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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 8, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. after keir starmer is harassed by protesters shouting "jimmy savile" — fresh pressure on the prime minister to withdraw accusations he made against the labour leader last week. some of the poorest households are suffering most from the energy price hike. a warning that some customers on pre—payment meters are going without gas and electrcity. i look at why. a tale fit for a princess — the duchess of cambridge is to become the first royal to read a cbeebies bedtime story.
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from aberdeen to beijing. where it started for the youngest member of team gb in aberdeen. kirsty me or just missing out on a medal this morning. after nearly 50 years in the business, could there be a brit for abba? we'll look ahead to tonight's awards. rain across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england and to the north, sunshine and showers and cold, to the south, some sunshine and milder. all the details later. it's tuesday, the 8th of february, our top story. borisjohnson is under growing pressure to withdraw comments he made towards sir keir starmer, falsely accusing him of failing to prosecute the serial sex offender, jimmy savile. it comes after the labour leader was heckled by protesters over the issue outside parliament last night. two people have been arrested. political editor laura
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kuenssberg reports. this is not normal rough and tumble, but abuse and untrue accusations being hurled at the leader of the opposition. one false claim that he protected the paedophilejimmy savile. keir starmer bundled into a police car. to a police car. two arrests were made. it happened outside parliament, where the prime minister made a false link between the two. i sure there were some people out there who already had conspiracy theories in their head, but the prime minister has given them a platform and permission, and that is tantamount to inciting to inciting them to these kind of horrific mobster activities. the prime minister wrongly suggested the labour leader had been involved in the decisions not to prosecute jimmy savile when he was the boss of public prosecutions. borisjohnson clarified after an outcry, but he did not say sorry. a lot of people have got hot under the collar and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear. i am talking not about the leader
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of the opposition�*s personal record when he was dpp, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. the prime minister wrote online... but others in his own party want him to say much more. a former tory cabinet member, julian smith, said... there is no sign of that. boris johnson's failure to apologise has already cost him one of his closest political confidantes. munira mirza, who worked for the pm for more than a decade, quit last week in disgust. protests around here are nothing new. for or against brexit, anti—lockdown, pro—public anger.
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but the prime minister might find himself accused of stirring up unacceptable behaviour. just when number 10 looked to calm things down. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. you heard laura talking about quieting down but it sounds like it will be a noisy week for the prime minister. it will be a noisy week for the prime minister. . , will be a noisy week for the prime minister. ., , ., , ., minister. it really does and it matters because _ minister. it really does and it matters because we - minister. it really does and it matters because we are - minister. it really does and it| matters because we are eight minister. it really does and it - matters because we are eight days on from borisjohnson making the false allegation in the commons and since then we have had the deputy prime minister defending him saying it is part of the cut and thrust of politics and we have had the chancellor saying he would not have used the remarks. we have seen the loss of one of the prime minister's long—standing advisers. yesterday, the health secretary, sitting here talking to breakfast, about how he hoped things would now move on from the allegation borisjohnson made. what we know from what happened in
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westminster last night is that will not happen. this row is burning again and there will be further pressure on the prime minister to say more than he said in his tweet last night. yes in his tweet he condemned those who were abusing circular starmer, but he did not say sorry, and he did not withdraw his originalfalse sorry, and he did not withdraw his original false allegation. sorry, and he did not withdraw his originalfalse allegation. i sorry, and he did not withdraw his original false allegation. i think given that, you will see critics in the party and on the labour benches continuing to press him to change his outlook. it falls into the pot marked boris johnson's future. his outlook. it falls into the pot marked borisjohnson�*s future. that is a bubbling pot and has been for some time and will continue to be as a result of what happened last night. emmanuel macron has said the coming days will be crucial to de—escalating the ukraine standoff, after a meeting with russia's vladimir putin. the french president will continue diplomatic talks later, with a visit to kyiv to meet the president of ukraine. paul adams reports.
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how are you? fine, just fine, how are you? emmanuel macron believes he can prevent war. on the back of several phone calls, a face—to—face meeting in the kremlin. the french leader says mr putin wants an historic agreement on the future of europe. translation: we are aware today, both of us, _ of the gravity of the situation. and of the urgent and imperative necessity, in the interests of everyone, to find a path of peace and stability in europe. but now the focus is back on kyiv. mr macron coming to ukraine's capital to brief the government here on his talks in moscow and, perhaps, to reassure ukraine once again that nothing is being done behind its back. translation: it looks like we are supported. | i mean, it looks like that, but we will see. the result is what matters, but we don't see it clearly yet. translation: | think -
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the west is supporting us. because they supply us with weapons. of course i'd like them to support us if the russians invade. but that's their business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says it's ready, carrying out drills in a region bordering russia—annexed crimea. american officials say russia could launch an attack any time. but it is still not clear what vladimir putin to do. and while the world waits, ukraine's capital gets on with life. hoping as presidents, prime ministers and government officials come and go, that a war already eight years old will not escalate, but end. pauladams, bbc news, kyiv. a report by a police watchdog has found officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police ombudsman examined the killings
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of five catholics at a bookmaker�*s shop and six other fatal shootings. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an active sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. at the weekend, they marked the 30th anniversary of the atrocity. it is not the people who walked in the bookies 30 years ago, it's the people who put the guns in their hands and the people allowed to act with impunity, and were never ever prosecuted. the report published today identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the murders to the imperial war museum. the security forces had informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in serious crimes, including murders. but police intelligence officers
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didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious, and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. up to a third of uk children consume at least one energy drink a week while some are having them almost daily, according to new research. the study commissioned by the department of health and social care found that drinking too many could lead to headaches and sleep problems. high consumption is also linked to worse educational outcomes. the uk government says it will soon be banning sales of energy drinks to children.
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websites that publish pornography will be legally required to verify the age of their users under new plans announced by the government. ministers say the draft online safety bill will be strengthened to include the measure, which would also see sites fined or blocked if they failed to act. cbeebies bedtime stories has made its first royal signing. the duchess of cambridge will take on her new role this week, settling down with a book to raise awareness on children's mental health. the duchess joins a host of famous faces, as tim muffett reports. the latest famous face to read the cbeebies bedtime story. this sunday, the duchess of cambridge will read the owl who was afraid of the dark byjill tomlinson as part of children's mental health week. cbeebies bedtime story. hello, my name's ed. ed sheeran.
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hello, my name is reese. reese witherspoon. hello, my name's tom. tom hardy. just a few of the household names who have previously signed up for the bedtime story. hi. hello. the duchess of cambridge has also been a keen supporter of early years education. two years ago, she was involved in the bbc�*s tiny happy people campaign, which was aimed at developing children's communication skills. sort of 90% of our adult brain grows before the age of five. and itjust shows what a precious time this is and what an amazing opportunity us as parents have got to really nurture their minds. the theme of this year's children's mental health week is "growing together". the story read by the duchess is about a baby barn owl who is helped by others to grow in confidence. her appearance also coincides with the 20th anniversary
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of cbeebies and cbbc. the duchess is reading air on sunday at 6.50pm. i have had a spillage. i might have ruined my time. what is it? it is a foreign liquid. let's not speculate. good morning. good morning to you. while we have a weather front draped across central parts of the country, that is the dividing line between mild air in the south and cold air further north. producing cloud and rain, the rain not heavy. to the north, sunshine and showers and some of the showers will be wintry mostly on the hills in the north. gusty winds, to gale force at times in the western
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isles and to the south, cloud. cloud in wales and south—west thick enough for drizzle, but brighter skies in the south—east. the black circles representing the strength of the wind gusts. strongest in the north and west and here it will be coldness. these temperatures still above average for the time of year. further south, above average for the time of year. furthersouth, back above average for the time of year. further south, back into mild conditions. this evening and overnight the rain peps up particularly across north—west england and the pennines and to the south, cloudy, some clear skies. to the north, strong winds, gusting to gale force in the northern and western isles and far north—west of scotland. the wintry showers to low levels. we could see some developed into quite a few centimetres in the highlands and even more on the highest ground. tomorrow, a similar story. still some wintry showers at
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lower levels in the north of scotland and gusty winds and with exposure we could see gusts up to 70 mph. as the weather front move south, colderair mph. as the weather front move south, colder air follows mph. as the weather front move south, colder airfollows in behind. holding onto milder conditions in the far south. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the situation is unacceptable. one study found that black women are 40% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. here's our global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar h ea rtb eats that cherished sound. your longed—for ba by�*s heartbeat. isabel is expecting a baby boy next month. can you see your baby's face? feeling emotional.
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just trying to contain myself. just can't help being more than happy. it has been a difficult journey for you guys? yes, it has been a very turbulent time. they lost their previous pregnancy at four months last march. this baby is doing well and they are being supported by staff at this specialist recurrent miscarriage clinic in coventry. but the care they received during their previous pregnancy and subsequent miscarriage has left isabel scarred for life. the day that we were sure there was something wrong, and i remember being laughed at from one of the staff nurses saying, "just go home, why do you keep coming?" just take, you know, codeine and paracetamol. you'll be fine. i was actually losing fluids and bleeding at the time.
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within 48 hours of going home, isabel started bleeding heavily. she was rushed to hospital but her baby boy died. and why do you feel you weren't listened to, you weren't heard? the colour of my skin. you know, black skin, she is not from here, you can wait. there is very little doctors can do to save a baby at this stage in pregnancy. but the feeling of not being listened to is what has stayed with isabel. judah, wakey wakey. more than 100 miles away, in hornchurch in essex, natasha cradles littlejudah. she experienced eight miscarriages before his arrival, including a late loss almost five months into her pregnancy. hello. everything is supposed to be ok. no one tells you your waters are going to break early.
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so that was a massive shock to me. and then to lose a baby and have to bury a baby, that was just unimaginable. natasha says she also didn't feel heard by some clinicians and says urgent research is needed to understand what's going on. natasha says she also didn't feel heard by some clinicians and says urgent research is needed to understand what's going on. we have been given the problem, we have been told about the problem, but we haven't been given a solution. we are in a western country, we are in 2022, and we don't have a solution to that. we don't even know what the steps are or the reason why. it is just really frustrating. i have come to queen charlotte's and chelsea hospital here in west london, which sees many black and ethnic minority patients, to try to get a better understanding of why black women are at higher risk of having a miscarriage, whether they have underlying health conditions or not, and no matter and no matter what their social, economic or educational background. why does a woman's skin colour affect her chances of having a healthy baby?
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dr ekechi runs the early pregnancy unit here. she is also co—chair of the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists' race equality task force. unfortunately, black women have a number of factors associated with the risk of miscarriage overrepresented. so, for example, they are more likely to have a number of conditions that puts them at greater risk of miscarriage. but, really, on a more significant level, what we hear time and time again is that black women never feel heard in this space. without addressing the institutional racism where it exists, we will never be able to truly say that all women receive the care that they so deserve. professor quenby runs the recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital coventry. a lot of the patients are understandably very anxious because of their previous pregnancy losses. she is also a leading researcher in this field.
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she is currently trying to get funding to investigate some of the many unknowns around why black women are at higher risk, including looking into any potential biological factors. we know for example if you are black and asian, then you handle glucose less well, so we know you are much more at increased risk of gestation or diabetes. of gestational diabetes. we also know that the balance of bacteria in your vagina is different in black and asian women to white women and we know an imbalance in the bacteria in the vagina has been associated with miscarriage and preterm birth. so that is another area we can look at. there is clearly a myriad of complex and difficult issues at play here. but the longer we don't have answers to some of these key questions, the longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly. one idea professor quenby and her team is already working on is an app where women will be able to input their clinical details like ethnicity, weight and whether they have had any previous miscarriages.
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they will then get specific evidence—based advice on how to lower their risk of loss. the black maternal health charity five times more is also carrying out training at maternity units with staff now wearing badges to reassure women that they will be heard. he has never been before. it is going to be interesting. natasha and her husband jay say despite their harrowing experiences of loss, they feel like one of the lucky ones. they say women deserve to understand their specific risks during pregnancy and also to simply feel heard. just seeing him is just a joy. sheerjoy. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian's front page is one of many to feature the labour leader, sir keir starmer, being supported by police after he was confronted by protesters outside parliament. the paper says mps from all sides have "angrily rounded
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on borisjohnson" after he falsely claimed that sir keir failed to prosecute the serial sex offenderjimmy savile. the prime minister has called the abuse directed at sir keir "absolutely disgraceful". the times carries borisjohnson�*s warning to russia that invading ukraine would only strengthen nato — the military alliance which president putin considers a security threat. the telegraph carries a story about a weekly weight—loss injection which is expected to be available via nhs prescription to address britain's obesity epidemic. and the daily mail says the duchess of cambridge is a tv natural, as she becomes the first royal to read a cbeebies bedtime story. the paper also reports that prince charles will live at buckingham palace when he becomes king. she may be a tv natural, but i do not imagine she needs to be.
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she has other stuff on. where else would prince charles live? 0f would prince charles live? of course at buckingham palace. but the queen does not live at buckingham palace. good point, very good point. that is me shut up. iam me shut up. i am sorry. she lives at windsor. i will share something with you this morning. i would live at buckingham palace if i would live at buckingham palace if i were king. i were king. i think you would live at buckingham palace even if you could. a gorgeous picture of port isaac. if you watched doc martin week you will —— doc martin, you will know this. the seawall, if it is not maintained, the village could be under threat, so work going on to make sure that does not happen and the village is protected. we have some nice pictures, in the daily telegraph. the headline...
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flame—enco. this is a festival celebrated by women. it says where the menfolk are pushed to the background and the town becomes the women's for the day. and on a fiery theme, beautiful pictures of sunrises across the uk. that is padstow. scarborough. and a beautiful one in cumbria. i am sure carroll has some gorgeous pictures coming your way. we have had beautiful sunrises recently. i will ask why that is. time of year? cloud coverage? where does the queen live? why is there sunlight? it is called the sun.
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in september last year, we introduced you to three dads — mike, andy and tim — who embarked on a 300—mile walk in memory of their daughters, who all took their own lives. after crossing the finishing line, they set their sights on their next mission — to see suicide prevention taught in schools, and will meet the government today to discuss their campaign. abi smitton reminds us of theirjourney. tim, andy and mike. brought together through grief. each dad lost a daughter — emily, sophie and beth — to suicide. determined to help and prevent otherfamilies from going through the same, they set off on a 300—milejourney. walking the distance between their homes in cumbria, manchester and norfolk, their story touched many people along the way.
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in 2019, i lost my daughter, tasha's little sister, katrina. i've recently lost my daughter to suicide, and ijust need to understand why. i'm a member of the same club. i lost a daughter, nikki, - when she was 19, back in 1987. the donations rolled in, including from daniel craig and nicole kidman, who each gave £10,000. the three dads smashed their original £30,000 target. battered and bruised, they crossed the finish line. so far, they've raised nearly £1 million for charity. the goal now is to get people talking and opening up as soon as possible. we've raised the awareness — we need to do something with that awareness, something positive. you know we've written to the government to try and get suicide prevention incorporated into the pshe syllabus,
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because if you're taught about suicide prevention when you are 11, 12, 13 that's going to stay with you for the rest of your life. so that will have a knock—on effect to reducing adult suicide figures, i'm sure. they started out as three dads walking — now hoping to turn their tragedy into a positive step for the future. abi smitton, bbc news. we'll be speaking to andy, tim and mike at 8.10 this morning. if you've been affected by any of the issues discussed, please visit bbc action line forsupport, by searching bbc.co.uk/actionline time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london — i'm alison earle. transport for london says it may be forced to close major road junctions and cut bus and tube services
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unless a long term funding deal is secured. brent cross flyover is one of six structures in the capital at risk of closure, as it needs millions of pounds in repairs. the government says it's working towards a "robust" financial settlement. if services become less reliable, if there are fewer tube services, if the bus service is cut by up to 18%, then obviously people are going to have far less confidence in the reliability of the public transport system and, inevitably, they will end up having to find alternatives, which of course include private car use. congestion will increase, air quality will reduce. environmental activists who held protests on the m25 and other major roads last year have said "they failed" in their mission. insulate britain wanted to persuade the government to improve homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. in a statement, the group said it would come back "even more ambitious". the national police chiefs' council, urged them to "highlight their cause in a reasonable manner".
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west ham defender kurt zouma has apologised after a video appeared to show him kicking and slapping a cat. in the clip, which appeared on social media, the 27—year—old is also seen throwing a pair of shoes at the pet. he said there are no excuses for his behaviour, which he sincerely regrets. his club said it does not condone animal cruelty. travel now — this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are severe delays on the district line between wimbledon and edgware due to a signalfailure. there are minor delays clockwise on the circle line. and minor delays on the hammersmith and city line. on to the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, a warm front went through, introducing some milderfeeling air. and we are set to stay with those mild conditions as we head through the next couple of days or so before, on wednesday evening, a cold front sinks southwards — that could give us a few spots of rain and it will bring us the chilly air back in time
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for the end of the working week. but lots of blue sky and sunshine, and we will see a return to the night—time frosts. other than that, it's a fairly quiet week of weather ahead. it's not as blustery as it was last week, and it will be dry or mostly dry. now, this morning it's a mild start to the day, 7 or 8 celsius. plenty of cloud around today but also some bright and some sunny spells emerging at times. a bit more of a westerly wind than we saw yesterday, but not as windy as it was over the weekend. top temperatures this afternoon all the way up to 13 or 1a celsius — so, very mild for this time of year. now, through this evening and overnight, in all of that mild air, temperatures probably won't drop much below 8 or 9 degrees for many of us. lots of cloud around. it's a mild day again on wednesday, plenty of cloud too. a few spots of rain with that cold front on wednesday night. and more sunshine on thursday, but a frosty start to friday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. hello... go on, then! this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... "bastille" will be here to tell us about their brand—new album — a celebration of us all being able to get back out onto the dance floor. it launched the careers of kylie minogue and margot robbie — but "neighbours" could finally be facing the axe. we'll be looking back on nearly four decades of life on ramsay street, with one of its former stars. and sheridan smith stars in new thriller "no return", about a dream holiday that turns into a nightmare.
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we'll talk to its bafta—award—winning writer — danny brocklehurst. to remember song from the wedding? more important things... last week the regulator ofgem raised the energy price cap, so that from april most households on a default tariff, with average usage, will pay nearly £2,000 a year for their energy. but spare a thought for those customers on pre—payment meters — they're often from the poorest households. they will be paying even more than that for their energy. nina has been taking a look. it's not great, and this has been a long—running issue, that people who are often progressed, his struggle to manage their finances on prepayment metres can't access those good direct debit deals and it's even more pronounced after the news last week of those soaring prices. we talked about the
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you will remember last week we talked about the price cap about the price cap going up and adding an extra £700 to the average default energy tariff bill. that's a lot. but not as much as those who use pre—payment meters. they're often used in households which have slipped in to debt. because you pay in advance, by topping up with a card or token, it's seen as a better way of managing budgets and stopping from falling behind. about a.5m homes in england, scotland and wales have a prepayment meter. and these customers are protected by a different energy price cap. but look what happened last week when the cap was raised. so while households with average usage on a default tariff — paying by direct debit — were told their bill would go up to about £1,971, those on prepayment meters were told their rise would be even higher — going up to £2,017. a bigger rise and a higher total. the regulators say this reflects the extra costs incurred with prepayment metres. and the government points
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to the £350 in support immediately offered to most households. but some say it's not enough, and is not targeted at those who need it most. as my colleague colletta smith has been finding out. jenny pays for her gas and electricity in advance. it is all done through an app now — topping up her meter in regular small chunks. that careful budgeting has helped her work her way out of debt and get the family back on two feet. but being a prepayment customer means she is charged the highest rate for her energy. where £10 could have lasted three, four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget, because you think, hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and now i've just checked and i've
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only got seven left. surely it should be this. and you are watching the balance go down and you are thinking, there is nothing i can do. when that goes, there is no electric, there is no gas. the regulator says it understands it is very difficult for prepayment customers, but they have to let companies charge more because it costs more to run a prepayment system. the government have announced extra money to soften the latest price cap rise. but the boss of the biggest dedicated prepayment company says it is not the right kind of support to help his customers. the measures that they announced in total is probably about right, it is just not targeted enough. it needs to be targeted on the 7—8 million households who are going to be really stretched, rather than subsidising everybody�*s energy consumption. how is that going to work for prepay customers, then? customers do all kinds of things,
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particularly in the rented sector. and you will potentially be putting a debt on a prepaid meter. possibly one person gets the benefit of the £200 subsidy, they then change tenancy and somebody else ends up picking up the bill for the a0 quid, and that's not fair. utilities' figures show that more customers are running out of money in their accounts than ever before. charities helping the most vulnerable say they expect that will get worse when this latest price rise kicks in. if you are on monthly billing and you are struggling financially, that day you can still turn on your light and the light will come on, whereas if you don't have money to put in the meter, there is no access to power that day. so i have often gone into people's homes and found that the lights are off, the houses are cold because they are having to wait until pay day a few days away until they are able to have access to any energy. most people don't tend to choose to be on a prepayment meter
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and if you have debt on the meter, you can't opt out of that. so people do feel quite stuck on it, as well. there are some safety nets for customers likejenny, as the major suppliers do have emergency funding available. but those with the least will be charged the most for their energy in the months ahead. colletta smith, bbc news, manchester. the government told us that its £9 billion package of measures to help consumers will benefit lower income households the most, as a proportion of their net income. it also confirmed plans to expand eligibility for the warm home discount by almost a third, which will benefit thousands of pre—payment energy customers across the country. that's what the government told us. if you are on a low income, and think you might qualify, the advice is to talk to your energy provider.
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they are legally obliged to advise you on that. and if you are on a prepayment metre and you just don't have the money to top up, they are obliged to offer an emergency credit scheme and then a realistic and sustainable prepayment plan for paying it back. but overall, the criticism is, why is every household getting this £200 loan instead of targeting at households likejenny�*s you need at the most? people literally having to think about turning off gas and electricity. nobody can turn off your gas and electricity without offering a long—term solution that is manageable for both. over the course of the pandemic, ambulance services across the uk faced some of their busiest ever periods. to relieve some of the pressure on hospitals, it's hoped paramedics with extra training can instead treat more people at home. a warning that this report from marc ashdown contains flashing images. 2021 has been the busiest year for the london ambulance service.
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we received into our control room is 2.1 million calls, emergency calls. in addition to that, we attended just over 1.1 million face—to—face incidents. that's fine, we are organising some help. just stay on the phone with me. it's vital, then, that resources are deployed efficiently to try to give patients the best outcomes. my name is agatha. but i'm called aggie. she is an advanced paramedic practitioner. the role requires extra training, and they carry more kit and medicine than a standard ambulance. we can collect you're in samples, we can do a urinary dipstick test. we also have pregnancy tests. we also have point of care blood testing. we can close certain wounds at home, apply specialist dressings, and prevent the person from going to hospital and being treated at hospital. we can provide that treatment. it is often more beneficial for patients to be treated at home,
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and we try to accommodate that as best we can. yes, this is a call. category three call. it's extremely important to keep people outside of the emergency department if they are not required to going. around about 80% of the patients they see in the home stay—at—home or go to an alternative pathway rather than going through to the emergency department. could be a variety of patients, a variety of conditions. illnesses, there also could be injuries, minor injuries and minor ailments. could you tell me what seems to be the problem? aggie's being called to a young lady, who we agreed not to film. she called 999 for an ambulance, but maybe aggie can help instead. around four, five i started coughing really bad, and then i had shortness of breath. yeah. and it wasn't stopping and my chest felt very tight and heavy and uncomfortable. yeah. success — after some tests, she's ok, and crucially doesn't need to go to hospital. if you've been having this back pain for a couple of weeks now, -
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it might be worth you talking to your gp _ the advanced paramedics also do shifts in the control room, which helps them understand the role from all sides. in the control room, my role is to screen| the calls that come _ through to the london ambulance service, call the patients back, do an advanced triage on themj and then screen the calls to see j if we can dispatch and advanced paramedic in urgent care to try and keep the patients - at home and try and treat them in the community. i back in the car, aggie has another call. my colleague in the emergency control centre spoke to this person. they screened the call and they deemed it suitable for me to attend. so i'm not going to put it too tight. no, that's all right, love, don't worry. as i told you, where there is no dent, there's no feeling. a lot better and easier, _ because i had visions of her having to go up to the hospital, wait in a&e with mum, i and then her may be getting out|
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later tonight, so it's a lot better. i used to drive and jitterbug and, oh, you name it, i done it! could have been hospital, yes. the lady had a fall. but i was able to assess the injury and deem it a soft tissue injury. i was able to provide support and give advice, how to deal with it at home. after two years of intense pressure, things are returning to normal — and these new ways of working are helping too. i've been working for the london ambulance service now for almost 13 years, and i really love myjob, i am really proud. we are still exceptionally busy. it is certainly worth remembering to try and use us wisely when you need to use an emergency ambulance. marc ashdown, bbc news. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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we spoke earlier about why the sun rises are so spectacular, and i said i would ask carol. carol, dan said to me that the reason is because of the sun! ~ , ., to me that the reason is because of the sun! ~ , . �* , to me that the reason is because of the sun! ~ , . 2 ., ., the sun! well, yeah, he's got a oint. the sun! well, yeah, he's got a point- we _ the sun! well, yeah, he's got a point- we got _ the sun! well, yeah, he's got a point. we got clear _ the sun! well, yeah, he's got a point. we got clear skies - the sun! well, yeah, he's got a point. we got clear skies at - the sun! well, yeah, he's got a| point. we got clear skies at the moment for some of us as well and we are seeing these beautiful colours, and it is lovely, you are quite right, but there's a lot of weather to get on with. today we have a north—south split. in the north it will be cold, in the south it will be mild. if you arejust will be cold, in the south it will be mild. if you are just stepping out, these are the temperatures you can expect. if i was showing you these as our afternoon maximum temperatures they would not be far off what you would expect at this stage in february. so a mild start, a mild day for many. there is a
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weather front across northern england, southern scotland, producing some outbreaks of rain. to the north of that we have wintry showers mostly on the hills, gusty winds across the north and west, and to the south we are looking at some sunny skies but also at times quite a bit of cloud, and that is producing drizzle in wales and the south—west. weather you are it will be breezy. temperatures up to 1a today, about six in stornoway. through this evening and overnight, the rain picks up across north—west england and the pennines, some snow showers getting down to sea level across northern scotland, a few centimetres possible. more than that on the hills. and again, gales across the far north and west. to the south, still in the mild air, to the south, still in the mild air, to the north wearing cold air, so they could be eyes to watch out for in the morning. during wednesday, he was the weather front, it pushes slowly southwards, more of us will be in the cold air, and you can see
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it is still windy, possibly severe gales especially with exposure across the north and west. snow showers again down to low levels across the north of scotland. more than that on l's. further south, some cloud and also hanging on to the higher temperatures. but it's not going to last because wednesday night into thursday, there goes the weather front, night into thursday, there goes the weatherfront, we night into thursday, there goes the weather front, we are all in the cold air and keeping a keen eye on this low pressure. that area of low pressure is likely to bring in strong winds, possibly even severe gales cross the far of scotland as it tracks across. it will also bring in some snow, down to sea level, across parts of scotland. we could have blizzard conditions hills. further south, a lot of dry weather, some sunshine and a few showers. some of the showers will be wintry as we come across northern
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ireland, northern ireland, northern england, north wales, possibly some getting down into the midlands. but the wintry nurse will mostly be in the wintry nurse will mostly be in the hills. on thursday, it will be cold wherever you are, certainly compared to the first part of this week. thank you for explaining that for us! thank you, carol. let's get the sport now, and john is on the slopes in aberdeen this morning. good morning. swap the ice for the snow this morning, the dry slopes of adventure aberdeen snow sports, where it all began for a three—year—old kirsty muir, the 17—year—old who was in action in the winter olympics overnight in the freestyle ski event, the big air final. and if you are not familiar
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with kirsty muir, i think you will be over the coming weeks and years because she is a superstar in the making. she narrowly missed out on a medal overnight having qualified with a final yesterday. this is how she did it, she put down a really impressive opening jump. you are marked on the tricks and twists and spins you produce off that huge jump. then she lay down a solid second, but to get into those medal places she had to go for it on her third jump, places she had to go for it on her thirdjump, she places she had to go for it on her third jump, she went for it, couldn't quite manage the landing. she finished fifth on her olympic debut, in a sport making its olympic debut, in a sport making its olympic debut, which is incredible when you consider she is the youngest team gb athletes competing in beijing. all the more impressive when you consider she isjuggling the more impressive when you consider she is juggling this alongside her exams. this is her head teacher here in aberdeen. i also have one of her first coaches.
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mike, where all waking up to the brilliance of this young girl, but you have probably it first—hand. firstly we are enormously proud of what _ firstly we are enormously proud of what she has done, it shows resilience _ what she has done, it shows resilience and commitment to what she is_ resilience and commitment to what she is doing. but she is a tremendous young person who just wants_ tremendous young person who just wants to _ tremendous young person who just wants to work hard and get things done, _ wants to work hard and get things done, she — wants to work hard and get things done, she is quite unassuming in the way she _ done, she is quite unassuming in the way she does all that. i done, she is quite unassuming in the way she does all that.— way she does all that. i think you can see that in _ way she does all that. i think you can see that in her— way she does all that. i think you can see that in herjumps. am i l can see that in herjumps. am i right in saying she has exams coming up right in saying she has exams coming up and she's had to take her school books with her to beijing as she prepares for her end of school exams? ~ , ,., , prepares for her end of school exams? ~ ,,., , , prepares for her end of school exams? ~ , , , exams? absolutely, she has been doin: that exams? absolutely, she has been doing that for _ exams? absolutely, she has been doing that for the _ exams? absolutely, she has been doing that for the past _ exams? absolutely, she has been doing that for the past four - exams? absolutely, she has been doing that for the past four years | doing that for the past four years since _ doing that for the past four years since we — doing that for the past four years since we had meetings with team gb about— since we had meetings with team gb about planning her school work alongside her training and competitions. she is used to all of that _ competitions. she is used to all of that. basicallyjust the laptop will do that— that. basicallyjust the laptop will do that and it gives her time to get on with— do that and it gives her time to get on with her— do that and it gives her time to get on with her lessons. she has really benefited — on with her lessons. she has really benefited from all the online work we've _ benefited from all the online work we've been doing over the last few years _ we've been doing over the last few years i_ we've been doing over the last few
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years. i think it's one of the slim benefits— years. i think it's one of the slim benefits we've had of having to go into lockdown and do the learning online _ into lockdown and do the learning online. but she has been tremendous all the _ online. but she has been tremendous all the way— online. but she has been tremendous all the way through and has made sure she — all the way through and has made sure she has been successful, she is a straight _ sure she has been successful, she is a straight a — sure she has been successful, she is a straight a student.— a straight a student. grant, when she came here — a straight a student. grant, when she came here as _ a straight a student. grant, when she came here as a _ a straight a student. grant, when i she came here as a three-year-old she came here as a three—year—old did you imagine you would see her competing in like this? hat did you imagine you would see her competing in like this?— competing in like this? not really. i don't competing in like this? not really. i don't think— competing in like this? not really. i don't think any _ competing in like this? not really. i don't think any of— competing in like this? not really. i don't think any of us _ competing in like this? not really. i don't think any of us expected i competing in like this? not really. | i don't think any of us expected at. from _ i don't think any of us expected at. from a _ i don't think any of us expected at. from a young _ i don't think any of us expected at. from a young age _ i don't think any of us expected at. from a young age she _ idon't think any of us expected at. from a young age she was- from a young age she was fantastic to coach— from a young age she was fantastic to coach and — from a young age she was fantastic to coach and work— from a young age she was fantastic to coach and work with, _ from a young age she was fantastic to coach and work with, and - from a young age she was fantastic to coach and work with, and she - from a young age she was fantasticl to coach and work with, and she was always— to coach and work with, and she was always smiling, _ to coach and work with, and she was always smiling, always _ to coach and work with, and she was always smiling, always having - to coach and work with, and she was always smiling, always having fun, l always smiling, always having fun, and it— always smiling, always having fun, and it was— always smiling, always having fun, and it was a — always smiling, always having fun, and it was a pleasure _ always smiling, always having fun, and it was a pleasure to _ always smiling, always having fun, and it was a pleasure to deal- always smiling, always having fun, and it was a pleasure to deal with.| and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i _ and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i think— and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i think everybody— and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i think everybody here - and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i think everybody here is - and it was a pleasure to deal with. but i think everybody here is veryl but i think everybody here is very proud, _ but i think everybody here is very proud, her— but i think everybody here is very proud, herfamily_ but i think everybody here is very proud, her family will— but i think everybody here is very proud, her family will be - but i think everybody here is very proud, her family will be really. proud, her family will be really proud, — proud, her family will be really proud, and _ proud, her family will be really proud. and she _ proud, her family will be really proud, and she should - proud, her family will be really proud, and she should be - proud, her family will be reallyl proud, and she should be really proud _ proud, and she should be really proud of— proud, and she should be really proud of herself. _ proud, and she should be really proud of herself. she _ proud, and she should be really proud of herself. she has- proud, and she should be really. proud of herself. she has done the sport— proud of herself. she has done the sport a _ proud of herself. she has done the sport a fantastic— proud of herself. she has done the sport a fantasticjob _ proud of herself. she has done the sport a fantasticjob and i - proud of herself. she has done the sport a fantasticjob and i hope - proud of herself. she has done the sport a fantasticjob and i hope it. sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires— sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires a — sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires a lot _ sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires a lot of _ sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires a lot of other— sport a fantasticjob and i hope it inspires a lot of other people to. inspires a lot of other people to come _ inspires a lot of other people to come down _ inspires a lot of other people to come down and _ inspires a lot of other people to come down and give _ inspires a lot of other people to come down and give it- inspires a lot of other people to come down and give it a - inspires a lot of other people to come down and give it a go. - inspires a lot of other people to| come down and give it a go. we heard from her, praising _ come down and give it a go. we heard from her, praising her— come down and give it a go. we heard from her, praising her team-mates. l come down and give it a go. we heardj from her, praising her team-mates. a from her, praising her team—mates. a great team ethics amongst the athletes in beijing. what takes someone from being a skier to a
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freestyle skier, doing all those tricks and moves? is itjust sheer guts? tricks and moves? is it 'ust sheer cuts? ., tricks and moves? is it 'ust sheer uts? ., ., tricks and moves? is it 'ust sheer cuts? ., ., guts? for the most part. you can learn on trampolines _ guts? for the most part. you can learn on trampolines and - guts? for the most part. you can learn on trampolines and pits - guts? for the most part. you can| learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, _ learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but — learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you _ learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you will— learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you will have _ learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you will have to - learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you will have to do - learn on trampolines and pits and stuff, but you will have to do it i stuff, but you will have to do it off a _ stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump _ stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump at _ stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump at some _ stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump at some point. i stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump at some point. so . stuff, but you will have to do it off a jump at some point. so it| stuff, but you will have to do it l off a jump at some point. so it is stuff, but you will have to do it i off a jump at some point. so it is a bit off a jump at some point. so it is a hit of— off a jump at some point. so it is a hit of guts — off a jump at some point. so it is a hit of guts a— off a jump at some point. so it is a bit of guts. a bit— off a jump at some point. so it is a bit of guts. a bit of— off a jump at some point. so it is a bit of guts. a bit of charisma, i off a jump at some point. so it is a bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a i bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a hit of— bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a bit of excitement _ bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a bit of excitement for— bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a bit of excitement for it, - bit of guts. a bit of charisma, a bit of excitement for it, i thinkl bit of excitement for it, i think going — bit of excitement for it, i think going from _ bit of excitement for it, i think going from being _ bit of excitement for it, i think going from being a _ bit of excitement for it, i think going from being a normal- bit of excitement for it, i think. going from being a normal skier bit of excitement for it, i think- going from being a normal skier to a freestyle _ going from being a normal skier to a freestyle skier. _ going from being a normal skier to a freestyle skier, for— going from being a normal skier to a freestyle skier, for me _ going from being a normal skier to a freestyle skier, for me it— going from being a normal skier to a freestyle skier, for me it was- freestyle skier, for me it wasjust watching — freestyle skier, for me it wasjust watching peopie _ freestyle skier, for me it wasjust watching people do _ freestyle skier, for me it wasjust watching people do tricks - freestyle skier, for me it wasjust watching people do tricks and i. freestyle skier, for me it wasjust l watching people do tricks and i was like, watching people do tricks and i was like. i_ watching people do tricks and i was like. i want — watching people do tricks and i was like. iwantto— watching people do tricks and i was like, i want to get— watching people do tricks and i was like, i want to get into _ watching people do tricks and i was like, i want to get into that! - watching people do tricks and i was like, i want to get into that! i- like, i want to get into that! i think— like, i want to get into that! i think it — like, i want to get into that! i think it was _ like, i want to get into that! i think it was the same - like, i want to get into that! i think it was the same for i think it was the same for kirsty, she started _ think it was the same for kirsty, she started with _ think it was the same for kirsty, she started with racing - think it was the same for kirsty, she started with racing and i think it was the same for kirsty, i she started with racing and got the eye for— she started with racing and got the eye for all— she started with racing and got the eye for at! of— she started with racing and got the eye for at! of us _ she started with racing and got the eye for all of us over _ she started with racing and got the eye for all of us over here. - she started with racing and got the eye for all of us over here. and i she started with racing and got the| eye for all of us over here. and she took— eye for all of us over here. and she took it— eye for all of us over here. and she took it from — eye for all of us over here. and she took it from there _ eye for all of us over here. and she took it from there and _ eye for all of us over here. and she took it from there and took - eye for all of us over here. and she took it from there and took a - eye for all of us over here. and she took it from there and took a leaf l took it from there and took a leaf out of _ took it from there and took a leaf out of some — took it from there and took a leaf out of some of our— took it from there and took a leaf out of some of our books - took it from there and took a leaf out of some of our books and i took it from there and took a leafl out of some of our books and here she is— out of some of our books and here she is now — out of some of our books and here she is now— she is now. amazing to have a facility like — she is now. amazing to have a facility like this _ she is now. amazing to have a facility like this in _ she is now. amazing to have a facility like this in aberdeen, i facility like this in aberdeen, which is great, you'd get people going on a board or skis. but when it comes to the big tricks, love the training goes on, you often see tricks being done, launching off a big jump, tricks being done, launching off a bigjump, into a pool orsomewhere you can create a soft landing, which
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i guess is vital when you are coupling of those kind of moves. that is the best way to learn. phone pits, that is the best way to learn. phone pits. all— that is the best way to learn. phone pits. all that — that is the best way to learn. phone pits, all that stuff, _ that is the best way to learn. phone pits, all that stuff, is _ that is the best way to learn. phone pits, all that stuff, is the _ pits, all that stuff, is the best way — pits, all that stuff, is the best way but— pits, all that stuff, is the best way. but you will _ pits, all that stuff, is the best way. but you will have - pits, all that stuff, is the best way. but you will have to i pits, all that stuff, is the best| way. but you will have to do it pits, all that stuff, is the best- way. but you will have to do it off the jump — way. but you will have to do it off the jump at some _ way. but you will have to do it off the jump at some point, - way. but you will have to do it off the jump at some point, so you . way. but you will have to do it off l the jump at some point, so you will have _ the jump at some point, so you will have to _ the jump at some point, so you will have to commit _ the jump at some point, so you will have to commit and _ the jump at some point, so you will have to commit and go for - the jump at some point, so you will have to commit and go for it, - the jump at some point, so you will have to commit and go for it, and l have to commit and go for it, and kirsty— have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is— have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is very _ have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is very good _ have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is very good at _ have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is very good at that. - have to commit and go for it, and kirsty is very good at that. very. kirsty is very good at that. very good _ kirsty is very good at that. very good at — kirsty is very good at that. very good at visualising what - kirsty is very good at that. very good at visualising what she i good at visualising what she wants to do— good at visualising what she wants to do and — good at visualising what she wants to do and just _ good at visualising what she wants to do and just doing it. _ good at visualising what she wants to do and just doing it. she - good at visualising what she wants to do and just doing it. she is i good at visualising what she wants to do and just doing it. she is very| to do and just doing it. she is very confident, — to do and just doing it. she is very confident, and _ to do and just doing it. she is very confident, and in— to do and just doing it. she is very confident, and in my— to do and just doing it. she is very confident, and in my opinion- to do and just doing it. she is very confident, and in my opinion one. to do and just doing it. she is very. confident, and in my opinion one of the best— confident, and in my opinion one of the best skiers _ confident, and in my opinion one of the best skiers to _ confident, and in my opinion one of the best skiers to touch _ confident, and in my opinion one of the best skiers to touch the - confident, and in my opinion one of the best skiers to touch the gb i the best skiers to touch the gb team~ — the best skiers to touch the gb team. ., . , the best skiers to touch the gb team. ., ., , ., ., the best skiers to touch the gb team. ., . , . ., , team. no medalthis time around, she does have another— team. no medalthis time around, she does have another event _ team. no medalthis time around, she does have another event to _ team. no medalthis time around, she does have another event to come i team. no medalthis time around, she does have another event to come so . does have another event to come so she could still pick up a medal on that. but hopefully stick around and you can show us some of those moves yourself. great to speak to you. i might get those keys on myself, this morning! it would have been great had kirsty won that medal, it would have been team gb's first of the olympics. there is still one, and it comes in the shape of our mixed curlers. they lost against norway yesterday, meaning they did not go
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on to contest the gold medal match. they are currently in the bronze against sweden, but unfortunately not quite going their way at the moment. last time i checked they were trailing 7—1 against sweden. not looking good at the moment for the mixed curlers, but still a great effort to be in there, contesting that medal. and just like kirsty, they have other events to come. plenty to look out for over the coming days and plenty to look out for here this morning as we look to get our skis on and get onto the slope. i picked myself up off the ice yesterday and i will probably be doing the same this morning. i look doing the same this morning. i look forward to that, _ doing the same this morning. i look forward to that, john. _ doing the same this morning. i look forward to that, john. big _ doing the same this morning. i look forward to that, john. big man i doing the same this morning. i look forward to that, john. big man in i forward to that, john. big man in skis. give us a time, i need to look forward to something today! what time are we looking at? about 7:40am. tall man in skis, live on bbc one. what could possibly go
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wrong? he managed on the ice. he did really well. adele, ed sheeran, dave and little simz are just some of the artists leading the nominations at this year's brit awards. the ceremony is being hosted for the first time by the comedian mo gilligan, who takes over from jack whitehall. our music correspondent mark savage has been chatting to him, ahead of tonight's event. british album of the year goes to adele! adele. it's ed sheeran. little mix! dave, psychodrama! dua lipa, future nostalgia. some of the biggest names in pop, and they are all nominated again at this year's brits. but one thing about the ceremony is new — the host, mo gilligan. i want you to take a look at this and read it out to me. ah! in 2013, i need to host the mobos or the brit awards. fingers crossed. this was tweeted. .. oh, my gosh, this was tweeted at 12 o'clock on the 6th of october, 2011.
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and i got two retweets! god bless whoever retweeted those, because they are the people that really believe in you when you've got nothing. nine years later, though, it's happened. i know, man. yeah, it's... i'll be honest — this is definitely, at the moment, it's still, like, i'm still pinching myself that i'm going to be able to host the brit awards. and the brits are known for being chaotic — how sharp do you have to be? oh, you've got to be so sharp, man. i think the brits is known for anything can happen, at any time, at any place, you know? i remember watching the brits when i was young and seeing geri halliwell with the spice girls wearing the unionjack dress — like, iconic moments. i remember tuning in and seeing dave perform at the piano with all the messages on it. and i think that's what's the cool thing about the brits is that you can have moments where it can be a bit chaotic and some carnage, but then you can have iconic moments where you'll be like, "oh, my god, i was there, i seen that live." # never mind, i'll find someone like you...#. adele, who gave a career making performance at the 2011 brits, will be back on stage tonight, and could win best album for the third time.
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# it's only when i'm lying in bed on my own...#. i others, like becky hill, are up for their first trophy. i'm super excited to be i at the brit awards this year. a few years ago i tweeted thatl i wouldn't go to the brit awards again until i was nominated, due to a high dose _ of impostor syndrome. so it's really nice to be back and feel like i belong - to be there this year. it's been lovely to see people come out and be so supportive. _ so, it's really... whether i win or not, - i already feel like a winner. one of the big changes this year is that the brits have scrapped the best male and female categories, and combined them into a single best artist prize. so, i think there are a number of reasons. but i guess probably the most exciting and important one is just to try to make the award as big as possible. also making the award as inclusive as possible as well — so how you choose to define as an artist, there is no barrier to stop you from sort of putting your music
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forward as well. # i still have faith in you...#. and returning to the brits for the first time since 1977 are abba, nominated for best international group. i must say, i don't think we ever had such good reviews, ever, as we have for this album. how does it feel to be on the shortlist again? i think it feels rather good, i have to say. i wouldn't mind getting a brit award. what would it mean to you if they open the envelope and they read out abba's name? how will you react? i don't know. i can send you a text and tell you. i look forward to it, thank you! that was abba's benny andersson ending that report by mark savage. i love him very much. you are cheering up over that! i actually wasn't! and you cans see the brits tonight on itv at eight o'clock.
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making it up! i do quite like abba, that's true. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. transport for london says it may be forced to close major road junctions and cut bus and tube services unless a long term funding deal is secured. brent cross flyover is one of six structures in the capital at risk of closure, as it needs millions of pounds in repairs. the government says it's working towards a robust financial settlement. if services become less reliable, if there are fewer tube services, if the bus service is cut by up to 18%, then obviously people are going to have far less confidence in the reliability of the public transport system and, inevitably, they will end up having to find alternatives, which of course include private car use.
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congestion will increase, air quality will reduce. environmental activists who held protests on the m25 and other major roads last year have said they failed in their mission. insulate britain wanted to persuade the government to improve homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. in a statement, the group said it would come back even more ambitious. the national police chiefs' council, urged them to highlight their cause in a reasonable manner. west ham defender kurt zouma has apologised after a video appeared to show him kicking and slapping a cat. in the clip, which appeared on social media, the 27—year—old is also seen throwing a pair of shoes at the pet. he said there are no excuses for his behaviour, which he sincerely regrets. his club said it does not condone animal cruelty. travel — this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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there's severe delays on the hammersmith and city line — liverpool street to barking, eastbound only . there are severe delays on the district line between wimbledon and edgware and also between barking and upminster. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. yesterday, a warm front went through, introducing some milderfeeling air. and we are set to stay with those mild conditions as we head through the next couple of days or so before, on wednesday evening, a cold front sinks southwards — that could give us a few spots of rain and it will bring us the chilly air back in time for the end of the working week. but lots of blue sky and sunshine, and we will see a return to the night—time frosts. other than that, it's a fairly quiet week of weather ahead. it's not as blustery as it was last week, and it will be dry or mostly dry. now, this morning it's a mild start to the day, 7 or 8 celsius. plenty of cloud around today but also some bright and some sunny spells emerging at times. a bit more of a westerly wind than we saw yesterday, but not as windy as it was over the weekend. top temperatures this afternoon all the way up to 13 or 1a celsius — so, very mild for this time of year.
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now, through this evening and overnight, in all of that mild air, temperatures probably won't drop much below 8 or 9 degrees for many of us. lots of cloud around. it's a mild day again on wednesday, plenty of cloud too. a few spots of rain with that cold front on wednesday night. and more sunshine on thursday, but a frosty start to friday morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to breakfast.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines. after keir starmer is harassed by protesters shouting �*jimmy savile' — downing street says there'll be no apology, despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw accusations he made against the labour leader. profiting from the price rises. while families are looking at 50% increases in energy bills, we expect bp to report a big rise in revenue in the coming minutes. a tale fit for a princess — the duchess of cambridge is to become the first royal to read a cbeebies bedtime story.
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good a cbeebies bedtime story. morning from aberdeen beijing. good morning from aberdeen to beijing. how the youngest member of team gb dazzled on her olympic debut. no medalfor kirsty mcgee but we are at the slopes where it all started for her. —— kirsty muir. pop giants bastille are heading back to the tiny venues where they started — two of the band's members will be here to tell us why. a band of cloud and rain across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england this morning. north of that cold with wintry showers. to the south, cloud but milder. all the details throughout the programme. it's tuesday the eighth of february, our top story. downing street has no intention of apologising to the labour leader sir keir starmer after boris johnson falsely
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accusing him of failing to prosecute the serial sex offender, jimmy savile. it comes after sir keir was heckled by protestors over the issue outside parliament last night. two people have been arrested. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports. this is not normal rough and tumble, but abuse and untrue accusations being hurled at the leader of the opposition. one false claim that he protected the paedophilejimmy savile. keir starmer bundled to a police car. two arrests were made. it happened outside parliament, where the prime minister made a false link between the two. i am sure there were some people out there who already had conspiracy theories in their head, but the prime minister has given them the platform and permission, and that is tantamount to inciting them to these kind of horrific mobster activities. the prime minister wrongly suggested the labour leader had been involved in the decisions not to prosecute jimmy savile when he was the boss of public prosecutions. borisjohnson clarified after
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an outcry, but he did not say sorry. a lot of people have got hot under the collar and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear. i am talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. the prime minister wrote online... but others in his own party want him to say much more. a former tory cabinet member, julian smith, said... there is no sign of that. boris johnson's failure to apologise has already cost him one of his closest political confidantes. munira mirza, who worked for the pm for more than a decade, quit last week in disgust.
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protests around here are nothing new. for or against brexit, anti—lockdown, pro—public anger. but the prime minister may find himself accused of stirring up unacceptable behaviour. just when number 10 looked to calm things down. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminsterfor us. we have confirmation recently of the prime minister's position on this. what can you tell us? i prime minister's position on this. what can you tell us?— prime minister's position on this. what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing — what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing street _ what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing street as _ what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing street as you _ what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing street as you have i what can you tell us? i have spoken to downing street as you have been j to downing street as you have been reporting and they have no intention for apologising for what boris johnson said a week yesterday, which started this row. when he suggested in the house of commons sir keir starmer, as a former director of public prosecutions, had failed to prosecute jimmy savile, public prosecutions, had failed to prosecutejimmy savile, something thatis prosecutejimmy savile, something that is factually inaccurate. the broader point they are making is
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look, they say, if the prime ministerfor week after look, they say, if the prime minister for week after week after week can take loads of political heat over parties that happened in government that he was not apt, it should be legitimate, so goes their argument, that they can raise questions about the leadership of an organisation during the time when it failed to do something. and yes, the crown prosecution service was led at that time by sir keir starmer, even though he had no personal involvement in the decision to review the files relating to jimmy savile. are they willing to see this calm down, are they willing to climb down and to come to the commons today and apologise, as some conservative mps, let alone labour mps are demanding? not a bit of it, they are sticking to their view of what the prime minister said was legitimate. what the prime minister said was lecitimate. .
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a report by a police watchdog has found officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police ombudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmakers' shop — and six other fatal shootings. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an active sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. at the weekend, they marked the 30th anniversary of the atrocity. it is not the people who walked in the bookies 30 years ago, it's the people who put the guns in their hands and the people allowed to act with impunity, and were never ever prosecuted. the report published today identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the murders to the imperial war museum.
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the security forces had informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in serious crimes, including murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious, and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. emmanuel macron has said the coming days will be crucial to de—escalating the ukraine standoff, after a meeting with russia's vladimir putin. mr putin hinted that progress had
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been made during his first moscow summit with a western leader since russian troops massed on ukraine's border. the french president will continue diplomatic talks later, with a visit to kyiv to meet the president of ukraine. up to a third of uk children consume at least one energy drink a week — while some are having them almost daily, according to new research. the study, commissioned by the department of health and social care, found that drinking too many could lead to headaches and sleep problems. high consumption is also linked to worse educational outcomes. the uk government says it will soon be banning sales of energy drinks to children. truckers in the canadian capital ottawa have been ordered to stop honking their horns for 10 days, in an ongoing protest that has snarled up the city. vehicles and tents have been blocking roads in the city for the past week. yesterday, ottawa's mayor declared a state of emergency over the protests, which started in response to a new rule that all truckers need a covid vaccine to cross the us—canada border.
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that would get on your nerves after a bit. like when you have been to new york. it is constant honking. if you have watched cbeebies bedtime stories, they have had some extraordinary people read them. they have a special one now. its first royal signing. the duchess of cambridge will fill the slot this sunday, as she reads �*the owl who was afraid of the dark�* byjill tomlinson. she's making a special appearance to mark children's mental health week. it looks like a nifty christmas jumper she is wearing. some breaking news. we are talking about bp profits. you will know bp and the brand. they
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extract oil from the north sea and other things. they have announced profits of 9.6 billion for the year. much higher than 2020 when not a lot was happening but higher than the year before that. why? shell posted a massive number last year, i am sorry, last week. 1a billion. basic supply and demand. we went from not needing much energy, to everyone needing much energy, to everyone needing it at the same time and the beast meant the value of the commodity of oil and gas rocketed. it caused in december, the chief executive of bp to say, when the market is strong, oil and gas prices are strong, this is literally a cash machine. so the prophet is going up. people thought it was in bad taste, and as we have been reporting, every household fielding the increase in energy bills by an average of 50% in the coming months. anti—poverty
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campaigners described the profits as obscene and labour called for a windfall tax, saying to the government you need to ask the businesses, making a massive profit out of unusual circumstances, share the money and give it back to some of the poorerfamilies. the government have not yet responded. this is coming at a time when families are struggling to pay bills. the profit from bp of almost £10 billion for the year. i}!(. £10 billion for the year. 0k, incredible _ £10 billion for the year. 0k, incredible numbers. - here's carol. good morning, this morning it is a mile start. that theme will continue, especially in the south. colder further north, continue, especially in the south. colderfurther north, but temperatures higher than we would expect in february. in the picture we have rain moving across southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland with showers coming in across the rest of scotland and
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some are wintry in the hills. to the south, cloudy, the cloud across wales and south—west england will bring drizzle. but some sunshine in the midlands and far south—east. these are the temperatures, up to 14. these are the temperatures, up to 1a. through the latter part of the afternoon, there will be sunshine. that is across parts of the midlands and east anglia. as we move north, the weather front will start to pep up the weather front will start to pep up across north—west england. showers continuing across scotland with gusts to gale force across northern and western isles. overnight, a very similar picture. we hang on to the gale force gusts in the north and west and the rain move south. we will see wintry showers down to sea level as we go through the night. a cold night in the north. mild ahead of the weather front in the south. tomorrow, the
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weather front slowly pushing south. more will see cold air. and we have an area of low pressure moving across the north that could bring heavier snow and potentially in northern scotland some blizzards, especially in the hills. let's return to our top story. two people have been arrested after protesters surrounded and heckled the labour leader, sir keir starmer, outside parliament. demonstrators were heard shouting "jimmy savile", in reference to borisjohnson's false claim that sir keir had failed to prosecute the serial six offender while director of public prosecutions. the labour mp and chair of the commons standards committee, chris bryant, joins us now. cani can i start, i am sure you are aware, itappears can i start, i am sure you are aware, it appears officials in downing street have spoken to our correspondence and told him they will not apologise. the prime minister will not say sorry for the words he used in parliament. i am
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words he used in parliament. i am not surprised _ words he used in parliament. i am not surprised because _ words he used in parliament. i am not surprised because i _ words he used in parliament. j —n not surprised because i think this has been a deliberate strategy. it has been a deliberate strategy. it has been a deliberate strategy. it has been done with malice aforethought. it is not accidental. we have known borisjohnson can be loose with words and sometimes it has horrible implications. i was on the foreign affairs committee when he was foreign secretary and he started rambling about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and ended up with her staying in prison a longer time than necessary and we hope she can come out one day. he has still not apologised for what he got wrong then. what happened last week was he was in a tough corner up against it and knew it would be difficult in the commons and had a meeting with advisers in downing street. they toyed with the idea of chucking this grenade into the debate. his advisers told him not to do it because they thought it was irresponsible and scurrilous. i think that is munira mirza's reasons
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to resign. and he went ahead. it is entirely deliberate and i am afraid words have consequences. and in particular, what winds me up is this is about child abuse. it is the most toxic allegation you can possibly make. we prosecute far too few people in this country for child abuse. i do not think we even see the tip of the iceberg. but i do not think borisjohnson could care a monkey's toenailfor the think borisjohnson could care a monkey's toenail for the victims of jimmy savile. this is simply there as a part of malice aforethought to stir the flames and get people talking about something completely different. i bet you borisjohnson, whatever he tweeted, went to bed thinking job well done, i have inflamed the mob, incited the mob.
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the worst of this is we know how this plays out because we have seen it in the united states of america. if borisjohnson keeps on doing this, we will see the same as in the united states of america with mps hounded on their way into parliament and people on the steps of parliamentjust and people on the steps of parliament just as there and people on the steps of parliamentjust as there were on the 6th of january on congress in the us. it 6th ofjanuary on congress in the us. , , ., , ., , , us. it seems a “ump to suggest the prime minister— us. it seems a jump to suggest the prime minister is _ us. it seems a jump to suggest the prime minister is happy _ us. it seems a jump to suggest the prime minister is happy he - us. it seems a jump to suggest the prime minister is happy he has i prime minister is happy he has incited a mob. people shouting other things it sir keir starmer last night. things it sir keir starmer last niuht. , , ., ., ,., night. they were shouting about jimmy savile — night. they were shouting about jimmy savile and _ night. they were shouting about jimmy savile and boris - night. they were shouting about jimmy savile and boris johnson | night. they were shouting about. jimmy savile and boris johnson is jimmy savile and borisjohnson is acting as a ventriloquist for the mob. it is the same as trump. completely scurrilous. we have always had a tradition in this country, even the prime minister always refers to the opposition, even when they are being horrible to him, as her majesty's loyal
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opposition and they have respect for each other across the divide. we have got ourselves in a terrible state. a lot of this goes direct to the personality of the prime minister. we had another instance last week. he lied to the house and we know because the head of the government statistics department has said categorically that the prime minister was wrong when he said there had been a 14% cut in crime when there has been a 14% increase. the prime minister refuses to apologise for that. what are we meant to do in parliament? we are not allowed to call him a liar even though it is clear if he refuses to correct the record he is a liar. so we end up chucking out the person who accuses him of being a liar. we create this topsy—turvy world with no morality, honesty, decency. it is not the way we do politics in this country. not the way we do politics in this count . ~ , country. the prime minister said
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what happened _ country. the prime minister said what happened last _ country. the prime minister said what happened last night - country. the prime minister said what happened last night was i what happened last night was disgraceful as regards to that attack and the word is said to sir keir starmer. it seems to be number 10 are trying to make a broader point that the prime minister has been on the receiving end about allegations about parties he was not at any yet he is taking responsibility for. so applying the same logic, it should be legitimate to act about failings of the crown prosecution service when led by sir keir starmer which seems to be the broader point number 10 are making. i think the prime minister's message last night, his tweet, was crocodile tears. they used to say crocodiles crying while they eat their prey. i am afraid i do not buy that line from the prime minister. second, it is not that he was not at parties, he was at parties. there were parties going on in his own flat.
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some people have come up with preposterous excuses like he was ambushed by a cake. the vast majority of people in this country, according to every opinion poll for weeks, think the prime minister has been taking them for fools because they did not get to go to funerals and hold the hands of loved ones when they died but the prime minister managed to have people invited round to parties. i am sorry, making a moral equation here is completely disingenuous. and in case anybody does not understand what i mean by that, i mean it is a lie, malice aforethought. a deliberate attempt to distract and using one of the most toxic things you can throw into the political debate in this country. i can understand why very decent tory mps likejulian smith and others have said you have got not only to come to the house of commons and
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apologise but completely withdraw these comments and condemn those who repeat them. i have seen too many people accused of hideous things in the past without the basis of any truth. the prime minister wants to get away with things. he loves smirking when his cunning plan comes off. this is not the way we do politics in this country. taste politics in this country. we appreciate _ politics in this country. we appreciate your _ politics in this country. we appreciate your time. thank you. i would mention there that it seems to be the message coming from number 10 is he will not apologise. this is what he said last night about what we saw happen to sir keir starmer. the behaviour directed at the leader of the opposition was disgraceful and all forms of harassment of elected representatives are not acceptable and the prime minister tweeted, i thank the police for responding swiftly. that is the only official message from the prime minister about what happened. when kwajo tweneboa
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was a young student looking after his dying father, they lived in a damp, mouldy flat infested with cockroaches. it's something which he says made his dad's final days even worse. two years later, kwajo is a social housing campaigner, who's determined to help other tenants living in squalor. his latest twitter video has been seen more than half—a—million times. let's take a look. the front door is so badly swollen. i want to show you how bad it is. i don't know what counts as a fire risk, but i think this would. you cannot even... and there are young kids here expected to open this door. and even to shut it. it is so badly swollen, it is almost impossible. they are exactly the same. i am going to pause the video and take another one to show you the other issues in the house. look underneath. you can see on the back
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of the walls, mould. young kids are having to live in... look at that. so here you can see a cockroach alive in the water still. yes, it is still alive now. you have said your youngest has fallen in the house because of the leak. and that is your landline cable there. that they have come to make safe. and where your washing machine is supposed to be, plugged in, it is not working at all. kwajo's work has caught the attention of the entrepreneur steven bartlett. we hope to speak to him shortly but let's start with you, that film is shocking and you are saying it is quite common. it shocking and you are saying it is quite common.— quite common. it is. that is one example- _ quite common. it is. that is one example- l _ quite common. it is. that is one example. i have _ quite common. it is. that is one example. i have spoken - quite common. it is. that is one example. i have spoken to i quite common. it is. that is one i example. i have spoken to hundreds of tenants if not thousands in london and beyond and had them send me pictures and videos of conditions of their homes. it is shocking. it
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should not happen. it is of their homes. it is shocking. it should not happen.— should not happen. it is all too common- _ should not happen. it is all too common- why _ should not happen. it is all too common. why is _ should not happen. it is all too common. why is this - should not happen. it is all too. common. why is this something should not happen. it is all too i common. why is this something you feel passionately about? i imagine those tenants have been complaining and asking about getting that stuff seem to because there are children living there, yet nothing happens. it was the same case with myself and thatis it was the same case with myself and that is why i am here today. i was ignored. i have been living in social housing the majority of my life and on this occasion i was living with disrepair, even though i was complaining and bringing up the housing association. nothing was done. i did not have kitchen, bathroom facilities, the ceiling in my front room was missing, cockroaches, mould and damp. still it was not enough for them to do the work until i went on to publicly shame them into doing the work, not just in my house but on my estate and now beyond. what are we seeing here? these were some of the
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cockroaches, flies in my kitchen. under the sink, it was like a nest mice had made. those cupboards were built in the 1930s. they were falling off the walls. i was asking for it to be replaced. my bathroom was darkness. the light was filled with water. i remembered a workman coming in and saying it was not fit for animals to live in when they came to look at the property, but here the family was, in forced to live in it while paying rent. you are making _ live in it while paying rent. you are making a — live in it while paying rent. you are making a difference for lots of people and your actions have caught the attention of people including this fellow, who you will recognise from dragons' den. steven bartlett, thank you for being on the programme. what was it about kwajo, why did his work catch your attention?—
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why did his work catch your attention? ., ,, , ., ., ., attention? thank you for having me. it was attention? thank you for having me. it was inspiring- _ attention? thank you for having me. it was inspiring. i— attention? thank you for having me. it was inspiring. i was _ attention? thank you for having me. it was inspiring. i was treated i it was inspiring. i was treated randomly i think about 11 bm while i was at home in london, a video of him speaking about the mission he is on and what has inspired it from personal experience. i saw this tweet and listen to him speak for two and a half minutes and clicked to his instagram and could see the images of social housing in the uk and i do not come from money, but even i have got to a point of privilege where i do not understand the extent of issues some people experience in this country. as i looked at the images, i was deeply horrified that people in this country we call great britain have to live in those conditions and they are being ignored. probably within six minutes of being tweeted that video by a total stranger, i tweeted kwajo and said i will give you £10,000 so you can carry on what you
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are doing. i invited him to my place in london to talk through how we can extend the mission. because i know content is key in the world we live in and ultimately what put him on the map to me, i will give you the camera equipment you need so you can document these conditions and hold the government to account. i was inspired by a young man i saw myself in. a couple of years ago i was a break 18—year—old kid trying to make it in the world and people along the way gave me help for no apparent reason so i thought i could pay it forward to a special young man. your reaction to that? _ forward to a special young man. your reaction to that? i _ forward to a special young man. your reaction to that? i know— forward to a special young man. your reaction to that? i know it has been a few— reaction to that? i know it has been a few days — reaction to that? i know it has been a few days but it has not sunk in. i am completely humbled. i went into this am completely humbled. ! went into this not— am completely humbled. i went into this not expecting anything out of it except — this not expecting anything out of it except i — this not expecting anything out of it except i genuinely cared about what _ it except i genuinely cared about what people lived in and did not want _ what people lived in and did not want them to go through what my family— want them to go through what my family went through. i was working from the _
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family went through. i was working from the station and started to get notifications. i remember seeing yesterday— notifications. i remember seeing yesterday i am completely humbled and i genuinely appreciate the support— and i genuinely appreciate the support everyone has given me, and from stephen especially, reaching out to— from stephen especially, reaching out to me — from stephen especially, reaching out to me. just nuts. i am a third-year— out to me. just nuts. i am a third—year student, a lot of my time is spent _ third—year student, a lot of my time is spent at _ third—year student, a lot of my time is spent at university, i am not wealthy, — is spent at university, i am not wealthy, it— is spent at university, i am not wealthy, it is hard to go round, it is expensive, but this will allow me to reach— is expensive, but this will allow me to reach people outside of london and do _ to reach people outside of london and do what it is i want to do which is help— and do what it is i want to do which is help people across the country and hopefully get change from government level down. stephen, you are brilliant on _ government level down. stephen, you are brilliant on social _ government level down. stephen, you are brilliant on social media. - government level down. stephen, you are brilliant on social media. how i are brilliant on social media. how important will social media be for kwajo and what he is trying to do? it is key. if you want to reach
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people at scale, understanding social media, producing an emotional message, like the one that reach me out of the blue, you want to put a couple of lottery tickets into the race in terms ofjust... that is what the video did. he went on lbc and did an interview and had no idea it would find me hundreds of miles away at night—time. if he can do that with a higher cadence, he can reach millions every day. most important, he can reach the government. there are officials who follow me and people from matt hancock to rishi sunak follows follow me and people from matt hancock to rishi sunakfollows me, and the video he produced with lbc has 4 million views on my timeline alone. let's start producing content and i think we can have a meaningful impact and change things.— impact and change things. talking about change. _ impact and change things. talking about change, a _ impact and change things. talking about change, a big _ impact and change things. talking about change, a big smile - impact and change things. talking about change, a big smile on i impact and change things. talking about change, a big smile on your face thinking about that, the family we talked about at the start, tell us what happened. they were moved out of that accommodation and are now in better housing. thea;r
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out of that accommodation and are now in better housing.— now in better housing. they are sta in: in now in better housing. they are staying in temporary _ now in better housing. they are i staying in temporary accommodation currently~ _ staying in temporary accommodation currently. they were supposedly going _ currently. they were supposedly going to — currently. they were supposedly going to be sent back into the property— going to be sent back into the property but 24—hour is after that video— property but 24—hour is after that video was— property but 24—hour is after that video was uploaded, viewed by 3 million _ video was uploaded, viewed by 3 million in — video was uploaded, viewed by 3 million in 24 hours, 48 hours, i e-mailed — million in 24 hours, 48 hours, i e—mailed the ceo and had a conversation with them and said they cannot— conversation with them and said they cannot go— conversation with them and said they cannot go back. they agreed they will look— cannot go back. they agreed they will look for permanent accommodation for that family. they are happy, _ accommodation for that family. they are happy, mum and the kids. will that make a _ are happy, mum and the kids. ii that make a difference to others? a lot of people are in the same situation. you found a family and the tenancy company have said they need to sort it out and it has happened for them but the key for you is to ensure that happens without pressure needing to be applied. without pressure needing to be a- lied. , without pressure needing to be aulied. , ., . applied. exactly. iwould much rather me _ applied. exactly. iwould much rather me not _ applied. exactly. iwould much rather me not having - applied. exactly. iwould much rather me not having to i applied. exactly. iwould much rather me not having to do i applied. exactly. iwould much| rather me not having to do this applied. exactly. iwould much i rather me not having to do this but ifeel— rather me not having to do this but i feel at— rather me not having to do this but i feel at this — rather me not having to do this but i feel at this time, i have to. i
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hope — i feel at this time, i have to. i hope it— i feel at this time, i have to. i hope it inspires families and gives them _ hope it inspires families and gives them hope and to stand up and fight. it is them hope and to stand up and fight. it is a _ them hope and to stand up and fight. it isa human— them hope and to stand up and fight. it is a human right to live in safe accommodation yet it is not happening for so many and it should be. happening for so many and it should be it— happening for so many and it should be. , . . , . happening for so many and it should be. ,. . ., ,, happening for so many and it should be. ,. . ., happening for so many and it should be. ,. . be. it is fantastic to speak to you. best of be. it is fantastic to speak to you. ltest of luck- _ be. it is fantastic to speak to you. best of luck. stephen, _ be. it is fantastic to speak to you. best of luck. stephen, thank- be. it is fantastic to speak to you. best of luck. stephen, thank you. j be. it is fantastic to speak to you. | best of luck. stephen, thank you. i think you are going to get on! thank you. you're watching breakfast. still to come. it launched the careers of kylie minogue and margot robbie — but neighbours could finally be facing the axe. we'll be looking back on nearly four decades of life on ramsay street, with one of its former stars. cannot wait for that. everybody needs good neighbours. people like kwajo. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london — i'm alison earle. transport for london says it may be forced to close major road junctions and cut bus and tube services unless a long term
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funding deal is secured. brent cross flyover is one of six structures in the capital at risk of closure, as it needs millions of pounds in repairs. the government says it's working towards a "robust" financial settlement. if services become less reliable, if there are fewer tube services, if the bus service is cut by up to 18%, then obviously people are going to have far less confidence in the reliability of the public transport system and, inevitably, they will end up having to find alternatives, which of course include private car use. congestion will increase, air quality will reduce. environmental activists who held protests on the m25 and other major roads last year have said "they failed" in their mission. insulate britain wanted to persuade the government to improve homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. in a statement the group said it would come back "even more ambitious". the national police chiefs' council,
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urged them to "highlight their cause in a reasonable manner." west ham defender kurt zouma has apologised after a video appeared to show him kicking and slapping a cat. the 27—year—old said there are no excuses for his behaviour, which he sincerely regrets. his club said it does not condone animal cruelty and would deal with the matter internally. travel now — lots of problems on the tube this morning. there's no service on the district line between turnham green and ealing broadway. there are severe delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge. there are severe delays on the hammersmith and city line. there are minor delays on the circle line. on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. yesterday, a warm front went through, introducing some milderfeeling air. and we are set to stay with those mild conditions as we head through the next couple of days or so before, on wednesday evening,
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a cold front sinks southwards — that could give us a few spots of rain and it will bring us the chilly air back in time for the end of the working week. but lots of blue sky and sunshine, and we will see a return to the night—time frosts. other than that, it's a fairly quiet week of weather ahead. it's not as blustery as it was last week, and it will be dry or mostly dry. now, this morning it's a mild start to the day, 7 or 8 celsius. plenty of cloud around today but also some bright and some sunny spells emerging at times. a bit more of a westerly wind than we saw yesterday, but not as windy as it was over the weekend. top temperatures this afternoon all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius — so, very mild for this time of year. now, through this evening and overnight, in all of that mild air, temperatures probably won't drop much below 8 or 9 degrees for many of us. lots of cloud around. it's a mild day again on wednesday, plenty of cloud too. a few spots of rain with that cold front on wednesday night. and more sunshine on thursday, but a frosty start to friday morning. that's it for the moment.
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now it's back to sally and dan. i'm back in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. it is 7:34am. chris johnson is facin: it is 7:34am. chris johnson is facing growing _ it is 7:34am. chris johnson is facing growing pressure i it is 7:34am. chris johnson is facing growing pressure to i it is 7:34am. chris johnson is i facing growing pressure to withdraw comments he made towards sur keir starmer falsely comments he made towards sur keir starmerfalsely him to comments he made towards sur keir starmer falsely him to prose gait sick sex offenderjimmy semel. two people were arrested by police after the labour list was heckled by protesters outside parliament yesterday. the prime minister described it as unacceptable. emmanuel macron has said the coming days will be crucial to de—escalating the ukraine standoff, after a meeting with russia's vladimir putin. mr putin hinted that progress had
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been made during his first moscow summit with a western leader since russian troops massed on ukraine's border. the french president will continue diplomatic talks later, with a visit to kyiv to meet the president of ukraine. up to a third of uk children consume at least one energy drink a week — while some are having them almost daily, according to new research. the study, commissioned by the department of health and social care, found that drinking too many could lead to headaches and sleep problems. high consumption is also linked to worse educational outcomes. the uk government says it will soon be banning sales of energy drinks to children. websites that publish pornography will be legally required to verify the age of their users under new plans announced by the government. ministers say the draft online safety bill will be strengthened to include the measure, which would also see sites fined or blocked if they failed to act. truckers in the canadian capital ottawa have been ordered to stop honking their horns for 10 days, in an ongoing protest that has snarled up the city. vehicles and tents have been blocking roads in the city for the past week.
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yesterday ottawa's mayor declared a state of emergency over the protests — which started in response to a new rule that all truckers need a covid vaccine to cross the us—canada border. that would be slightly tricky. quite an annoying noise. but that's a purpose of a protest. cbeebies bedtime stories has made its first royal signing. the duchess of cambridge will film a slot, she is going to read the owl who was afraid of the dark, making a special appearance to my children's mental health week. conservative mp's are among those calling on the prime minister
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to withdraw a false claim that sir keir starmer failed to prosecute the serial sex offenderjimmy savile, when he was director of public prosecutions. it comes after protesters heckled the labour leader over the issue outside parliament last night. we'rejoined now by the digital minister, chris philp. your response to what happened keir starmer yesterday. i’m your response to what happened keir starmer yesterday.— starmer yesterday. i'm appalled and horrified by the _ starmer yesterday. i'm appalled and horrified by the harassment - starmer yesterday. i'm appalled and horrified by the harassment and i starmer yesterday. i'm appalled and horrified by the harassment and an l horrified by the harassment and an imitation that keir starmer and david lambie suffered last night. no one, frankly, and no elected official, certainly not the leader official, certainly not the leader of the opposition, should suffer the harassment and intimidation that he suffered last night. it has no place in a civilised democracy. i'm glad the police have made a couple of arrests afterwards. what i would say to anyone who was involved in the incident, oranyone to anyone who was involved in the incident, or anyone might get involved in that kind of thing in the future, is don't do it. that kind of incident undermines our democracy and it not happen. and i
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join others in unreservedly condemning the experience that keir starmer and david lemmy had yesterday. starmer and david lemmy had yesterday-— starmer and david lemmy had yesterday. starmer and david lemmy had esterda . , ., yesterday. many would say the prime minister himself _ yesterday. many would say the prime minister himself is _ yesterday. many would say the prime minister himself is partly _ minister himself is partly responsible for what happened because of his comments last week. are they right? m0. because of his comments last week. are they right?— because of his comments last week. are they right?_ are they right? no, and there are two or three _ are they right? no, and there are two or three reasons _ are they right? no, and there are two or three reasons why. - are they right? no, and there are two or three reasons why. some l are they right? no, and there are l two or three reasons why. some of the individuals involved in last night's incident i believe have done this before, for example michael gove, newsnightjournalist nick what have suffered incidents like this in the past. it's a long winning pattern of behaviour by some of the individuals concerned. i've watched the clip info when they were mostly, these people, who were harassing keir starmer, they were mostly talking aboutjulian assange, for some reason i don't understand. they were duggee about covid scenes in the conduct of the opposition in general. they did mentionjimmy savile, that most of what they were shouting was to do withjulian assange. so i don't accept there is any link between the prime
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minister's reference to keir starmer�*s record as director of public prosecutions and what happened last night which was totally acceptable and there is no justification or no excuse for that kind of behaviour towards a democratically elected person, especially the leader of the opposition, at all, no justification.- opposition, at all, no justification. opposition, at all, no 'ustification. �* , justification. but the fact they were saying — justification. but the fact they were saying jimmy _ justification. but the fact they were saying jimmy savile, - justification. but the fact they l were saying jimmy savile, they justification. but the fact they - were saying jimmy savile, they were shouting those words, itjust shows your prime minister must make comments from last week have definitely cut through, should he now apologise? i definitely cut through, should he now apologise?— now apologise? i think what the prime minister _ now apologise? i think what the prime minister did _ now apologise? i think what the prime minister did last - now apologise? i think what the prime minister did last week, i now apologise? i think what the l prime minister did last week, was within a day or two of the original comments, was clarified exactly what his comments meant. he was very clear that he was not suggesting thatjimmy savile was in any way personally and individually responsible for prosecution decisions aboutjimmy savile. what he was talking about was the fact that keir starmer had general responsibility for the cps and in
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fact keir starmer himself acknowledges that on his chambers website, and keir starmer himself a few years later in 2013 apologised for the cbs�*s handling of thejimmy savile affair, and he had overall responsibility for cbs... but what boris johnson _ responsibility for cbs... but what boris johnson said _ responsibility for cbs... but what boris johnson said was _ responsibility for cbs... but what boris johnson said was incorrect. | borisjohnson said was incorrect. should hejust borisjohnson said was incorrect. should he just say sorry and get it over with? i should he 'ust say sorry and get it over with? ., �* ~' should he 'ust say sorry and get it over with? ., �* ~ ., , over with? i don't think he was incorrect- _ over with? i don't think he was incorrect. the _ over with? i don't think he was incorrect. the first _ over with? i don't think he was. incorrect. the first comments... over with? i don't think he was - incorrect. the first comments... you don't incorrect. the first comments. .. you don't think— incorrect. the first comments... you don't think he _ incorrect. the first comments... you don't think he was _ incorrect. the first comments... you don't think he was incorrect? - incorrect. the first comments... you don't think he was incorrect? they . don't think he was incorrect? they were capable _ don't think he was incorrect? they were capable of — don't think he was incorrect? they were capable of being _ don't think he was incorrect? tue: were capable of being misconstrued. and that's why it's right that a couple of days later he did clarified that he was not suggesting at any time that keir starmer had personal responsibility for the case, but he obviously did have overall responsibility for the conduct of the cps. let overall responsibility for the conduct of the cps.- overall responsibility for the conduct of the cps. let me check, ou sa conduct of the cps. let me check, you say what _ conduct of the cps. let me check, you say what boris _ conduct of the cps. let me check, you say what boris johnson - conduct of the cps. let me check, you say what boris johnson said i conduct of the cps. let me check, you say what boris johnson said in you say what borisjohnson said in parliament was right or wrong? i’m parliament was right or wrong? i'm sa inc parliament was right or wrong? i'm sa in: it parliament was right or wrong? ten saying it was capable of being misconstrued. the words on the face
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of it were correct, but it was capable of being misinterpreted, and thatis capable of being misinterpreted, and that is why he was very clear and terrified except what he meant a couple of days later, which was the right thing to do.— right thing to do. what it was the reaction from _ right thing to do. what it was the reaction from some _ right thing to do. what it was the reaction from some members - right thing to do. what it was the reaction from some members of| right thing to do. what it was the - reaction from some members of your party tell you? lots of tory mps are not happy about this at all. i party tell you? lots of tory mps are not happy about this at all.- not happy about this at all. i don't think there _ not happy about this at all. i don't think there is any _ not happy about this at all. i don't think there is any way _ not happy about this at all. i don't think there is any way you - think there is any way you can reasonably suggest that the comments on keir starmer�*s overall responsibility for the cps in any way provoked the very unseemly and totally unacceptable harassment we saw last night. these are people who have done this before to other public figures, they were going on aboutjulian assange at length, i don't understand why, there is no way you can reasonably make a link between the cps comments and the harassment, it does not in anyway... you don't think borisjohnson standing up in parliament and saying those words has had any connection with those people shouting that last night? in your brief, tackling
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misinformation is part yourjob. that's right, and that's why it was important last week, speaking in blackpool, the prime minister clarified his remarks from the previous monday, which could have been misinterpreted. and because it is important that we combat this information or misinformation of any kind, it was important the prime minister clarified precisely what he meant, which he did. but there is no way you can suggest his remarks in any way prompted and certainly not justified what we saw last night. these are people who have done this to other public figures in the past, including michael gove, they were mostly shouting about other issues, they did mentionjimmy several, but they did mentionjimmy several, but they were mostly shouting about other issues. so i don't accept the link that people are trying to make. the point about this information is important and that's where the clarification was important. another point, it's important we take the heat out of our political discourse.
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0n social media especially, but more widely as well. our political discourse has become very heated and very confrontational. find discourse has become very heated and very confrontational.— very confrontational. and where do ou think very confrontational. and where do you think that _ very confrontational. and where do you think that has _ very confrontational. and where do you think that has come _ very confrontational. and where do you think that has come from? - very confrontational. and where do i you think that has come from? where do you think that heat is coming from? b, do you think that heat is coming from? �* ., ., , _ from? a lot of it is fuelled by social media, _ from? a lot of it is fuelled by social media, where - from? a lot of it is fuelled by social media, where people | from? a lot of it is fuelled by i social media, where people say things they would not... i found this as a constituency mp. people say things on social media they wouldn't dream of saying to you face—to—face. i've met people in person who have been perfectly civil and we've had a respectful debate, perhaps disagreeing but a bit respectful debate, and the same people either before or after have said really inflammatory and offensive things on social media. for some reason, that does seem to bring out the worst in people. as a political culture, all of us need to take the temperature down a bit and try and conduct our debates in a more, in a calmer and more
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respectful manner.- more, in a calmer and more respectful manner. you are here to talk about the _ respectful manner. you are here to talk about the online _ respectful manner. you are here to talk about the online safety - respectful manner. you are here to talk about the online safety bill. i talk about the online safety bill. tell me what you are planning to change which is not in the draft bill already. we change which is not in the draft bill already-— change which is not in the draft bill alread . ~ ., , ., bill already. we are updating the draft bill, bill already. we are updating the draft bill. we _ bill already. we are updating the draft bill, we will _ bill already. we are updating the draft bill, we will be _ bill already. we are updating the draft bill, we will be introducing | draft bill, we will be introducing it in the coming weeks, and introducing a new requirement on all online platforms, whether those are social media platforms or commercial pornography sites, to prevent children under the age of 18 viewing pornography. we think that is really important because a shockingly high proportion of children have viewed and are viewing online pornography, 51%, over half of 11 to 13—year—olds have viewed online pornography, which i think is a horrifyingly high figure for children so young. the police tell us they are concerned that this is fuelling the increase in sexual assaults we are seeing amongst school age children. and thatis amongst school age children. and that is why it's important we take on brands of action. and that's what this change being announced today and implemented in a few weeks' time
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via the bill is intended to do. chris felt, thank you. let's get the sport now and john is on the slopes in aberdeen this morning. has he got his skis on? i cannot wait.- has he got his skis on? i cannot wait. a, ., ., i cannot wait. morning. i am all the wa u- i cannot wait. morning. i am all the way no here- _ i cannot wait. morning. i am all the way no here- we — i cannot wait. morning. i am all the way up here. we are on _ i cannot wait. morning. i am all the way up here. we are on the - i cannot wait. morning. i am all the way up here. we are on the dry - way up here. we are on the dry slopes in aberdeen which is where it all began for kirsty mueller, the 17—year—old who has made such a brilliant impact on her olympic day view in beijing. she was taking part in the bake there were big air competition. i am with tom, he was asking me what trick i'm going to do. i said, asking me what trick i'm going to do. isaid, i'm not going asking me what trick i'm going to do. i said, i'm not going to any trick, i'm going to attempt to get to the bottom in one piece! well, that was close. well, there we go. just about made it. with a little
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detour. but someone who can do it a lot better is kirsty herself, she is a sensation in the making. it was quite superb last night what she did despite missing out on a medal. at 17 years old, the youngest gb athlete competing in beijing. this is how the final went down, having qualified yesterday she put down a storming first run. this event all about the hugejump storming first run. this event all about the huge jump you get and the spins and tricks you are marked for that you do afterwards. it was the second that she laid down a second there were really good score again. really had to go for it in her third jump, really had to go for it in her third jump, couldn't quite know the landing, and missed out on a podium place. as you can imagine, on her olympic debut, in a sport making its olympic debut, in a sport making its olympic debut, in a sport making its olympic debut, she was delighted with what she produced overnight. i'm so happy right now, honestly! the level— i'm so happy right now, honestly! the level was insane. 0h, i'm so happy right now, honestly! the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for— the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for it _
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the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for it first run, cover the blunt— went for it first run, cover the blunt grab _ went for it first run, cover the blunt grab. i think that's the best i've blunt grab. ! think that's the best i've ever— blunt grab. i think that's the best i've ever done it. it feels amazing, i've ever done it. it feels amazing, i couldn't— i've ever done it. it feels amazing, i couldn't have hoped to have skied better— i couldn't have hoped to have skied better today. so proud of all the girls _ better today. so proud of all the uirls. ,, , better today. so proud of all the uirls. . , , ., better today. so proud of all the uirls. ,, , , ., ., better today. so proud of all the uirls. . , , ., ., , girls. she is proud of herself, her team-mates. _ girls. she is proud of herself, her team-mates, her _ girls. she is proud of herself, her team-mates, her team _ girls. she is proud of herself, her team-mates, her team out - girls. she is proud of herself, her| team-mates, her team out there, girls. she is proud of herself, her i team-mates, her team out there, i team—mates, her team out there, i think someone who will be proud of kirsty as her dad jim who joins us now. good morning, jim. kirsty as her dad jim who 'oins us now. good morning, jim._ now. good morning, jim. hello. how are ou now. good morning, jim. hello. how are you doing? _ now. good morning, jim. hello. how are you doing? very _ now. good morning, jim. hello. how are you doing? very well. _ now. good morning, jim. hello. how are you doing? very well. it's - are you doing? very well. it's great to be here — are you doing? very well. it's great to be here where _ are you doing? very well. it's great to be here where it _ are you doing? very well. it's great to be here where it all— are you doing? very well. it's great to be here where it all started - are you doing? very well. it's great to be here where it all started for l to be here where it all started for kirsty, where i think you can tell me at the age of three she came here, but on skis of the first time and never looked back.— here, but on skis of the first time and never looked back. pretty much. as a great facility, _ and never looked back. pretty much. as a great facility, great _ and never looked back. pretty much. as a great facility, great people. - as a great facility, great people. she started off doing alpine and always— she started off doing alpine and always looked across to the other slope _ always looked across to the other slope where the jumpers, and she was always— slope where the jumpers, and she was always eyeing that up and eventually one of— always eyeing that up and eventually one of the _ always eyeing that up and eventually one of the clubs she was out, they gave _ one of the clubs she was out, they gave her— one of the clubs she was out, they gave her a — one of the clubs she was out, they gave her a go at the end of that, and never— gave her a go at the end of that, and never looked back, really. find
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and never looked back, really. and it's amazing- _ and never looked back, really. jifuc it's amazing. am i right in saying it's amazing. am i right in saying it was the last olympics, she was actually watching all that unfold, pictures on her phone, in the back of your car on a family trip? yeah, we were driving _ of your car on a family trip? yeah, we were driving up _ of your car on a family trip? yeah, we were driving up to go - of your car on a family trip? yeah, i we were driving up to go skiing when she was— we were driving up to go skiing when she was watching that. that's really what inspired her, i think, she was watching that. that's really what inspired her, ithink, really gave _ what inspired her, ithink, really gave her— what inspired her, ithink, really gave her the edge to want to take it to another— gave her the edge to want to take it to another level. to dedicate herself— to another level. to dedicate herself to it.— to another level. to dedicate herself to it. ., ., , , to another level. to dedicate herselfto it. ., ., , , herself to it. yeah. you must be so roud. herself to it. yeah. you must be so proud. undoubtedly _ herself to it. yeah. you must be so proud. undoubtedly a _ herself to it. yeah. you must be so proud. undoubtedly a star - herself to it. yeah. you must be so proud. undoubtedly a star in - proud. undoubtedly a star in the making. tom was asking what trick i was going to do. when kirsty started producing those tricks, no easy thing, pretty nerve—racking, it requires real guts — how do you feel every time using a pulling those moves? kirsty does all the training, strengthening, conditioning, she has put the hours in the work in, so you
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have to go with it and let her do her thing without transferring any nervousness on to go with it and let her do her thing without transferring any nervousness onto her. i transferring any nervousness onto her. ~ , ., transferring any nervousness onto her. ~' . , transferring any nervousness onto her. ~ ., , ., her. i think is a family we are re her. i think is a family we are pretty much _ her. i think is a family we are pretty much used _ her. i think is a family we are pretty much used to - her. i think is a family we are pretty much used to it. - her. i think is a family we are | pretty much used to it. yeah, her. i think is a family we are i pretty much used to it. yeah, it her. i think is a family we are - pretty much used to it. yeah, it is really— pretty much used to it. yeah, it is really her— pretty much used to it. yeah, it is really her against the course, and we just— really her against the course, and we just get— really her against the course, and we just get on with it. we have to -et we just get on with it. we have to get over— we just get on with it. we have to get over the nerves. yes, you are worried, _ get over the nerves. yes, you are worried, especially when we are not there _ worried, especially when we are not there but, — worried, especially when we are not there. but, yeah, she is capable and she is_ there. but, yeah, she is capable and she is ready — there. but, yeah, she is capable and she is ready. she there. but, yeah, she is capable and she is ready-— she is ready. she is indeed. no sign of nerves overnight. _ she is ready. she is indeed. no sign of nerves overnight. what _ she is ready. she is indeed. no sign of nerves overnight. what a - of nerves overnight. what a brilliant performance, finishing fifth in the big air event overnight. and she still has the slopestyle event, so there is still the chance of a medal. jim, great to speak to you. i wanted to quickly bring in some of the youngsters here this morning. what did you make on it overnight? you must be so pleased with what kirsty has done. do you want to follow in her footsteps?
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kind of, in the racing side. watching _ kind of, in the racing side. watching someone i used to ski with a couple _ watching someone i used to ski with a couple of— watching someone i used to ski with a couple of years ago, at the olympics _ a couple of years ago, at the olympics-— olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah, olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah. she _ olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah, she started _ olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah, she started here - olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah, she started here and - olympics. that was brilliant, wasn't it? yeah, she started here and now| it? yeah, she started here and now she is in the _ it? yeah, she started here and now she is in the olympics. _ it? yeah, she started here and now she is in the olympics. amazing. i she is in the olympics. amazing. fan a she is in the olympics. amazing. fancy a gold _ she is in the olympics. amazing. fancy a gold medal— she is in the olympics. amazing. fancy a gold medal one - she is in the olympics. amazing. fancy a gold medal one day? - fancy a gold medal one day? yes, robabl . fancy a gold medal one day? yes, probably- it _ fancy a gold medal one day? yes, probably. it worked for _ fancy a gold medal one day? yes, probably. it worked for kirsty, - probably. it worked for kirsty, no doubt it can _ probably. it worked for kirsty, no doubt it can work _ probably. it worked for kirsty, no doubt it can work for _ probably. it worked for kirsty, no doubt it can work for you - probably. it worked for kirsty, no doubt it can work for you guys. it j doubt it can work for you guys. it could have been gb's first medal of the games, and it wasn't to be for the games, and it wasn't to be for the curlers either. they lost to sweden this morning. but so many events to come. i'm sure gb will pick up theirfirst events to come. i'm sure gb will pick up their first medal soon. john, congratulations on being outside in a dry ski slope, skiing, bringing us the sports news, interviewing... we were a bit concerned went on to the astroturf, but you brought it
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back. ., ., ., back. you and me both, dad! i thought there _ back. you and me both, dad! i thought there was - back. you and me both, dad! i thought there was going - back. you and me both, dad! i thought there was going to | back. you and me both, dad! i i thought there was going to be back. you and me both, dad! - i thought there was going to be a horrible incident, you careering into a child. thank you, john. everyone is safe. a technical masterpiece, that, getting down there to interview someone's parent miles away and then chatting to children who are also alive. and all the sport as well! "bastille" already have two uk number one albums under their belt — and this week, they're hoping for their third. with more than 1.5 billion views, they're one of the world's most streamed bands. "give me the future" celebrates being able to get back out onto the dancefloor, and it's currently at the top of the mid—week charts. let's take a look... # so shut off the lights, we don't need them to dance. # hey... # oh, you said... # just shut off the lights, we don't need them to dance #.
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# don't wake me up, don't wake me up. # when i'm dreaming tonight, i can do anything. i can go anywhere. # when i'm dreaming tonight, i can be anyone. # so don't wake me up, don't wake me up #. # days like these you want to get away. # close our eyes, pretend we're miles away. # hear the sound of my heart exploding. # can you hear the sound of my heart exploding #. # there'll be no bad days, there'll be bad days. # there'll be no bad days. # you'll have no more bad days. # when you're gone, gone. # there'll be no bad days. # you'll have no more bad days #.
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we can speak now to bastille's dan smith and kyle simmons. good morning. you are on tour at the moment, you are in preston last night. moment, you are in preston last niuht. ., , , ., night. two gigs in preston last niaht, night. two gigs in preston last night. two _ night. two gigs in preston last night. two in _ night. two gigs in preston last night, two in leeds— night. two gigs in preston last night, two in leeds tonight. i night. two gigs in preston last| night, two in leeds tonight. so night. two gigs in preston last - night, two in leeds tonight. so how are ou night, two in leeds tonight. so how are you this — night, two in leeds tonight. so how are you this morning? _ night, two in leeds tonight. so how are you this morning? were - night, two in leeds tonight. so how are you this morning? were not - night, two in leeds tonight. so how. are you this morning? were not used to bein: are you this morning? were not used to being up — are you this morning? were not used to being up quite _ are you this morning? were not used to being up quite this _ are you this morning? were not used to being up quite this early. - to being up quite this early. welcome to our world! great news about the album being a boy charts at mid week. you must be excited about where you could be at the weekend. we about where you could be at the weekend. ~ , ., , , weekend. we will see, either massive essimist. weekend. we will see, either massive pessimist- but. _ weekend. we will see, either massive pessimist. but, yeah... _ weekend. we will see, either massive pessimist. but, yeah... it's _ weekend. we will see, either massive pessimist. but, yeah... it's great - pessimist. but, yeah... it's great bein: on pessimist. but, yeah... it's great being on tour— pessimist. but, yeah... it's great being on tour together! - pessimist. but, yeah... it's great being on tour together! we're - pessimist. but, yeah... it's great being on tour together! we're so| being on tour together! we're so ha - being on tour together! we're so happy people _ being on tour together! we're so happy people are _ being on tour together! we're so happy people are responding - being on tour together! we're so | happy people are responding well to the album. so excited our music out and be playing again. but! the album. so excited our music out and be playing again.— and be playing again. and you are -la in: and be playing again. and you are playing shows _ and be playing again. and you are playing shows in _ and be playing again. and you are playing shows in a _ and be playing again. and you are playing shows in a different - and be playing again. and you are playing shows in a different way, l playing shows in a different way, they are much smaller venues, smaller audiences. what difference does that make? is it more special?
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it has been amazing, easing back into it, getting to go back to small, independent venues. the tool is in collaboration with small indie record shops. it's great getting to be in smaller rooms, looking people in the eye, taking requests... taking requests! it’s in the eye, taking requests... taking requests!— in the eye, taking requests... taking requests! it's loads more intimate. and _ taking requests! it's loads more intimate. and there _ taking requests! it's loads more intimate. and there is _ taking requests! it's loads more intimate. and there is a - taking requests! it's loads more intimate. and there is a park - taking requests! it's loads more i intimate. and there is a park where we gather— intimate. and there is a park where we gather up all their dreams and... that sounds— we gather up all their dreams and... that sounds terrifying!— that sounds terrifying! we've been t in: to that sounds terrifying! we've been trying to make _ that sounds terrifying! we've been trying to make it — that sounds terrifying! we've been trying to make it really _ that sounds terrifying! we've been trying to make it really inclusive, l trying to make it really inclusive, so the _ trying to make it really inclusive, so the people who can't make it to a show— so the people who can't make it to a show or— so the people who can't make it to a show or people in different countries we've been taking requests online _ countries we've been taking requests online and _ countries we've been taking requests online and trim in the run. tell countries we've been taking requests online and trim in the run.— online and trim in the run. tell me about the dreams, how— online and trim in the run. tell me about the dreams, how does - online and trim in the run. tell me about the dreams, how does that l about the dreams, how does that work? ., , , about the dreams, how does that work? . , , ., about the dreams, how does that work? ., work? the album is about escapism and it's all about... _ work? the album is about escapism and it's all about... don't _ work? the album is about escapism and it's all about... don't ask - work? the album is about escapism and it's all about... don't ask us - and it's all about... don't ask us to do it now- — and it's all about... don't ask us to do it now. i _ and it's all about. .. don't ask us to do it now. i feel— and it's all about... don't ask us to do it now. i feel like - and it's all about... don't ask us to do it now. i feel like that's i to do it now. i feel like that's where — to do it now. i feel like that's where this— to do it now. i feel like that's where this is going.— to do it now. i feel like that's where this is going. well... the album is a _ where this is going. well... the album is a bit _ where this is going. well... the album is a bit about _ where this is going. well... the album is a bit about the - where this is going. well... the album is a bit about the future | album is a bit about the future and escapism and dreaming of those kind
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of things. so we've been asking people online and in the queue for the show to send in their way to streams, and we sort of amalgamate a bunch of them, we get them written out, play some audio clips and we sort ofjam through this weird futuristic song, and i'm just singing in hard autotune the maddest stuff from people's nights the night before! and it's generally quite funny, is the back—and—forth between all of us on stage... i don't know, it kind of works. it’s all of us on stage... i don't know, it kind of works.— it kind of works. it's ridiculous but it's been _ it kind of works. it's ridiculous but it's been really _ it kind of works. it's ridiculous but it's been really fun. - it kind of works. it's ridiculous but it's been really fun. who | it kind of works. it's ridiculous - but it's been really fun. who came up but it's been really fun. who came up with the idea? i but it's been really fun. who came up with the idea?— up with the idea? i don't know, i think people _ up with the idea? i don't know, i think people want _ up with the idea? i don't know, i think people want a _ up with the idea? i don't know, i think people want a bit - up with the idea? i don't know, i think people want a bit of - think people want a bit of connection and interactivity. and we want to— connection and interactivity. and we want to make the album and the process of— want to make the album and the process of the tour as inclusive as possible — process of the tour as inclusive as possible. so we've been trying to stream _ possible. so we've been trying to stream it — possible. so we've been trying to stream it online for people who can't _ stream it online for people who can't make the shows as well. it's kind of— can't make the shows as well. it's kind of weird, but it's been really fun _ kind of weird, but it's been really fun. , , ., , kind of weird, but it's been really fun. , kind of weird, but it's been really fun. _., , , ., kind of weird, but it's been really fun. , , , ., , fun. everybody has been through this andemic fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for— fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for the _ fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for the last _ fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for the last 18 _ fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for the last 18 months, - fun. everybody has been through this pandemic for the last 18 months, two years, and you can see from how much
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energy you have this morning that being able to tour and being in these venues are being able to interact with your audience is obviously something you are really enjoying. obviously something you are really en'o inc. , , ., �*, obviously something you are really en'o inc. , , . �*, ., enjoying. definitely, and it's a hue enjoying. definitely, and it's a huge part _ enjoying. definitely, and it's a huge part of— enjoying. definitely, and it's a huge part of band _ enjoying. definitely, and it's a huge part of band life - enjoying. definitely, and it's a huge part of band life and - enjoying. definitely, and it's a . huge part of band life and playing music— huge part of band life and playing music and — huge part of band life and playing music and being able to interact with people in that way. and there is the _ with people in that way. and there is the writing of the music on the playing _ is the writing of the music on the playing of— is the writing of the music on the playing of the music, and the whole playing _ playing of the music, and the whole playing was stripped away. we haven't — playing was stripped away. we haven't been in a band in that way since _ haven't been in a band in that way since we _ haven't been in a band in that way since we started. so now we get a chance _ since we started. so now we get a chance to — since we started. so now we get a chance to go back, as dan says, we are doing _ chance to go back, as dan says, we are doing the tour and on some of the dates— are doing the tour and on some of the dates we are doing two shows that day— the dates we are doing two shows that dayjust to try and get as much of it back— that dayjust to try and get as much of it back as— that dayjust to try and get as much of it back as possible, make up for lost time — of it back as possible, make up for lost time. �* i. �* , lost time. and you've been working on the album. _ lost time. and you've been working on the album, you _ lost time. and you've been working on the album, you were _ lost time. and you've been working on the album, you were working i lost time. and you've been working i on the album, you were working on it for a long time, before the pandemic started? ~ , , for a long time, before the pandemic started? , , ., started? we basically started... a first album _ started? we basically started... a first album came _ started? we basically started... a first album came out _ started? we basically started... a first album came out in _ started? we basically started... a first album came out in 2013, - started? we basically started... a first album came out in 2013, and| started? we basically started... a i first album came out in 2013, and we did three albums and a bunch of tours didn't step until 2020 we were planning to make an album and take
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year out. everyone stopped. so we started the record in 2019, and it was an amazing anchor for us to have through these complicated last couple of years. to have the sort of project to work on. and everything that happened massively informed it. the album is about trying to be optimistic about the future, and our relationship with technology and how it affects all our lives. and living through the last couple of years... trying to be optimistic. how are you managing with that? it trying to be optimistic. how are you managing with that?— managing with that? it doesn't sit amazin al managing with that? it doesn't sit amazingly with — managing with that? it doesn't sit amazingly with me, _ managing with that? it doesn't sit amazingly with me, but _ managing with that? it doesn't sit amazingly with me, but we - managing with that? it doesn't sit amazingly with me, but we are i managing with that? it doesn't sit i amazingly with me, but we are doing our best. ., ,. amazingly with me, but we are doing our best. ., i. ., ., amazingly with me, but we are doing our best. ., ., ., ., ., our best. you said you are a natural pessimist. — our best. you said you are a natural pessimist. are _ our best. you said you are a natural pessimist, are you _ our best. you said you are a natural pessimist, are you a _ our best. you said you are a natural pessimist, are you a natural- pessimist, are you a natural optimist? how is it working a band? i think i definitely am the kind of li-ht i think i definitely am the kind of light relief of the band. i will try and bring — light relief of the band. i will try and bring us back. and i am on this new album. — and bring us back. and i am on this new album, there is actually a few hopeful— new album, there is actually a few hopeful moments which is rare for a bastille _ hopeful moments which is rare for a bastille record! one song in
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particular, are single out at the moment, — particular, are single out at the moment, is one of those moments. so, idon't _ moment, is one of those moments. so, idon't know. _ moment, is one of those moments. so, i don't know, you are coming round. we wanted — idon't know, you are coming round. we wanted it— i don't know, you are coming round. we wanted it to reflect that positivity, and it's really inclusive. riz ahmed does an amazing spoken word piece in the middle, there is an amazing singer who finishes the record. loads of friends play all over. we wanted it to feel super collaborative and hopeful. to feel super collaborative and ho eful. , ., to feel super collaborative and hoeful. , ., ., hopeful. sally mentioned about technology. _ hopeful. sally mentioned about technology, but _ hopeful. sally mentioned about technology, but also _ hopeful. sally mentioned about technology, but also the - hopeful. sally mentioned about technology, but also the music| technology, but also the music industry, and here you are doing gigs trying to get back in tune with that local independent record shop, which is still at the heart and soul of the industry.— of the industry. massively. small venues and _ of the industry. massively. small venues and those _ of the industry. massively. small venues and those record - of the industry. massively. small venues and those record stores l of the industry. massively. small. venues and those record stores are so vital for new artists coming through, new bands. we cut our teeth playing small venues and driving round the country in a car we borrowed from my friend's mum and sleeping on floors. we wouldn't be in a band
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sleeping on floors. we wouldn't be in a hand if it wasn't for that. stand in a band if it wasn't for that. and ou had in a band if it wasn't for that. and you had huge _ in a hand if it wasn't for that. and you had huge success in the states. weirdly. hat you had huge success in the states. weirdl . ., , ., weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are ou weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are you that _ weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are you that you — weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are you that you can _ weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are you that you can continue i weirdly. not weirdly! how hopeful are you that you can continue with j are you that you can continue with that and maybe get out there a bit more? we that and maybe get out there a bit more? ~ ., that and maybe get out there a bit more? . . . ., that and maybe get out there a bit more? ~ . ., ., , more? we have a tour... pretty ho eful. more? we have a tour... pretty hopeful- if — more? we have a tour... pretty hopeful. if no _ more? we have a tour... pretty hopeful. if no it _ more? we have a tour... pretty hopeful. if no it doesn't - more? we have a tour... pretty| hopeful. if no it doesn't happen, things— hopeful. if no it doesn't happen, things are — hopeful. if no it doesn't happen, things are going really bad. | hopeful. if no it doesn't happen, things are going really bad. i was t in: to things are going really bad. i was trying to deduct _ things are going really bad. i was trying to deduct there's - things are going really bad. i was trying to deduct there's an - trying to deduct there's an incredible stat about your success incredible stat about your success in the uk and the us. have you got that? i read it somewhere. you are the only people apart from the beatles and someone else to have... queen! top five in the us in the uk. i have... queen! top five in the us in the uk. ., �* ~ ., ., ., the uk. i don't even know what that means. the uk. i don't even know what that means- but — the uk. i don't even know what that means- but we _ the uk. i don't even know what that means. but we are _ the uk. i don't even know what that means. but we are so _ the uk. i don't even know what that means. but we are so lucky. - the uk. i don't even know what that means. but we are so lucky. this i means. but we are so lucky. this band started with making songs in a laptop in my bedroom, and rehearsing in a windowless basement in croydon, so the idea we get to release the songs all over the place is still so
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mad to us and we feel incredibly lucky. mad to us and we feel incredibly luc . �* ., , ., , ., lucky. and to be in a small venue like preston _ lucky. and to be in a small venue like preston and _ lucky. and to be in a small venue like preston and leeds _ lucky. and to be in a small venue like preston and leeds and i lucky. and to be in a small venue i like preston and leeds and reconnect with those people who put you there in the first place, we have that global stardom, in the first place, we have that globalstardom, it in the first place, we have that global stardom, it must be quite surreal. , , ~ , ., surreal. definitely. as we have crown surreal. definitely. as we have grown and _ surreal. definitely. as we have grown and are _ surreal. definitely. as we have grown and are lucky _ surreal. definitely. as we have grown and are lucky enough i surreal. definitely. as we have grown and are lucky enough to j surreal. definitely. as we have i grown and are lucky enough to play bigger— grown and are lucky enough to play bigger places, there is always that place _ bigger places, there is always that place in _ bigger places, there is always that place in your heart where it is like. — place in your heart where it is like. it— place in your heart where it is like, it would be good to go back to the smaller— like, it would be good to go back to the smaller venues and be able to see every— the smaller venues and be able to see every face in the audience. it -ets see every face in the audience. it gets bigger and louder, but you lose an element— gets bigger and louder, but you lose an element of the intimacy you get in those _ an element of the intimacy you get in those small venues. and also to be able _ in those small venues. and also to be able to— in those small venues. and also to be able to support those independent venues _ be able to support those independent venues as— be able to support those independent venues as well. find be able to support those independent venues as well.— venues as well. and we've been takin: venues as well. and we've been taking questions _ venues as well. and we've been taking questions and _ venues as well. and we've been taking questions and stuff- venues as well. and we've been taking questions and stuff and l taking questions and stuff and taking questions and stuff and taking requests, and hearing as i'm singing, sally from preston's weird dream aboutjustin bieber in a car park... dream about justin bieber in a car ark... ., ., dream about justin bieber in a car ark". ., ., ,., dream about justin bieber in a car ark". ., ., 4' ., dream about justin bieber in a car ark... ., ., ~ ., ., ., park... how do you know about that? and hearing —
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park... how do you know about that? and hearing how excited. _ park. .. how do you know about that? and hearing how excited. i _ park... how do you know about that? and hearing how excited. i heard i and hearing how excited. i heard about that _ and hearing how excited. i heard about that dream, _ and hearing how excited. i heard about that dream, it _ and hearing how excited. i heard about that dream, it was - and hearing how excited. i heard about that dream, it was weird. l and hearing how excited. i heard i about that dream, it was weird. not the about that dream, it was weird. tint the weirdest. about that dream, it was weird. not the weirdest. well, _ about that dream, it was weird. not the weirdest. well, enjoy _ about that dream, it was weird. not the weirdest. well, enjoy leeds, i about that dream, it was weird. not | the weirdest. well, enjoy leeds, two the weirdest. well, en'oy leeds, two ins the weirdest. well, en'oy leeds, two .'.5 in the weirdest. well, en'oy leeds, two gigs in leeds _ the weirdest. well, en'oy leeds, two gigs in leeds tonight. i 'give me the future' is out now, and the arena tour starts in bournemouth on march the 31st. best of luck. stay with us — headlines coming up. you want to share your dreams at all? no, not right now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines. after keir starmer is harassed by protesters shouting 'jimmy savile', there'll be no apology from downing street, despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw accusations he made against the labour leader. profiting from the price rises. while families are looking at 50% increases in energy bills, bp have just reported a multi—billion—pound rise in revenue.
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a tale fit for a princess — the duchess of cambridge is to become the first royal to read a cbeebies bedtime story. good morning from aberdeen. to beijing. we are on the dry ski slopes where it started for the youngest member of team gb in beijing, kirsty muir, whojust missed out on a medal overnight. neighbours theme tune. it looks like not everybody needs neighbours these days. the aussie soap facing the axe, we'll look back at the highs and lows of ramsay street good morning, cloud across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england producing rain. to the north of that, wintry showers and gusty wind. to the south, more cloud but milder. all the details later.
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it's tuesday, the eighth of february. downing street has no intention of apologising to the labour leader sir keir starmer after boris johnson falsely accused him of failing to prosecute the serial sex offender jimmy savile. it comes after sir keir was heckled by protesters over the issue outside parliament last night. two people have been arrested. political editor laura kuenssberg reports. this is not normal rough and tumble, but abuse and untrue accusations being hurled at the leader of the opposition. one false claim that he protected the paedophilejimmy savile. keir starmer bundled to a police car. two arrests were made. it happened outside parliament, where the prime minister made a false link between the two. i am sure there were some people out there who already had conspiracy theories in their head, but the prime minister has given them the platform and permission, and that is tantamount to inciting them to these kind of horrific mobster activities.
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the prime minister wrongly suggested the labour leader had been involved in the decisions not to prosecute jimmy savile when he was the boss of public prosecutions. borisjohnson clarified after an outcry, but he did not say sorry. a lot of people have got hot under the collar and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear. i am talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. the prime minister wrote online... but others in his own party want him to say much more. a former tory cabinet member, julian smith, said... there is no sign of that.
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boris johnson's failure to apologise has already cost him one of his closest political confidantes. munira mirza, who worked for the pm for more than a decade, quit last week in disgust. protests around here are nothing new — for or against brexit, anti—lockdown, pro—public anger. but the prime minister may find himself accused of stirring up unacceptable behaviour. just when number 10 looked to calm things down. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. political correspondent chris mason is in westminster. we have been listening at interviews today and it does not appear it will calm down anytime soon. it today and it does not appear it will calm down anytime soon.- today and it does not appear it will calm down anytime soon. it will not. the government _ calm down anytime soon. it will not. the government absolutely - calm down anytime soon. it will not. the government absolutely digging i calm down anytime soon. it will not. | the government absolutely digging in on this. number 10 determined not to apologise. their argument is they say if the prime minister has been subjected to all sorts of questions about lots of parties in government
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during lockdown is that he was not at, of course he was at some of them, but not at lots them, then why should they not ask questions they see as legitimate about the crown prosecution service and its decision not to prosecute jimmy savile when sir keir starmer was leading that institution. we should make it absolutely clear that sir keir starmer had nothing to do whatsoever with that decision not to prosecute jimmy savile, which was at the heart of the allegation made by the prime minister eight days ago. number 10 is determined not to apologise, and ministers out and about, including here in the last half hour, articulating a similar argument. these people who are harassing sir keir starmer were mostly talking about _ keir starmer were mostly talking about julian assange for some reason i don't _ about julian assange for some reason i don't understand, talking about covid _ i don't understand, talking about covid vaccines and the conduct of the opposition in general. they mention— the opposition in general. they mentionjimmy savile but most of
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what _ mentionjimmy savile but most of what they— mentionjimmy savile but most of what they were shouting was to do withjulian — what they were shouting was to do withjulian sands. i do not accept any link— withjulian sands. ! do not accept any link to— withjulian sands. i do not accept any link to the prime minister's reference — any link to the prime minister's reference to keir starmer's record as director— reference to keir starmer's record as director of public and is and what _ as director of public and is and what happened last night. in other words, what happened last night. in other words. they _ what happened last night. in other words. they say — what happened last night. in other words, they say it _ what happened last night. in other words, they say it is _ what happened last night. in other words, they say it is the _ what happened last night. in other words, they say it is the fault i what happened last night. in other words, they say it is the fault of i words, they say it is the fault of the mob and not borisjohnson. but we have seen former conservative cabinet ministers boiling with anger about this, who see it as illegitimate what the prime minister had to say and this in the last hour from kim leadbeater, labour mp in west yorkshire. remember, hersister jo cox was murdered on the streets going about her business as an mp. kim leadbeater says she is incredibly angry and upset at the scenes yesterday. she said she keeps thinking about keir starmer's and david lammy�*s friends, david lammy was with sir keir starmer. she said these things do notjust happen, words have consequences and leaders have a duty to behave responsibly
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and politics is not a game, our country deserves far better. this row is far from _ country deserves far better. this row is far from over. _ in the last hour, the energy company, bp, has announced full—year profits of almost £10 billion. nina's here to tell us more. £10 billion profit from bp, a multinational oil company and extract oilfrom the multinational oil company and extract oil from the north sea and other places. profits of 9.5 billion. more than 2020 when we stop doing anything but it is the highest amount of profit in eight years. it is not a surprise. shell announced similar profits last week and it is because of supply and demand. we stop doing anything globally and then we all started needing energy a lot at the same time which pushed up prices. the chief executive said when the market is strong, oil prices are strong, it is literally a
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cash machine which triggered an angry response from campaigners who said the amount of profit is obscene when families are struggling to pay bills and we are all looking at bills and we are all looking at bills going up around 50%. bp and shell do not charge directly for energy but their price increases are part of what trickles down to us. labour said they should be subjected to a windfall tax, when you put more into the public part because of unusual circumstances leading to unusual circumstances leading to unusual profit. it is thought the chancellor do not want to do that. bp are investing heavily in renewable energy and today said they were upping carbon technology tenfold, and they form part of investment in pensions. but this is a number. analysts think if bp and shell combine profits this year, £40 billion, it would be enough to cover energy bills for the majority of uk
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households. a report by a police watchdog has found that officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 19905. the northern ireland police ombudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmaker�*s shop — and six other fatal shootings. the police service of northern ireland has apologised forfailings identified in the report, and to the families of the victims. cbeebies bedtime stories has made its first royal signing. the duchess of cambridge will take on the role this week, settling down with a book to raise awareness on children's mental health. the duchess joins a host of famous faces, as tim muffett reports. the latest famous face to read the cbeebies bedtime story. this sunday, the duchess of cambridge will read the owl who was afraid of the dark byjill tomlinson as part of children's mental health week. cbeebies bedtime story. hello, my name's ed. ed sheeran.
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hello, my name is reese. reese witherspoon. hello, my name's tom. tom hardy. just a few of the household names who have previously signed up for the bedtime story. hi. hello. the duchess of cambridge has also been a keen supporter of early years education. two years ago, she was involved in the bbc�*s tiny happy people campaign, which was aimed at developing children's communication skills. sort of 90% of our adult brain grows before the age of five. and itjust shows what a precious time this is and what an amazing opportunity us as parents have got to really nurture their minds. the theme of this year's children's mental health week is "growing together". the story read by the duchess is about a baby barn owl who is helped by others to grow in confidence. her appearance also coincides
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with the 20th anniversary of cbeebies and cbbc. tim muffett, bbc news. it is on on sunday night at 6:50pm. it is on on sunday night at 6:50pm. i think it will get a hefty audience. and it probably will be on the iplayer. we will probably show some on monday, as well. here's carol. a mile start this morning more or less across the board except in parts of northern scotland. generally temperatures today will be above average. and highest in the south, where we could see 14 degrees. we have a line of rain across southern scotland, northern england, northern ireland. and also wintry showers across the north of scotland. most of the wintry showers being on top of the hills but gusty winds in the northern and western isles up to 55 mph. the head of the
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weather front more cloud in wales and the south—west producing drizzle. we will see sunshine through the midlands, east anglia, the southeast. it will be breezy wherever you are. temperatures from five in lerwick to 14 in norwich and london. overnight, the weatherfront will slip further south. heavy rain at times across north—west england and the pennines. to the south of it, drier conditions and mild air, but we will see snow showers to sea level across the far north of scotland. and here in the north and west we are looking at the gusty winds. tomorrow, continuing with strong winds blowing a gale literally in the north and west. snow showers in the highlands down to lower levels. the cold air filtering further south. by the time we get to thursday and friday, the cold air will be upon us all.
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in september last year we introduced you to three dads — mike, andy and tim — who embarked on an incredible challenge in memory of their daughters, who had all taken their own lives. after walking 300 miles, and raising nearly a million pounds, they're now on a mission to see suicide prevention taught in schools, and will meet the government today to disuss their campaign. we'll speak to them in just a moment, but first, let's remind ourselves of their journey. tim, andy and mike. brought together through grief. each dad lost a daughter — emily, sophie and beth — to suicide. determined to help and prevent otherfamilies from going through the same, they set off on a 300—milejourney. walking the distance between their homes in cumbria, manchester and norfolk, their story touched many people along the way. in 2019, i lost my daughter,
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tasha's little sister, katrina. i've recently lost my daughter to suicide, and ijust need to understand why. i'm a member of the same club. i lost a daughter, nikki, - when she was 19, back in 1987. the donations rolled in, including from daniel craig and nicole kidman, who each gave £10,000. the three dads smashed their original £30,000 target. battered and bruised, they crossed the finish line. so far, they've raised nearly £1 million for charity. the goal now is to get people talking and opening up as soon as possible. they started out as three dads walking — now hoping to turn their tragedy into a positive step for the future.
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abi smitton, bbc news. mike, andy and tim join us now from westminster. it is nice to have you back on the programme. after all you have been through it must feel like a significant day to be outside the houses of parliament about to speak to some mps. houses of parliament about to speak to some mps-— to some mps. yes, absolutely, it is incredible and _ to some mps. yes, absolutely, it is incredible and a _ to some mps. yes, absolutely, it is incredible and a privilege _ to some mps. yes, absolutely, it is incredible and a privilege to - to some mps. yes, absolutely, it is incredible and a privilege to be i incredible and a privilege to be down here. we were invited down by gillian keegan, ministerfor care gillian keegan, minister for care and gillian keegan, ministerfor care and mental health. she has suicide prevention on her portfolio and it is brilliant we have the opportunity to talk to her today.— to talk to her today. explain what it is ou to talk to her today. explain what it is you would — to talk to her today. explain what it is you would like _ to talk to her today. explain what it is you would like schools i to talk to her today. explain what it is you would like schools to i to talk to her today. explain what it is you would like schools to be | it is you would like schools to be able to do and what children need to be able to talk about. what able to do and what children need to be able to talk about.— be able to talk about. what struck us on the way _ be able to talk about. what struck us on the way down _ be able to talk about. what struck us on the way down was _ be able to talk about. what struck| us on the way down was everyday, be able to talk about. what struck i us on the way down was everyday, we spoke to people who lost children.
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the stories were all different but the outcome is the same. we had the same thing, which was we only found out suicide was the biggest killer of under 35s in the uk after we lost our child, why does nobody tell us about it? that led to the conversation about why it is not talked about in schools. it conversation about why it is not talked about in schools.- talked about in schools. it has become obvious _ talked about in schools. it has become obvious it _ talked about in schools. it has become obvious it is - talked about in schools. it has become obvious it is so i talked about in schools. it has i become obvious it is so important to prepare, _ become obvious it is so important to prepare, equip and invest in young people _ prepare, equip and invest in young people from school age and give them an awareness of mental health issues and of— an awareness of mental health issues and of suicide. to teach them awareness and prevention that will -ive awareness and prevention that will give them — awareness and prevention that will give them a knowledge they will carry— give them a knowledge they will carry through the rest of their lives — carry through the rest of their lives. ., , ., ., ., ., ., lives. tim, do you have an idea of what it will— lives. tim, do you have an idea of what it will look _ lives. tim, do you have an idea of what it will look like _ lives. tim, do you have an idea of what it will look like in _ lives. tim, do you have an idea of what it will look like in practice? i what it will look like in practice? is the point of meeting is like today to iron out those things. you want it taught in schools. it
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today to iron out those things. you want it taught in schools.— want it taught in schools. it seems obvious that _ want it taught in schools. it seems obvious that charities _ want it taught in schools. it seems obvious that charities have - want it taught in schools. it seems obvious that charities have suicide | obvious that charities have suicide prevention material available at the moment. we have a curriculum at school, phse, which talks about many things, but does not discuss the things, but does not discuss the thing most likely to kill our kids. surely, if it is a risk based assessment we should put that into the curriculum. free space up in the curriculum, drop something else out if necessary, but the charities have the material ready to go, so it is a simple, low—cost initiative. hoop the material ready to go, so it is a simple, low-cost initiative. how do ou feel simple, low-cost initiative. how do you feel about _ simple, low-cost initiative. how do you feel about parents _ simple, low-cost initiative. how do you feel about parents who - simple, low-cost initiative. how do you feel about parents who might l you feel about parents who might think they are frightened of talking to their children about this? i imagine you have firm views on this. what do you say to parents who are scared to talk about children who take their own lives? you scared to talk about children who take their own lives?— scared to talk about children who take their own lives? you have to talk about — take their own lives? you have to talk about it. — take their own lives? you have to talk about it. the _ take their own lives? you have to talk about it. the only _ take their own lives? you have to
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talk about it. the only way - take their own lives? you have to | talk about it. the only way people are saved is by communication and if we do not talk, people will die. what you learn after losing a child, if people had spoken about it beforehand, we might have had a chance to save our daughters and others. it is to talk, not to climb up. it seems crazy the schools are not geared up to talk about the single most dangerous thing in young people's lives, which is themselves. in talking to you on this programme, it is something you have touched on, conversations you wished you had had and now having spent time with the charity and learned more about it, you are encouraging others to have conversations, and sometimes to ask difficult questions of children. absolutely. suicide is not a subject you bring up readily with your family members, friends. it is very difficult. but it is so important sometimes to ask direct questions.
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you will often get a yes or no answer and that gives you the ability to act on it.— answer and that gives you the ability to act on it. how hopeful are ou ability to act on it. how hopeful are you of _ ability to act on it. how hopeful are you of getting _ ability to act on it. how hopeful are you of getting some - ability to act on it. how hopeful are you of getting some kind i ability to act on it. how hopeful are you of getting some kind ofj are you of getting some kind of commitment may be from the government today? what do you hope to come away with? to government today? what do you hope to come away with?— to come away with? to start that conversation. — to come away with? to start that conversation, because _ to come away with? to start that conversation, because clearly i to come away with? to start that conversation, because clearly we to come away with? to start that i conversation, because clearly we are seeing the department of health and social care and it is another government department who would have to deliver. it is opening the conversation as a starting point that charities are happy to support in the future. this is a starting point. in the future. this is a starting oint. ~ in the future. this is a starting oint. . , point. we saw in the film the number of --eole point. we saw in the film the number of people who _ point. we saw in the film the number of people who came _ point. we saw in the film the number of people who came up _ point. we saw in the film the number of people who came up to _ point. we saw in the film the number of people who came up to you - point. we saw in the film the number of people who came up to you and i point. we saw in the film the number. of people who came up to you and may be of people who came up to you and may he spoke for the first time about experiences in their family and amongst theirfriends. experiences in their family and amongst their friends. was that an eye—opener when you went on the walk, the number of people affected, and have never spoken to anybody about it? ., ., ,
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and have never spoken to anybody about it? . ., , ., and have never spoken to anybody about it? . . , ., ., and have never spoken to anybody about it? . ., , ., ., ., about it? that was at the heart of the walk. about it? that was at the heart of the walk- we _ about it? that was at the heart of the walk. we were _ about it? that was at the heart of the walk. we were trying - about it? that was at the heart of the walk. we were trying to i about it? that was at the heart of the walk. we were trying to showj about it? that was at the heart of. the walk. we were trying to show it could affect any family. we thought we might get approached by some people. what we did not expect is dozens and dozens and dozens of people we were seeing every day, all with the similar tale of we have only just found out with the similar tale of we have onlyjust found out how dangerous suicide is and why are we not talking about it? by the time we got into the second week of the walk, we seem to be carrying other people's stories with us and notjust our own. it feels like that here, it is notjust own. it feels like that here, it is not just the three own. it feels like that here, it is notjust the three of us standing here, but everybody who has contacted us. it is notjust the three of us standing here. we know the walk made _ three of us standing here. we know the walk made us _ three of us standing here. we know the walk made us all— three of us standing here. we know the walk made us all talk— three of us standing here. we know the walk made us all talk about i three of us standing here. we know the walk made us all talk about it. | the walk made us all talk about it. you are on the television, in the papers, the campaign was more visible. what is next for you? hate
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visible. what is next for you? we are ve visible. what is next for you? , are very positive about the meeting today with gillian keegan and very grateful. we will see afterwards. we have ideas. i think it is poignant because it is children's mental health week this week. bit by bit, we will see. health week this week. bit by bit, we will see-— health week this week. bit by bit, we will see. , ~' ., ,., we will see. they know something. the are we will see. they know something. they are not _ we will see. they know something. they are not telling _ we will see. they know something. they are not telling us. _ we will see. they know something. | they are not telling us. gentlemen, it is a privilege to speak to you. we wish you the best with the meeting. i am sure we will continue to follow your story. have a good day by the banks of the river thames. if you've been affected by any of the issues discussed, please visit bbc action line for support by searching bbc.co.uk/actionline. adele, ed sheeran, dave and little simz are just some of the artists leading the nominations at this year's brit awards. the ceremony is being hosted
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for the first time by the comedian mo gilligan, who takes over from jack whitehall. music correspondent mark savage has been chatting to him, ahead of tonight's event. british album of the year goes to adele! adele. it's ed sheeran. little mix! dave, psychodrama! dua lipa, future nostalgia. some of the biggest names in pop, and they are all nominated again at this year's brits. but one thing about the ceremony is new — the host, mo gilligan. i want you to take a look at this and read it out to me. ah! in 2013, i need to host the mobos or the brit awards. fingers crossed. this was tweeted. .. oh, my gosh, this was tweeted at 12 o'clock on the 6th of october, 2011. and i got two retweets! god bless whoever retweeted those, because they are the people that really believe in you when you've got nothing. nine years later, though, it's happened. i know, man. yeah, it's... i'll be honest — this is definitely,
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at the moment, it's still, like, i'm still pinching myself that i'm going to be able to host the brit awards. and the brits are known for being chaotic — how sharp do you have to be? oh, you've got to be so sharp, man. i think the brits is known for anything can happen, at any time, at any place, you know? i remember watching the brits when i was young and seeing geri halliwell with the spice girls wearing the unionjack dress — like, iconic moments. i remember tuning in and seeing dave perform at the piano with all the messages on it. and i think that's what's the cool thing about the brits is that you can have moments where it can be a bit chaotic and some carnage, but then you can have iconic moments where you'll be like, "oh, my god, i was there, i seen that live." # never mind, i'll find someone like you...#. adele, who gave a career making performance at the 2011 brits, will be back on stage tonight, and could win best album for the third time. # it's only when i'm lying in bed on my own...#. i others, like becky hill, are up for their first trophy. i'm super excited to be i at the brit awards this year. |a few years ago, i tweeted thatj
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i wouldn't go to the brit awards again until i was nominated, due to a high dose _ of impostor syndrome. so it's really nice to be back and feel like i belong - to be there this year. it's been lovely to see people come out and be so supportive. _ so, it's really... whether i win or not, - i already feel like a winner. one of the big changes this year is that the brits have scrapped the best male and female categories, and combined them into a single best artist prize. i think there are a number of reasons. but i guess probably the most exciting and important one is just to try to make the award as big as possible. also making the award as inclusive as possible as well — so how you choose to define as an artist, there is no barrier to stop you from sort of putting your music forward as well. # i still have faith in you...#. and returning to the brits for the first time since 1977 are abba, nominated for best international group. i must say, i don't think we ever had such good reviews, ever,
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as we have for this album. how does it feel to be on the shortlist again? i think it feels rather good, i have to say. i wouldn't mind getting a brit award. what would it mean to you if they open the envelope and they read out abba's name? how will you react? i don't know. i can send you a text and tell you. i look forward to it, thank you! that was abba's benny andersson ending that report by mark savage. the real one, not the hologram we might see on stage when they are outperforming. and you cans see the brits tonight on itv at eight o'clock. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london — i'm alison earle. transport for london says it may be forced to close major road junctions and cut bus and tube services unless a long term funding deal is secured. brent cross flyover is one of six
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structures in the capital at risk of closure, as it needs millions of pounds in repairs. the government says it's working towards a "robust" financial settlement. if services become less reliable, if there are fewer tube services, if the bus service is cut by up to 18%, then obviously people are going to have far less confidence in the reliability of the public transport system and, inevitably, they will end up having to find alternatives, which of course include private car use. congestion will increase, air quality will reduce. environmental activists who held protests on the m25 and other major roads last year have said "they failed" in their mission. insulate britain wanted to persuade the government to improve homes by 2030 to cut carbon emissions. in a statement the group said it would come back "even more ambitious". the national police chiefs' council, urged them to "highlight their cause in a reasonable manner. west ham defender kurt zouma has
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apologised after a video appeared to show him kicking and slapping a cat. the 27—year—old said there are no excuses for his behaviour, which he sincerely regrets. his club said it does not condone animal cruelty and would deal with the matter internally. travel now — lots of problems on the tube this morning. there are severe delays on the district line between turnham green and ealing broadway. there are severe delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge. there are minor delays on the hammersmith and city line. and on the hammersmith and city line. also the water on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, a warm front went through, introducing some milderfeeling air. and we are set to stay with those mild conditions as we head through the next couple of days or so before, on wednesday evening, a cold front sinks southwards — that could give us a few spots of rain and it will bring us the chilly air back in time
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for the end of the working week. but lots of blue sky and sunshine, and we will see a return to the night—time frosts. other than that, it's a fairly quiet week of weather ahead. it's not as blustery as it was last week, and it will be dry or mostly dry. now, this morning it's a mild start to the day, 7 or 8 celsius. plenty of cloud around today but also some bright and some sunny spells emerging at times. a bit more of a westerly wind than we saw yesterday, but not as windy as it was over the weekend. top temperatures this afternoon all the way up to 13 or 14 celsius — so, very mild for this time of year. now, through this evening and overnight, in all of that mild air, temperatures probably won't drop much below 8 or 9 degrees for many of us. lots of cloud around. it's a mild day again on wednesday, plenty of cloud too. a few spots of rain with that cold front on wednesday night. and more sunshine on thursday, but a frosty start to friday morning. that's it for the moment. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to sally and dan. i'm back just after 9am.
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hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. it is 8:31am. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the situation is unacceptable. one study found that black women are 40% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. here's our global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar. h ea rtb eats that cherished sound. your longed—for ba by�*s heartbeat. isabel is expecting a baby boy next month. can you see your baby's face? feeling emotional. just trying to contain myself. just can't help being
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more than happy. it has been a difficult journey for you guys? yes, it has been a very turbulent time. they lost their previous pregnancy at four months last march. this baby is doing well and they are being supported by staff at this specialist recurrent miscarriage clinic in coventry. but the care they received during their previous pregnancy and subsequent miscarriage has left isabel scarred for life. the day that we were sure there was something wrong, and i remember being laughed at from one of the staff nurses saying, "just go home, why do you keep coming?" just take, you know, codeine and paracetamol. you'll be fine. i was actually losing fluids and bleeding at the time. within 48 hours of going home, isabel started bleeding heavily. she was rushed to hospital
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but her baby boy died. and why do you feel you weren't listened to, you weren't heard? the colour of my skin. you know, black skin, she is not from here, you can wait. there is very little doctors can do to save a baby at this stage in pregnancy. but the feeling of not being listened to is what has stayed with isabel. judah, wakey wakey. more than 100 miles away, in hornchurch in essex, natasha cradles littlejudah. she experienced eight miscarriages before his arrival, including a late loss almost five months into her pregnancy. hello. everything is supposed to be ok. no one tells you your waters are going to break early. so that was a massive shock to me. and then to lose a baby and have to bury a baby,
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that was just unimaginable. natasha says she also didn't feel heard by some clinicians and says urgent research is needed to understand what's going on. we have been given the problem, we have been told about the problem, but we haven't been given a solution. we are in a western country, we are in 2022, and we don't have a solution to that. we don't even know what the steps are or the reason why. it is just really frustrating. i have come to queen charlotte's and chelsea hospital here in west london, which sees many black and ethnic minority patients, to try to get a better understanding of why black women are at higher risk of having a miscarriage, whether they have underlying health conditions or not, and no matter what their social, economic or educational background. why does a woman's skin colour affect her chances of having a healthy baby? dr ekechi runs the early pregnancy unit here. she is also co—chair of the royal college
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of obstetricians and gynaecologists' race equality task force. unfortunately, black women have a number of factors associated with the risk of miscarriage overrepresented. so, for example, they are more likely to have a number of conditions that puts them at greater risk of miscarriage. but, really, on a more significant level, what we hear time and time again is that black women never feel heard in this space. without addressing the institutional racism where it exists, we will never be able to truly say that all women receive the care that they so deserve. professor quenby runs the recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital coventry. a lot of the patients are understandably very anxious because of their previous pregnancy losses. she is also a leading researcher in this field. she is currently trying to get funding to investigate some of the many unknowns around why black women are at higher risk,
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including looking into any potential biological factors. we know for example if you are black and asian, then you handle glucose less well, so we know you are much more at increased risk of gestation or diabetes. of gestational diabetes. we also know that the balance of bacteria in your vagina is different in black and asian women to white women and we know an imbalance in the bacteria in the vagina has been associated with miscarriage and preterm birth. so that is another area we can look at. there is clearly a myriad of complex and difficult issues at play here. but the longer we don't have answers to some of these key questions, the longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly. one idea professor quenby and her team is already working on is an app where women will be able to input their clinical details like ethnicity, weight and whether they have had any previous miscarriages. they will then get specific evidence—based advice on how to lower their risk of loss. the black maternal health charity
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five times more is also carrying out training at maternity units with staff now wearing badges to reassure women that they will be heard. he has never been before. it is going to be interesting. natasha and her husband jay say despite their harrowing experiences of loss, they feel like one of the lucky ones. they say women deserve to understand their specific risks during pregnancy and also to simply feel heard. just seeing him is just a joy. sheerjoy. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. gorgeous. last week the regulator ofgem raised the energy price cap, so that from april most households on a default tariff, with average usage, will pay nearly £2,000 a year for their energy. but spare a thought for those customers on pre—payment meters — they're often from the poorest households. they will be paying even more than that for their energy.
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nina has been taking a look. yes, good morning. you will remember last week we talked about the price cap the households who need the most support can't access the backs direct debit deals. you will remember last week we talked about the price cap going up and adding an extra £700 to the average default energy tariff bill. that's a lot — but not as much as those who use pre—payment meters. they're often used in households which have slipped in to debt. because you pay in advance, by topping up with a card or token, it's seen as a better way of managing budgets and stopping from falling behind. about 4.5m homes in england, scotland and wales have a prepayment meter. and these customers are protected by a different energy price cap. but look what happened last week when the cap was raised. so, while households with average usage on a default tariff — paying by direct debit — were told their bill
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would go up to about £1,971, those on prepayment meters were told their rise would be even higher — going up to £2,017. a bigger rise and a higher total. the regulators say this reflects the extra costs incurred with prepayment metres. and the government points to the £350 in support immediately offered to most households. but some say it's not enough, and is not targetted at those who need it most, as my colleague colletta smith has been finding out. jenny pays for her gas and electricity in advance. it is all done through an app now — topping up her meter in regular small chunks. that careful budgeting has helped her work her way out of debt and get the family back on two feet. but being a prepayment customer
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means she is charged the highest rate for her energy. where £10 could have lasted three, four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget, because you think, hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and now i've just checked and i've only got seven left. surely it should be this. and you are watching the balance go down and you are thinking, there is nothing i can do. when that goes, there is no electric, there is no gas. the regulator says it understands it is very difficult for prepayment customers, but they have to let companies charge more because it costs more to run a prepayment system. the government have announced extra money to soften the latest price cap rise. but the boss of the biggest dedicated prepayment company says it is not the right kind of support to help his customers. the measures that they announced in total is probably about right,
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it is just not targeted enough. it needs to be targeted on the 7—8 million households who are going to be really stretched, rather than subsidising everybody�*s energy consumption. how is that going to work for prepay customers, then? customers do all kinds of things, particularly in the rented sector. and you will potentially be putting a debt on a prepaid meter. possibly one person gets the benefit of the £200 subsidy, they then change tenancy and somebody else ends up picking up the bill for the 40 quid, and that's not fair. utilities' figures show that more customers are running out of money in their accounts than ever before. charities helping the most vulnerable say they expect that will get worse when this latest price rise kicks in. if you are on monthly billing and you are struggling financially,
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that day you can still turn on your light and the light will come on, whereas if you don't have money to put in the meter, there is no access to power that day. so i have often gone into people's homes and found that the lights are off, the houses are cold because they are having to wait until pay day a few days away until they are able to have access to any energy. most people don't tend to choose to be on a prepayment meter and if you have debt on the meter, you can't opt out of that. so people do feel quite stuck on it, as well. there are some safety nets for customers likejenny, as the major suppliers do have emergency funding available. but those with the least will be charged the most for their energy in the months ahead. colletta smith, bbc news, in manchester. the government told us that its £9 billion package of measures to help consumers will benefit lower income households the most, as a proportion of their net income. it also confirmed plans to expand eligibility
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for the warm home discount by almost a third, which will benefit thousands of pre—payment energy customers across the country. dan and sally, if you are at home and thinking, maybe entitled to the warm home discount, do get in touch with your energy company, they are legally obliged to discuss it with you. if you are on a prepayment metre on or a direct debit, and you can't afford to turn on your energy, contact your supplier, they are not allowed to switch off your supply without discussing options with you. but it doesn't take away this criticism of the government that everybody, even multimillionaires, are getting this £200 help. shall we see... i can't talk!
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morning, carol. i'm going to start by showing you pictures ofjapan. these pictures show some very deep snow. yesterday we had 1.2 metres of lying snow. 60 centimetres, 24 inches of that fell in just 24 hours. that's an all—time 24—hour record for that part of japan. we have snow on our forecast today as well but it's mostly in the hills in scotland. gusty winds as well across the north and west, gusting to gale force at times. there will be sunshine as well. across northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland there is more cloud, with also got some outbreaks of light rain. south of that there is some sunshine but still areas of cloud big enough and drizzle in wales. in the south—west. wherever you are today it's going to be breezy, that the strongest winds
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are across the northern and western isles. temperatures today from five in the north to 14 as we push down towards the south. very mild for the time of year. this evening and overnight, here is the weather front, the rain and it will pick up over england in the pennines. to the south wherein the mild air, but in the north we are in cold air so the wintry showers will come down to sea level and we could see a few centimetres across northern scotland with more than that on the hills. still strong when this with exposure, gusting as much a 70 mph. that they will be some ice first thing in the morning where we have damp surfaces. tomorrow i weather front continues to sink south, still taking cloud and spots of rain with it. sunshine and showers fully behind but once again the showers across parts of scotland will be down to sea level. these are the temperatures. five to nine or ten
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behind the front, still in the mild conditions further south. still gusting to gale force across the far north and west of scotland. wednesday into thursday, eventually this weather front sinks and clears, then we are keeping an eye on this area of low pressure scooting across the north of the country. it has the potential to bring gales, possibly even severe gales, further snow, so blizzard is potentially on the hills as well. but a lot of dry weather. still wintry showers and western parts of scotland, but we will see some of those getting in across northern ireland, also across northern england, in through wales and some good head on the direction of the midlands. most of the snow will be on the hills, but we could see some sleet at lower levels. in some of the heavier showers, may be a little snow. but the heavier snow will be in scotland. wherever you are on thursday it's going to feel cold, don't forget the wind, especially so in the north. tonnes
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going on with the forecast. thank you. have a great tuesday, carol. we've been looking at pictures of snow injapan. shall we go straight tojohn, who is on the slopes of aberdeen? not so much snow there, butjohn is right at the top. give us a wave, john! let's see what you've got for us. what a beautiful morning. wish me luck. it's a lovely morning in aberdeen, we are on the dry scopes where it started for kirsty muir. she finished fifth in the big air event overnight. she's the youngest gb athlete, hugely impressive. i'm up gb athlete, hugely impressive. i'm up here with herfirst gb athlete, hugely impressive. i'm up here with her first coach when she put on his skis for the first time at the age of three. he is going to showcase some of the moves you produced overnight. i am going to try and get down one piece. what
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could possibly go wrong? look at that! amazing. unbelievable. this is where it all began for kirsty. you probably watched her overnight. if you didn't, this is what happened. the big air event is a new event to the winter olympics, and atjust 17 she absolutely starred on the biggest stage of all. in her final, this was the first run she produced, a brilliant opening score. she nailed a really good second jump as well. but to go for the podium place you had to go big on the puck there were points. she couldn't quite lend it in the end. but on her olympic debut at the engine of 17, to produce a performance like that has been hugely impressive. you can imagine how batting she was afterwards. i'm so happy right now, honestly. the level— i'm so happy right now, honestly. the level was insane. 0h, i'm so happy right now, honestly. the level was insane. oh, my god! i
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went— the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for— the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for my— the level was insane. oh, my god! i went for my dump 12 first run and a tried a— went for my dump 12 first run and a tried a blunt — went for my dump 12 first run and a tried a blunt grab, and i think that's— tried a blunt grab, and i think that's the _ tried a blunt grab, and i think that's the best i've ever done it. it feels — that's the best i've ever done it. it feels amazing, honestly, i couldn't— it feels amazing, honestly, i couldn't have hoped to have skied better— couldn't have hoped to have skied better today. so proud of all the girls _ better today. so proud of all the uirls. �* f , , girls. and they're still every chance you _ girls. and they're still every chance you could _ girls. and they're still every chance you could pick- girls. and they're still every chance you could pick up i girls. and they're still every chance you could pick up a i girls. and they're still every i chance you could pick up a medal, because she has the slopestyle to come. grant, took us through what we saw. how tough is it to execute the moves she's done? it saw. how tough is it to execute the moves she's done?— moves she's done? it takes a lot of time in practice, _ moves she's done? it takes a lot of time in practice, commitment- moves she's done? it takes a lot of time in practice, commitment and. time in practice, commitment and confidence — time in practice, commitment and confidence as well. kirsty, being the fantastic ski as she is, she handles— the fantastic ski as she is, she handles it _ the fantastic ski as she is, she handles it so well and it shows in the results — handles it so well and it shows in the results-— the results. when you kick off for her? she came _ the results. when you kick off for her? she came here _ the results. when you kick off for her? she came here at _ the results. when you kick off for her? she came here at the i the results. when you kick off for her? she came here at the age i the results. when you kick off forj her? she came here at the age of three, when did she demonstrate she will be able to do that kind of thing? will be able to do that kind of thin ? a, , will be able to do that kind of thing? maybe around ten she started winnin: thing? maybe around ten she started winning competitions _ thing? maybe around ten she started winning competitions and _ thing? maybe around ten she started winning competitions and knocking i winning competitions and knocking out some _ winning competitions and knocking out some of the older riders at the a-e out some of the older riders at the age of— out some of the older riders at the age of ten, — out some of the older riders at the age of ten, which was fantastic to see _ age often, which was fantastic to see a_ age of ten, which was fantastic to see a lot — age of ten, which was fantastic to see. a lot of us have been proud of her since _ see. a lot of us have been proud of her since day— see. a lot of us have been proud of her since day one. read about the a-e her since day one. read about the age of— her since day one. read about the age often — her since day one. read about the age of ten. she might say
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differently, she might say earlier. but that _ differently, she might say earlier. but that is— differently, she might say earlier. but that is when i noticed it, at least — but that is when i noticed it, at least. ., ., ~' but that is when i noticed it, at least. , ., least. took us through the slopestyle. _ least. took us through the slopestyle, what _ least. took us through the slopestyle, what are i least. took us through the slopestyle, what are the i least. took us through the i slopestyle, what are the chances least. took us through the - slopestyle, what are the chances of picking up a medal there? i’m slopestyle, what are the chances of picking up a medalthere? i'm quite confident in — picking up a medalthere? i'm quite confident in her— picking up a medalthere? i'm quite confident in her ability. _ picking up a medalthere? i'm quite confident in her ability. slopestyle i confident in her ability. slopestyle is a harder— confident in her ability. slopestyle is a harder event than big air, that is a harder event than big air, that isiust_ is a harder event than big air, that isiust one — is a harder event than big air, that isjust one trick, is a harder event than big air, that is just one trick, really. is a harder event than big air, that isjust one trick, really. whereas slopestyle. — isjust one trick, really. whereas slopestyle, you have to combine it all into— slopestyle, you have to combine it all into a run. if she can put a run down as— all into a run. if she can put a run down as clean as i know she can, then— down as clean as i know she can, then the — down as clean as i know she can, then the chances are quite high. slopestyle is rails and jumps, down through a course. will she have planned out what she have planned out what she's going to do? when you are up at the top, do you know exactly what you are going to do? absolutely. she is fantastic at planning _ absolutely. she is fantastic at planning her goals and her runs, so she will— planning her goals and her runs, so she will have it all set up ready to id she will have it all set up ready to go and _ she will have it all set up ready to go and will— she will have it all set up ready to go and will be practising on different courses all over the world — different courses all over the world. it's all there, different courses all over the world. it's allthere, ready different courses all over the world. it's all there, ready to go. the world's— world. it's all there, ready to go. the world's biggest stage. i'm very confident in her. age
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the world's biggest stage. i'm very confident in her.— confident in her. age is 'ust a number. i confident in her. age is 'ust a number. she i confident in her. age is 'ust a number. she is i confident in her. age isjust a number. she is showing i confident in her. age isjust a number. she is showing that l confident in her. age isjust a i number. she is showing that at confident in her. age isjust a - number. she is showing that at 17. and this is where it started for her. i? and this is where it started for her. ' , ., ., ., ., ., her. 17 is a great age for it and she definitely _ her. 17 is a great age for it and she definitely has _ her. 17 is a great age for it and she definitely has a _ her. 17 is a great age for it and she definitely has a lot - her. 17 is a great age for it and she definitely has a lot of - her. 17 is a great age for it and | she definitely has a lot of years her. 17 is a great age for it and . she definitely has a lot of years to come _ she definitely has a lot of years to come and — she definitely has a lot of years to come and i'm really excited. i think we are _ come and i'm really excited. i think we are all_ come and i'm really excited. i think we are all excited to see her progression. it has been a constant upward _ progression. it has been a constant upward curve, and she is smashing it. upward curve, and she is smashing it it's _ upward curve, and she is smashing it. it's fantastic to see.— it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm 'ust it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm just glad — it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'miust glad i _ it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm just glad i made _ it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm just glad i made it - it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm just glad i made it down - it. it's fantastic to see. thanks. i'm just glad i made it down in l i'm just glad i made it down in one piece for experts —— in one piece. there was a chance with the mixed curlers, bruce mouat and jen dodds, they are in the semifinal, they didn't manage to contest the gold medal match, but unfortunately they lost their bronze match against sweden this morning despite the fact that they beat them in the round—robin format. a bit of a disappointment forjen and bruce. we were down in edinburgh yesterday where it started for them in their careers. but worth pointing out, they also have another event to come
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as well with the men's and women's events to come in the curling. so best of luck to them. and of course we wait to see what we can produce, what else their superb skills we've seen with those gb athletes out of those freestyle ski events, it is compelling viewing. amazing. john, our skiinu compelling viewing. amazing. john, your skiing skills _ compelling viewing. amazing. john, your skiing skills were _ compelling viewing. amazing. john, your skiing skills were just - compelling viewing. amazing. john, your skiing skills were just too good! well done, john. i good! well done, john. ., , good! well done, john. . , , _ ., well done, john. i was tempted by a 'um - , well done, john. i was tempted by a 'um, but well done, john. i was tempted by a jump. but we _ well done, john. i was tempted by a jump, but we would _ well done, john. i was tempted by a jump, but we would leave _ well done, john. i was tempted by a jump, but we would leave that - well done, john. i was tempted by a jump, but we would leave that to . well done, john. i was tempted by a | jump, but we would leave that to the experts! jump, but we would leave that to the exerts! ., _, ., , experts! that could have been disastrous. _ now, there can't be many tv theme tunes as recognisable as this one... # neighbours, everybody needs good neighbours. # with a little understanding you can find the perfect blend. it's normally at this point my dad would walk in and say, oh, not this again! when the kennedys divorced,
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that cut me deep! and bouncer, let's not forget bouncer. did you do anything other than watch telly when you were a kid? kylie minogue, jason donovan, and margot robbie were household names in neighbours. but now the future of ramsay street looks uncertain, after channel 5 said it was dropping "neighbours" from its schedules. lets take a look back at some of the show�*s most memorable moments. # neighbours, everybody needs good neighbours. # with a little understanding... charlene! # you can find the perfect blend. # neighbours... harold! # that's when good neighbours...#. susie! don't you touch me!
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# every part of me needs to know every part of you. #just you. # it's you #. that's a proper tv kiss! is that a bit much for this time of day? we're joined now by a former resident of ramsay street, julie mullins, who played julie martin in neighbours in the 1990s. lovely to see you on the programme. bought back some beautiful memories for many people who watched neighbours throughout those years. but also you. what did you make of the story in recent days about the fact that it might be the envy
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forget my neighbours? twitter has been auoin forget my neighbours? twitter has been going wild. _ forget my neighbours? twitter has been going wild. i _ forget my neighbours? twitter has been going wild. i had _ forget my neighbours? twitter has been going wild. i had jet - forget my neighbours? twitter has been going wild. i had jet lag - been going wild. i had jet lag because ijust flown back been going wild. i had jet lag because i just flown back from australia and 5am sunday morning it just started beeping and hasn't stopped. they are grief stricken. i guess that's why i'm here, because they reached out and they are desperate to find a way to avoid the end of this institutional drama. had there been any whispers? had you heard any rumours it might be coming to an end? did you feel it was coming? i to an end? did you feel it was cominu ? . , �* ., ., coming? i really didn't. i heard one whisper late _ coming? i really didn't. i heard one whisper late last _ coming? i really didn't. i heard one whisper late last year _ coming? i really didn't. i heard one whisper late last year that - coming? i really didn't. i heard one whisper late last year that some i whisper late last year that some friends i knew, their contract wasn't going to quite as long as may be at had before. but i thought that might have been a covid, let's pause for a bit, might have been a covid, let's pause fora bit, reject might have been a covid, let's pause for a bit, reject the budget. but i wasn't expecting it. and the incredibly loyal fans were not inspecting it. heartbroken. fin inspecting it. heartbroken. an audience of about a million people every day in the uk for it, and the wait was being financed was it was
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paid for by the uk to be made... probably part financed. i think it was 1.5 million regular viewers in the uk. plus it is syndicated in other countries as well. that is its biggest audience, and then the australian audience. a lot of people still dip in and out, they have been doing so for the best butter for decades. so they have grown up with it. many actors have grown up in it. and crew. so it is family to them. so it's a bit of a rough time after covid to potentially lose it, because that's when you need good neighbours, right now, when you are in a bubble and can't visit anyone else! ~ . , in a bubble and can't visit anyone else! . , ., ._ , else! we have seen already this mornin: else! we have seen already this morning so _ else! we have seen already this morning so many _ else! we have seen already this morning so many key _ else! we have seen already this morning so many key moments| else! we have seen already this - morning so many key moments from the last three decades. tell me what are your favourite pets? what have last three decades. tell me what are yourfavourite pets? what have been the best storylines for you? i your favourite pets? what have been the best storylines for you?- the best storylines for you? i guess it's either the _ the best storylines for you? i guess it's either the comic _ the best storylines for you? i guess it's either the comic stuff, - it's either the comic stuff, the comic things, i think at that neighbours really does quite well.
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hosing the neighbour or running them over or a car explodes. then it slides into the homie, coming in and to peoples houses without knocking, no gates between the back yards, people in the kitchen... i loved all those scenes with the martin family or the robinson family in the lounge of the kitchen. he relaxed between takes, have a chat, talk to the camera person. then next you are acting like a mum. it's a great thing to do as an actor, to have that regular work and create a good team. figs that regular work and create a good team. �* , that regular work and create a good team. a , , that regular work and create a good team. ,, team. as we said, because it was so --oular, team. as we said, because it was so pepular. it — team. as we said, because it was so popular, it launched _ team. as we said, because it was so popular, it launched so _ team. as we said, because it was so popular, it launched so many - popular, it launched so many careers, particularly pop careers. so many people went on to do other things as well. find so many people went on to do other things as well-— things as well. and i haven't asked all of them. _ things as well. and i haven't asked all of them, because _ things as well. and i haven't asked all of them, because i _ things as well. and i haven't asked all of them, because i don't - things as well. and i haven't asked all of them, because i don't know. all of them, because i don't know them, but the ones i know feel quite
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affectionate towards neighbours, because it was a training ground. chris hemsworth, what a great career! margot robbie. beautiful allendale who played my on—screen dad, jim robinson. went to america and reinvented himself. good on him. what was it like to be in? it and reinvented himself. good on him. what was it like to be in?— what was it like to be in? it was ureat to what was it like to be in? it was great to have — what was it like to be in? it was great to have a _ what was it like to be in? it was great to have a regular- what was it like to be in? it was great to have a regular gig. - what was it like to be in? it was i great to have a regular gig. actors are always hustling for the next job. even a brilliant high quality bbc limited series, it ends, and are they going to do another series? where is when you get that regular work, you can have the normal things that people have. but you do hone your craft. that people have. but you do hone our craft. , ., ., .., your craft. 0h, 'ust have to comment on what seems— your craft. oh, just have to comment on what seeing at _ your craft. oh, just have to comment on what seeing at the _ your craft. oh, just have to comment on what seeing at the moment. - your craft. oh, just have to comment on what seeing at the moment. isn't| on what seeing at the moment. isn't that retro! my _ on what seeing at the moment. isn't that retro! my lovely _ on what seeing at the moment. isn't that retro! my lovely husband. - on what seeing at the moment. isn't that retro! my lovely husband. he i that retro! my lovely husband. he was a good _ that retro! my lovely husband. he was a good mate. _ that retro! my lovely husband. he was a good mate. we _ that retro! my lovely husband. he was a good mate. we had - that retro! my lovely husband. he was a good mate. we had some l that retro! my lovely husband. he -
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was a good mate. we had some laughs. a spider inside traffic incident. thank you so much for coming and i'm talking about it. there is a lot of love the neighbours out there and hopefully someone will pick it up... ijust want to hopefully someone will pick it up... i just want to tell you, mark in the car park here from oldham wants itv to pick it up. colin and amillion twitter people are asking me to ask you if the bbc will have it back. we are not in charge of the purse strings. but we'll see what we can do. you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines... after keir starmer is harassed by protestors shouting "jimmy savile," downing street says there'll be no apology — despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw false accusations he made against the labour leader. i don't accept there is any link between the prime minister's reference to keir starmer's record as director of public prosecutions and what happened last night, which was totally unacceptable. oil giant bp announces profits of £9.5 billion last year — its highest for eight years. calls consumers should benefit as the cost of living crisis deepens. how are your energy bills looking? and in the light of the bp profits, should the government do more
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to help customers with these costs? do get in touch with me at @annitabbc using the hashtag

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