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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  February 8, 2022 5:00am-5:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. france's emmanuel macron moves onto kyiv — after discusing the tense situation on the ukraine—russia border with president putin in moscow. protestors in london harass opposition leader sir keir starmer as borisjohnson faces more calls to withdraw a false accusation he made against him in the house of commons. israeli police face allegations of using spyware against public figures — including aides of the former prime minister benjamin netanyahu. ottawa police face mounting criticism for not breaking up a truck drivers, anti covid protest — that's brought the canadian
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capital to a standstill. hollywood waits to hear which films are in the running for this year's oscars. kenneth branagh�*s �*belfast�* is expected to be among the nominations for a golden statuete. and the duchess of cambridge, will help send kids off to sleep as she becomes the first member of the royal faimily to read a bedtime story for the bbc cbeebies tv channel. hello and welcome . president emmanuel macron
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of france is visiting kyiv later today to meet ukraine's president. the latest in a series of western european leaders to lend him public diplomatic support given the continuing tense situation on the ukraine—russia border and nato's eastern flank. on monday mr macron held five hours of talks with president putin in moscow. the talks didn't resolve the crisis but the russian and french leaders both said there were points of agreement. paul adams reports. there were points of agreement. how are you? fine, just fine, how are you? fine, “ust fine, “ust how are you? fine, “ust fine, just fine. * how are you? fine, just fine, just fine. emmanuel- how are you? fine, just fine, just fine. emmanuel macronl just fine. emmanuel macron believes he _ just fine. emmanuel macron believes he can _ just fine. emmanuel macron believes he can prevent - just fine. emmanuel macron believes he can prevent war| just fine. emmanuel macron - believes he can prevent war and on the back of some phone calls, a face—to—face meeting in the kremlin. mr putin wants a historic agreement on the future of europe. we a historic agreement on the future of europe.— a historic agreement on the future of europe. we are aware toda , future of europe. we are aware today. both _ future of europe. we are aware today. both of _ future of europe. we are aware today, both of us, _ future of europe. we are aware today, both of us, of _ future of europe. we are aware today, both of us, of the - today, both of us, of the gravity of the situation and of the urgent and imperative necessity in the interests of everyone to find a path of peace and stability in europe.
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but now the focus is back on kyiv. emmanuel macron coming to the you capital to brief the government he on his talks in moscow and perhaps to reassure ukraine again that nothing is being done behind its back. it looks like we are supported. i mean, it looks like that, but we will see. the result is what matter, but we don't see it clearly yet. i matter, but we don't see it clearly yet-— matter, but we don't see it clearly yet. i think the west is suworting _ clearly yet. i think the west is supporting us _ clearly yet. i think the west is supporting us because i clearly yet. i think the west l is supporting us because they supply— is supporting us because they supply us with weapons. of course, _ supply us with weapons. of course, i_ supply us with weapons. of course, i would like them to supporters of the russians invaded _ supporters of the russians invaded but that is their business. if invaded but that is their business.— invaded but that is their business. . ., , business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says — business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says it _ business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says it is _ business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says it is ready, - ukraine says it is ready, carrying out drills in a region bordering russian annexed crimea. american officials say russia could launch an attack anytime but it's still not clear what vladimir intends to do. and while the world waits, ukraine's capital gets on with
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life. hoping as presidents, prime ministers and government officials, go that a war already eight years old will not escalate but end. paul adams, bbc news. britain's prime minister borisjohnson has condemned the harassment on monday of the labour leader sir keir starmer, near the houses of parliament. he was escorted to safety by police after shouts of �*traitor�* hurled at him, and someone can be heard shouting �*jimmy savile' — taken to be a reference to the false accusation made by borisjohnson — that sir keir had failed to prosecute the late tv personality savile for child sex offences when he was director of public prosecutions. in his statement mrjohnson made no reference to the accusation despite calls from senior aides and party colleagues for him to withdraw it in full. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports.
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this is not normal rough—and—tumble, but abuse and untrue accusations being hurled at the leader of the accusation — one false claim that he protected the paedophile jimmy savile. all shouting. keir starmer bundled to a police car. two arrests were made. it happened outside parliament, where, seven days ago, the prime minister made a false link between the two. look, i'm sure there were some people out there who already had conspiracy theories in their head, but the prime minister's given them a platform and permission, and that is tantamount to inciting them to these kind of horrific mobster activities. the prime minister wrongly suggested the labour leader had been involved in the decisions not to prosecute jimmy savile when he was the boss of public prosecutions. boris johnson clarified after an outcry, but he did not say sorry. a lot of people have got hot under the collar and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear, i'm talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp and i totally understand he had nothing to do personally
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with those decisions. the prime minister wrote online... but others in his own party want him to say much more. the former tory cabinet member julian smith said... there's no sign of that. borisjohnson�*s failure to apologise has already cost him one of his closest political confidants. munira mirza, who worked for the pm for more than a decade, quit last week in disgust. protests around here are nothing new — for or against brexit, anti—lockdown, pro—public anger. but the prime minister may find himself accused of stirring up unacceptable behaviour, just when number ten hoped to calm things down.
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laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. the israeli government has anounced an independent inquiry into reports that police illicitly used spyware against its own citizens, including aides of the former prime minister benjamin netanyahu. an israeli newspaper reported that police used a mobile phone hacking tool made by israel's nso group known as pegasus, to gather intelligence against ministers, mayors, journalists and even the prime minister's relatives without judicial warrants. israel's current prime minister naftali bennet said the public would get answers quickly. translation: regarding - the pegasus affair, the reports allegedly describe a very grave | situation, that is unacceptablej in a democratic state. these cyber tools were - designed to fight terrorism and serious crime, not to be used against citizens. - we will see to a transparent, quick and in—depth inquiry i because, all of us, citizens
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of the state of israel, - government ministers, - all establishments, deserve answers. let's get some of the day's other news the us have offered a reward of up to 10 million dollars for information leading to the identification or location of the leader of the islamic state militant group in afghanistan — sanullah gafari. washington believes he was behind the bomb attack on kabul airport last august. police in mexico say two french citizens and a german national are among the 8 victims of a bus crash near the resort city of cancun. 28 passengers were injured in the accident with 12 of them being in a serious condition in hospital. the bus was travelling from the city of merida to cancun when the crash happened. the us state department has added the former president of honduras, juan orlando hernandez, to a list of officials who will be refused entry to the united states. mr hernandez is accused of being involved in
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a drug trafficking ring. the canadian prime minister justin trudeau has said the ongoing protests in the capital ottawa against covid restrictions have got to stop. the city centre has been paralysed for twelve days now by hundreds of parked trucks. mr trudeau pledged he would send reinforcements. our correspondentjessica murphy sent this report from ottawa. they were told to get theirjab or get into quarantine, and this was the response. most canadian truck drivers crossing the border into the us regularly have already been vaccinated, but those who haven't are adamant they will never be, and their cause has fed into larger concerns over covid—i9 restrictions in canada, with thousands of supporters joining the truckers. the chaos prompted
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the city's mayor to declare a state of emergency. we have a serious emergency where we have to put all options on the table, and that may include some violence. we want to minimise that, but at the end of the day, if people will not leave, they will be forced to leave. but that warning has not stopped the 500 trucks from continuing their protest. it's important for me to come here and fight for my freedom. i don't want to be told what to do, to get an injection if i don't want to, to wear a mask if i don't want to. i don't want people telling me what to do. some of the businesses here downtown have closed and others say they've lost foot traffic. you can see behind me trucks going back blocks and barbecues and even bonfires. it's clear they plan to stay here for the long haul. residents say they're tired of the noise and disruption. today, a judge granted a ten—day injunction seeking to stop the truckers from honking their horns. i don't want them here, -
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they have no right to be here. they have done their protest. and they should have been sent home a long time ago. people and their shops, - we can't open because of them. police have tried to clamp down on fuel coming into the main protest area. for now, a gap remains between what the protesters want and what the government is willing to do. jessica murphy, bbc news, ottawa. a report by a police watchdog has found officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police ombudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmakers' shop and six other fatal shootings. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. ona on a wednesday afternoon in 1992 there was an act of sectarian carnage at this bookmaker shop. the loyalist group, the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five
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catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. at the weekend, they marked the 30th anniversary of the atrocity. it's not the people who walked in the book is 30 years ago, it's the people who put the guns in their hands and that they went and acted with impunity and were never prosecuted.— impunity and were never rosecuted. ,., ., ._ prosecuted. the report today identify significant _ prosecuted. the report today identify significant failures i identify significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the murders to the imperial war museum. the security forces had informers in the loyalist organisation who are involved in serious crimes, including murders. but police intelligence officers did not pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. the conflicts are largely ended later in the 19905, largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be
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investigated is complex and contentious and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government's planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces, that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. the nominations are about to roll in. hollywood waits to hear which films are in the running for this year's oscars. there's mr mandela, mr nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. iran's spiritual leader, ayatollah khamenei, has said he's passed a death sentence on salman rushdie, the british author of a book which many muslims say is blasphemous. the people of haiti have flocked to church to give thanks for the ousting of their former president,
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ba by doc duvalier. because of his considerable value as a stallion, - shergar was kept in a special secure box in the stud - farm's central block. shergar was driven away. in a horse box the thieves had brought with them. there stepped down from the plane a figure in mourning — elizabeth ii, queen of this realm and all her other realms and territories, head of the commonwealth, defender of the faith. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines.
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france's emmanuel macron moves onto kyiv — after discusing the tense situation on the ukraine—russia border with president putin in moscow. protestors in london harass opposition leader sir keir starmer — as borisjohnson faces more calls to withdraw a false accusation he made against him in the house of commons. in morocco the funeral has taken place of rayan, a five—year—old boy who spent five days trapped down a well. the boy had fallen down a narrow, 32—metre dry well last tuesday — sparking a complex digging operation to try to reach him, which gripped the world. aru na iyengar reports. the final journey for five—year—old rayan, whose plight touched a nation and reverberated around the arab world. hundreds of mourners came to the village in morocco's rural northern province to pay tribute. among them, rayan�*s father. the community coming together to give support.
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social media across the arab world has been flooded with messages of support for the community. grief, and praise for rescue workers. we will neverforget ourson, rayan. he will always be in our hearts. little rayan is not only the son of this village, but the child of the whole world. rescue crews using bulldozers mounted a huge operation to get rayan out stop crowds came to watch and thousands more are followed on social media. the opening to the well was just 45 centimetres wide, too narrow for rescuers to enter, so they dug a slope into the hill before carefully tunnelling towards rayan to avoid causing a landslide. on saturday night, crowds cheered as rescue workers finally reached rayan and pulled him out, but the joy turned to grief when it was announced that the boy was dead. king mohammed vi called rayan�*s
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to give condolences. pope francis and the french president, emmanuel macron, have also sent messages with the pope praising the beautiful sight of people gathered together to try to save a child. the boy's death has left moroccans in shock but there is thanks as well. thank you to the journalists, to the excavator drivers, to the people who helped us, to the people who came from all over morocco, from the arab world and every person he reached out to us. the area that was excavated is now being filled back. many here take strength from the good will showed by different faiths towards a defenceless boy in danger. the australian prime minister scott morrison has made a formal apology in parliament to brittany higgins — a former staffer who alleges she was raped in parliament house in 2019. ms higgins' allegations and complaints about the way she was treated afterwards,
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sparked an independent review into the workplace culture in parliament offices. i am sorry. we are sorry. i am sorry to miss higgins for the terrible things that took place here, in the place that should have been a place of safety and contribution which turned out to be a nightmare. awards season is upon us and in a matter of hours we'll find out which actors and filmmakers are nominated for this year's oscars. lady gaga could see a nomination in the best actress category for her role in �*house of gucci', while will smith is predicted to be in the lineup for the best actor award for �*king richard�*. this year, 10 films will be nominated for the academy�*s top category — best picture. among the favourites
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is sir kenneth branagh�*s powerful memoir of childhood �*belfast�*. he said it would get decided by christmas. when is he coming back? at the weekend. he is going to the pictures, he is taking us to titty titty bang bang. what is the name of god is that? it is a flying car. it goes over a cliff and you nearly fall out of your seat. do you want to come? it will be company for you. if god wanted had wanted me to seek flying cars he would have given me blinking wings. clayton davis is the awards editor at variety, hejoins me live now from los angeles. a warm welcome to the programme and i have to say of the films that are likely to be nominated, belfast is the one i�*ve seen and i�*ve thoroughly enjoyed it but give us your take on the likely nominees. belfast is definitely the favourite to be nominated and win the category and kenneth
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branagh, who wrote, directed and produced the film is likely to make history tomorrow and would be the first person who would be the first person who would have ever been nominated in seven different oscar categories, surpassing walt disney and george clooney howell have been nominated in six but some of the big favourites, june is likely to need with ten or 11 nominations and that�*s great for the science—fiction genre and it lead the tally —— dune. and the power of the dog from jane campion is another favourite and could do nine or ten dom —— nominations and she would be the first woman to be nominated as best director a second time as best director a second time as there is only ever been a women nominated for the category and to have one, and jane campion could join the fold and then on top of that we have west side story from steven spielberg who jane campion —based the first time
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around in the piano and schindler is list and he is expected to do very well for the actors, who is a favourite for best supporting actress. there is so much there and it is rich this year and all to play for, as you say. talk is through the process this time, the number of people voting is that much greater and is more diverse and this is the oscars trying to change, isn�*t it? yes. after the controversy the academy did the work of changing its membership and we saw the fruits of that when a record number of people of collars were nominated and nine out of the 20 acting spots were not filled by a purple —— a person of colour. but what is interested by the new diverse membership as it spans internationally so what is making it difficult for somebody like me to predict what will happen, we will see not the same people at parties
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because there are no parties going on now and there is no campaign event so we have to take into consideration what someone in europe is thinking about a film and how they will respond so something like drive my card, the japanese feature as a chance of breaking into best picture and director category because of that voting bloc that might really help out and the oscars have done their job in diversifying the membership and we are seeing that this year. figs membership and we are seeing that this year.— that this year. as you say, cuick that this year. as you say, quick to — that this year. as you say, quick to react _ that this year. as you say, quick to react in _ that this year. as you say, quick to react in a - that this year. as you say, quick to react in a way - that this year. as you say, quick to react in a way and they had to comment on the day in orderfor the oscars they had to comment on the day in order for the oscars to remain relevant now, but talk us through how it will work as we have the nominations today and what about the ceremony itself, do we know how it will roll amidst covid? the itself, do we know how it will roll amidst covid?— itself, do we know how it will roll amidst covid? the focus of the academy — roll amidst covid? the focus of the academy and _ roll amidst covid? the focus of the academy and it _ roll amidst covid? the focus of the academy and it should - roll amidst covid? the focus of the academy and it should be l the academy and it should be the academy and it should be the focus of all award shows is not the of your nominees and i think people are led to believe
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that people will tune in depending on the movies that will be nominated which is why there was such a big push to see something like spider—man be nominated which is likely not to happen but what the academy is focusing on is delivering a great show and they have tapped will packer, one of the great producers in hollywood and he will turn the show on its head and maybe throw the playbook. what we have seen as normal academy flair, we might see a fresh take and there is a tick—tock generation that we don�*t understand and they are consuming content and they watch movies differently and they watch on their phones versus a movie screen and while they are celebrating the movies they are celebrating the movies they will take the series is out of the ceremony and making fun while keeping traditions, so i�*m excited about what the show will look like but we don�*t know who will host and that will be the next big thing to drop in the next coming days. i
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to drop in the next coming da s. . . to drop in the next coming da 5. ., ., ., to drop in the next coming da s. . ., ., ., days. i am waiting to hear, clayton. — days. i am waiting to hear, clayton. but _ days. i am waiting to hear, clayton, but thank - days. i am waiting to hear, clayton, but thank you, - days. i am waiting to hear, i clayton, but thank you, thank you. see you soon, clayton davies from variety. children who watch and listen to the bbc�*s cbeebies bedtime stories in the uk have been used to celebrities like dolly parton, ryan reynolds and orlando bloom on their screens. and now they can look forward to a story read by the duchess of cambridge this weekend. tim muffett reports. the latest famous face to read the bedtime stories. this sunday, the duchess of cambridge will read the owl who was afraid of the dark byjill tomlinson as part of children�*s mental health week. tomlinson as part of children's mental health week.— tomlinson as part of children's mental health week. hello. my name is eddie. _ mental health week. hello. my name is eddie. ed _ mental health week. hello. my name is eddie. ed sheeran. - name is eddie. ed sheeran. hello, my _ name is eddie. ed sheeran. hello, my name _ name is eddie. ed sheeran. hello, my name is - name is eddie. ed sheeran. hello, my name is rees. i name is eddie. ed sheeran. i hello, my name is rees. reese withersraoon- — hello, my name is rees. reese witherspoon. hello, _ hello, my name is rees. reese witherspoon. hello, my- hello, my name is rees. reese witherspoon. hello, my name i hello, my name is rees. reese| witherspoon. hello, my name is tom. tom hardy, just a few of
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the household names who have previously signed up for the bedtime story. the duchess of cambridge has been a keen supporter of early years education. two years ago she was involved in the bbc�*s tiny, abbey people project. was involved in the bbc's tiny, abbey people project.- was involved in the bbc's tiny, abbey people project. abbey people pro'ect. about 9096 ofthe abbey people pro'ect. about 9096 of the adutt — abbey people pro'ect. about 9096 of the adult brain— abbey people project. about 9096 of the adult brain grows _ abbey people project. about 9096 of the adult brain grows before i of the adult brain grows before the age of five and it shows what a precious time this is and what an amazing opportunity asked parents have got to really nurture their minds. the theme of this _ really nurture their minds. the theme of this years children's theme of this years children�*s mental health week is growing together. the story read by the duchessis together. the story read by the duchess is about a baby barn owl who was helped by others to grow in confidence. her appearance also coincides with the 20th anniversary of cbeebies and cbbc. we have so
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much more of you here on the programme and all the top business stories and among them, bp reporting its latest results with its chief executive saying it can bring cash. i will see you soon. wintry showers and the south, it will be very mild for the time of year. and there will be some sunshine around. wintry on the hills of scotland and windy here and further south also breezy but dry sunny spells and a bit more cloud for
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wales and south—west england. a blustery day as you can see across the board but the gas will reach in excess of 50 miles an hour across northern scotland into the northern isles and temperatures in single digits but the north of the weather front, single digits but the north of the weatherfront, but single digits but the north of the weather front, but to the south of it, may be 11 or 1a degrees, so very mild particular way get sunny spells. the tuesday night the weather front hangs around three central areas and slowly pushing south into england and wales but to the north, further snow showers and these will be blustery and accumulating snow on the hills of scotland are very windy, breezy in the south where it will stay mild. into wednesday it will push southwards across england and wales and the mild air to the south but more areas will be in the colder air on wednesday so that will be scotland, northern ireland, may be north wales later in the day and plenty of snow showers across scotland and significant accumulations across the scottish hills and it will be very windy with gusts of 60 miles an hour in
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northern scotland. a breezy day for all but the weather front will bring more cloud across southern england and wales where it will remain very mild. the mild air eventually gets pushed out to where the weather front slips into the near continent and keeping an eye on this feature, this low pressure which could bring severe gales and snow to northern scotland through thursday but friday sees a ridge of high pressure settling things down so it will turn colder for all into thursday and we could see single figure values there but it�*s a chilly night on friday but lighter winds and some sunny spells and the return of overnight frost.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines. steeling the march — the us and japan iron out a new deal rolling back trump era tariffs on steel imports. a licence to print cash — that�*s what the boss of bp says as oil prices go up and up — the oil giant reveals its latest earnings in a few hours. big ambitions — the european union wants 20% of the global semiconductor market to be manufactured within the eu by 2030. and is this providing vital emotional support or an expensive toy? we look at the robotic pet market.

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