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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 4, 2022 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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today at 5pm: pressure continues to build for the prime minister as another conservative mp submits a letter of no confidence. the bbc understands around 17 have now been put forward. it comes afterfive of the prime ministers aides resign within 2a hours. a cabinet minister denies the government is in disarray, the prime minister wanted change and he said there would be change, and we are seeing that change now. a former labour peer lord ahmed is jailed for sexually abusing two children in the 1970s. a court orders checks on food and agricultural goods from britain to northern ireland must continue for now. the winter olympics are officially under way. the opening ceremony has been held inside beijing's bird's nest stadium.
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ofgem says it may start reviewing the energy price cap every three months, rather than the current six. and coming up — halle berry and patrick wilson are astronauts trying to save earth in moonfall. find out what mark kermode thinks about this and the week's other big releases in the film review at 5.45pm. good evening, welcome to bbc news at 5pm, i'm jane hill. it's a bad end to a difficult week for borisjohnson as another mp has submitted a letter of no confidence in his leadership, following five resignations within 2a hours from his team
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in downing street. mps supportive of the prime minister are suggesting he's making necessary staff changes, following a damning report by the senior civil servant sue gray into rule—breaking parties at number 10 during the pandemic. but the former head of the downing street policy unit, munira mirza, quit because of the prime minister's false claim that sir keir starmer failed to prosecutejimmy savile. and in the last hour, the conservative mp aaron bell has said the prime minister's position is untenable. the bbc is aware of around 17 letters of no confidence have now been submited. more on that in a moment, but first our political corresondent nick eardley reports on the resignations inside number 10's top team. another day, another crisis. borisjohnson has lost five members of his team in just 2a hours, including one of his longest—serving allies. this is munira mirza, an aide to mrjohnson for 1h years. she quit yesterday,
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criticising her boss over incorrect comments suggesting sir keir starmer was linked to the decision not to prosecutejimmy savile. these three have left too — the prime minister's director of communications, his principal private secretary and his chief of staff, all three caught up in the parties row, but their departures leave big questions over the future direction of number 10. and this morning, a fifth resignation — elena narozanski, another member of borisjohnson�*s policy unit, hanging up her gloves. the prime minister was clear in his response to the sue gray update that there would be changes at number 10 downing street. that is what has happened. four people have served their country fantastically well, some during the whole pandemic, borisjohnson has thanked them
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for their service, they have resigned and he has accepted their resignation. but this runs deeper, with the prime minister being criticised by some of his long—serving allies. and there was this from the chancellor, a frontrunner to replace mrjohnson. being honest, i wouldn't have said it, and i'm glad that the prime minister clarified what he meant. a politician careful with his words, distancing himself from his boss's comments. among tory mps, a growing sense of frustration. i am troubled. i do find it very upsetting, my constituents are upset. i feel we have lost faith and public trust with them. i would like to get that back, but i would rather see what the prime minister can do to turn it around rather than acting with haste. we want to see him resign but we do not think he has the scruples to resign, despite all his transgressions, it is up to the conservative party to hear what people like munira mirza say, and act.
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borisjohnson has tried to get back on the front foot but it has not worked. there are still questions about his language, judgment and future. meanwhile, the energy regulator, ofgem, says it's considering reviewing the energy price cap every three months to try to cope with the volatility in the market. the cap is currently assessed every six months, limiting what gas and electricity companies can charge a typical household. yesterday it was announced that the cap will rise in april, meaning an average household on a variable tariff will see its bill rise by £693 a year to nearly £2,000. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. for hussain and halima master, who have three kids, rising energy bills means life is getting tougher. it's going up again, isn't it? yeah, to 250. that's crazy, that. hussain has a full—time job but they are struggling to make ends meet. we have looked into the local food bank. 0n the weekends, they have it open to the public,
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where you pay a couple of pounds and fill your bags up. so we have had a look at that and we have started to kind of use that. for many families like the masters, worse is to come. consumer prices are capped by the regulator 0fgem. but the cap is going up in april to reflect a big rise in the price suppliers have to pay for the energy they sell to us. it means some 22 million households will end up paying more. we saw an extraordinary increase in gas and electricity prices at the end of last year, unprecedented. and that was driven by global forces, the global gas market. so it's unavoidable, in the short term, that prices were going to go up. the government's trying to soften the blow. it will provide £200 towards each household's energy costs in october. but the money will have to be paid back through bills later on. most households in england will also get a discount of £150 in april. it will be available for homes
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in council tax bands a to d and won't need to be repaid. critics say these measures simply don't go far enough to help vulnerable people at a time when the cost of living is already rising rapidly and household finances are under pressure. but the energy minister said £141; million was available to local authorities to support those in most need. there is that discretionary fund for local authorities to help those who, due to different circumstances, might be in high—band council tax properties or don't pay council tax. labour has described the government's actions as wholly inadequate. the party has called for a windfall tax on the profits of big energy companies, to help bring down bills and address what it calls our broken energy system. theo leggett, bbc news. let's get more on that latest mp who has submitted a letter in no—confidence. aaron bell said, "as someone
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who backed brexit and backed borisjohnson for the leadership in 2019, i am profoundly disappointed that it has come to this. the government that the prime minister has led delivered some huge successes. however, the breach of trust that the events in no 10 downing street represent, and the manner in which they have been handled makes his position untenable". let's speak to our political correspondent helen catt. that letter is striking, helen, not least because he makes the point that he had, until this point, been very supportive of borisjohnson. yes, which is not something you can see of all of those who say they have submitted letters, but certainly add a was one of those who backed boris johnson for the leadership in 2019 —— aaron bell. it was a aaron bell who asked that question of the prime minister earlier this week talking about the bills, describing going to his
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grandmother's funeral and not being able to stop for a cup of tea or touch his parents and as the prime minister, do you think i am a full? you can see from his very emotional contribution in the commons that he was very unhappy —— do you think that i am a fool? it may not come as a big surprise but shows that there is still there is current of unhappiness and that day by day, what we are seeing is what appear to be individual decisions by mps right across the party coming forward and saying, actually, i no longer have confidence in the prime minister. at this stage, it doesn't feel like it is one big coordinated post. it does still feel like individual decisions heat and thereby to concentric those is still very dangerous for the prime minister.— is still very dangerous for the prime minister. helen, for now, thank you very _ prime minister. helen, for now, thank you very much. _ prime minister. helen, for now, thank you very much. helen - thank you very much. helen monitoring all of that at westminster. the conservatives have won the southend west by—election, trigged by the fatal stabbing
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of the tory mp sir david amess. anna firth got a majority of more than 12,000. the seat was not contested by labour, the liberal democrats or the green party because of the nature of the circumstances of this by—election. just 24% of the electorate voted, making it one of the worst turnouts for a by—election since the second world war. a former labour member of the house of lords has beenjailed for 5.5 years for child sexual offences. lord ahmed assaulted two children in the 1970s when he was a teenager. his victims are calling for him to be stripped of his title. 0ur correspondent danny savage has been following the story. a key appeal that is being made today in the wake of the sentencing, danny? today in the wake of the sentencing, dann ? , , ., ., i. ., danny? yes, it is not often you have a court case — danny? yes, it is not often you have a court case where _ danny? yes, it is not often you have a court case where both _ danny? yes, it is not often you have a court case where both the judge i a court case where both the judge and the defendant can both
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technically be called your lord or my lordship, but today we had exactly that. with lord ahmed of rotherham in the dock and being sentenced to 5.5 years in prison. he was tried under his name nazir ahmed. that trial ended last month and it was the sentencing hearing today. he assaulted two children, a boy and girl, back in the 1970s when he himself was a teenager. they, the victims and other pressure groups, have now been saying since he was found guilty that he should not be allowed to keep his title of lord. he will go to prison as a lord, he will come out from his sentence, potentially after serving only half of it, as a lord, and they do not think it is right he could potentially benefit from that title once he is released from prison and carries on with his life. however, there is no drilling, no law which allows a lord to be stripped of
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their title —— no ruling. it is an anomaly pressure groups are pushing to be changed. as things stand, he keeps his title, and there was a victim impact statement from the two victims today, who were children, of course in the 1970s but are now both middle aged, saying how this had devastated their lives, one of them feeling suicidal, and had a lifelong impact on them. the judge reiterated to lord ahmed as he was sentencing him that he had had a profound effect on his victims' lives but he goes to prison with his title today and as things stand in the law, he will keep that title.— will keep that title. danny, thank ou. will keep that title. danny, thank yom danny _ will keep that title. danny, thank you. danny savage. _ the 24th edition of the winter olympics have officially been inaugurated after the olympic cauldron was lit in a restrained opening ceremony in beijing. almost 3,000 athletes from 91 nations will compete across the games. the ceremony included the olympic torch, which was placed
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into the centre of a giant snowflake, which was then illuminated to become the cauldron. few global leaders have journeyed to beijing to be at the opening, but the russian president vladimir putin is there, and he's held a meeting with his chinese counterpart, xi jinping. the two countries have put out a long joint statement, describing the talks as "very warm" and agreeing on a raft of policies. it warned against what they called nato's cold war ideology. many in the west fear the russian leader is planning to invade ukraine, which wasn't mentioned directly. 0ur china correspondent stephen mcdonell is in beijing, and he explained how people in the city have been gathering to watch the games. yes, well, here i am ata beijing pub. it's full of people, a real party atmosphere. kids in here, couples, young people, old people. and the reason there's such a community feeling here, in part, is that people have come to places
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like this to watch the opening ceremony on the big screen because they can't buy tickets. you can't, as a member of the public, go into the opening ceremony or anything here at the games because of covid restrictions. i think there is an understanding in the general community that because of the tough restrictions within the bubble, then it sort of makes sense also that within the general community, there are also such restrictions. it's a bit of a downer, frankly, for a city that's been looking forward to this, but nevertheless, there is quite some excitement. of course, the pressure on officials is going to be to minimise the spread of covid over the coming weeks inside those venues. now, at the opening ceremony itself, very interesting, we had some world leaders there, but not that many, nothing compared to 2008 — vladimir putin, imran khan, but the list sort of runs out soon after that.
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interestingly, the camera didn't cut away to world leaders as teams came in. that could be because they don't really want to draw attention to who is or isn't at the games because it is such a contentious point here. as for politics, there have been officials warning athletes not to make a scene, not to have political t—shirts when they receive medals and the like. again, the coming days will see if that really... see if that strategy works. however, it is over to the sport now and officials will be hoping now that the the ceremony is nearly over, the sport really kicks off, and that much more attention will be on the athletes and what the olympics is really all supposed to be about. stephen mcdonald there in beijing. it is 5:15pm. the headlines on bbc news...
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pressure continues to build for the prime minister as another conservative mp submits a letter of no confidence. the bbc understands around 17 have now been put forward. it comes afterfive of the prime ministers aides resign within 2a hours. a former labour peer lord ahmed is jailed for sexually abusing two children in the 1970s. let's turn our attention to the situation in northern ireland. a high courtjudge in belfast has ordered that checks on food and agricultural goods traded between the british mainland and northern ireland must remain in place until a judicial review next month. the ruling comes two days after a minister in the devolved government ordered that the inspections be stopped — a move that has triggered a political crisis. the checks are part of the brexit deal struck between the britain and the eu to prevent the return of a hard border on the island of ireland.
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let's talk to our correspondent, danjohnson, in belfast. we have had that court ruling today, dan, and people will wonder how government is happening at all where you are. government is happening at all where ou are. , ., government is happening at all where ouare. , ., ., ., government is happening at all where ouare. , ., ., , you are. yes, two aspects to this row, this — you are. yes, two aspects to this row, this process _ you are. yes, two aspects to this row, this process at _ you are. yes, two aspects to this row, this process at the - you are. yes, two aspects to this row, this process at the momentj you are. yes, two aspects to this i row, this process at the moment in stormont, jane. the dup agricultural minister ordering the officials at the ports are to stop those checks on the goods coming across the irish sea from great britain to northern ireland, check that were agreed as part of the 09 protocol. those checks were continuing anyway but the judge said there was check should continue in full as it is a legal challenge to what the
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agriculture minister audit. many dup decided to remove their first ministerfrom stormont, which means that the sinn fein deputy first minister was withdrawn from herjob because it has a shared office which means effectively there is no political decision—making here. departmental ministers are here and can make some decisions and enact some legislation already going through the assembly but there cannot be any new law making a major decision that we do not know how long that will last. there are elections due to take place here in early may, there has been some speculation they could be brought forward to resolve this crisis. but there is not unanimous agreement on that. at the moment, political decision—making here in northern ireland is to some degree at least, interrupted because of the democratic unionist party's decision, which it says is its only option, having reached the end of its road in terms of the frustration
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with the northern ireland protocol�*s operation and the impact those rules are having on business and the economy in northern ireland and what they see as northern ireland's status within the united kingdom having been reduced by that protocol and the way it is having an effect on business and life here. dan. on business and life here. dan, thank you _ on business and life here. dan, thank you very _ on business and life here. dan, thank you very much. - on business and life here. dan, thank you very much. dan - on business and life here. dan, thank you very much. dan johnson on business and life here. dan, thank you very much. danjohnson in belfast. i'm joined by shaun woodward, who was secretary of state for northern ireland during gordon brown's time as prime minister. a very good evening to you. if you were secretary of state today have what it would you be about the situation? i what it would you be about the situation? ., , what it would you be about the situation?— what it would you be about the situation? ., , , ., situation? i would be very worried indeed. situation? i would be very worried indeed- -- — situation? i would be very worried indeed- -- how — situation? i would be very worried indeed. -- how worried. - situation? i would be very worried indeed. -- how worried. i- situation? i would be very worried indeed. -- how worried. ithink. situation? i would be very worried i indeed. -- how worried. ithink what indeed. —— how worried. i think what is worrying is the absence of the prime minister. this is not a party political point, not about being a labour or conservative secretary of state for northern ireland, this is about recognising that gordon brown, as prime minister, tony blair as prime minister, and before that, john major is by minister, all of them knew that at these sorts of
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moments, it is the prime minister who has to go in to bat, it is the prime minister who should be in northern ireland right now with the taoiseach from northern ireland and with the european union representatives because fundamentally this is not about the dup or the first minister, it's about the cobbled together protocol that put a border down the irish sea, ora border that put a border down the irish sea, or a border across ireland, northern ireland and the republic of ireland, and this was not properly resolved. the prime minister is the only person who can do this. and of course, the prime minister cannot do anything at the moment because he has lost his authority and is totally consumed with trying to rescue his personal position as prime minister in downing street. but that wouldn't stop him getting on a plane and having conversations, though, would it?— though, would it? well, it shouldn't do. it though, would it? well, it shouldn't do- it didn't — though, would it? well, it shouldn't do. it didn't stop _ though, would it? well, it shouldn't do. it didn't stop him _ though, would it? well, it shouldn't do. it didn't stop him going - though, would it? well, it shouldn't do. it didn't stop him going to - do. it didn't stop him going to ukraine on tuesday but things have got worse since tuesday. to lose five aids in 2a hours is pretty serious. and i should think he would
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do absolutely have a inside downing street now to cling to the walls. you outline the context it is not just about economics are trade, although that is a key issue, as we heard, but to what extent is also about forthcoming elections, the? it is about the protocol. it is about where you put the border and the problem is if you had elections next week or next month, it will not solve this problem. the underlying problem is that borisjohnson effectively lied. he told one group of people one thing and told another group of people another thing. whereas you can often get away with that in politics and borisjohnson is a pretty good apologist on these things, the problem in northern ireland is actually, you really do run the risk of taking northern ireland back to violence because what is absolutely at the heart of
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the politics of the settlement that tony blair, the work thatjohn major did before him, which allowed the good friday agreement, this is an understanding about the border. if you put in the border down the idc, then you do upset the unionists. and if you do put the border between —— put the border down the irish sea. if you put it between northern ireland and the republic, you're upset the nationalists. and gordon brown and a a way to nuance that and borisjohnson, instead of new and sing it, absolutely stuck it to the nationalists and unionists and told a different thing and it has caught up a different thing and it has caught up with him. it catches up in checks and balances in terms of the kind of thing that has been ruled on this afternoon, but what it is really about is people's identity and where the borderers. no election will solve that. it needs the minister on the case, nothing to liz you go and
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it. she has no more ability to do this —— it needs the prime minister on the case. it is not a job for secretary of state, but the prime minister. he did not understand what he was doing and did not deal with it and jeffrey donaldson want him last summer, you must sort this out. as a consequence, it is now falling apart. it is entirely the fault of this prime minister.— apart. it is entirely the fault of this prime minister. ,, ., . . this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank ou this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank you very — this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank you very much _ this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank you very much for _ this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank you very much for your - this prime minister. shaun woodward, thank you very much for your time - thank you very much for your time tonight. former secretary of state for northern ireland under gordon brown's premiership. let's say with elements of what he was talking about their because we have been talking generally tonight about the pressure on the prime minister. five ministers of his team are resigning any 24—hour period —— members of his team. and another conservative mp submitting that letter of no confidence, those letters that go to graham brady at the 1922 committee. let's discuss, as we head into the weekend, what
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may or may not unfold in the coming days. with me now is rachel cunliffe, senior associate editor of the new statesman, and henry hill, deputy editor of conservative home. her meal, i hope you can hear shaun woodward their —— henry hill, the prime minister, he says, is in no position to engage with some really vital issues. is that part of the problem here tonight? it is certainly part of the case. i think we have seen in some areas such as foreign affairs and defence, ben wallace has been able to conduct a very creditable british government response was ukraine. but very creditable british government response was ukraine.— response was ukraine. but it is certainly true _ response was ukraine. but it is certainly true that _ response was ukraine. but it is certainly true that if _ response was ukraine. but it is certainly true that if the - certainly true that if the government that is fighting for its life in the prime minister's closest allies are firefighting, wooing mps, trying to prejudge the media agenda and everything else, they do not have the agenda scratch energy to
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put onto serious challenges the government is facing, they now plan protocol only one. on the mainland we are already facing a cost of living crisis which will tie up the government for the next few months but instead they are tied up doing this. it will hinder the government if the prime minister cannot depart or stabilise his petition. aha, if the prime minister cannot depart or stabilise his petition.— or stabilise his petition. a quick thou~ht or stabilise his petition. a quick thought about _ or stabilise his petition. a quick thought about the _ or stabilise his petition. a quick thought about the latest - or stabilise his petition. a quick thought about the latest letter| or stabilise his petition. a quick. thought about the latest letter of no confidence going on. the individual concerned being in favour of brexit,. aaron bell, the letter that has gone in to graham brady, people watching this tonight might remember his a very emotional words earlier in the week in the comments about the sacrifices he made around the time of his grandmother's funeral, for example. absolutely. i
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think the one _ funeral, for example. absolutely. i think the one issue _ funeral, for example. absolutely. i think the one issue is _ funeral, for example. absolutely. i think the one issue is that - funeral, for example. absolutely. i think the one issue is that brexit i think the one issue is that brexit is simply a less salient issue than it was. this is one of the prime minister's problems because he was able to hold his coalition together through thick and thin because of the imperative of getting brexit done and now that we are out, northern ireland aside, that imperative is weakening. but there is also a growing realisation among many brexiteers, who previously supported the prime minister, that the next election is crucial because if the tories win in 2024, labour will not take office in 2028 and brexit will be a done deal, the new normal and whoever leads labour into that election will have other things to talk about. but if they lose and so keir starmer, while so much —— takes over while so much of our relationship with the eu is up in the air, much could be unpicked so the air, much could be unpicked so the really important thing for brexit, if you're a brexiteer, is winning in 2024. they are asking themselves, is borisjohnson, is he
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really the man who will take them over the line? and i don't think he is. .. over the line? and i don't think he is. . . ., over the line? and i don't think he is. rachel, from the new statesman, how do you — is. rachel, from the new statesman, how do you see _ is. rachel, from the new statesman, how do you see events _ is. rachel, from the new statesman, how do you see events moving - is. rachel, from the new statesman, how do you see events moving in - is. rachel, from the new statesman, j how do you see events moving in the next few days? we talk about the number of letters in, but it is still only about 17, we think. it has a long way of any kind of serious challenge, isn't it? i prefer to zone out and look as though— prefer to zone out and look as though it _ prefer to zone out and look as though it is not going to happen in the next _ though it is not going to happen in the next couple of days, but is this goingm _ the next couple of days, but is this goingm just — the next couple of days, but is this going... just to pick up on what henry— going... just to pick up on what henry was_ going... just to pick up on what henry was saying there, if you go now, _ henry was saying there, if you go now. if— henry was saying there, if you go now. if you — henry was saying there, if you go now, if you look at two years ago, it is days — now, if you look at two years ago, it is days ago we were celebrating the two—year anniversary of getting brexit_ the two—year anniversary of getting brexit done and but had just won his landslide _ brexit done and but had just won his landslide victory. and everyone on labours _ landslide victory. and everyone on labour's side as well as conservative side were talking about another _ conservative side were talking about another decade in power, boris johnson, — another decade in power, boris johnson, who could possibly topple him, johnson, who could possibly topple him. how— johnson, who could possibly topple him, how could labour hope to win the next _ him, how could labour hope to win the next election. this was going to be a the next election. this was going to he a prime — the next election. this was going to be a prime minister who with their
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-- he _ be a prime minister who with their -- be there— be a prime minister who with their —— be there for some time. no one is talking _ —— be there for some time. no one is talking about — —— be there for some time. no one is talking about that now, will he last of the _ talking about that now, will he last of the week, will heal and point to the local_ of the week, will heal and point to the local elections? i would say they— the local elections? i would say they are — the local elections? i would say they are crucial because it will —— will he _ they are crucial because it will —— will he limp — they are crucial because it will —— will he limp on to the local elections. it is worth pointing out if you _ elections. it is worth pointing out if you are — elections. it is worth pointing out if you are a — elections. it is worth pointing out if you are a tory hopeful and you have _ if you are a tory hopeful and you have ambitions to lead the conservative party and be prime minister. — conservative party and be prime minister, you probably do not want to take _ minister, you probably do not want to take over— minister, you probably do not want to take over right before your party is going _ to take over right before your party is going to — to take over right before your party is going to suffer a very disappointing result in those local elections — disappointing result in those local elections. there is that to consider as well _ elections. there is that to consider as well in— elections. there is that to consider as well. in terms of the next couple of days, _ as well. in terms of the next couple of days, we — as well. in terms of the next couple of days, we have 70 letters that —— 17 letters _ of days, we have 70 letters that —— 17 letters we — of days, we have 70 letters that —— 17 letters we know that about the anger _ 17 letters we know that about the anger against borisjohnson 17 letters we know that about the anger against boris johnson from 17 letters we know that about the anger against borisjohnson from his conservative mps anger against borisjohnson from his conservative mp5 is coming from a real range — conservative mp5 is coming from a real range of factions. you have aaron— real range of factions. you have aaron bell, _ real range of factions. you have aaron bell, one of the red well mps, we have _ aaron bell, one of the red well mps, we have backbenchers who are still very angry — we have backbenchers who are still very angry at him about covid. we have _ very angry at him about covid. we have traditional conservatives who are not— have traditional conservatives who are not really sure about what all these _ are not really sure about what all these are — are not really sure about what all these are tax rises are about and
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obviously— these are tax rises are about and obviously the cost of living crisis, a lot _ obviously the cost of living crisis, a lot of— obviously the cost of living crisis, a lot of mps really worried about the reality for people and their constituencies and how that will play out — constituencies and how that will play out at the local elections and beyond _ play out at the local elections and beyond. those are a lot of different factions _ beyond. those are a lot of different factions to — beyond. those are a lot of different factions to hold together. and the series— factions to hold together. and the series of— factions to hold together. and the series of resignations in downing street, _ series of resignations in downing street, it — series of resignations in downing street, it isjust another sign series of resignations in downing street, it is just another sign this administration is crumbling. it does not have _ administration is crumbling. it does not have the strength at its centre to hold _ not have the strength at its centre to hold all — not have the strength at its centre to hold all those factions together. henry— to hold all those factions together. henry hill, most a lot of people in the last 24 hours. what are your thoughts about her is brought in to replace them? a couple of appointments made already, certainly one for sure. —— who is brought in. could that change anything if strong people are brought in? other people have been asked and do not want the job? have been asked and do not want the “ob? �* have been asked and do not want the 'ob? �* . , , have been asked and do not want the “ob? . , , ., have been asked and do not want the “ob? . , ., ., , job? and in, maybe, at the margins. i think the departure _ job? and in, maybe, at the margins. i think the departure of _ job? and in, maybe, at the margins. i think the departure of munira - i think the departure of munira mirza is so striking because she has been with borisjohnson mirza is so striking because she has been with boris johnson forever, mirza is so striking because she has been with borisjohnson forever, all the way back to when he was mayor of london and her departure really marks the end of that team of people who come with borisjohnson on his politicaljourney. and really giving
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his premiership such focus and intellectual shape as it had in those early days before it got blown off course by the pandemic and everything else. now bringing strong people in can help. it does not help having weak people, certainly, but again, iagree having weak people, certainly, but again, i agree with rachel, actually, what you need to do is take a step backwards, look, and boris johnson's poll take a step backwards, look, and borisjohnson's poll ratings are underwater, across the board with all kinds of voters, especially the event voters he won in 2019, as a result, the conservative party's poll rating as well underwater and the question is, who will win the next election? currently, it is not borisjohnson. tory mps need to ask themselves seriously, where did he think the revival is coming from questioning the government is about to go into a serious cost of living crunch, there will be nothing like the falklands war to bail out margaret thatcher when her poll ratings look like this in the early 19805. ratings look like this in the early 1980s. there will be nothing like the falklands war to bail out margaret thatcher when her poll ratings look like this in the early
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19805. ratings look like this in the early 1980s. those fundamental issues are, in a meeting time, what will decide borisjohnson's fate. and i do not see a possible way that we will be here in two years and saying boris johnson came back miraculously. it was those crucial appointments in the downing street operation i did it. i do not see, and no disrespect to any individuals involved, anyone who could have that kind of influence over a ministry in this much trouble. rachel, all of that said, if there is a move to eventually get that requisite number of letters, mps still need a potential replacement. is that still not an issue here? there is no obvious successor? no one clear candidate?— candidate? that is definitely an issue. candidate? that is definitely an issue- i'm _ candidate? that is definitely an issue. i'm not— candidate? that is definitely an issue. i'm not sure _ candidate? that is definitely an issue. i'm not sure the - candidate? that is definitely an issue. i'm not sure the peoplel candidate? that is definitely an - issue. i'm not sure the people who want _ issue. i'm not sure the people who want the _ issue. i'm not sure the people who want the job— issue. i'm not sure the people who want the job wanted right at the second — want the job wanted right at the second. the chancellor is the obvious— second. the chancellor is the obvious one. he wrote a joint op—ed with the _ obvious one. he wrote a joint op—ed with the prime minister last weekend saying _ with the prime minister last weekend saying how great it was that they were _ saying how great it was that they were increasing national insurance lry were increasing national insurance by 10%~ _ were increasing national insurance by 10%~ for— were increasing national insurance by10%. forthose were increasing national insurance by 10%. for those who know, that was very much— by 10%. for those who know, that was very much against his personal
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beliefs — very much against his personal beliefs in — very much against his personal beliefs in a low tax and low interventions. there is also the point _ interventions. there is also the point that— interventions. there is also the point that we are facing a cost of living _ point that we are facing a cost of living crisis— point that we are facing a cost of living crisis and that various successors, the people who are seen as likely— successors, the people who are seen as likely successors must enact, liz truss. _ as likely successors must enact, liz truss. they— as likely successors must enact, liz truss, they are the kind of conservatives or towards the conservative wing of the party away from state — conservative wing of the party away from state intervention —— sunak. and they— from state intervention —— sunak. and they are _ from state intervention —— sunak. and they are away from the direct support— and they are away from the direct support that would be popular at the moment— support that would be popular at the moment so that is part of it as welt _ moment so that is part of it as welt i— moment so that is part of it as welt i do— moment so that is part of it as well. i do not think that the lack of a successor is the main reason why we _ of a successor is the main reason why we haven't seen the conservative party move _ why we haven't seen the conservative party move yet because we know the conservative party is absolutely ruthless — conservative party is absolutely ruthless and when they want to get rid of— ruthless and when they want to get rid of a _ ruthless and when they want to get rid of a prime minister, they do so and let— rid of a prime minister, they do so and let the — rid of a prime minister, they do so and let the cards fall where they may _ and let the cards fall where they may i_ and let the cards fall where they may ljust— and let the cards fall where they may. ijust want to pick up a month and say— may. ijust want to pick up a month and say i _ may. ijust want to pick up a month and say i really hope that downing street _ and say i really hope that downing street is _ and say i really hope that downing street is not listening to this and his comments about the falklands war because _ his comments about the falklands war because that is really the kind of show— because that is really the kind of show of— because that is really the kind of show of strength that is needed now in order— show of strength that is needed now in order to _ show of strength that is needed now in orderto line show of strength that is needed now in order to line some legitimacy to
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the administration. we have seen what _ the administration. we have seen what is _ the administration. we have seen what is going on in ukraine and russia. — what is going on in ukraine and russia. is— what is going on in ukraine and russia, is risky foreign intervention to distract from the troubles— intervention to distract from the troubles here at home is exactly the kind of— troubles here at home is exactly the kind of reckless we might expect. i very much— kind of reckless we might expect. i very much hope it doesn't go down that road — very much hope it doesn't go down that road. we very much hope it doesn't go down that road. ~ , ., that road. we must leave it there but we really _ that road. we must leave it there but we really appreciate - that road. we must leave it there but we really appreciate your - that road. we must leave it there i but we really appreciate your time. very interesting to hear your perspectives. the time is 533. a very busy friday evening.
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as you've seen, the winter olympics are officially underway. we've had the opening ceremony inside beijings bird's nest stadium. team gb flagberaers were alpine skier dave ryding and curling's eve muirhead, a bronze medallist in 2014. both are at there fourth games . team gb is 50 strong, and the aim will be to beat the record five medals won at each of the last two 0lympics. the olympic torch was then placed into the centre of a giant snowflake, bearing the names of each of the 91 nations taking part, and there it will stay for the next 16 days of competition 16 days isn't long enough to pack in all the curling, that has been going for a few days and great britain have a really strong medal hopes in the mixed doubles with world champions jen dodds and bruce mouat. they beat australia, although they had to go to an extra end to pinch it 9—8. that's 3 wins out of 4 for ther british pair and they lie second in the standings at this round robin stage. the top four reach the semis but they still have another five matches to play
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after two high profile departures from the england men's set—up this week, the the ecb chief executive tom harrison says that he is still the man to help turn the fortunes of the test team around. head coach chris silverwood left his position 24 hours after ashley giles stood down as director of cricket. it follows their 4—nil ashes defeat adding to a total of nine test defeats in 15. sir andrew staruss returns to the director of criucket role on an interim basis, and he will choose a temporary coach for next months test series in west indies. joe root will continue to captain the side. 0ur ambitions within this cricket is not to make up the numbers, our ambition is to be the number one team in all formats. and for the last 12 months or so, the test team, it is hard to say that we have moved forward and i suppose these decisions have been made to try to
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help that process happen to improve the team forward to get some fresh voices in there, to get some fresh thinking, to challenge the players in different ways and to move the whole environment forward. it's a huge fa cup weekend, we're at the fourth round stage and the first tie is actually tonight, it's an 8 o'clock kick—off at old trafford manchester united are at home to championship side middlesbrough, the boro manager is optimistic about what his players can do, but also realistic. the result is decided in manchester united and they play as they can play and the deck is stacked against us. it's not a short time to swapping situation and i want them to play well. i want the players to play well and i want to give a good account of ourselves and they could with a competitive, make it a
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dangerous night for manchester united. it's a great weekend for sports fans, it's also the start of rugby union's six nations championship. wales will begin their title defence tomorrow in dublin against ireland after that, it's the calcutta cup at murrayfield. scotland won at twickenham last year for the first time since 1983 but only finished 4th in the table. albeit above england. they are being atipped as dark horse in this years tournament off the back of a strong autumn series that included a victory over australia. we have the backing of our or defence and we give them a lot to cheer about. confidence levels, we are confident in what we are going to do and we are confident that the challenges that england are going to check it is that we can deal with them orjust want check it is that we can deal with them or just want to check it is that we can deal with them orjust want to go out there and executed to the best we possibly can. absolutely phenomenal side with phenomenal players and yeah, we are
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excited for the challenge. for phenomenal players and yeah, we are excited for the challenge.— excited for the challenge. for all the build-up _ excited for the challenge. for all the build-up to _ excited for the challenge. for all the build-up to the _ excited for the challenge. for all the build-up to the six _ excited for the challenge. for all the build-up to the six nations l the build—up to the six nations matches. in the winter the build—up to the six nations matches. in the winter olympics and it's going to be one of those. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. we will talk about energy prices and the cost—of—living would talk about politics as well. i am joined by the shadow employment minister. the cost of living is key coverage today. can
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ijust of living is key coverage today. can i just start with your thoughts on the situation at number 10 downing street saying that boris johnson still has control of downing street despite those resignations we have seenin despite those resignations we have seen in the past 24 hour period. i think it fairto seen in the past 24 hour period. i think it fair to say that we haven't heard from anyone in your party for a while and us were going to the weekend, i would like to hear your thoughts on marissa tonight with british politics. it’s thoughts on marissa tonight with british politics. it's exasperating, to be honest- _ british politics. it's exasperating, to be honest. reading _ british politics. it's exasperating, to be honest. reading that - british politics. it's exasperating, to be honest. reading that letter| to be honest. reading that letter about why she was leaving downing street and even people who were really close to borisjohnson are absolutely frustrated with his behaviour in the way that he has acted. and it seems like so many people are now resigning and boris johnson, the person who should design will be the last one out the door and ijust feel this is utterly exasperating. people deserve the
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truth about these downing street parties and a heck of a long time ago, they had to wait for all this time that is passed by when we are taking up precious time in parliament debating the stuff and still, his strongest allies walked out the door of number ten, boris johnson doesn't seem to be able to see that it's him who should be walking out the door. he number ten sa at walking out the door. he number ten say at least — walking out the door. he number ten say at least three _ walking out the door. he number ten say at least three of _ walking out the door. he number ten say at least three of part _ walking out the door. he number ten say at least three of part of - walking out the door. he number ten say at least three of part of number. say at least three of part of number ten taking stock and acting in the wake of the report that that is why those three individuals gone, so, they would say that is part of the process of clearing things out and refreshing in light of that report to. it refreshing in light of that report to. ., , �* refreshing in light of that report to. ., ,�* , to. it doesn't exactly exude confidence _ to. it doesn't exactly exude confidence the _ to. it doesn't exactly exude confidence the fact - to. it doesn't exactly exude confidence the fact that - to. it doesn't exactly exude confidence the fact that so | to. it doesn't exactly exude - confidence the fact that so many people are having to walk out of number ten yet not the prime minister. a dozen really build confidence, i don't think. the answer was evident along time ago comments as of the prime minister,
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he was first asked, could have distorted the truth and taking responsibility but is chosen not to. and as it is, we've had across all of these weeks, boris johnson's closest allies saying that you are not acting in a way that is right or reasonable or the way the country expects you to, what on earth is going on. i think the answer is clear, this borisjohnson is the one who should be taking responsibility and all of this just seems like an absolute pantomime. flan and all of thisjust seems like an absolute pantomime.— and all of thisjust seems like an absolute pantomime. can be addressed ener: absolute pantomime. can be addressed energy prices- — absolute pantomime. can be addressed energy prices- a — absolute pantomime. can be addressed energy prices. a huge _ energy prices. a huge issue for so many families. they may look at reviewing the price cap and six share volatility of the market —— volatility of the market. how are people managing as the bills go up in april? in people managing as the bills go up in aril? ., ., .,, people managing as the bills go up inaril? ., ., , ., in april? in oil and gas company to exand in april? in oil and gas company to exoand this _ in april? in oil and gas company to expand this and _ in april? in oil and gas company to expand this and help _
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in april? in oil and gas company to expand this and help people - in april? in oil and gas company to i expand this and help people because we think we need to get that permanent help to people, notjust with the government have announced riches a buy now pay later scheme in which people left to pay it back over the years. of course, in the longer term, we need the energy market and we have investment in renewables for climate change, but also to get a better supply of energy to deal with the praise phrases that people have been facing. labourwould phrases that people have been facing. labour would have an approach that gives hope to people in huge profits have been made in the oil and gas industry and they'll get help to people in the long—term investing in secure green energy supplies so we can get them out to people. we supplies so we can get them out to --eole. ~ . . supplies so we can get them out to neale, . , ., , people. we must leave it there but we will talk — people. we must leave it there but we will talk about _ people. we must leave it there but we will talk about this _ people. we must leave it there but we will talk about this again - people. we must leave it there but
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we will talk about this again soon. | cancer charities have told the government that improving cancer care in the wake of the pandemic will be a huge challenge — as ministers promise a new 10 year strategy for england. figures suggest there were 50,000 fewer cancer diagnoses across the uk since covid struck — that means there are likely to be more late diagnoses, which reduces someone's chance of survival. the other uk nations have their own plans for improving cancer services. 0ur health correspondent katharine da costa reports. bryony thomas had suffered from severe fatigue and bloating for several years. then, in december 2019, she was rushed to hospital with jaundice. it was there she was given the devastating diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. the words that have been used for me were, "you might be operable." when i realised that what that meant was i was very likely to die and i was very likely to die very soon, i sobbed my heart out. when i asked, "if i don't get the surgery, how long do
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detecting cancer early means it is easier to treat. people are urged to look out for common symptoms, including diarrhoea lasting for three weeks or more, new lumps, and unexplained weight loss orfatigue. many cancer specialists are worried thousands of patients put off seeking help, or were unable to access care during the pandemic. inevitably, there has been a drop in people coming forward, and therefore in the type of cancers that unfortunately kill people quite quickly, we have seen a drop in incidents of the cancers as well. so people have actually never been diagnosed with cancer and sadly may have died before they had even been diagnosed. that is purely because they haven't been seen in the secondary care sector when they have had their diagnosis. the government has already committed to new community diagnostic hubs, offering more scans and checks. the plans to go further by stepping up investment in new blood tests, vaccines and treatments, as well as boosting the cancer workforce. health secretary sajid javid is promising a ten—year war on cancer.
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we need a new national war on cancer — that is why today on world - cancer day i am introducing a ten year plan on cancer, about how we can do even better prevention, how we can do - about how we can do even better prevention, how we can do muchj better in early diagnosis and how we can make the _ very best use of cutting—edge treatments _ charities welcome the ambition for cancer services but warn the plan needs to be backed by research, funding and extra staffing, or there is a danger progress will stall. catherine da costa, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. we will be in beijing for the 2022
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winter olympics are under way

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