but so is the investment that the government make. as a city before, people should not have too travel hundreds of miles to go and get cancer treatment —— as i said to you before. so i think there is a lot of money being invested by
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many years by various different british governments, but i think it is important that we have a coordinated strategy both nationally and internationally to make sure that that money is being invested wisely, that the right treatment is available to the right patient in the right place. if it was up to me, i would probably create a number of centres of excellence around the uk, make sure they are as accessible to everyone, ratherthan make sure they are as accessible to everyone, rather than someone in newcastle having to travel all the way down to london to get treatment. but i think that the government is doing an awful lot, but i think they have to do as much as they possibly can because, as i said, the problem is only going to get bigger and bigger. as well as the opening ceremony at the beijing winter 0lympics, a number of events are taking place today. including curling and figure skating. but what�*s it like to compete in an olympic games? especially a controverisal games like this one, which has seen numerous diplomatic boycotts. amy williams is a former
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team gb gold medallist in the skeleton. do you wish you were there? yes, of course _ do you wish you were there? yes, of course i_ do you wish you were there? yes, of course i d0~ — do you wish you were there? yes, of course i do. slightly sweaty palms. and the _ course i do. slightly sweaty palms. and the excitement that the athletes are feeling. 0h, and the excitement that the athletes are feeling. oh, my goodness, i wish i are feeling. oh, my goodness, i wish i could _ are feeling. oh, my goodness, i wish i could be _ are feeling. oh, my goodness, i wish i could be there and compete again. team _ i could be there and compete again. team gb— i could be there and compete again. team gb has got 50 athletes. i know you will probably want to name all of them, but if you just name a few stop obviously you have the skeleton. stop obviously you have the skeleton-— stop obviously you have the skeleton. . , skeleton. matt weston, marcus wire. all our bobsleigh _ skeleton. matt weston, marcus wire. all our bobsleigh athletes. _ skeleton. matt weston, marcus wire. all our bobsleigh athletes. brad - all our bobsleigh athletes. brad hall and — all our bobsleigh athletes. brad hall and his team. all our bobsleigh athletes. brad halland his team. someone all our bobsleigh athletes. brad hall and his team. someone like james _ hall and his team. someone like james woods, r freestyle skiing. he is really— james woods, r freestyle skiing. he is really hoping to get a medal this time _ is really hoping to get a medal this time yeah, — is really hoping to get a medal this time. yeah, zoe atkins, the two sisters, — time. yeah, zoe atkins, the two sisters, i— time. yeah, zoe atkins, the two sisters, i could keep going. you are t in: to sisters, i could keep going. you are trying to get — sisters, i could keep going. you are trying to get through _ sisters, i could keep going. you are trying to get through the _ sisters, i could keep going. you are trying to get through the whole - trying to get through the whole team. now, these athletes are in a really unusual olympics for two reasons. there is intense political
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discussion about the issues surrounding china and some of its policies. numbertwo, surrounding china and some of its policies. number two, there is the pandemic, and in china there is a zero covid policy. trying to picture what this must like the four athletes?— what this must like the four athletes? �* , . , ., athletes? there's athletes have re aired athletes? there's athletes have repaired every _ athletes? there's athletes have repaired every day _ athletes? there's athletes have repaired every day for— athletes? there's athletes have repaired every day for at - athletes? there's athletes have repaired every day for at least l athletes? there's athletes have l repaired every day for at least the last four— repaired every day for at least the last four years, since the last winter— last four years, since the last winter olympics. and their bodies are highly— winter olympics. and their bodies are highly tuned. nothing is left without— are highly tuned. nothing is left without thinking of it. every single second _ without thinking of it. every single second of— without thinking of it. every single second of every day. so you already have a _ second of every day. so you already have a lot _ second of every day. so you already have a lot of — second of every day. so you already have a lot of stress on your shoulders, the pressure to be able to perform — shoulders, the pressure to be able to perform when it matters, and now also the _ to perform when it matters, and now also the added pressure of taking that covid — also the added pressure of taking that covid test every single day. i can't _ that covid test every single day. i can't even — that covid test every single day. i can't even imagine what it's like. even _ can't even imagine what it's like. even us — can't even imagine what it's like. even us working every day, testing to see _ even us working every day, testing to see if— even us working every day, testing to see if you can go to work, so for athletes _ to see if you can go to work, so for athletes it— to see if you can go to work, so for athletes it is— to see if you can go to work, so for athletes it is a really tough thing. if i athletes it is a really tough thing. if i was— athletes it is a really tough thing. if i was one — athletes it is a really tough thing. if i was one of them, i would be thinking — if i was one of them, i would be thinking every athlete is in the same — thinking every athlete is in the same position so we cannot control it, same position so we cannot control it. we _ same position so we cannot control it. we just — same position so we cannot control it, we just have to do it to the
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best— it, we just have to do it to the best of— it, we just have to do it to the best of our— it, we just have to do it to the best of our ability and that really lit away, — best of our ability and that really lit away, concentrate on your performance at what you need to do in your— performance at what you need to do in your competition. how performance at what you need to do in your competition.— in your competition. how much of a difference will _ in your competition. how much of a difference will it _ in your competition. how much of a difference will it make _ in your competition. how much of a difference will it make to _ in your competition. how much of a difference will it make to the - in your competition. how much of a difference will it make to the fact . difference will it make to the fact that they won�*t be able to have much contact with crowds, for example? do you need that any skeleton?— you need that any skeleton? skeleton athletes are all— you need that any skeleton? skeleton athletes are all used _ you need that any skeleton? skeleton athletes are all used to _ you need that any skeleton? skeleton athletes are all used to sliding. - athletes are all used to sliding. local— athletes are all used to sliding. local schools will come out with their _ local schools will come out with their cowbells and everything. i remember very vividly in vancouver suddenly— remember very vividly in vancouver suddenly having all these crowds that you — suddenly having all these crowds that you hadn't ever practised with, and the _ that you hadn't ever practised with, and the extra nerves that those crowds — and the extra nerves that those crowds would bring. so i think for some _ crowds would bring. so i think for some athletes it could be a blessing in disguise _ some athletes it could be a blessing in disguise that they can just do their— in disguise that they can just do their normal thing and their normal race, _ their normal thing and their normal race and _ their normal thing and their normal race, and almost half that and pretend — race, and almost half that and pretend that it is not the olympic games— pretend that it is not the olympic games so— pretend that it is not the olympic games so that you can try and get the best— games so that you can try and get the best out of your performance and take control — the best out of your performance and take control of your nerves. amy, are we now _ take control of your nerves. amy, are we now a _ take control of your nerves. amy, are we now a winter _ take control of your nerves. amy, are we now a winter olympics - are we now a winter olympics country? {lit are we now a winter olympics count ? . ., , are we now a winter olympics count ? .., , ~
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are we now a winter olympics count ? , . ,, ., are we now a winter olympics count? , ~ ~' ., ~ country? of course! we know winter ol mics, country? of course! we know winter olympics. we _ country? of course! we know winter olympics. we are — country? of course! we know winter olympics, we are much _ country? of course! we know winter olympics, we are much more - country? of course! we know winter olympics, we are much more of- country? of course! we know winter olympics, we are much more of a i country? of course! we know winter i olympics, we are much more of a team than our— olympics, we are much more of a team than our cousins, the summer olympics _ than our cousins, the summer olympics. we bring home medals, and that does— olympics. we bring home medals, and that does steadily grow. our success -ets that does steadily grow. our success gets higher and higher over the years — gets higher and higher over the years. and we do do better. sol really— years. and we do do better. sol really hope _ years. and we do do better. sol really hope we bring home medals. we have got— really hope we bring home medals. we have got a _ really hope we bring home medals. we have got a good chance of bringing home _ have got a good chance of bringing home several medals in these olympics, so fingers crossed and good _ olympics, so fingers crossed and good luck— olympics, so fingers crossed and good luck to all of the athletes. thank— good luck to all of the athletes. thank you — good luck to all of the athletes. thank you so much forjoining us. the winter olympics are beginning in beijing. there will be coverage across the bbc, and this is the first games that beijing has hosted since 2008. i used to live there. there is not much snow and ice. ski slopes will have to add their own mix of artificial snow for the
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snowboarders and skiers. for viewers on bbc two, we want to leave you with this shot of the stadium in beijing where the opening ceremony has been taking place. you are watching bbc news. you�*re watching bbc news... a senior conservative mp tells the prime minister to �*shape up, or ship out�* as pressure builds on boris johnson following the resignation of five downing street aides 0fgem says it may start reviewing the energy price cap every three months, rather than the current six 0fgem says it may start reviewing the energy price cap every three months, rather than the current six. the winter olympics are officially under way — the opening ceremony has been taking place inside beijing�*s birds nest stadium. for nearly two years now, the world has lived under the shadow of coronavirus.
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the pandemic has instilled plenty of fear and anxiety — but it has also inspired creativity. an exhibition of art made during lockdown has opened in sweden — showcasing the challenges people faced. tim allman has more. getting a haircut during lockdown was hard enough but this is ridiculous. and how about this? a zoom meeting recreated in watercolour and pastels. art that speaks of loneliness, of confinement and of time passing. it's a reaction about the pandemic. it's a consequence of the pandemic. you work at home, you work in the studio, you're not outside. a sculpture of neon signs from shops in malmo, forced to close during the pandemic. but this isn�*tjust about looking backwards, it�*s about looking forwards, too. in this exhibition, we can see some form of hope for the future, so it's not closed down, it's something new that's coming up here. more than 200 works of art are on display,
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each one a memory, a reminder of the past, and a promise for the future.

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