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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 6, 2022 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm lewis vaughan jones. the queen celebrates the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne — and says she'd like her daughter—in law, camilla, to become queen consort. it indicates not least that the queen is not thinking about what happens after the end of her rain and settles one of the big unresolved issues of what will camilla be known as. moroccan officials say a five year old boy who spent four days trapped down a well, has died. hoping to steady the ship. uk prime minister borisjohnson adds new recruits to his inner circle at downing street. and — the uk firms up tougher laws that will force global social—media companies to take down harmful content, more quickly.
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hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. the queen has announced her hopes for the monarchy, when her eldest son, prince charles, becomes king. in a highly significant intervention, she's expressed her "sincere wish," that her daughter—in law, camilla, be known as queen consort, paving the way for the duchess of cornwall, to be crowned at her husband's side. the news comes on the eve of the 70th anniversary of her own accession to the throne. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports from sandringham. she's preparing to mark the 70th anniversary of the day she came to the throne. this morning, the queen greeted guests in the ballroom at sandringham, walking slowly and carefully, steadied with a stick. but alert and fully engaged.
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i was told it had to be upside—down for the press. so, they can see it. laughter. idon�*t mind! i don't matter. the queen seemed quite fit and well today, yes. she has actually had that little sparkle in her eye and, you know, her sense of humour was there, so, yeah, i'd say she was fine. a little frail, but terrific sense of humour she'sl got, which, you know, really stands out. - and very bright, and her. memory must be fantastic! and it's clear for the first time how actively the queen is contemplating the arrangements for the future. probably be quite different because nowadays won't we do things quite differently? in a statement tonight she recalled the pledge she made at the time of her 21st birthday. i declare before you all that my whole life, whether it be long or short, shall be devoted your service. the queen made it clear there is no question of her stepping back
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from her role. she said. and then she turns to the transition to the reign of her eldest son, and says this. and then she turns to the transition to the reign of her eldest son, and says this. until now, mindful of the sensitivities around camilla's role in the breakdown of charles�*s first marriage, it had been intended that she would become princess consort. now, the queen has made clear her wish that camilla should have the full status as the wife of a king and be known as queen. tonight, clarence house said charles and camilla were touched and honoured.
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and nicholas witchell is at sandringham with the latest. it is highly significant, i think. in indicates not least that the queen is thinking about what happens after the end of her rain and settles one of the big unresolved issues about charles rain. what will camilla be known as? her choice of words my sincere wish, for the prime minister of the day to advise her on things like this but who will argue now that the queen has said this. charles will be delighted, he has wanted this ever since camilla married. the queen mindful of public opinion, aware of the hostility there has been towards camilla over the years from certain quarters, but mindful too and she says how blessed she was to have prince philip as her consort. she clearly believes of the country will accept
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this. she clearly believes that charles and camilla deserve it. one important distinction. queen consort, has no constitutional significance. unlike queen regnant which is what the queen is, sovereign and head of state. one touching note. the queen finish this statement issued on the eve of the 70th anniversary with the words, your servant elizabeth r. the queen's second son, prince andrew, will give evidence under oath in london next month, to lawyers in the civil case representing the woman accusing him of sexual assault. virginia giuffre claims as a 17 year old, she was trafficked by the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein, to have sex with the duke, in the early 2000s. the prince strenuously denies the allegations. the operation to rescue a five—year—old boy trapped in a well in morocco since tuesday has ended in tragedy. emergency workers were able
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to reach the boy, rayan awram, earlier this evening — but the moroccan authorities confirmed that he had died. king mohammed sent condolences to his parents. rayan awram, aged five, fell into the well on tuesday, triggering a huge rescue effort that engrossed the country. duncan kennedy has more on the story. for a few moments, the crowd to gather to witness this difficult national spectacle cheered. apparently in the belief that five—year—old rayam was being brought out alive. but as an ambulance left the scene, it later became evident that rayam had not survived. the royal court confirmed that the five—year—old boy had died. and said king mohammed had contacted his parents to tell them the news. the ordeal began on tuesday. this ghostly images
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of the five—year—old with captured by the rescue teams. they also fed him systems to provide him oxygen and water but is unclear if he is able to use them. he had slid down the well while out with his father. and the ten story building, but the width of a newspaper. that meant the rescuers could not go down the whole and had instead gouged out a new trench at the side. hundreds of construction workers, engineers and volunteers, burrowed for five days, leaving tonnes of rock and sand. for the final few delicate breeders, they held up the brittle collapsed prone strata with plastic and metal terminals. the story of the little trapped boy proper moroccans out to witness this unfolding drama in the heels of
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their towns. unfolding drama in the heels of theirtowns. it unfolding drama in the heels of their towns. it seems the rescue teams could not get to him in time. in the prayers of the nation went unanswered. the country hoping for a child's salvation has been left bereft and rayan's parents can only mourn their son. moroccan journalist hassan alawii has been following the story — he gave us his reaction to the news. we were hoping to have some good news, even if it doesn't make sense for this story to end in a good manner because if you spent five days in the bottom of a well, and you are only a five—year—old boy, it is very unlikely that you can survive this terrible experience.
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so, tonight, at around 9:30pm local time, 8:30pm gmt, the ambulance came to the front door of this cave, and... ..the rescue team just put the body there of rayan and left. and we didn't know at the time what was happening. but, then, we had the breaking news, the king himself, king mohammed vi, himself called the father and mother of rayan and presented his condolences to them live on television. this is something that never ever happened in the history of morocco, that the king himself expresses his condolences to a family live on television. after that, i sawjust a short bit of the news at 9 o'clock here, and there was an official statement from
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the palace itself. and it confirmed the bad news, unfortunately, and it said that the king is very sad to know about the outcome of this experience for rayan. let's get some of the day's other news hundreds of people in rio dejaneiro have demonstrated next to a seafront kiosk where a congolese migrant was murdered last month. who worked at the kiosk, was tied up and beaten to death after complaining about unpaid wages. his ordeal was captured by a security camera. his ordeal was captured demonstrators called for a full investigation and the arrests of everyone involved. the american military says an attack that killed more than a hundred and eighty people in afghanistan last august was the work of a single suicide bomber. a pentagon investigation found the explosion at kabul airport
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could not have been prevented. scientists say the highest glacier on mount everest, nearly eight thousand metres above sea level, is now melting eighty times faster than it formed. the study of our planet's highest ice core called south col, is the first to indicate how vulnerable the himalayan glaciers are to climate change. a billion people depend on the himalayan mountain range for their drinking water. britain's prime minister boris johnson has announced two new major appointments to his downing street team, saying the shake—up will "improve how no 10 operates," following weeks of turmoil. the labour party have accused johnson of panicking and said the government is collapsing into chaos. our political correspondent, iain watson has the very latest. after another week of bad headlines, the loss of senior downing street staff and some of his own mps openly calling for him to go, tonight borisjohnson was attempting to get on the front foot.
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he has appointed the former bbc journalist guto hari as his director of communications. he worked for borisjohnson when he was london mayor and here he was just over a week ago setting out what the prime minister had to do. boris has always underestimated how critical it is to have a fantastic team around him and i don't think, even if he can pull this back, he will be allowed to do it unless he promises to his party that he is going to overhaul that machinery. and as part of that overhaul, unusually the new chief of staff in downing street won't be a civil servant but a politician, the former brexit secretary steve barclay. his job will be to ensure that the cabinet and mps feel more involved in decision—making, although tony blair's former chief of staff jonathan powell questioned whether a demanding full—time role as a government official really can be combined with the job of an mp. after so—called partygate, borisjohnson had to promise his mps behind closed doors that he'd make significant changes to the way that downing street was run.
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and i'm told there will be an even bigger staff shake—up announced in the coming week. but he's also being pressed by seniorfigures in his party to make changes to his cabinet, to look beyond his natural allies. and i'm told that those discussions, or perhaps i should say, negotiations, are already under way. it is actually an opportunity for a reset, which i hope the prime minister takes, because it's a very important part of his premiership, that he actually builds bridges, notjust between downing street and the parliamentary party but across the parliamentary party. but will this be enough? more mps are considering submitting letters of no confidence and potential rivals to the prime minister seem to be limbering up. rebuilding trust with mps is one thing, but what voters think is rather more crucial. and here in plymouth, the prime minister still seems to have his work cut out. he's apologised, he's clearing out number 10. maybe he's doing his bit. he might be doing his bit, but he let a lot of people down. well, i don't think- anybody else could take over and do any better. borisjohnson is hoping that
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the changes in downing street will convince his conservative critics not to change its occupant. iain watson, bbc news. additional us troops have arrived in poland as part of a new deployment to bolster nato forces as tensions with russia remain high. the soldiers from the eighty—second airborne division of the us army, landed in the south—east of the country not far from the ukrainian border. the biden administration announced this week it will send three thousand additional american soldiers to eastern europe. russia has massed more than a hundred thousand troops on its border with ukraine, but the kremlin denies it's planning to invade. adam easton has the latest. well, what we've seen so far is the first elements — actually, mostly equipment — for this deployment has arrived in poland, and that's come from germany, from us bases in germany. the 82nd airborne division, which you mentioned, is based in north carolina,
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and 1,700 troops from that division will be arriving in poland over the coming hours and days. and this deployment, while that number, 1,700, is not particularly large if you compare it to the 100,000 russian troops that have massed on the borders with ukraine, it is a significant political gesture to send this many troops to poland, because it actually increases the number of american troops in poland by more than one—third, and if you compare that to 2014 when russia annexed the crimea, president obama then was thinking of sending just 100 soldiers to poland. so, this is 1,700, significantly more, so a significant gesture that's
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been welcomed extremely by polish leaders. the polish prime minister mateusz morawiecki saying that this is an important signal of nato's unity against the threat of russian aggression. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines. the queen celebrates the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne — and says she'd like her daughter—in law, camilla, to become queen consort. moroccan officials say a five year old boy who spent four days trapped down a well, has died. the uk government wants tougher laws forcing global social media companies, to take down illegal content, without having to wait for users to report it. it's an issue politicans across the world have been trying to deal with. last year g7 leaders agreed a set of internet safety principles to improve online safety. here in the uk the new legislation, would compel the removal of material under a wide range of categories, including drugs and arms dealing, and forums that encourage suicide.
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here's katie prescott. frankie was 15 when she took her own life in 2018. afterwards, her parents had her laptop forensically checked. and realised that, back earlier in the year, january, february, march of 2018, she had been accessing sites about self—harm, suicide. just appalling stuff. and we had no idea and the school had absolutely no idea. stories like these are behind plans to toughen up regulations online. tech companies will face fines of up to 10% of their turnover if they don't take down material relating to... those sending threatening messages, like the racist abuse of england's footballers last year, will face prosecution, as will people at the companies themselves. the organisations will have - to name individuals who will be
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responsible within those i organisations for complying with the legislation. if they continue to flout that legislation, those named i individuals will be responsible and could face up to five - years' imprisonment. tech companies say they welcome the clear guidance from government and that they see the need for more regulation. they say that the internet needs to become a safer place, too, but there are concerns that this could stifle people's access to information, if companies were to over moderate and remove too much content in order to comply. experts say the challenge will be putting it into practice. on facebook platforms alone, people are posting more than 100 billion times a day. in 2017, facebook and instagram were taking down 35,000 posts a day about self— harm and suicide alone. so, this is regulation not at a minor scale, but at an industrial scale.
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while there's criticism about whether the plans go far enough, they will mean a revolution in how the online world is policed. katie prescott, bbc news. a sculpture of an algerian military hero has been vandalised in central france, hours before it was inaugurated. the artwork, which was commissioned to mark sixty years of algerian independence, depicts emir abdel kaader — who led the struggle against the french invasion of algeria in 1830. he was dubbed france's worst enemy and was imprisoned in the french town of am—bwaaz, where the new sculpture now stands. mexico has long been one of the most dangerous countries in the world forjournalists. but even by its standards, it's been one of the deadliest months in years. in total, fourjournalists were murdered in the country over the past few weeks our mexico correspondent, will grant, reports from tijuana.
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ifearfor my life. i fear for my life. the ifearfor my life. the radio journalist told the president live on television 2019. unfortunately, she was right to be worried. last week, she was murdered by a gunman outside her home. the third journalist of four killed in mexico this year, she was embroiled in the legal dispute with the former governor of her state was denied any involvement in her killing. when she was killed, they had a bodyguard in a panic button in the journalist protection scheme, it made no difference. journalists like this are generally covering stories that won't make international headlines or get any attention they deserve your mexico. they risk their lives daily for pitifully low wages and working conditions amid harassment and intimidation.
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yet, they do so on a commitment to expose the abuse and violence that underpins some of the peoples lives in this country. a large contingent of those attended her funeral. some to cover it, others to grieve. an entire profession in shock. ella it happens often. journalists tell the authorities that they are in trouble, they tell them that they are receiving threats and more often than not, the response by the mexican government if response by the mexican governmen— government if it's not negative. _ government if it's not negative, it _ government if it's not negative, it is - government if it's not negative, it is simply| government if it's not - negative, it is simply silence. no, nothing is done about it. paying its respects was antonio, also the protection scheme of the suspected cartel members appeared at his home in an unmarked vehicle. now, he is accompanied all day but by an armed guard shadowing his every move. if antonio knows if the drug cartels want to silence them, there is little we can do. , �* , them, there is little we can
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do. , �* ., do. of course, i'm very aware of that _ do. of course, i'm very aware of that- if— do. of course, i'm very aware of that. if a — do. of course, i'm very aware of that. if a person _ do. of course, i'm very aware of that. if a person wants - do. of course, i'm very aware of that. if a person wants to l of that. if a person wants to hurt — of that. if a person wants to hurt you. _ of that. if a person wants to hurt you, they'll hurt you because _ hurt you, they'll hurt you because a person who's going to do it_ because a person who's going to do it has— because a person who's going to do it has been paid to do a job — do it has been paid to do a 'ob. , . ., do it has been paid to do a 'ob. , .., ., ., , ., job. the second “ournalist to be cured h job. the second “ournalist to be cured in _ job. the second journalist to be cured in tijuana - job. the second journalist to be cured in tijuana within i job. the second journalist to be cured in tijuana within a l be cured in tijuana within a week with the photographer also going down. the killings have touched everyjournalist in the city. it even advises to the governments protection scheme say it is not fit for purpose. it has been broken from its very— it has been broken from its very inception. _ it has been broken from its very inception. it— it has been broken from its very inception. it was - it has been broken from its - very inception. it was designed with no— very inception. it was designed with no recommendations - very inception. it was designedj with no recommendations from journalists _ with no recommendations from journalists. instead, _ with no recommendations from journalists. instead, it- with no recommendations from journalists. instead, it was- journalists. instead, it was put— journalists. instead, it was put together _ journalists. instead, it was put together in _ journalists. instead, it was put together in the - journalists. instead, it was. put together in the pressure from — put together in the pressure from international— put together in the pressure from international human i put together in the pressure - from international human rights groups— from international human rights groups at— from international human rights groups at the _ from international human rights groups at the high _ from international human rights groups at the high rate - from international human rights groups at the high rate of - groups at the high rate of attacks _ groups at the high rate of attacks and _ groups at the high rate of attacks and murders - groups at the high rate of attacks and murders of. attacks and murders of journalists. _ attacks and murders of journalists. it - attacks and murders of journalists. it was - attacks and murders of journalists. it was justl journalists. it wasjust improvised, _ journalists. it wasjust improvised, they- journalists. it was justl improvised, they made journalists. it was just i improvised, they made it journalists. it was just - improvised, they made it up as it went — improvised, they made it up as it went along _ improvised, they made it up as it went along. we _ improvised, they made it up as it went along.— it went along. we asked the state government _ it went along. we asked the state government but - it went along. we asked the state government but none| it went along. we asked the - state government but none was given. but the president has, be offensive.— be offensive. few “ournalists are be offensive. few “ournalists carrying h be offensive. few “ournalists are carrying out _ be offensive. few journalists are carrying out the - be offensive. few journalists are carrying out the noble i be offensive. few journalists i are carrying out the noble work of informing, he said. on the many that accused him of
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ignoring the dangers they face. journalists across the country protested to demand greater protection and an end to impunity. of the prime reality is that with four voices extinguished already this year, mexico looks to remain the most dangerous country in the world forjournalists outside of a war zone. the controversy over china's winter olympics has intensified over beijing's decision to get a uighur athlete from xinjiang to light the olympic cauldron during the opening ceremony. china has been accused of using the cross—country skier, dinigarjala—moojang, as a propaganda tool, to undermine criticism of its policies in xinjiang. beijing is alleged to have carried out human rights abuses against the region's ethnic uyghurs. chinese diplomats said choosing the xinjiang competitor showed china was one �*big family'. our analyst michael bristow says this is china's way of hitting back at the west's criticism.
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the responses been that essentially, this is a political ploy by beijing essentially to cover up what it's doing and xinjiang, it's being accused of human rights abuses and xinjiang, uighur people put in camps, re—education camps and a whole series of other measures introduced against the uighur minority there. and ideally, without saying so, this is china hitting back and saying look, we are a nation of 56 different ethnic groups, uighurs are among them and we have an athlete taking part in this olympics ceremony, letting the cauldron as a symbolic act, it is their way of showing the world that uighurs are a part of china and treated well.
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also, it's got to be seen in terms of a promotion by the chinese government because if you look on twitter, chinese diplomats are promoting this and also sharing videos of this athletes family back home in xinjiang, celebrating the honour of leading the cauldron and really show how this family should be proud of the fact that there she is competing in the olympics. in danish city of copenhagen, a light festival is brightening up the dark nordic winter. the majority of the light works are placed along the quay and on the bicycle bridges of copenhagen. following the repeal of covid—19 restrictions, organisers hope to welcome more visitors than last year, when more than half a million people visited over a three—week period. the festival has 50 installations making it the largest in europe. you can reach me on twitter —
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i'm @lvaughanjones hello there. the rain is pushing southward, the snow is returning to the north. with a real risk of some quite significant snow through the remainder of the night and the start of sunday. our weather front slowly meandering south bringing that milder, wetter and windier weather. quite a contrast as we go towards dawn. the prospect of several centimetres of snow piling up over the hills of scotland and even a few centimetres at lower levels, blowing around in those strong to gale force winds. of course with that, temperatures close to freezing as well. blizzards in places, in contrast, the rain is quite heavy, pushing its way further southwards across england and wales with a relatively mild in contrast, in fact, temperatures more akin to what they would be in the daytime at this time of year.
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so we've got that north, south switch during the morning strong winds throughout, blowing that rain away we think by the end of the morning for most parts, certainly the heavier rain. but a strong wind blowing that rain away we think by the end of the morning for most parts, certainly the heavier rain. but he could linger in southern and western areas, still that strong wind, potentially gales through the channel by the north and west a lot of wintry showers following him behind with hail and thunder as well as sleet and snow. a blustery day throughout which will accentuate the chill. in fact, we've got that cold, arctic air with us. these are temperatures to start the day, they will dip away as the day goes on across the southern half of the country. we are into the cold airagain on sunday but it doesn't last long. i think we will have quite a chilly night here under the starry skies. temperatures will fall away and we are more likely to see a frost quite widely by the time we get to monday morning. this is monday morning. a further north and west, we've got the cloud gathering once again and the rain, our next weather front toppling in.
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doesn't look as if it will give a significant rain because the high—pressure building towards the south. but that weather front here in the northwest at least on monday will give us fairly wet weather. so, let's watch the progress of that as it topples into the day. brightness and sunshine further south and east and a relatively mild day in contrast once again a real topsy—turvy with our temperatures as we've seen throughout the week and that continues into the start of next week. high pressure will start to build through. i think we will be a lot of cloud around through the day on tuesday and indeed into wednesday but still a lot of dry and settled weather to end the week. as ever, the warnings are on the website.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. the queen has announced she wants camilla, the duchess of cornwall, to be known as queen consort when her eldest son, prince charles, becomes king. she expressed what she called her "sincere wish" in a message to mark the 70th anniversary of her reign. a five—year—old boy in morocco who fell down a well on tuesday has died, following a huge rescue effort. he was finally pulled from the 30—metre—deep shaft but his death was later confirmed by king mohammed — who passed on his condolences to the boy's parents. the uk prime minster, borisjohnson has announced two new major appointments to his downing street team, saying the shake—up will improve operations following weeks of turmoil. the cabinet office minister, steve barclay, becomes chief of staff — and the formerjournalist, guto harri, is the new director of communications. now on bbc news —
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