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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 5, 2022 11:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. pressure continues to build on borisjohnson as another former british minister calls on him to resign as prime minister. but the former international trade secretary, liam fox, says that mps should wait for the outcome of the met police investigation. this is a time where we actually need to give her a full focus to the issues affecting the country and it issues affecting the country and it is not a time for the conservative party to indulge in one of its bouts of navel—gazing. former us vice president, mike pence, says he had no right to overturn the result of the 2020 presidential election, and that donald trump was wrong to claim otherwise. president trump is wrong.
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i had no right to overturn the election, the presidency belongs to the american people and the american people alone. emergency workers in morocco say they're hopeful of reaching a five—year—old boy who's spent four days trapped in a well. british ministers are strengthening a bill that will force social media companies to take down reported content more quickly. and the queen reads cards from well wishers ahead of the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a former uk government minister has joined calls for borisjohnson
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to resign over the claims of downing street lockdown parties — and submitted a letter of no confidence. nick gibb — who was schools minister until last year — accused the prime minister of "flagra ntly disregarding the rules". mrjohnson has written to all of his mps, pledging to improve the way downing street operates. our political correspondent damian grammaticas reports. borisjohnson left downing street for the weekend last night and escaped to the countryside, perhaps, but there's no escaping his difficulties. nick gibb, a former schools minister, the latest mp to submit a letter of no confidence. in today's telegraph, which once carried mrjohnson�*s columns, he says... adding... others disagree. there's a number of mps and
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ministers who are the same names we there is an assumption that he is the office manager. he is not. he is not responsible for paying electricity bills or making sure this social distancing is applied. yesterday, it was another tory mp, aaron bell, who submitted a letter. earlier in the week in parliament, he'd said he'd followed the lockdown rules at his grandmother's funeral. does the prime minister think i'm a fool? no, mrspeaker. mrjohnson has now written to all his mps trying to shore up support, saying the resignations of his top aides show he's making changes. but some of his mps think it's the beginning of the end for the prime minister. it certainly looks
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like that at the moment. i think that you have to say that i know a number of colleagues who are very concerned. some will wait for the due process, some will be doing as i am doing, which is making our decisions over this weekend. but i think it's it looks very difficult for the prime ministerfrom here. and another who's lost confidence in him says cabinet ministers should tell the prime minister it's time to go. i think it's now's the time for the cabinet to show that leadership. i think the writing's been on the wall for the prime minister for quite some time in very large letters. i think the cabinet needs to spell it out, this can't continue. the longer this runs on, it's damaging further the credibility of the prime minister, it's damaging the government, it's damaging our country. as yet, though, there's no coordinated campaign to remove him. there are too few letters to trigger a leadership challenge, and borisjohnson still hopes he can reshape his team and ride things out.
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david dramatics, bbc news, westminster. i've been getting analysis from our political correspondent helen catt. i think we're going to find out whether he can withstand it in the coming weeks, rn to be? what is interesting about this issue head on the report there, at the moment, it does not feel like one coordinated push on one particular group within the conservative party. it seems like lots of individuals coming to this conclusion varying reasons and the sorts of things they are bearing in mind oursome the sorts of things they are bearing in mind our some of them are concerned about the original allegations around those downing street parties were the constituents have reacted to that. some by the way borisjohnson has personally handled it. the jape aboutjimmy savill has gone down particularly badly. some said he said he can fix it, do we think you can? and some are same hillside is going on so long that isjust are same hillside is going on so long that is just starting to distract from the everyday business of government. we need to draw a
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line under it and this is the way of doing that. all sorts of other things. political calculations to be made. the timing for those who do want him out. actually you've got to call this at the right time to make sure that you win it. although sorts of things and then the emotional impact. it is big dealfor an mp to write and say, i have no confidence in my party reader. having said that, there are mps who are backing mrjohnson. the culture secretary is one of the men here is what she had to say. one of the men here is what she had to sa . . . one of the men here is what she had to sa . ., ., , ., one of the men here is what she had tosa. ., ., , ., ~, to say. there are a number of mps, ex ministers — to say. there are a number of mps, ex ministers who _ to say. there are a number of mps, ex ministers who a _ to say. there are a number of mps, ex ministers who a small— to say. there are a number of mps, ex ministers who a small number. to say. there are a number of mps, j ex ministers who a small number of mps, _ ex ministers who a small number of mps. many— ex ministers who a small number of mps, many in safe seats, who are, the same _ mps, many in safe seats, who are, the same names we keep hearing cropping — the same names we keep hearing cropping up on some of those names have been_ cropping up on some of those names have been trying to get david cameron_ have been trying to get david cameron out and theresa may out and
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now boris_ cameron out and theresa may out and now borisjohnson, the truth is, no prime _ now borisjohnson, the truth is, no prime minister will please any of those _ prime minister will please any of those. . .., prime minister will please any of those. ., . ., , prime minister will please any of those. ., . ., i, ., those. that can certainly be said of some of the _ those. that can certainly be said of some of the names, _ those. that can certainly be said of some of the names, yes, - those. that can certainly be said of some of the names, yes, but - those. that can certainly be said of some of the names, yes, but if- those. that can certainly be said of| some of the names, yes, but if you look at who has come forward in the last 2a hours or so, the mp for newcastle backed borisjohnson in the leadership election in 2019 and made a point of saying that. nick gibb served under theresa may and david cameron as a minister so he is not necessarily the usual like, so the names coming forward might be of concern to downing street and the fact that it does seem to be people from not any one particular faction in the party but right across at the moment. see how that develops in the weeks and we'll see whether that builds into that pressure that goes to a confidence vote. well, meanwhile, another former minister, liam fox, has been speaking at an event in the past few hours. he's told party members in the south west of england that being a conservative is not a vehicle for personal ambition — but comes with a built—in set of values and beliefs. he was asked whether he continues
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to support borisjohnson. ifi if i didn't support borisjohnson i would have already submitted a letter and i have not. and i think what we need to do is get on the process of government. it is not as though we're short of big issues to deal with. with the crisis in ukraine, we've got the global recovery from the pandemic, we have got inflation rearing its ugly head and we have seen a rise in interest rates. this is a time when we need to give our full focus to the issues affecting the country and it is not affecting the country and it is not a time for the party to indulge in one of its bouts of navel—gazing. let's talk to sebastian payne, whitehall editor with the financial times. do you think many members of the public would agree with what liam fox said just there about it being navel—gazing, all this? fox said just there about it being navel-gazing, all this?— fox said just there about it being navel-gazing, all this? many members ofthe navel-gazing, all this? many members of the public — navel-gazing, all this? many members of the public are _ navel-gazing, all this? many members of the public are completely _ navel-gazing, all this? many members of the public are completely fed - navel-gazing, all this? many members of the public are completely fed up - of the public are completely fed up with this whole row and it looks like just another bout of westminster intrigue which i'm sure
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they are really not that bothered about. they'll be far more concerned about. they'll be far more concerned about what is going on with energy prices and whether the prime minister has lied or misled parliament. those are two substantial issues and at the moment the prime minister passed that position is relatively, you know, it still stable but those letters are still stable but those letters are still trickling in. nick gibb, very indicative of the kind of mps who have lost face boris johnson. indicative of the kind of mps who have lost face borisjohnson. there are people you see on the news channel with a loud voice in parliament, they are just getting on with the job of being local representatives and the fact you've got people like him, and also a former government whip and mp in devon. these are not normal plotters who have lost faith here and i think if that drip drip drip of those kinds of people continued then the prime minister could find themselves in some real trouble by the end of this week if there's letters keep going in but, for the moment, the
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question is, what is borisjohnson was like new operation. how are we going to face the staff who have left? when that happens, the general public will be looking to see, can this government function any better? do you think any change or new direction in the coming days and weeks will be enough to mitigate against the damage that has already been done? ~ ., , , been done? well, that is the big cuestion, been done? well, that is the big question, really, _ been done? well, that is the big question, really, and _ been done? well, that is the big question, really, and it - been done? well, that is the big question, really, and it is - been done? well, that is the big question, really, and it is not. been done? well, that is the big question, really, and it is not an| question, really, and it is not an easy one to answer because it depends on what that new operation is and what it looks like because one of the things we have been trying to decide that this whole party gate row and jimmy savile slow over the past week is how much of this is borisjohnson and how much of it is people around him? the people around me have changed and we've seen via very senior people in downing street have gone but ultimately you can bring new advisers in but advisers are only there to advise. if a lot of this chaotic approach is the prime
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minister then things might not change that much and mps like the culture secretary who has been out and about very ardently defending the prime minister, they would argue that when he was mayor of london he acted in a very different way and had a very strong team of advisers who were effective at that point but being prime minister is a different ball game. a muchjob are much more complicated and that is the question that has to be answered over the coming days. can there be a new a new team, new structure to have a more effective government or is it going beyond that and is it really a case of it is borisjohnson and if it is that then obviously the prime minister is going to be much deeper trouble. conservative mps are looking to downing street to see, i think is going to change? is the operation going to be better and if it doesn't, things don't feel better in a fortnight�*s time that i think we will certainly be in territory of a no—confidence vote in the prime minister's position. just a no-confidence vote in the prime minister's position.— minister's position. just briefly, i know ou minister's position. just briefly, i know you said — minister's position. just briefly, i know you said earlier _ minister's position. just briefly, i know you said earlier that - minister's position. just briefly, i i know you said earlier that members of the public are not as concerned
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about this and it does come across as navel—gazing but do you think, given the prime minister does not have full confidence of all his party members, can he retain confidence of his previous voters? well, if you look at the polls, borisjohnson was not personal ratings are on the floor. there are nearly at the point ofjeremy corbyn on the 2019 election who was at that point the most unpopular patient to have a stand for the position of prime minister. that's a real issue. there is no doubt the public had lost a huge amount of faith and borisjohnson. you've obviously i think the part of the tory coalition, the traditional conservative party and sort of the prosperous home counties of middle england and then the so—called red wall the people who voted conservative for the first time in part because of borisjohnson and both sides of that coalition have lost faith in him and that is where the numbers are so bad. we saw the big levelling up white paper that was to speak to a new path of the
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coalition but i think it is the traditional part that will feel most aggrieved about the centre that jimmy savile surveyor and he hasn't been entirely forthcoming about the party gate row. there a huge amount but it is very rare for prime minister to gain lost faith when in office. the only rare example of that as margaret thatcher in the falklands war and that is the big challenge for him.— thank you. donald trump's former vice president, mike pence, says he couldn't have overturned the result of the 2020 us presidential election, and that mr trump was wrong to think he could have done so. the former president, who has falsely claimed the election was stolen from him, recently insisted again that mr pence could have blocked certification of the results. 0ur north america correspondent, david willis reports. mike pence was renowned for his almost filial sense of loyalty to donald trump, never publicly disagreeing with him and staunchly defending even the former
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president's most controversial actions. but there was one area in which the two men have not seen eye to eye. donald trump maintains the former vice president could have used his authority to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election as they were being presented to congress. and following renewed assertions to that effect from mr trump in recent days, mike pence has now decided to speak out. president trump said i had the right to overturn the election. but president trump is wrong. i had no right to overturn the election, the presidency belongs to the american people and the american people alone. the former vice president was one of a number of lawmakers who were rushed to safety after a mob of donald trump supporters
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smash their way into the us capitol as the election results were being certified onjanuary the 6th last year. some in the crowd called for mike pence to be hanged. senior republicans continue to regard the insurrection as a peaceful rally. shortly before mike pence spoke, the party's governing body voted to censor to lawmakers looking into the events of that fateful day. liz cheney, the daughter of another former us vice president, dick cheney and adam kinsinger, both voted along with eight other republican lawmakers to impeach donald trump for inciting the insurrection. in a tweet, liz cheney said afterward she didn't recognise those in her own party, who she said had abandoned the constitution in order to embrace donald trump. history will be their judge, she wrote. all this comes as mike pence appears to be laying the groundwork
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for a possible presidential run of his own in 202a. that could put him in direct competition with his former boss, who has also been teasing a comeback. much of the republican party remains loyal to donald trump and a former republican suggested that if he were to be re—elected, he would consider pardoning those who carried out the attack on the us capital. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. emergency workers in morocco are hopeful they'll soon reach a five—year—old boy who's spent four days trapped in a well. the child fell more than 30 metres into the shaft while his father was repairing it. the shaft is narrow — so rescuers are digging a parallel hole to reach the boy — as simonjones reports. it is a race against time. rayan has spent a fourth night below ground.
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rescue workers say they won't stop until they get him out. worried locals can only look on and hope. translation: we are praying for rayan to be alive. - may his family have patience and honestly, our hearts are breaking. i hope he will come out of this 0k. it is like one of our own children has fallen. we are praying for his safety. he is one of our children. this is the opening of the well rayan fell down. it is too narrow for the rescue was to get to him, so they have had to come up with a different plan. a large hole is being dug parallel to the well to try to reach the boy. there are only a few metres to go. but that brings with it its own dangers, the possibility of a landslide. the gathered crowd are desperate for progress and a happy outcome. rayan�*s father says
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he has not slept a wink. his mother says she is trying to remain positive. this is a complex and delicate operation. oxygen and water has been sent down the well, a helicopter is on standby to get the boy to hospital. but rayan remains trapped while the most challenging part of the rescue is still ahead. simon jones, bbc news. as you can see there are people gathered round throughout this rescue operation, crowds have gathered to come and see how rescuers are doing. he was playing near the well that his father was repairing. there is a live pictures from the scene. you can just about see the people gathering to take a look. they have been watching, many have been watching the rescue and social media as well and part of the
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reason the rescue operation has been so dangerous is also because of fears of a landslide as well. there is that risk and also the mixture of rocky and sandy soils as well as made the whole process quite painstaking because it is so dangerous. and we have heard from the rescuers about how it is going, as you had in what we said earlier, they are hopeful that they are inching closer to him. 0bviously they are hopeful that they are inching closer to him. obviously a worrying time for his parents, his father has said that they have been really worried since but rescuers, as i said, are hopeful. there is a live pictures and we will return there and bring you any updates on that when we get them. uk ministers are toughening up laws that will force social media companies to find and block harmful content before it's reported by users — or face potentially huge fines. additions to the 0nline safety bill mean using sites like twitter and facebook to make threats, stalk or coercively control people
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will become a criminal offence. angus crawford has more on this. the online world can seem like a lawless space. this bill a first attempt to regulate it, expected before parliament very soon. tech companies already face fines of up to 10% of global turnover if they don't take down child abuse material and terrorism content. but now, that will also include: . the government says it'll be able to bring the full weight of the law against people using the internet as a weapon to ruin other people's lives. users will also face new criminal offences for sending threatening or harmful messages, protecting high—profile figures, like england's footballers, who faced a barrage of racist abuse
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after the euros. deliberately posting harmful material, like hoax covid treatments, may also become an offence. but what about extra protections for children? what we need is a statutory code that protects children wherever they are online, and we need privacy preserving age insurance so we make sure that we know who the kids are, and we treat them accordingly. we've just got to bring an end to treating kids like adults. otherwise, the opportunity that the digital world affords is not going to be delivered to them. a complex bill, a difficult balance. protecting users while allowing freedom of speech. angus crawford, bbc news. the comedianjimmy carr is facing criticism for a joke he made about europe's traveller communities being murdered during the holocaust. he made the joke in a comedy special released on netflix. travellers groups, mps
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and the �*holocaust memorial day trust�* are among those to express their disgust. there have been calls for netflix to remove the content — joining me now isjournalist and media law expert, david banks. first of all, just explain what the differences between how netflix is regulated versus, say, you know, our terrestrial channels.— terrestrial channels. netflix, they euro ean terrestrial channels. netflix, they european -based, _ terrestrial channels. netflix, they european -based, in _ terrestrial channels. netflix, they european -based, in the - terrestrial channels. netflix, they - european -based, in the netherlands, european —based, in the netherlands, although a us company, so they are under the remit of 0fcom, the regulator, the uk regulator that regulates terrestrial channels that we see here like the bbc, so that makes this issue complicated. many people might want to complain about the. jimmy carr show, but if you go
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on to the 0fcom site, and try make a complaint about netflix you can find a link to the dutch regulator so they cannot take a complaint. sorry, our sianal they cannot take a complaint. sorry, your signal cut-off _ they cannot take a complaint. sorry, your signal cut-off briefly _ they cannot take a complaint. sorry, your signal cut-off briefly there - your signal cut—off briefly there but we will persist, it picked up a bit. is this a case of anything to be regulated at all even if 0fcom are in charge is this a that some people have argued just of free speech. people have argued 'ust of free seech. ~ speech. well, the thing with regulation — speech. well, the thing with regulation is _ speech. well, the thing with regulation is that _ speech. well, the thing with regulation is that it - speech. well, the thing with regulation is that it tries - speech. well, the thing with regulation is that it tries to l regulation is that it tries to balance those two things. the 0fcom code does include reference to the european convention on human rights and free speech but also, it accepts that in certain circumstances is going to impose limits on that free speech and in some instances, this might be one of them. 0fcom might deem the content to be offensive and
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the broadcaster would be sentient if they were regulated here in the uk. and that remains to be seen as to whether streaming service get regulated in the uk.— whether streaming service get regulated in the uk. what was netflix's responds _ regulated in the uk. what was netflix's responds and - regulated in the uk. what was netflix's responds and what i regulated in the uk. what was - netflix's responds and what would netflix's responds and what would netflix be expected to do on this given that they are not under any regulation? what is the kind of expected course of action as a response to the backlash? i expected course of action as a response to the backlash? i have not seen a response _ response to the backlash? i have not seen a response from _ response to the backlash? i have not seen a response from netflix - response to the backlash? i have not seen a response from netflix thus i seen a response from netflix thus far. in previous instances netflix have been fairly robust in leaving the content up, particularly of comedians, there have been previous rows about content and comedians but netflix have not been particularly quick to respond a sort of social media storm is about the content. they may well take the view that the storm creates greater audience and attracts more attention to the content itself.— attracts more attention to the content itself. thank you, david. sor we
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content itself. thank you, david. sorry we had _ content itself. thank you, david. sorry we had to _ content itself. thank you, david. sorry we had to keep _ content itself. thank you, david. sorry we had to keep it - content itself. thank you, david. sorry we had to keep it brief. - content itself. thank you, david. i sorry we had to keep it brief. thank you forjoining us. the queen will become the first british monarch to celebrate a 70—year reign on the throne tomorrow. she'll mark the milestone at sandringham, where herfather king george the sixth, died suddenly on february the 6th, 1952. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more. no british monarch has achieved such a milestone before — 70 years of service. she can look back at three previousjubilees — the silver, gold and diamond. and tomorrow, privately at sandringham, the queen will recall the date, february six 1952, when herfather, george vi, died unexpectedly and she became queen. at the time, she was just 25 years of age. in the years since, across decade after decade of change, from the years after the second world war to the present day, within britain and on the wider international stage, she's been a constant presence.
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a head of state who's earned wide respect. if guided always by duty, but coupled with a sense of humility. she takes her role enormously seriously, she takes her duties seriously. she doesn't really take herself very seriously. she doesn't take... she laughs in private, as she has an absolutely superb sense of humour. so, humour, a lightness of touch. ten years ago for the diamond jubilee, there were appearances around the country. this time, it's likely to be rather different. the principal focus will be thejubilee weekend at the start ofjune. that will be the main opportunity for people to express their gratitude for her 70 years of service. nicholas witchell, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes.
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hello. mixed weather fortunes coming our way today. the south—east staying dry and after a sunny start, the weather will turn cloudier here. we have rain affecting north—western areas with strong winds gusting to 55 miles an hour in western scotland. that will take the edge off the temperatures, but it will be mild for most of us, eight to 10 degrees. colder this afternoon in scotland and feeling chilly here given the strength of those custody westerly winds. 0vernight showers turn to snow in scotland. over the hills, we could see some significant accumulations, ten to 15 centimetres, but even lower down you might see a few centimetres of snow as we head into sunday. all the while, wet and windy weather affecting england and wales. the pulse of rain worked its way eastwards during sunday and sunday the weather brightens up with a mix of sunshine and showers are most of the showers across north—western areas are cold enough for some snow away from western
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coasts in scotland. pressure continues to build on the borisjohnson as another former british minister, nick gibb, calls on him to resign as prime minister. but the former international trade secretary, liam fox, says mps should wait for the outcome of the met police investigation before making a judgment
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former us vice president, mike pence, says he had no right to overturn the result of the 2020 presidential election, and that donald trump was wrong to claim otherwise. emergency workers in morocco say they're hopeful of reaching a five year old boy who's spent four days trapped in a well. british ministers are strengthening a bill that will force social media companies to take down harmful content more quickly. and the queen reads cards from well wishers ahead of the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne. now on bbc news, freestyle skier gus kenworthy in conversation with our sport correspondent laura scott i think that my legacy as an athlete
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is honestly probably more about the social impact than it is about is honestly probably more about the social impact than it is about the skiing accolades or awards. gus kenworthy is difficult to define. he is an olympic silver medallist from saatchi. , ., is an olympic silver medallist from saatchi. ,., . ~ ., , ., saatchi. going in backwards for the tri - le 14. saatchi. going in backwards for the triple 14- he _ saatchi. going in backwards for the triple 14. he is _ saatchi. going in backwards for the triple 14. he is good. _ saatchi. going in backwards for the triple 14. he is good. my— saatchi. going in backwards for the | triple 14. he is good. my goodness! that was_ triple 14. he is good. my goodness! that was absolutely insane. and gus kenworthy _ that was absolutely insane. and gus kenworthy knows it. the that was absolutely insane. and gus kenworthy knows it.— kenworthy knows it. the freestyle skier is also _ kenworthy knows it. the freestyle skier is also a _ kenworthy knows it. the freestyle skier is also a proud _ kenworthy knows it. the freestyle skier is also a proud member i kenworthy knows it. the freestyle skier is also a proud member of l kenworthy knows it. the freestyle i skier is also a proud member of the lb chief q society and an outfit is —— and activists and an aspiring athlete. -- and activists and an aspiring athlete. �* , , ., ., , athlete. i'm very proud of my ski career and _ athlete. i'm very proud of my ski career and i've _ athlete. i'm very proud of my ski career and i've had _ athlete. i'm very proud of my ski career and i've had an _ athlete. i'm very proud of my ski career and i've had an admirable j career and i've had an admirable career and i've had an admirable career and i think i've done a lot, and certainly there are skiers with bigger resumes in terms of podiums and stuff, but i think one thing i'm proud of is that i have become kind of a voice for the community and
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last time i did get a medal

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