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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 7, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

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president macron and vladimir putin have been holding talks in moscow, the latest attempt to defuse the growing crisis over ukraine. as the talks began, russia said both sides had concerns about the security situation in europe. meanwhile, the new german chancellor has been meeting president biden on his first official visit to the white house. joe biden later said diplomacy remained the best way to resolve the ukraine crisis — but the us and its allies would be ready if russia invaded. uk opposition labour leader, sir keir starmer, has been escorted to safety by police, after he was targeted by a crowd near parliament. two arrests have been made after clashes between police and protesters in westminster. doctors in switzerland have used a spinal implant to enable a man whose nerves were completely severed in a motorbike accident to walk again. the electronic device has been used successfully in nine patients so far.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster henry bonsu and lord digbyjones, former trade minister. both the whiskered these days. i rather like. i'm all in favour. the front pages then. the metro says borisjohnson is being accused of endangering sir keir starmer�*s life — after the labour leader was surrounded by a mob shouting allegations that he protected the likes ofjimmy savile. last week boris johnson alleged the labour leaderfailed to prosecutejimmy savile when he was director of public prosecutions — which is a false claim. the guardian reports that mps from all sides angrily are rounding on borisjohnson, accusing him of whipping up political "poison" after the labour leader, keir starmer, was set upon by protesters. the �*i' predicts the next 48 hours could be crucial for the prime minister — as it suggests tory whips say mps
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can be absent from commons this week — in attempt to avoid a quick coup. the financial times features emmanuel macron and vladimir putin at either end of a very long table in the kremlin, where they've been holding talks on ukraine today. the times has borisjohnson warning president putin that invading ukraine would only strengthen nato as he prepares to deploy royal marines, raf typhoons and royal navy warships to eastern europe. the daily mirror carries a warning that nhs waiting lists will get worse before they get better as hospitals struggle with the covid backlog. the daily mail focuses on porn sites being forced to stop children accessing harmful content, under draft internet laws. meanwhile, the daily telegraph claims six north sea oil and gas fields are expected to be approved later this year as number ten faces resistance over moves towards net zero.
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let's make a start. we will start with the metro. kier starmer fleas hate mob, calls for the prime minister to withdraw the claims that he made about kier starmer in the commons which were false claims and coming from many different quarters, in fact. , ., 1, , coming from many different quarters, infact. _, in fact. yes, and boris johnson should definitely _ in fact. yes, and boris johnson should definitely withdraw - in fact. yes, and boris johnson l should definitely withdraw them. in fact. yes, and boris johnson - should definitely withdraw them. the planes is lost. the point is completely lost, and i think prime minister and indeed all politicians should understand that any nuance goes out the window when you get division and hate and all the stuff that has whipped up. carrie starmer factually was the head of the cps at that time that he had to write this letter on behalf of cps on behalf of the cps of which he said nothing to do with anything personal from him, he had nothing to do with it whatsoever in any way shape or form, that he was the captain on the
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bridge of the ship at the time. borisjohnson was wrong to say you, you know, to personalise it to kier starmer, because it's not true, it's a lie, and it was not the same. and if boris is trying to say that it's all about being in charge of things whether they're going out or not, and all the things that are alleged to have gone on and factually did go on at number ten, that is subject to the met police and all the rest. but if he was trying to get to that point, it was a cheap political point, it was a cheap political point, it was a cheap political point, it didn't work, it backfired, he picked the wrong target created division and hate, and hate, and the best thing that boris johnson division and hate, and hate, and the best thing that borisjohnson should now do is be statesman—like, actually say this is what i was trying to do and i am sorry. not only did it not work, but it has fanned the flames of the hate and division in our society to the point where a democratic elected politician who the government, you
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and i, the taxpayer, paid to oppose the government. that's of the leading opposition is, paid by the taxpayer to oppose the government, and what you get is you can't even walk in the street without being vilified and threatened. and if our society is treating democracy as nastily and disgusting is that, than the prime minister, what he says in the prime minister, what he says in the house of commons has to bear some responsibility, and on that basis, he should withdraw them remark. ., ~' , basis, he should withdraw them remark. ., ~ , ., basis, he should withdraw them remark. ., ~' , ., ~' basis, he should withdraw them remark. ., ~' , ., ~ , remark. how like they do think it is he well? keys _ remark. how like they do think it is he well? keys had _ remark. how like they do think it is he well? keys had to _ remark. how like they do think it is he well? keys had to apologise - remark. how like they do think it is he well? keys had to apologise in l he well? keys had to apologise in past. he well? keys had to apologise in ast. ~ . . he well? keys had to apologise in ast. ~ ., . , he well? keys had to apologise in ast. ~ . . , ., past. watch his career over the ears, past. watch his career over the years. he _ past. watch his career over the years, he doesn't _ past. watch his career over the years, he doesn't really - past. watch his career over the | years, he doesn't really believe past. watch his career over the i years, he doesn't really believe in apologising. it's only when his back is really— apologising. it's only when his back is really against the wall and people — is really against the wall and people are coming out from all sides — people are coming out from all sides. let's rememberwhat people are coming out from all sides. let's remember what he actually— sides. let's remember what he actually he said instead of prosecuting his —— spending his time prosecuting — prosecuting his —— spending his time prosecuting journalists instead of prosecuting journalists instead of prosecuting jimmy savile, it was a very nasty— prosecuting jimmy savile, it was a very nasty attack from a very deliberate, very personal. and importantly. — deliberate, very personal. and importantly. a _ deliberate, very personal. and importantly, a false _
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deliberate, very personal. fific importantly, a false claim about deliberate, very personal. fific importantly, a false claim about his role in all of this.— role in all of this. completely false. role in all of this. completely false- it's _ role in all of this. completely false. it's been _ role in all of this. completely false. it's been fact - role in all of this. completely false. it's been fact checked l role in all of this. completely. false. it's been fact checked at nausea — false. it's been fact checked at nausea them and why people were able to produce _ nausea them and why people were able to produce your own data on the bbc news _ to produce your own data on the bbc news channel. so he was swimming in a very— news channel. so he was swimming in a very nasty— news channel. so he was swimming in a very nasty soup and it's not becoming _ a very nasty soup and it's not becoming of a prime minister and he knows _ becoming of a prime minister and he knows that, — becoming of a prime minister and he knows that, that's why he's head of the policy— knows that, that's why he's head of the policy unit of downing street resigning, and that's why farmer, you know. — resigning, and that's why farmer, you know. a — resigning, and that's why farmer, you know, a very senior tory figure, peopie _ you know, a very senior tory figure, people like — you know, a very senior tory figure, people like juliet smith, the former chief wept, said this is disgusting, you have _ chief wept, said this is disgusting, you have to— chief wept, said this is disgusting, you have to apologise unequivocally, but it's _ you have to apologise unequivocally, but it's not _ you have to apologise unequivocally, but it's not in his nature and the thing _ but it's not in his nature and the thing is — but it's not in his nature and the thing is he — but it's not in his nature and the thing is he doesn't seem to realise that when— thing is he doesn't seem to realise that when you are prime minister it's the _ that when you are prime minister it's the nature of the job, whether you call— it's the nature of the job, whether you call it — it's the nature of the job, whether you call it the feral beast of the media — you call it the feral beast of the media as tony blair used to, people do come _ media as tony blair used to, people do come at — media as tony blair used to, people do come at you and you have to be thick—skinned. fora guy do come at you and you have to be thick—skinned. for a guy who likes to present — thick—skinned. for a guy who likes to present himself as very robust and free — to present himself as very robust and free speech loving a libertarian, you know, stop all of
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this cancel— libertarian, you know, stop all of this cancel culture, snowflakes to me he _ this cancel culture, snowflakes to me he seems remarkably thin skin for a guy— me he seems remarkably thin skin for a guy who _ me he seems remarkably thin skin for a guy who came to the top.— a guy who came to the top. police rescue kier _ a guy who came to the top. police rescue kier starmer _ a guy who came to the top. police rescue kier starmer as _ a guy who came to the top. police rescue kier starmer as the - a guy who came to the top. police rescue kier starmer as the pm - a guy who came to the top. police l rescue kier starmer as the pm faces crunch 48 hours. and whether there is or isn't some kind of tension between rishi sunak and the prime minister. just briefly, if you would. ., , ., minister. just briefly, if you would. ., , , would. people are playing up the tensions, would. people are playing up the tensions. you — would. people are playing up the tensions, you know, _ would. people are playing up the tensions, you know, that - would. people are playing up the tensions, you know, that very i would. people are playing up the i tensions, you know, that very thing going _ tensions, you know, that very thing going on— tensions, you know, that very thing going on between downing street and the treasury, and there is talk that rishi _ the treasury, and there is talk that rishi sunak— the treasury, and there is talk that rishi sunak boris johnson the treasury, and there is talk that rishi sunak borisjohnson hasjoked previously— rishi sunak borisjohnson hasjoked previously in the past about moving to the _ previously in the past about moving to the department of and social care, _ to the department of and social care, about him being vulnerable and a potential— care, about him being vulnerable and a potential reshuffle. also, we have tory mp_ a potential reshuffle. also, we have tory mp is— a potential reshuffle. also, we have tory mp is being told they do not need _ tory mp is being told they do not need to— tory mp is being told they do not need to be on the westminster estate. — need to be on the westminster estate, the palace of westminster this week— estate, the palace of westminster this week out of fear that they may plot if— this week out of fear that they may plot if they— this week out of fear that they may plot if they see each other face—to—face, and who knows what this wiii— face—to—face, and who knows what this will do— face—to—face, and who knows what this will do to those tory mps who are plotting in the background and
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writing _ are plotting in the background and writing letters of no confidence. we need that _ writing letters of no confidence. we need that threshold of 54. that's what _ need that threshold of 54. that's what people are looking for and we don't _ what people are looking for and we don't know— what people are looking for and we don't know how many have gone in or the chairman— don't know how many have gone in or the chairman of the 1922 committee notice _ the chairman of the 1922 committee notice. . , . the chairman of the 1922 committee notice. ., , ., , , , the chairman of the 1922 committee notice. ., , ., i, , �*, notice. that is a mystery. let's look at the _ notice. that is a mystery. let's look at the times. _ notice. that is a mystery. let's look at the times. britain i notice. that is a mystery. let's look at the times. britain will l notice. that is a mystery. let's i look at the times. britain will not flinch over ukraine, says prime minister, whether vladimir putin takes a much notice of borisjohnson at the moment, we don't know, but he is part of the nato alliance that is all saying the same thing. filth. is part of the nato alliance that is all saying the same thing. oh, yes, by the henry _ all saying the same thing. oh, yes, by the henry come _ all saying the same thing. oh, yes, by the henry come it's _ all saying the same thing. oh, yes, by the henry come it'sjust - all saying the same thing. oh, yes, by the henry come it'sjust cross i all saying the same thing. oh, yes, | by the henry come it'sjust cross my by the henry come it's just cross my mind it's 20 to one in the morning where you are committed to? yes. mind it's 20 to one in the morning where you are committed to? yes, it is, buti where you are committed to? yes, it is, but i am — where you are committed to? yes, it is. but i am an _ where you are committed to? yes, it is, but i am an resilient— where you are committed to? yes, it is, but i am an resilient farm. - is, but i am an resilient farm. admire— is, but i am an resilient farm. admire your resilience to coming to me on this. yes, martin, i think putin will listen to what boris johnson is saying, no more or less than others with one exception we are a nuclear power, we do have the
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most powerful military capability on the european continent west of russia with great respect to the french, they are very close behind, so nevertheless, that duly democratic elected leader of the united kingdom does have some clad, and nowhere near as much as america for obvious reasons. so putin would listen because actually, at the moment, putin is exactly where he wants to be. he promised the russian people that he would put russia back on the world stage, he has. he promised that he would get them back to being respected, he has. and he actually said that the destruction of the soviet union was the greatest tragedy of the 20th century, which is absolute rubbish, but nevertheless, his intention is to rebuild the soviet union. that is not your pollens or your czech republic so hungry is, it is all the stands, critic stan and the ukraine. so there is, he is on a mission to
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get decanted and he has got the world flocking to his door, he's got background there at the moment, he's got the german chancellor next week, he has had liz truss into russia, but not to see him, and boris johnson and joe biden sings that self that is one reason why actually think there is a very good chance, sticking my neck out here that he won't invade. he sticking my neck out here that he won't invade-— sticking my neck out here that he won't invade. he has certainly got everyone's _ won't invade. he has certainly got everyone's attention. _ won't invade. he has certainly got everyone's attention. he - won't invade. he has certainly got everyone's attention. he won't i everyone's attention. he won't invade, everyone's attention. he won't invade. he — everyone's attention. he won't invade, he won't _ everyone's attention. he won't invade, he won't invade - everyone's attention. he won't invade, he won't invade while l everyone's attention. he won't i invade, he won't invade while china has got these limits on, because they persuaded not to take him out they persuaded not to take him out the front page, but once that is over, i think the problem with invading is he shoots the hostage, and once you shoot the hostage, where do you negotiate? where are your levers of negotiation? we are getting bogged down in a war. that's what is basically saying to them. you are going to get back down and occupational war with your trading partners and means of financing
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everything shut the door to you. i mean, that is whatjohnson is saying in his article, it is absolutely right. in his article, it is absolutely riuht. ,, ., right. on the ft, kier starmer mentions _ right. on the ft, kier starmer mentions macron. _ right. on the ft, kier starmer l mentions macron. extraordinary right. on the ft, kier starmer i mentions macron. extraordinary long table there —— digby mentions. just briefly saying it's essential that the sovereignty, the integrity of ukraine of moldova, belarus are maintained, just briefly. just maintained, 'ust briefly. just briefl , maintained, 'ust briefly. just briefly. he _ maintained, just briefly. just briefly, he wants _ maintained, just briefly. just briefly, he wants to - maintained, just briefly. just briefly, he wants to be the prudent whisperer— briefly, he wants to be the prudent whisperer in the way that he was a trunrp _ whisperer in the way that he was a trump whisperer a few years ago. that didn't — trump whisperer a few years ago. that didn't end very well he's got an election — that didn't end very well he's got an election to fight in france in a couple _ an election to fight in france in a couple of— an election to fight in france in a couple of months' time. he wants to, and the _ couple of months' time. he wants to, and the world's attention and there has been _ and the world's attention and there has been a — and the world's attention and there has been a press conference this evening — has been a press conference this evening and put in was quite warm when _ evening and put in was quite warm when he _ evening and put in was quite warm when he said there has been a number of interesting or realistic ideas from _ of interesting or realistic ideas from an— of interesting or realistic ideas from an annual macron and we will call on _ from an annual macron and we will call on each — from an annual macron and we will call on each other again in short order— call on each other again in short order when— call on each other again in short order when he has come back from ukraine _ order when he has come back from ukraine because he will visit ukraine _ ukraine because he will visit ukraine soon, and macron. thank you for our ukraine soon, and macron. thank you for your brevity. _ ukraine soon, and macron. thank you for your brevity, henry. _
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ukraine soon, and macron. thank you for your brevity, henry. let's - ukraine soon, and macron. thank you for your brevity, henry. let's move i for your brevity, henry. let's move on to the mirror. waiting shame. this is about some 6 million people waiting for non—urgent operations, the government blaming the covid backlog whether there might be wrangle over money with the chatterley —— treasury. wrangle over money with the chatterley -- treasury. again, the - a - er chatterley -- treasury. again, the paper trying _ chatterley -- treasury. again, the paper trying to _ chatterley -- treasury. again, the paper trying to inflame _ chatterley -- treasury. again, the paper trying to inflame potential. paper trying to inflame potential tensions— paper trying to inflame potential tensions between downing streets and the treasury. it appears that rishi sunak— the treasury. it appears that rishi sunak is— the treasury. it appears that rishi sunak is not prepared to sign off on the prime _ sunak is not prepared to sign off on the prime minister's target forgetting waiting lists down unless they are _ forgetting waiting lists down unless they are much tougher and much tighter— they are much tougher and much tighter and they are not going to cost too — tighter and they are not going to cost too much because how do you get down? _ cost too much because how do you get down? at— cost too much because how do you get down? at 6— cost too much because how do you get down? at 6 million procedure with an awful— down? at 6 million procedure with an awful lot _ down? at 6 million procedure with an awful lot of— down? at 6 million procedure with an awful lot of money and not a lot of new staff — awful lot of money and not a lot of new staff and new equipments. rishi sunak— new staff and new equipments. rishi sunak is— new staff and new equipments. rishi sunak is not convinced that this plan _ sunak is not convinced that this plan such— sunak is not convinced that this plan such as why they have been delayed — plan such as why they have been dela ed. �* . plan such as why they have been dela ed. . ., ._ plan such as why they have been dela ed. . ., ., ., delayed. again, delayed again, diub , delayed. again, delayed again, digby. again. _ delayed. again, delayed again, digby, again, briefly, _ delayed. again, delayed again, digby, again, briefly, if- delayed. again, delayed again, digby, again, briefly, if you i delayed. again, delayed again, i digby, again, briefly, if you would, so many people suffering. i think one of those hidden effects of the
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pandemic. one of those hidden effects of the andemic. , �* , one of those hidden effects of the andemic. , ~ , ., ., ., , pandemic. yes. any government of any -a who pandemic. yes. any government of any party who has been _ pandemic. yes. any government of any party who has been dealing _ pandemic. yes. any government of any party who has been dealing with the i party who has been dealing with the last two years and the way of their response will have left an enormous waiting list in the nhs, and this is duly being delivered. it is not a tory issue, it would not have been a neighbour issue if it where the other way around —— labour issue. the government should not be judged on how quickly they get rid of it,, and that calls for more money, but it calls for better management it calls for better management of resources. it calls about good quality leadership within the organisation, and the nhs has always been brilliant on the front line, lousy in the back office, and at the moment, nothing is changing. no amount of money is going to start that out, what was her that it is better quality management, but where that paper and the labour leaning paper, where they are leading to try to accentuate the rift between rishi sunak and johnson, if you think about it, and and pms have always
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fallen out about when to spend always. after back in the day with jeffrey howe and nigel lawson, then you've got the infamous one of blair and brown. he had a and 0sborne. they've always... so i don't put any credence into that row, but what i do believe is that it could be the making of sajid javid, i think as health minister, he could actually really make his name and do something brilliant for the country. if he could actually get this sorted. that would be a flag for the country, it would also be a flag in the ground for him, it's an improvement in management as well as an increase. ., , improvement in management as well as an increase. , ., an increase. people say this all the time, so an increase. people say this all the time. so i — an increase. people say this all the time, so i cannot _ an increase. people say this all the time, so i cannot really _ an increase. people say this all the time, so i cannot really quickly, i. time, so i cannot really quickly, i remember— time, so i cannot really quickly, i remember a _ time, so i cannot really quickly, i remember a choice and diversity when the health _ remember a choice and diversity when the health secretary back in 1991, and every— the health secretary back in 1991, and every three years, there is a reconfiguration of the nhs, and age to sit on—
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reconfiguration of the nhs, and age to sit on the quality and diversity commitment —— committee on the time, and people _ commitment —— committee on the time, and people tearing their hair out constantly reconfiguring. yes. and people tearing their hair out constantly reconfiguring.- and people tearing their hair out constantly reconfiguring. yes. it is constantly reconfiguring. yes. it is constant chairman, _ constantly reconfiguring. yes. it is constant chairman, isn't _ constantly reconfiguring. yes. it is constant chairman, isn't it? its i constant chairman, isn't it? its constant chairman, isn't it? its constant churn, and there is the argument that some people would argue that labour invested more in the nhs when they were in power, thatis the nhs when they were in power, that is the argument that gets trotted out a lot of the time. that's also wrong. that's also factually inaccurate. but that's also wrong. that's also factually inaccurate. but that's the perception. _ factually inaccurate. but that's the perception, isn't _ factually inaccurate. but that's the perception, isn't it? _ factually inaccurate. but that's the perception, isn't it? the _ perception, isn't it? the perception. right, quickly. two more papers to do, so i need you to be as brief as you can, please. digby north sea oilfired up amid net zero row. what do you do a? to get rid of sets facile fuels or do you supply. the hundreds of men to people who watch us at half past ten would have seen you denying me the privilege of asking henry a question, and you said say that. disk asking henry a question, and you said say that-—
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asking henry a question, and you. said say that._ which said say that. ask it quickly. which is this. said say that. ask it quickly. which is this- why _ said say that. ask it quickly. which is this. why are _ said say that. ask it quickly. which is this. why are all _ said say that. ask it quickly. which is this. why are all the _ said say that. ask it quickly. which is this. why are all the green i is this. why are all the green saying leave it in the ground, shetland, scotland, north sea, and instead of fat, tell you what to do, why don't you go and buy it from something else to hurt your security, put yourself in a bad place, pollute the world as you bring it over and then still burn fossil fuel. bring it over and then still burn fossilfuel. why? why oh bring it over and then still burn fossil fuel. why? why oh why would you do that? the answer is, i think because it deals with the short—term issue of doing that, the long term call for net zero. the problem is we all know when the sun doesn't shine in the wind doesn't blow, we have a problem. and i love henry to tell me if he had to make his decision tonight in power, would he stop sticking it out the ground or would he allow us to stop hurting ourselves security of energy and polluting the world on the way through? i polluting the world on the way throu . h? ., polluting the world on the way throu~h? ., ., ,, ., . ., through? i would take the advice of the brightest _ through? i would take the advice of the brightest brains _ through? i would take the advice of the brightest brains around - through? i would take the advice of the brightest brains around me. i through? i would take the advice of. the brightest brains around me. that is a cowardly — the brightest brains around me. trisgt is a cowardly answer. the brightest brains around me. that is a cowardly answer. i _ the brightest brains around me. that is a cowardly answer. i don't - the brightest brains around me. that is a cowardly answer. i don't have i is a cowardly answer. i don't have the best part _ is a cowardly answer. i don't have the best part possible _
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is a cowardly answer. i don't have the best part possible data i is a cowardly answer. i don't have | the best part possible data in front of me _ the best part possible data in front of me right now, but if i did, i would — of me right now, but if i did, i would obviously, my priority would clearly _ would obviously, my priority would clearly be — would obviously, my priority would clearly be to secure the short—term needs— clearly be to secure the short—term needs of— clearly be to secure the short—term needs of the country. you have to if you are _ needs of the country. you have to if you are in _ needs of the country. you have to if you are in government. he clearly have _ you are in government. he clearly have to. _ you are in government. he clearly have to, because at the lights don't io have to, because at the lights don't go on. _ have to, because at the lights don't go on. and — have to, because at the lights don't go on. and i— have to, because at the lights don't go on, and i rememberthe three go on, and i remember the three day week— go on, and i remember the three day week in— go on, and i remember the three day week inthe— go on, and i remember the three day week in the early 705, just about old enough to remember that. in terms _ old enough to remember that. in terms of— old enough to remember that. in terms of heritage can i come from a country— terms of heritage can i come from a country in _ terms of heritage can i come from a country in west africa, where there is a phrase — country in west africa, where there is a phrase called light5 country in west africa, where there is a phrase called lights on and off. is a phrase called lights on and off the — is a phrase called lights on and off. the government is always under pressure _ off. the government is always under pressure if— off. the government is always under pressure if there is not a problem pre55ure if there is not a problem with the _ pre55ure if there is not a problem with the energy supply. it pressure if there is not a problem with the energy supply. it something that affect developing countries much _ that affect developing countries much worse. so clearly, that is a priority. — much worse. so clearly, that is a priority. but— much worse. so clearly, that is a priority, but the longer term, the resilience. — priority, but the longer term, the resilience, the frontier thinking, priority, but the longer term, the resilience, the frontierthinking, i thinking _ resilience, the frontierthinking, i thinking has to be in renewables. there _ thinking has to be in renewables. there will— thinking has to be in renewables. there will be jumps in a moment... there will bejumps in a moment... in a moment, there will be best from our director if we do not finish this last, how long have we got? 0ne this last, how long have we got? one minute 20. very quick. the times,
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lazy way to lose weight. very quickly, how does this work. apparently, if you go to bed in our at a quarter— apparently, if you go to bed in our at a quarter or so earlier, you will save _ at a quarter or so earlier, you will save yourself the equivalent of three _ save yourself the equivalent of three biscuits worth of calories or 270 calories, a lot of people, especially bigger people who are in this particular trial we are told to id this particular trial we are told to go to— this particular trial we are told to go to bed — this particular trial we are told to go to bed a bit earlier and if you io go to bed a bit earlier and if you go to— go to bed a bit earlier and if you go to bed — go to bed a bit earlier and if you go to bed late, you're hungry, you need. _ go to bed late, you're hungry, you need. you — go to bed late, you're hungry, you need, you go to that, you are not so hungry— need, you go to that, you are not so hungry and — need, you go to that, you are not so hungry and you sleep deeper and as a result— hungry and you sleep deeper and as a result of— hungry and you sleep deeper and as a result of that can you consume less calories _ result of that can you consume less calories and — result of that can you consume less calories and your are healthier because — calories and your are healthier because of it.— calories and your are healthier because of it.- if- calories and your are healthier because of it.- if i i calories and your are healthier because of it.- if i may| calories and your are healthier. because of it.- if i may say because of it. henry? ifi may say very quickly. _ because of it. henry? ifi may say very quickly, martin, _ because of it. henry? ifi may say very quickly, martin, i— because of it. henry? ifi may say very quickly, martin, i am - because of it. henry? ifi may say very quickly, martin, i am living l very quickly, martin, i am living proof that this works, because a few years ago, i actually 7/2 hours of sleep every night and i found i was losing some weight, and nothing else is changing. it was all him i was told him it was down to me sleeping longer and better. you told him it was down to me sleeping longer and better.— longer and better. you know what, we better aet longer and better. you know what, we better get going. _ longer and better. you know what, we better get going, because _ longer and better. you know what, we better get going, because we - longer and better. you know what, we better get going, because we are i longer and better. you know what, we better get going, because we are a i better get going, because we are a bit late to bed tonight can henry even more so. doing the papers is
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not going to do anything for your waistline, is a? but we are grateful to you. i waistline, is a? but we are grateful to ou. ., , ., to you. i will do my 5k in the hotel on the treadmill. _ to you. i will do my 5k in the hotel on the treadmill. it's _ to you. i will do my 5k in the hotel on the treadmill. it's cool. - to you. i will do my 5k in the hotel on the treadmill. it's cool. stay i on the treadmill. it's cool. stay away from _ on the treadmill. it's cool. stay away from the _ on the treadmill. it's cool. stay away from the biscuits - on the treadmill. it's cool. sta. away from the biscuits anyway, on the treadmill. it's cool. st
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feasibility study, costing almost 3 millions pounds, that the digital culture media and sport select committee chair julian knight called a waste of money on a "pipe dream" that was "doomed from the start". instead, the fas will focus on a joint bid for euro 2028. dan roan reports. it is known for passionate fans, great stadiums and top players. but today, uk and irish football abandoned hopes for a joint bid to host the 2030 world cups, more than half a century after wimbley staged the event, the five football associations confirmed that after a feasibility study, they would focus on the sport's second—biggest international tournament instead, hosting a euro offers a similar return on investment, carrying a far lower delivery cost and the potential of the benefits being realised sooner, they said. we believe the uk and the republic of ireland can offer uefa and european football something special in 2028. we work very closely
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with the sctoland republic of ireland, and england of course. to the england is an economic power with the amount of structures they have, but the discussions are very, there is a great energy between the associations. it's brilliant. we english love football. just imagine what we| can achieve together. the fa's campaign to bring about doing that in 2018 that in 2018 ended in humiliation. and today one of the ambassadors for that bid told me they were right to be cautious. the infighting between uefa and fifa, it's not anything we have seen before, i think the portuguese spanish bid was favoured as the european bed to go forward, there is no doubt that the scenes at wembley add to the euro final didn't do us any good at all. i think on those three reasons, it would've been very difficult for us to make a bid. wembley hosted eight matches that last year's euros including the final, but was marred by crowd
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trouble and something any world cup bid was always doomed. it's good to have ambition, but not pipe dreams. i really do think that it was a complete waste of money in order to have done this feasibility study. they could've done it in about 20 seconds and be told there was no hope. with impressive club grounds and stadiums to choose from, the british government had given financial backing to the idea of a joint world cup bid, but today said it accepted this was not the moment to proceed. it said it hoped to confirm support for a euros bid in the coming weeks. we know we have the infrastructure here, we have the it capacity, the transport, we have everything needed for a country to host. with england and scotland staging euro games last summer, the five nations bid is set to be the favourite when uefa
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makes its decision next year. those dreaming of a home world cup, however, the wait goes on. dan roan, bbc news. the everton manager frank lampard says he doesn't care what dele alli does or what he wears, as long as he "gives everything to produce". the former england manager glenn hoddle said alli looked like he'd been "dragged off the street" as he was unveiled as everton's new signing during saturday's fa cup tie with brentford. alli has moved to goodison park from tottenham hotspur, and lampard has defended his new recruit. i don't care what car he drives, what clothes he wears, as long as i get a lad that comes to training every day, wants to improve every day, respects the club, his team—mates and produces and give everything to produce. everyone has their own individual personality to try and handcuff that or restrict that i think would be detrimental, so as i say, as long as players have the right behaviours when it comes to football and doing the right things, i've got no worries. british men's number one, cameron norrie, has bounced back from his australian open first round exit with a victory over
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france's ugo humbert in rotterdam. the 26—year—old had a phenomenal 2021, unexpectedly climbing to the verge of the top ten and winning indian wells but incredibly that is his first win of 2022. he came through in straight sets seeing off the world number 41, 6—2 6—4. paul collingwood has been appointed the england men's cricket team interim head coach. he'll take charge for the three—match test series against west indies next month after chris silverwood left the role following england's 4—0 ashes defeat in australia. collingwood's been an assistant coach and led the team in their t20 series in the caribbean last month, which they also lost. the test squad will be announced tomorrow. team gb's mixed doubles curlers will have to settle for a bronze at best after losing their semi final at the winter olympics. bruce mouat and jen dodds started well in their match against norway, but the lead they established was wiped out on end 6 with norway scoring a crucial three points. they held on and won with the hammer on the eighth and final end claiming a 6—5 victory, with gb now heading to a bronze medal playoff
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against sweden tomorrow morning. i'm just really disappointed in my last three ends. i think that's going to be the toughest thing to get over. jen played amazing all day and i'm just disappointed more for what i've done to the team than myself. it's tough. and that's all the sport for now. from me and the rest of the team, bye—bye. hello there. we've got the battle of the air masses taking place this week, certainly for the next few days, we will have a north—south divide, much colder air across northern areas with some wintry showers. further south, it'll be very mild indeed for the time of year, and there will be some sunshine around. so, the dividing line between the cold air to the north and the mild air to the south is this weather front,
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which will be hanging around through central parts of the country throughout tuesday, so thicker cloud for northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, outbreaks of rain on this weather front. to the north of it, it's brighter with sunshine and blustery showers. these are wintry on the hills of scotland, and it will be windy here. further south, also quite breezy, but dry with sunny spells, a bit more cloud for wales and southwest england. a blustery day, as you can see across the board, but gusts will be reaching in excess of 50 mph across northern scotland into the northern isles. temperatures in single digits, to the north of the weather front to the south of it, 11 to maybe 14 celsius, so very mild indeed, particularly where you get the sunny spells. through tuesday night, that weather front hangs around through central areas, outbreaks of rain on it, slowly pushing southwards into england and wales, to the north of it, again, further snow showers. and these will be blustery, accumulating snow on the hills of scotland. very windy here, breezy in the south where it'll stay mild.
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so, into wednesday, then, that weather front slowly pushing its way southwards across england and wales. again, the mild air to the south of it, but more areas will be in the colder air on wednesday. so, that'll be scotland, northern ireland, northern england, perhaps north wales later in the day, plenty of snow showers across scotland. significant accumulations across the scottish hills, and it'll be very windy, gusts of 60 mph northern scotland. a breezy day to come for all, but our weather front will be bringing more cloud across southern england, south wales, where it'll remain very mild. the mild air eventually gets pushed out of the way as that weather front slips into the near continent. keeping an eye on this feature, this little low pressure which could bring severe gales and some snow to northern scotland on thursday, but then for friday, there is a ridge of high pressure building in to settle things down. so, it is turning colder for all into thursday. you can see single figure values there. it's chilly on friday, but light winds with some sunny spells and the return of overnight frost.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... in moscow, east meets west as russia and france discuss ways of defusing the military crisis brewing in ukraine. both sides say the talks were constructive. protestors in london harass opposition leader sir keir starmer, as borisjohnson faces more calls to withdraw a false accusation he made against him in the house of commons. horns honk. 0ttawa police face mounting criticism for not breaking up a truck drivers' anti—covid protest that's brought the canadian capital to a standstill. a world first for medicine, as doctors help

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