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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 4, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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the winter olympics opening ceremony has taken place in beijing, signalling the official start of the games. but the run—up to the event has been fraught with controversy, with many countries staging a diplomatic boycott. just ahead of the opening ceremony, the leaders of china and russia met in beijing. xijinping and vladimir putin said they support each other�*s security and foreign policy aims. china backed russia's demand that nato halts any expansion. downing street insists borisjohnson is still in control after another conservative mp called on him to go. the prime minister has also seen the resignation of a fifth senior adviser. rescuers in morocco are reported to be getting closer to reaching a young boy trapped at the bottom of a well. the five—year—old, called rayan, fell down the 32—metre well on tuesday.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow morning. with me are susie boniface, who's a columnist at the daily mirror, and ali miraj, a columnist at the article. welcome to both. thank you very much indeed for looking through the papers with us. some of the front pages focus on the relationship between the prime minister and the chancellor. the i says borisjohnson has become isolated as rishi sunak takes centre stage. similar theme in the guardian, which says the pm's attempts to rally his top team are floundering. the times of claims a cabinet minister has called for johnson to sack sunak, accusing him of being on manoeuvres. meanwhile, the mail has an exclusive from a tory peer, who says the prime minister's wife,
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carrie, is to blame for the downing street turmoil. the telegraph says british gas is under pressure because it failed to fix the boilers belonging to thousands of customers this winter. and the yorkshire post have a huge picture of the queen, who will mark the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne this weekend. let's begin. susie, why don't you with the paragraph. the —— telegraph. they have this exclusive with nick gibb saying it's hard to see how it can be the case that he told the truth, talking about the prime minister, why he believes he should go. yes. about the prime minister, why he believes he should go.— believes he should go. yes, it's nice to see _ believes he should go. yes, it's nice to see that _ believes he should go. yes, it's nice to see that the _ believes he should go. yes, it'sl nice to see that the conservative party is catching up. when party gate for started breaking and most of the country realise what was
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going on. the met police has been very slow, but some of the conservative backbenchers do seem to be getting their letters then. a few weeks ago, i think we're about 13 now, which is a long way off the 55 they would need, but it does feel very much like the end times in downing street. the i is reporting that boris johnson downing street. the i is reporting that borisjohnson is throwing around that offer to buy people's support. the ft is reporting that his supporters are putting their own letters of no—confidence so that when they get up towards the magic number, and asked if they want to keep those letters in, they get some kind of early warning that they can tell the prime minister but it's coming on this will somehow save him. he's actually getting his friends to submit his own letters of no confidence. what a classic strategy. the mirror is reporting
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there's a photograph, notjust a photograph, 300 photos of these alleged gatherings. now at least one of them appears to have been taken by one of his three official photographers of the prime minister holding a can of beer. i think it was only yesterday telling the bbc... he was unaware of any partners. —— parties. iwish they could stop so i could sleep and stop looking at twitter.— looking at twitter. ollie, let's looking at twitter. ollie, let's look at the — looking at twitter. ollie, let's look at the times. _ the prime minister is told to the sacristy sunak —— ali. rishi sunak said he would not say that in reference to what the prime minister said about keir starmer failing to prosecutejimmy said about keir starmer failing to prosecute jimmy sabol. said about keir starmer failing to prosecutejimmy sabol. that said about keir starmer failing to prosecute jimmy sabol. that whole story is a bit of a self—inflicted
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wound —— jimmy savile. it's actually come back to bite him. wound -- jimmy savile. it's actually come back to bite him.— come back to bite him. well, where did the self-inflicted _ come back to bite him. well, where did the self-inflicted wounds - come back to bite him. well, where did the self-inflicted wounds stop? | did the self—inflicted wounds stop? owen _ did the self—inflicted wounds stop? owen patterson was a self—inflicted wound _ owen patterson was a self—inflicted wound when they tried to change the rules around the discipline of that mp, rules around the discipline of that mp. who — rules around the discipline of that mp, who usually would just leave the comments _ mp, who usually would just leave the comments for 30 days. that turned into a _ comments for 30 days. that turned into a massive fiasco. then you had the wallpaper issue about whether the wallpaper issue about whether the prime — the wallpaper issue about whether the prime minister shared certain text with — the prime minister shared certain text with the independent adviser of ministerial code. now you've got the latest _ ministerial code. now you've got the latest drive — ministerial code. now you've got the latest drive in the comments from the prime — latest drive in the comments from the prime minister. you have to ask the prime minister. you have to ask the -- _ the prime minister. you have to ask the -- act _ the prime minister. you have to ask the —— act prime ministerial, and he went— the —— act prime ministerial, and he went straight — the —— act prime ministerial, and he went straight forward. apparently he was advised not to say it, but his
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adviser— was advised not to say it, but his adviser walked out of belding street yesterday. it's a very big blow to the prime — yesterday. it's a very big blow to the prime minister. —— downing street — the prime minister. —— downing street it— the prime minister. —— downing street. if the prime minister wants to sacristy— street. if the prime minister wants to sacristy sunak, fine. that's verym — to sacristy sunak, fine. that's verym he's— to sacristy sunak, fine. that's very... he's one of the most confident— very... he's one of the most confident ministers in the cabinet. the difficulty is he got two sets of cabinet ministers. the second group who are _ cabinet ministers. the second group who are perfectly confident decent ministers — who are perfectly confident decent ministers who have now increasingly be ministers who have now increasingly he tainted _ ministers who have now increasingly be tainted by this drip, drip, and having— be tainted by this drip, drip, and having to— be tainted by this drip, drip, and having to go and defend us. it's like jeffrey's resignation speech when _ like jeffrey's resignation speech when he — like jeffrey's resignation speech when he resigned from margate thatcher's government. that's exactly — thatcher's government. that's exactly what you would feel if you
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are a _ exactly what you would feel if you are a tory— exactly what you would feel if you are a tory mp right now. the pantomime continues, and this is the drip effect— pantomime continues, and this is the drip effect of the tory party so part where does this leave rishi sunak? — part where does this leave rishi sunak? the part where does this leave rishi sunak? th— part where does this leave rishi sunak? the times... is he really wieldin: sunak? the times... is he really wielding the _ sunak? the times... is he really wielding the knife? _ sunak? the times... is he really wielding the knife? i— sunak? the times... is he really wielding the knife? i don't - sunak? the times... is he really wielding the knife? i don't think| wielding the knife? i don't think he's building — wielding the knife? i don't think he's building the _ wielding the knife? i don't think he's building the knife. - wielding the knife? i don't think he's building the knife. i - wielding the knife? i don't think he's building the knife. i think. wielding the knife? i don't think| he's building the knife. i think he was asked — he's building the knife. i think he was asked a question and i think rishi _ was asked a question and i think rishi sunak appears to be a serious competent figure who wants to get on with the _ competent figure who wants to get on with the job in running the economy in a very— with the job in running the economy in a very difficult time. he doesn't want _ in a very difficult time. he doesn't want to— in a very difficult time. he doesn't want to have to be defending the prime _ want to have to be defending the prime minister's self—inflicted gaffes — prime minister's self—inflicted gaffes. fair enough, suddenly he's now on— gaffes. fair enough, suddenly he's now on manoeuvres. we know rishi sunak— now on manoeuvres. we know rishi sunak was— now on manoeuvres. we know rishi sunak was a — now on manoeuvres. we know rishi sunak was a very capable person. hes— sunak was a very capable person. he's always been destined for the top. he's always been destined for the too he's — he's always been destined for the top. he's always been a top performer. fair enough. is he on
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manoeuvres? he'sjust trying performer. fair enough. is he on manoeuvres? he's just trying to do hisioh _ manoeuvres? he's just trying to do hisioh i_ manoeuvres? he's just trying to do hisjob. i think people should put in that— his job. i think people should put in than ,, , �* , his job. i think people should put intha. ,, , �*, his job. i think people should put inthar ,, , �*, ., they have a tory peer saying that carriejohnson is to blame for the number ten chaos. i'm carriejohnson is to blame for the numberten chaos. i'm not carriejohnson is to blame for the number ten chaos. i'm not sure who the pier is. what about the more general claims that his wife is becoming or has become a problem in downing street? a lot of people would say that's misogynistic. this is lady macbeth. _ would say that's misogynistic. t'i 3 is lady macbeth. it may not be that carrie is an unpleasant person. it may be she's not helping. it may be she's victimised. but the thing is for usjohnson is the person who was elected. borisjohnson is the person who has made these repeated self—inflicted wounds with ridiculous, stupid throw away behaviour that is very difficult to defend or argue about. you can say
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she ambushed him with a cake, but that's not why he's been seen sitting there with bottles of wine. there wasn't a single bit of working done. he had family over for birthdays when it wasn't allowed, and so on. why his staff lives, why he denied. hejust and so on. why his staff lives, why he denied. he just tried to drag and so on. why his staff lives, why he denied. hejust tried to drag it out. the right to get up good bit of the rebooted overview of the stuff, whether he brought him back into parliament, it seems to have been some very silly behaviour. 0n parliament, it seems to have been some very silly behaviour. on top of it, it won't happen again. none of this would've happened. it's the denial, is the cover up, it's a lie that really gets on people's nerves. if the fact that you feel you've
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been made a full out of. that's the thing i think upsets most people, whether they have been directly bereaved by covid or not, it's the fact that leaders... something was for the best, but the person who's in charge either didn't the rules apply to them or genuinely was too stupid to follow them. it's the idea that we've been fooled by electing someone who's thick enough to commit a crime while his official photographer who is making a record of it. all of it feels like we've been taken for months. it's like an episode of love island and we can't get rid of it. despite the fact ali is saying rishi sunak is a perfect successor, if there photographs of him of the party, i would suggest that's not the case if that's true. there is no one in the party who
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would be the normal natural successor who actually wants to step forward at this point. if you are to take over the conservative party tomorrow, and call a general election straight away, you've got to do it in the teeth of a massive cost of living prices. if you are to take over and try to keep it going to the next election, you've only got 23 months in order to try to wife everybody�*s mind of everything that's been going on. you can only do that if there is no covid. if all the prizes come back down, we'll get more money. now those things are going to happen, so taking over now, whether it was rishi sunak or someone else, whether there is a general election tomorrow, whoever takes over for borisjohnson has got a dreadfuljob. which is why nobody wants it, and that way mail working his favour the wants it, and that way mail working his favou ., ., wants it, and that way mail working his favou . . , his favour the mail are saying the department _ his favour the mail are saying the department of — his favour the mail are saying the department of health _ his favour the mail are saying the department of health staff - his favour the mail are saying the department of health staff have l his favour the mail are saying the - department of health staff have been
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told only to do a minimum. what is your feeling about that? because the government and number ten have been trying to get people back to the office. but there is a reluctance amongst many people to do that. i there is a reluctance amongst many people to do that.— people to do that. i think it goes to a much _ people to do that. i think it goes to a much deeper _ people to do that. i think it goes to a much deeper conversation l people to do that. i think it goes - to a much deeper conversation that's -ot to a much deeper conversation that's got to— to a much deeper conversation that's got to he _ to a much deeper conversation that's got to be happening between employees and their employers, which is what _ employees and their employers, which is what is _ employees and their employers, which is what is the future and what does it look— is what is the future and what does it look like — is what is the future and what does it look like for different people in different— it look like for different people in different circumstances? if you're a front _ different circumstances? if you're a front line _ different circumstances? if you're a front line medical staff worker, you can't _ front line medical staff worker, you can't exactly work from home. it really _ can't exactly work from home. it really depends what kind ofjob you do. really depends what kind ofjob you do you _ really depends what kind ofjob you do. you would also put in place the backdrop _ do. you would also put in place the backdrop of— do. you would also put in place the backdrop of cost of living issues, increased — backdrop of cost of living issues, increased travel costs, the fact that people work mean hours at home because _ that people work mean hours at home because they minimise travel.
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they've — because they minimise travel. they've also got quite used to it over— they've also got quite used to it over two — they've also got quite used to it over two years. you could also argue we do _ over two years. you could also argue we do need — over two years. you could also argue we do need to get back to some semblance of normality, and also not only is it _ semblance of normality, and also not only is it important for the economy, services around where people _ economy, services around where people work, all these kinds of things — people work, all these kinds of things. but also the fact that younger— things. but also the fact that younger members of the workforce, particularly — younger members of the workforce, particularly learn from those who are more — particularly learn from those who are more experienced. if you are going _ are more experienced. if you are going into — are more experienced. if you are going into a _ are more experienced. if you are going into a newjob, it's very difficult — going into a newjob, it's very difficult to _ going into a newjob, it's very difficult to understand the culture of it, _ difficult to understand the culture of it. but — difficult to understand the culture of it, but these are much in deeper issues _ of it, but these are much in deeper issues this — of it, but these are much in deeper issues. this doesn't look good for the government in the sense that its own civil— the government in the sense that its own civil servants are not actually leading _ own civil servants are not actually leading by— own civil servants are not actually leading by example. i would've leading by example. iwould've thought— leading by example. i would've thought they would. i think there's a balance — thought they would. i think there's a balance to be struck, but four days _ a balance to be struck, but four days a — a balance to be struck, but four days a month seems like to me. susie, _ days a month seems like to me. susie, let's— days a month seems like to me. susie, let's look at the telegraph. they have a picture of the queen viewing a display of memorabilia from previousjubilees viewing a display of memorabilia from previous jubilees at wender castle —— windsor castle. this is
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the head of the 70th anniversary of her succession to the throne on sunday. it's 70 years since the death of her father, of course, when she came to the throne at the age of only 25. it’s she came to the throne at the age of onl 25. �* , , ., only 25. it's interesting to note the things _ only 25. it's interesting to note the things that _ only 25. it's interesting to note the things that change. - only 25. it's interesting to note the things that change. she's l the things that change. she's looking at various items, but one things i haven't seen in a single piece ofjubilee coverage, and there's been quite a lot, is one single mention of the most important thing that happened in 1952 alongside the queen �*s's succession to the throne, which was operation hurricane, a bomb detonated off the coast of northwest australia. that sent us into the nuclear age. it meant in the years a sense, we didn't have a major war on our territory. it meant that we had a seat at the top table. we were considered equal players in the cold
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war with america and russia. we were an important ally. i know some people are well into their 90s, many have not survived, i've spoken to a few of those. there he said when they went out to the weapons blast, it was his daughter. those men have gone on to have sterility, massive miscarriage and ten times the modern birth defects. those men who served their country when she was freshly... are still being ignored. 0k. point taken. let'sjust talk freshly... are still being ignored. 0k. point taken. let's just talk a bit more about the queen and the 70 years. it's an extraordinary length of time to be the monarch. would you
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