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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 8, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines... after keir starmer is harassed by protestors shouting "jimmy savile," downing street says there'll be no apology — despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw false accusations he made against the labour leader. i don't accept there is any link between the prime minister's reference to keir starmer�*s record as director of public prosecutions and what happened last night, which was totally unacceptable. oil giant bp announces profits of £9.5 billion last year — its highest for eight years. calls consumers should benefit as the cost of living crisis deepens. how are your energy bills looking? and in the light of the bp profits, should the government do more
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to help customers with these costs? do get in touch with me at @annitabbc using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. let me know what you think. after meeting with vladimir putin in moscow, french president emmanuel macron heads to kyiv for talks with ukraine's president, amid continuing tensions on the border with russia a report by a police watchdog says officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. health experts call for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage than white women are. specialists say the situation is unacceptable. finally we get two on the board, that's it, though. at the winter olympics, disappointment for gb�*s curlers as they are beaten by sweden in the mixed doubles bronze medal match.
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welcome to bbc news. downing street says borisjohnson will not apologise for his false claim that sir keir starmer, who used to be the director of public prosecutions, failed to prosecutejimmy savile for sexual assault. the prime minister has faced calls to apologise from across the political spectrum, including from his own mps, after sir keir was targeted by anti—vaccine protestors in central london last night. they were heard accusing him of "protecting paedophiles". our political correspondent chris mason reports. shouting: where's jimmy savile?! abuse hurled at the labour leader as he walked through westminster, a false claim that he protected the paedophilejimmy savile. keir starmer bundled into a police car... two arrests were made. it happened after parliament, where the prime minister made
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a false link between the two. we know exactly how this plays out, because we've seen it in the united states of america. if borisjohnson keeps on doing this, we will see exactly the same as in the united states of america. mps will be hounded on their way into parliament and there will be people on the steps of parliament, just as there were on the 6th of january on congress in the united states. the prime minister wrongly suggested the labour leader had been involved in the decisions not to prosecute savile when he was the boss of public prosecutions. after a huge row, borisjohnson rather changed what he was saying, but he did not say sorry. a lot of people have got hot under the collar, and i understand why. let's be absolutely clear, i'm talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. the prime minister says...
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but others in his own party want him to say much more. julian smith, who used to serve in borisjohnson�*s cabinet, said... but this morning downing street has no intention of apologising for the prime minister's remarks. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. we will be talking to our political correspondent chris mason in a few minutes, as well as the labour and pete docter rosena allin—khan. —— the labour mp, doctor rosena allin—khan. the oil giant bp has reported its highest
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profit for eight years. the company made £9.5 billion for 2021, and saw its profits surge in the final quarter of the year after oil and gas prices started to climb. the global increase in energy prices has pushed up gas and electricity bills for households, and has led to calls for a windfall tax on big energy firms. i'm joined now by our business correspondent dharshini david. what is bp saying about this prophets, the highest in eight years? a, prophets, the highest in eight ears? �* ., , prophets, the highest in eight ears? �* ., ., prophets, the highest in eight ears? ., years? a few months ago bp's own boss referred _ years? a few months ago bp's own boss referred to _ years? a few months ago bp's own boss referred to his _ years? a few months ago bp's own boss referred to his operations - years? a few months ago bp's own boss referred to his operations as i boss referred to his operations as being like a cash machine, it has benefited from the high global costs for oil and gas. research on demand and constrained supply, we are feeling it in bills, but when you look at the likes of bp, notch is bp, they are seeing higher profits and bp is saying we will give money back to shareholders —— notjust bp. babel reaped over £1 billion worth of rewards. —— they will reap. but some people are saying that the cash
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machine might run dry because it is hugely depending on what has happened to energy prices, bp has swung from a loss to a massive profit, people are saying, where is the windfall tax to help people struggling with bills? the contrast is unavoidable _ struggling with bills? the contrast is unavoidable between _ struggling with bills? the contrast is unavoidable between those - is unavoidable between those prophets and the cost of living crisis, energy bills being a big chunk of that. labour certainly has called for a windfall tax on energy companies, in other parts of europe they are putting constraints on how much profit the energy firms can make in order to give money back to consumers so how will this go, to what extent you think the will increase? is what extent you think the will increase? , ., what extent you think the will increase? , . ., increase? is a winter full tax desirable — increase? is a winter full tax desirable on _ increase? is a winter full tax desirable on the _ increase? is a winter full tax desirable on the face - increase? is a winter full tax desirable on the face of - increase? is a winter full tax | desirable on the face of age, increase? is a winter full tax - desirable on the face of age, when you look at those numbers and how much people are suffering —— is a winterfull much people are suffering —— is a winter full tax desirable? fore and bp together could make a0 billion worth of profits this year, enough
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to pay the energy bills for the majority of households. but the chancellor is very reluctant because he is concerned it could damage investment in renewables, you could say that energy companies would say that but bp has very ambitious plans to ramp up investment on renewables, we know this is an area we have to focus on because this crisis has shown into sharp relief that we need a secure wholesale lower carbon form of energy which needs to be invested in and in the meantime we need to make sure we are more self—sufficient when it comes to gas, we import more than half of that so there is a question of whether it is desirable but also whether it is desirable but also whether it is workable, whether firms will find a way around it, how you tax energy firms' profits, they make money the world over. when we talk about shareholders, let's not forget that some of that involves pension firms and that shareholders
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are therein the good times as well as bad and oil companies are very keen to take that can be lean times and we need the money to invest. £1. and we need the money to invest. q, dharshini david. —— thank you, dharshini david. —— thank you, dharshini david. back now to our main story: downing street says borisjohnson will not apologise for his false claim that sir keir starmer, who used to be the director of public prosecutions, allowed jimmy savile to avoid justice for his sexual assaults. let's talk to our political correspondent chris mason. no apology from the pm, but is not sustainable? it is no apology from the pm, but is not sustainable?— sustainable? it is now day eight since those _ sustainable? it is now day eight since those remarks _ sustainable? it is now day eight since those remarks were - sustainable? it is now day eight since those remarks were made sustainable? it is now day eight i since those remarks were made in sustainable? it is now day eight - since those remarks were made in the house of commons, the prime minister rather changed tack towards the tail end of last week, acknowledging that sir keir starmer had no personal involvement whatsoever in the decision not to prosecutejimmy savile, which was the clear implication of what he said a few
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days earlier in the house of commons, but in the light of what happened last night, this mob of anti—vax protesters who on seeing case —— unseeing sir keir starmer started chanting, among other things, jimmy savile at him. conservative party said the prime minister has other things to be getting on with, he is chairing cabinet around now. the central crux of their argument is that if the prime minister is going to take lots of heat followed the parties that took place in government during the pandemic that he was not at, we should mention that he was at some of them, to take lots of heatable parties he was not out, then they argue it is legitimate that sir keir starmer faces argue it is legitimate that sir keir starmerfaces questions argue it is legitimate that sir keir starmer faces questions about the organisation he was leading, the crown prosecution service, when he was director of public, at the time it decided not to prosecutejimmy savile even though sir keir had no
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involvement in that decision. they also say they do not see a connection between what the prime minister said last week and that mob outside parliament yesterday. here is the minister chris philp allitems about this morning, talking to our colleagues in on bbc one.- colleagues in on bbc one. these --eole colleagues in on bbc one. these people harassing _ colleagues in on bbc one. these people harassing keir— colleagues in on bbc one. these people harassing keir starmer. colleagues in on bbc one. these i people harassing keir starmer were mostly— people harassing keir starmer were mostly talking about julian assange fulsome _ mostly talking about julian assange fulsome reason ijo whiley understand, about covid vaccines and the conduct _ understand, about covid vaccines and the conduct of the opposition in generah — the conduct of the opposition in general. they mentioned jimmy savile but much _ general. they mentioned jimmy savile but much of— general. they mentioned jimmy savile but much of what they were shouting was to _ but much of what they were shouting was to do— but much of what they were shouting was to do with julian assange so i do not _ was to do with julian assange so i do not think there is any link between _ do not think there is any link between the prime minister's reference to sir keir starmer's record — reference to sir keir starmer's record as _ reference to sir keir starmer's record as director of public sent what _ record as director of public sent what was — record as director of public sent what was said last night. it is around one — what was said last night. it is around one week _ what was said last night. it 3 around one week since borisjohnson made those false claims in the house of commons, he has lost one of his closest aides over this and it is still in the headlines today, so to what extent is this increasing pressure on the prime minister over
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his personal behaviour and judgment? what are the implications of all of this, that is the central question, particularly around the idea of whether the prime minister can be toppled. if you look at the conservative mps who spoke publicly last night to condemn the prime minister and say he should apologise, there were a good number who have already publicly said they think they should be a vote of confidence, then if you look like the former northern ireland secretary, former chief with julian smith, he secretary, former chief withjulian smith, he had secretary, former chief with julian smith, he had already been outspoken on this particular topic last week —— the former chief whip, julian smith. so the central question which is how to put your finger on smith. so the central question which is how to put yourfinger on really is how to put yourfinger on really is just this collectively and organically tempt more conservative mps to submit a letter of no confidence and do you reach a point therefore, almost by accident, where therefore, almost by accident, where the 5a that is required is reached
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and a vote of confidence comes along? it does not appear there is any coordinated campaigning groups of mps attempting to push that number over the line any time soon and as and when that number is approach the maybe some within the party who wonder whether the timing is right to see if they can persuade another 130 conservative colleagues to back than any vote of confidence to back than any vote of confidence to bring the prime minister time, but your central question is absolutely vital at the moment, i'm not sure we are much more the wiser as to whether or not what has happened last night will significantly make any difference, i can't help think it is not likely to help the prime minister, though. chris mason, thank you. president macron of france is visiting kyiv for talks with ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, on the tensions along the border with russia. the french president is the latest in a series of european leaders to lend mr zelensky public diplomatic support. yesterday, mr macron
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held five hours of talks with president putin in moscow, but the talks failed to resolve the crisis, as paul adams reports. how are you? fine, just fine, how are you? emmanuel macron believes he can prevent war. 0n the back of several phone calls, a face—to—face meeting in the kremlin. the french leader says mr putin wants an historic agreement on the future of europe. translation: we are aware today, both of us, _ of the gravity of the situation. and of the urgent and imperative necessity, in the interests of everyone, to find a path of peace and stability in europe. but now the focus is back on kyiv. mr macron coming to ukraine's capital to brief the government here on his talks in moscow and, perhaps, to reassure ukraine once again that nothing is being done behind its back. translation: it looks like we are supported. | i mean, it looks like
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that, but we will see. the result is what matters, but we don't see it clearly yet. translation: | think - the west is supporting us. because they supply us with weapons. of course i'd like them to support us if the russians invade. but that's their business. if an invasion comes, ukraine says it's ready, carrying out drills in a region bordering russia—annexed crimea. american officials say russia could launch an attack any time. but it is still not clear what vladimir putin to do. and while the world waits, ukraine's capital gets on with life. hoping as presidents, prime ministers and government officials come and go, that a war already eight years old will not escalate, but end. pauladams, bbc news, kyiv. let's hearfrom the ukrainian capital — our correspondent james waterhouse is there.
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hello, james. no resolution to the crisis yet, but do you sense with president macron in moscow yesterday and in kyiv today that there is some moment in behind this diplomacy? first off, the diplomatic treadmill has not been slowing here, there have been endless foreign ministers and world leaders visiting for the last couple of weeks, as you know. does this meeting feel a bit more significant? yes, because of its recent meeting with vladimir putin and the call that president mark lobel had. you will notice the clothes from president putin last night that gave to reporters about should ukraine be accepted into nato when trying to reclaim crimea, which russia illegally annexed eight years ago, if they try to reclaim it by
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force there will be able. president macron will find president zelensky with his cell red lines, that ukraine's territory is not for debate, that the occupied territories in the east of the country, the so—called people's republic of china by russian backed militants, but there is no political dialogue between kevin anderson these so—called people's republics. it goes directly against what russia wants, it will be a tricky negotiation today. wants, it will be a tricky neaotiation toda ., . , ., , negotiation today. james, that is the diplomacy. — negotiation today. james, that is the diplomacy, what _ negotiation today. james, that is the diplomacy, what about - negotiation today. james, that is the diplomacy, what about what | negotiation today. james, that is. the diplomacy, what about what is happening on the ground and along the border between ukraine and russia? we the border between ukraine and russia? ~ . , _, russia? we have these continued military drills _ russia? we have these continued military drills to _ russia? we have these continued military drills to the _ russia? we have these continued military drills to the north - russia? we have these continued military drills to the north which i military drills to the north which are causing security concerns, there are causing security concerns, there are a number of russian units moving closer to the border, we are seeing
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more warships being mobilised in the black sea to the south by both russia and the us, the uk is moving 350 troops to eastern europe, to poland, germany, 350 to lift away near and we had seen the first of 3000 us troops that were announced move to eastern europe this week. notably none in ukraine itself as it is not a nato member and we had seen president biden today talking about wanting to chateau nord stream 2, the controversial gas pipeline running between russia and directly to germany —— wanting to shutdown nord stream 2. that would double russia's are europe at controversially by quite ukraine, which historically had russian gas blue throughout, ukraine used to make money from that and once upon a time it used to get gas at a discount price from russia when relations were better, that is very much a sticking point, president
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biden has said it will be blocked completely should there be an invasion, so the debate of what to do in the event of conflict rumbles on, along with diplomacy here in kyiv. on, along with diplomacy here in k iv. , . , on, along with diplomacy here in kiv. .mg, the headlines on bbc news... after keir starmer is harassed by protestors shouting "jimmy savile," downing street says there'll be no apology — despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw accusations he made against the labour leader. 0il giant bp announces profits of £9.5 billion last year — its highest for eight years — prompting calls that consumers should benefit as the cost of living crisis deepens. after meeting vladimir putin in moscow, french president emmanuel macron heads to kyiv for talks with ukraine's president, amid continuing tensions on the border with russia. a report by a police watchdog says officers colluded with loyalist
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paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police 0mbudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmakers�* shop and six other fatal shootings. the report also found there was an unjustifiable use of informants involved in serious crime. assistant chief constable jonathan roberts from the police service of northern ireland said officers had greatly improved policies and procedures. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an active sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. at the weekend, they marked the 30th anniversary of the atrocity. it is not the people who walked in the bookies 30 years ago, it's the people who put the guns in their hands and the people allowed to act with impunity,
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and were never ever prosecuted. the report published today identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the murders to the imperial war museum. the security forces had informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in serious crimes, including murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious, and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives
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of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. websites that publish pornography will be legally required to verify the age of their users under new plans announced by the government. ministers say the draft 0nline safety bill will be strengthened to include the measure, which would also see sites fined or blocked if they failed to act. more now on our main story — downing street says borisjohnson will not apologise for his false claim that sir keir starmer, who used to be the director of public prosecutions, allowed jimmy savile to avoid justice for his sexual assaults. let's speak to labour's shadow minister for mental health, dr rosena allin—khan. thank you very much forjoining us today, a government minister doing the rounds of earlier said he does not see a connection between what the prime minister said about one week ago and last night's events when sir keir and david lammy were
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mobbed? it when sir keir and david lammy were mobbed? . , , when sir keir and david lammy were mobbed? ., , , ,, ,, mobbed? it was very distressing to see the footage, _ mobbed? it was very distressing to see the footage, sir _ mobbed? it was very distressing to see the footage, sir keir _ mobbed? it was very distressing to see the footage, sir keir and - mobbed? it was very distressing to see the footage, sir keir and david | see the footage, sir keir and david are friends of mine and nobody wants to see anybody treated that way regardless of their political party, but i think it is very clear that some of the language used, that i had seen the footage of, repeated some of the words that were echoed by the prime ministerjust last week, and we have to understand that words have consequences and although there were people talking about anti—vax conspiracy theories and mentioning other things, without a doubt thejimmy mentioning other things, without a doubt the jimmy savile issue mentioning other things, without a doubt thejimmy savile issue was brought up. and we know that from the past one borisjohnson has made slurs against muslim, saying they look like letterboxes, around the country islamophobic hate crime towards muslim went up, without a doubt. he holds the highest office in the land and people listen to what is says, and it is trumpian
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style politics and legitimises the sort of political discourse that is not what we like or deserve in this country. i believe he should come to the house of commons and apologise unreservedly for the slurs he made last week, which is exactly what any of his conservative mps are asking. i give absolutely clear that there is a link between what happened to your party leader yesterday and what the prime minister said last week —— are you absolutely clear? i the prime minister said last week -- are you absolutely clear?— are you absolutely clear? i was not there myself. _ are you absolutely clear? i was not there myself. i— are you absolutely clear? i was not there myself, i did _ are you absolutely clear? i was not there myself, i did not _ are you absolutely clear? i was not there myself, i did not hear- there myself, i did not hear everything search, but i know that when you hold the highest office in the land and make comments and get smear and conspiracy material from the deepest corners of the dark web to challenge your opponents with, thatis to challenge your opponents with, that is not helpful and without a doubt things were raised yesterday that mirrored the language used last week. it is very simple, boris johnson can come to parliament, he expresses that he was concerned by what happened yesterday, if he is
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truly concerned and truly sorry, he should come to parliament and apologise unreservedly. but can i just remind you that all of this is a deflection tactic from the very fact that he is being investigated by the met police, he has his eye off the ball, we are enduring a cost crisis, people are choosing between heating and eating, patients at the a&e department where i work as a doctor are coming in with burns from cheap electric heaters because they cannot afford to put the central heating on, these are the sorts of things the prime minister —— the country is dealing with when the prime minister is trying to take to his opponent. even his own staff have had enough, they resigned in their droves last week, he was singing i will survive yesterday when the country is struggling to survive and keep their children. i am not sure to what extent you have private conversations with
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conservative mps, obviously some of them have said they want the prime minister to apologise, are you saying that more conservative mps would want to introduce this even if they are not saying so publicly? —— would want him to do this? i they are not saying so publicly? -- would want him to do this?- would want him to do this? i have not been more _ would want him to do this? i have not been more proud _ would want him to do this? i have not been more proud to _ would want him to do this? i have not been more proud to be - would want him to do this? i havej not been more proud to be british than going through this pandemic with people around the country standing together and doing the right thing, and i don't think the public like this political discourse. it is not healthy, not nice, not what we do to one another in britain. unfortunately the prime minister is doubling down and not apologising, just elongating and prolonging the whole sorry saga. he needs to come and apologise, draw a line underneath it and get on with thejob of governing line underneath it and get on with the job of governing the country, which he is clearly not fit to do. we go into public office to serve people and save lives and boris johnson hasjust people and save lives and boris johnson has just come people and save lives and boris johnson hasjust come into people and save lives and boris johnson has just come into serve himself, he will smear anyone or any
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group that stands on his way. dr rosena allin—khan, thank you very much for your time this morning. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the situation is unacceptable. one study found that black women were a0% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. ministers say they committed to tackling disparities in maternity care. our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar has h ea rtb eats these women sell sisters and loss, it is the name of their organisation, created to help give black women a voice when it comes to maternal health. all had suffered pregnancy loss. i maternal health. all had suffered pregnancy loss— maternal health. all had suffered pregnancy loss. i had my loss after 12 weeks into _ pregnancy loss. i had my loss after 12 weeks into thousand _ pregnancy loss. i had my loss after 12 weeks into thousand 18. - pregnancy loss. i had my loss after 12 weeks into thousand 18. this - 12 weeks into thousand 18. this woman told _ 12 weeks into thousand 18. this woman told she _ 12 weeks into thousand 18. this
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woman told she was _ 12 weeks into thousand 18. in 3 woman told she was inconsolable when she was scanned and told there was no heartbeat. i she was scanned and told there was no heartbeat-— no heartbeat. i 'ust collapsed, i not sick no heartbeat. i 'ust collapsed, i got sick right_ no heartbeat. ijust collapsed, i got sick right there, _ no heartbeat. ijust collapsed, i got sick right there, then - no heartbeat. ijust collapsed, i got sick right there, then she . got sick right there, then she asked. — got sick right there, then she asked, why are you throwing up, did you come _ asked, why are you throwing up, did you come here sick? i had to explain, _ you come here sick? i had to explain, you just tell me my baby no tohger_ explain, you just tell me my baby no longer has _ explain, you just tell me my baby no longer has a — explain, you just tell me my baby no longer has a heartbeat.— explain, you just tell me my baby no longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion- — longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion- i— longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion. i woke _ longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion. i woke up, _ longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion. i woke up, was- longer has a heartbeat. there was no compassion. i woke up, was having l compassion. i woke up, was having really bad back pain and was told by my doctor that i was just constipated, they told me to come backin constipated, they told me to come back in few hours for an ultrasound, i never made it to that ultrasound because i miscarried at home. bill because i miscarried at home. all four women despite numerous occasions when they did not feel that concerns were taken seriously by the nations —— described numerous occasions. i by the nations -- described numerous occasions. ., �* ~' by the nations -- described numerous occasions. ., �* ~ ., occasions. i don't think we are bein: occasions. i don't think we are being listened _ occasions. i don't think we are being listened to _ occasions. i don't think we are being listened to and - occasions. i don't think we are being listened to and heard i occasions. i don't think we are being listened to and heard in| occasions. i don't think we are . being listened to and heard in the spaces. d0 being listened to and heard in the saces. ,, ~ being listened to and heard in the saces. i, ~ , being listened to and heard in the saces. ~ ,., spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your _ spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your skin? _ spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your skin? absolutely. .
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colour of your skin? absolutely. it reall is a colour of your skin? absolutely. it really is a struggle when it comes| really is a struggle when it comes to maternal care.— to maternal care. this is in obstetrics _ to maternal care. this is in obstetrics and _ to maternal care. this is in j obstetrics and gynaecology to maternal care. this is in - obstetrics and gynaecology doctor in philadelphia he was working to improve maternal outcomes with a focus on black women. abs, improve maternal outcomes with a focus on black women.— focus on black women. a black woman's risk _ focus on black women. a black woman's risk of _ focus on black women. a black woman's risk of miscarriage i focus on black women. a black i woman's risk of miscarriage after ten weeks of pregnancy is double the risk of a white woman at that stage. the reason behind this disparity is probably multifaceted and still remains unclear. race is socially constructed so it is probably not the risk factor, but racism and gender bias, these are at the root underlying most of these health disparities we see in maternal health. , , ., disparities we see in maternal health. , health. there is your baby's heartbeat. _ health. there is your baby's heartbeat, nice _ health. there is your baby's heartbeat, nice and - health. there is your baby's - heartbeat, nice and reassuring. 3000 miles away in — heartbeat, nice and reassuring. 3000 miles away in coventry _ heartbeat, nice and reassuring. 3000 miles away in coventry in _ heartbeat, nice and reassuring. 22: miles away in coventry in the uk, this professor runs a recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital, she is also a leading researcher in the field and trying to get funding to investigate some
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of the many unknowns about why black women arous higher risk, including looking into any potential biological factors looking into any potential biologicalfactors —— black women are at higher risk. ii biological factors -- black women are at higher risk.— are at higher risk. if you are black or asian you _ are at higher risk. if you are black or asian you handle _ are at higher risk. if you are black or asian you handle glucose - are at higher risk. if you are black or asian you handle glucose less l or asian you handle glucose less well, so more risk of gestation diabetes, and we know the balance of bacteria in the regina is different in black and asian women to white women and we know that has been associated with miscarriage and preterm birth —— balance of bacteria in the vagina. preterm birth -- balance of bacteria in the vagina-— in the vagina. there is clearly m riad in the vagina. there is clearly myriad complex _ in the vagina. there is clearly myriad complex and - in the vagina. there is clearly myriad complex and difficultl in the vagina. there is clearly - myriad complex and difficult issues that play, but the longer we do not have answers to these key questions, the longer so many women will suffer needlessly. 0ne the longer so many women will suffer needlessly. one idea the professor and her team is already working on is a nap while women in the uk will be able to input clinical details like ethnicity and weight and whether they have had any previous miscarriages —— is an app. they will get specific evidence—based advice
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on how to lower their risk of loss. i feel very optimistic because more conversations are occurring and the more exposure this gets, then other women feel more comfortable asking the questions. with me is dr ria clarke, who specialises in pregnancy and childbirth. she has also suffered a number of miscarriages herself. we appreciate you joining us today to talk about this. reading through the background to all of this, what is really striking, one of the things that is really striking is i suppose the fundamental lack of data to allow conclusions to be done to allow research and for improvements to be made. �* , ,., , ~ research and for improvements to be made. , , ~ ., made. absolutely. we are in the osition made. absolutely. we are in the position at _ made. absolutely. we are in the position at the _ made. absolutely. we are in the position at the moment - made. absolutely. we are in the position at the moment where l made. absolutely. we are in the l position at the moment where we made. absolutely. we are in the - position at the moment where we are telling black women that they are more likely to have a miscarriage if they do get pregnant successfully, they are more likely to have poor outcomes, they are four
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to have poor outcomes, they are four to five times more likely to die, so we are giving pregnant women these statistics, but we do not have enough research to give answers or ways to make it better. that is terrifying, to be given this information but not know what to do with it. and historically, knowing that black women have not been as present in research as they should be and that needs to change. i5 present in research as they should be and that needs to change. is it also wrong _ be and that needs to change. is it also wrong to _ be and that needs to change. is it also wrong to talk about black women as a group? because we would not necessarily talk about any other group of people in that very broad and general sense.— group of people in that very broad and general sense. absolutely, what does black women _ and general sense. absolutely, what does black women mean? _ and general sense. absolutely, what does black women mean? does - and general sense. absolutely, what does black women mean? does it i and general sense. absolutely, what i does black women mean? does it mean black african women? black caribbean women? is a black caribbean woman myself, is my risk the same in the uk as it would be if i were in jamaica, where my family are from? 0r jamaica, where my family are from? or if i were in africa, where historically my family were from? we really must unpick that because black women are not a homogenous group and so we must understand that if we are going to give advice. to what extent is health service making
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any strides to collecting this data and unpicking all that information? so far, we know the nhs plan has stated that their aim is for black women to have continuity of care in pregnancy. however, there are not any specific targets mentioning miscarriage and loss in black women and black pregnant people, and that is really important, so that must be a priority for the government so that black women can feel more confident. �* , , , confident. and rusty patients, black women who — confident. and rusty patients, black women who come _ confident. and rusty patients, black women who come to _ confident. and rusty patients, black women who come to you _ confident. and rusty patients, black women who come to you for- confident. and rusty patients, black i women who come to you for treatment, for care, what do they say about their experience, whether they go on to have a successful pregnancy or whether they, unfortunately, miscarry? i whether they, unfortunately, miscarry?— whether they, unfortunately, miscar ? ~ ., miscarry? i think it is often what they don't _ miscarry? i think it is often what they don't say — miscarry? i think it is often what they don't say as _ miscarry? i think it is often what they don't say as much - miscarry? i think it is often what they don't say as much as - miscarry? i think it is often what they don't say as much as what. miscarry? i think it is often what i they don't say as much as what they do. what i cannot... i cannot speak for all black women, but when i was going through miscarriage, i wanted to know that i was being heard, that
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i was being seen, that my vulnerabilities were being noticed. there is a stereotype about black women that we are strong, that we are hyper resilient, that we do not feel pain the same way as other women, and thatjust is not true, so there needs to be space for us to feel safe enough to be honest about what we are feeling and to be in a culturally safe health care system that recognises the complexity of what we are going through. find that recognises the complexity of what we are going through. and do ou think what we are going through. and do you think there _ what we are going through. and do you think there is _ what we are going through. and do you think there is an _ what we are going through. and do you think there is an institutional l you think there is an institutional racism underlying all this? is that what is at the core of these issues? that is really difficult to say. do i think racial bias and racism are an aspect of pregnancy loss? absolutely. do i think it is the sole cause of the heart of the cause? i do not think it is easy to say that, no, but is it an aspect? yes. . , ., ., ., ,, say that, no, but is it an aspect? yes. . i, ., ., ,, ., yes. and when you are talking about atients yes. and when you are talking about patients who — yes. and when you are talking about patients who have _ yes. and when you are talking about patients who have miscarried, i patients who have miscarried, obviously you share that experience with them, it must be very hard for
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you, at the same time i guess you can give them that empathy, but not necessarily everyone working on a ward at any given time will be able to do that, will they? ida. ward at any given time will be able to do that, will they?— to do that, will they? no, no, that is wh we to do that, will they? no, no, that is why we are _ to do that, will they? no, no, that is why we are all _ to do that, will they? no, no, that is why we are all trained _ to do that, will they? no, no, that is why we are all trained and i to do that, will they? no, no, that is why we are all trained and know| is why we are all trained and know how to talk to pregnant women and people who go through pregnancy loss. i have been working in obstetrics and gynaecology since 201a, but before that i had not experienced pregnancy loss, iwas still caring for people who had. so while my experiences give me an insight, that should not be the sole factor that defines whether pregnant women get good care.— factor that defines whether pregnant women get good care. thank you very much for sharing _ women get good care. thank you very much for sharing your _ women get good care. thank you very much for sharing your thoughts - women get good care. thank you very much for sharing your thoughts with l much for sharing your thoughts with us today about that story, and we will be talking to the charity tommy's about this as well. the time is 9:3aam. we have been looking at the winter olympics and will be seen, but first carol with the weather. good morning. it has been a male
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started the day for the of year. we have a weather front that has produced some outbreaks of rain. showers are wintry on the tops of hills in scotland. gusty winds across the north and west. the southern side of the weather front, still cloud around at times, they can afford drizzle, in wales and south—west england, we will also see sunshine. a breezy day for us all, temperatures between five and 1a degrees. through this evening and overnight, the weather front sinks further south, we are also looking at that range capping up across the north west of england and pennines and the snow in scotland getting down to level levels in the north. still gusty winds and the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. 0n the southern side of the weather front, still rather mild. heading into tomorrow, a weather front slowly slips southwards, we can all the time, taking this cloud and spots of rain with it. more of us will be in the cold air. 0nce rain with it. more of us will be in
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the cold air. once again, we will see some of that slow down to sea level and we are looking at gusty winds across the north and west, with exposure because it guests up to 70 mph. —— gets up to. temperatures to 13 degrees in the south. 0n the mild side. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... after keir starmer is harassed by protestors shouting �*jimmy savile', downing street says there'll be no apology, despite pressure on the prime minister to withdraw false accusations he made against the labour leader. i don't accept there is any link between the prime minister's reference to keir starmer's record as director of public prosecutions and what happened last night, which was totally unacceptable. 0il giant bp announces profits of £9.5 billion last year — its highest for eight years.
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there are calls that consumers should benefit as the cost of living crisis deepens. after meeting vladimir putin in moscow, french president emmanuel macron heads to kyiv for talks with ukraine's president, amid continuing tensions on the border with russia. a report by a police watchdog says officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. health experts call for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage than white women are. specialists say the situation is unacceptable. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. emphasis on the winter olympics. john, hyde. curling yesterday, tell us what you are up to today. curling yesterday, tell us what you are up to today. good morning.
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the winter olympic adventure continues. we are in aberdeen on a dry ski slow peer following our exploits on the ice in the curling yesterday in edinburgh. it is on this slope that kirsty muir strapped on a pair of skis, and who would have predicted that at 17 years old, the youngest team gb member in beijing, would have contested a medal overnight. she finished an impressive fifth in a brilliant ski big airfinal, as the mixed curlers missed out on a bronze, as they lost to sweden. there was a chance that could have been the first medal. two others were back out on the ice for their bronze medal, but they couldn't win, they did lose out to sweden. joe lynksey reports. the weight of medals at these games goes on. they feel it hardest in
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curling. bruce merritt and jen dodds were in a match for bronze and face a swedish pair they beachjust last week, but very quickly at 0lympics, teams fine form. they beat just last week. sweden scored four points with one shot, in the sport on the ice, that's a mountain to climb. when it gb went 7—1 down, it was too much. they will get more chances in team events, but still, this felt cruel. yesterday they were so close to the gold medal match, now they had missed out on bronze. got gold medal match, now they had missed out on bronze.— gold medal match, now they had missed out on bronze. got off to a bad start and _ missed out on bronze. got off to a bad start and that _ missed out on bronze. got off to a bad start and that is _ missed out on bronze. got off to a bad start and that is what - missed out on bronze. got off to a | bad start and that is what punished us the most. just had to fight back from there. we would have made a really good charter for four, from there. we would have made a really good charterforfour, fair play to her on such a big game, great feeling for her i'm sure. we will have to console ourselves because we have a big week with both our teams. in because we have a big week with both our teams. , ., ,
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our teams. in the big air, they ski in full tower— our teams. in the big air, they ski in full tower shadows, _ our teams. in the big air, they ski in full tower shadows, but - our teams. in the big air, they ski in full tower shadows, but in i our teams. in the big air, they ski in full tower shadows, but in this | in full tower shadows, but in this event they go for the spotlight. britain's kirsty muir is just 17 that he took on the trick of her life. . . . that he took on the trick of her life. ., . ., ., that he took on the trick of her life. . . ., ., , ., that he took on the trick of her life. .. ., ., , ., i. life. immaculate! that is how you want to start _ life. immaculate! that is how you want to start a _ life. immaculate! that is how you want to start a final! _ life. immaculate! that is how you want to start a final! that - life. immaculate! that is how you want to start a final! that took i life. immaculate! that is how you | want to start a final! that took her to the top of _ want to start a final! that took her to the top of the _ want to start a final! that took her to the top of the standings, - want to start a final! that took her to the top of the standings, and i want to start a final! that took her to the top of the standings, and in the end, she was happyjust to come fifth. china's competitor is just 18 herself, she came to her last run in third and then did this. 16. herself, she came to her last run in third and then did this.— third and then did this. 16, 20, she has one third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and _ third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and put _ third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and put it _ third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and put it down! - third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and put it down! a - third and then did this. 16, 20, she has gone and put it down! a 16-20| third and then did this. 16, 20, she i has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4-5 tens in — has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4-5 tens in the _ has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens in the air _ has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens in the air and _ has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens in the air and one _ has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens in the air and one of- has gone and put it down! a 16-20 is 4.5 tens in the air and one of these l a.5 tens in the air and one of these games' biggest stories. she learnt to ski in california but switched to china three years ago. now she leads the home nation on the greatest stage. the home nation on the greatest stare. , , ., . , stage. definitely not crying! it was a dream that _ stage. definitely not crying! it was a dream that in _ stage. definitely not crying! it was a dream that in the _ stage. definitely not crying! it was a dream that in the beginning i i stage. definitely not crying! it was| a dream that in the beginning i was scared to even think about because i did not want to let myself down, but before dropping into my felt like i was going to land it. i was just before dropping into my felt like i was going to land it. i wasjust in the zone all day, and all the stars
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aligned for me today and i'm so grateful. aligned for me today and i'm so crateful. . , ., aligned for me today and i'm so crateful. ,, , ., ., aligned for me today and i'm so crateful. . , ., ., _ ., grateful. she is one more symbol at these games _ grateful. she is one more symbol at these games of— grateful. she is one more symbol at these games of the _ grateful. she is one more symbol at these games of the diplomatic i these games of the diplomatic challenges. watching her win a gold was the chinese tennis player who went missing for some weeks last year. beijing is the games on fake snow in the city, now china hopes the focus stays on a skiing star. yes, we still wait for that first medal for team yes, we still wait for that first medalfor team gb yes, we still wait for that first medal for team gb at these winter olympics out in beijing. some 0lympics out in beijing. some disappointment overnight for england women, who were in action in their final one—day match of the ashes series against australia. they lost by eight wickets. it means, for the first time, they have failed to win a match in their ashes series. let's not forget at the world cup is now just a few months away as well. the former england bowler alex hartley says england may now need to make a few changes before that begins. england
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have not to changes before that begins. england have got to go _ changes before that begins. england have got to go away, _ changes before that begins. england have got to go away, they _ changes before that begins. england have got to go away, they have i changes before that begins. england have got to go away, they have ten l have got to go away, they have ten days quarantine in new zealand, think where they can improve, may be some tweaks in the batting order, within the england camp have to be made going forward, because things are not quite going right for them. they have to bring somebody else into the world cup squad. we saw mlr make a debut, which shows she will probably go to new zealand and be in the world cup squad. —— emma land. they have matchwinners within the batting line—up but have not performed through this 0di series. some awful images emerging overnight of the west ham defender care zouma slapping and kicking his character. his club have wholly condemned the incident. he has since apologised. this is what he said in a statement...
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some alarming pictures that emerged overnight. so all eyes will be on the winter olympics and disappointment, i guess, for our athletes overnight, but there's still hope they could go on pick up some medals, suddenly for bruce mouat and jen dodds, who are once again got in the team events in the team curling events, so who knows? that medal, the first medal it might not be too far away now. fingers crossed, john. studio: fingers crossed, john. last week we talked about the energy price cap going up, and adding an extra £700 to the average household energy bill. but those who use pre—payment meters could face even steeper rises. these meters are often used in households which have slipped into debt. because you pay in advance, by topping up with a card or token, it's seen as a better way of managing budgets and stopping you from falling behind. about a.5 million
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homes in england, scotland and wales have a prepayment meter. and these customers are protected by a different energy price cap. but look at what happened last week when the cap was raised. while households with average usage on a default tariff — paying by direct debit — were told their bill would go up to about £1,971, those on prepayment meters were told their rise would be even higher, going up to £2,017. the regulators say this reflects the extra costs incurred with prepayment metres. the government points to the £350 in support ministers have offered to most households. but some say it's not targeted at those who need it most, as colletta smith has been finding out. jenny pays for her gas and electricity in advance. it is all done through an app now, topping up her metre in regular small chunks. get the chef in behind you.
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that careful budgeting has helped her work her way out of debt and get the family back on two feet. but being a prepayment customer means she is charged the highest rate energy. where £10 could have lasted you three or four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget because you are like, hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, now i've just checked and i've only got £7 left, there should be this. and you are watching the balance go down and you think, there is nothing i can do. when that goes, there is no electricity, there is no gas. the regulator says it understands it is very difficult for prepayment customers, but they have to let companies charge more because it costs more to run a prepayment system. the government have announced extra money to soften the latest price cap rise,
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but the boss of the biggest dedicated prepayment company says it is not the right kind of support to help his customers. the measures that they have announced in total is probably about right, it is just not targeted enough. it needs to be targeted on the 7 or 8 million households who are going to be really stretched rather than, you know, subsidising everybody�*s energy consumption. how is that going to work for prepayment customers, then? customers do all kinds of things, particularly in the rented sector, and you are going to potentially be putting a debt on a prepaid meter, possibly one person gets the benefit of the £200 subsidy, the then change tenancy and somebody else ends up picking up the bill for the £a0, and that is not fair. utilities figures show more customers are running out of money in their accounts than ever before.
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charities helping the most vulnerable say they expect that will get worse when this latest price rise kicks in. if you are on monthly billing and you are struggling financially, you can still turn on your light and you will have a light come on, whereas if you don't have money to put in the metre, there is no access to power that day, so i have often go into people's homes and find the lights are off, the houses are cold because they're having to wait until payday, a few days away, until they are actually able to have access to energy. most people don't tend to choose to be in a prepayment metre and if you have debt on ammeter, you can opt out of that. ——a meter. so people do feel quite stuck on it as well. there are some safety nets for customers likejenny, as the major suppliers do have emergency funding available. but those with the least will be charged the most for their energy in the months ahead. coletta smith, bbc news, in manchester. some have been getting in touch about the question we ask at the
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beginning of the hour, which was about the cost of living, especially energy bills and set alongside the huge profits we have been hearing today from the oil giant bp. russell has been in touch, he says, why are the public footing the bill for increased energy costs when we do not control supply? basic utilities are treated like a monopoly when we just want to live comfortably. hannah says, this must be put in context, it is no longer the 1980s, we are facing a climate crisis. in that context, bb's profits are heinous. regarding pension funds, many are making sure pensions are not invested in fossil fuels. make sure you keep getting in touch about the story and what you want the do given some of the energy giants are making such huge profits. do you want to see the government is doing more to help consumers with their energy bills? get in touch with me on twitter. reports of drink and drugs spiking — which is giving someone drugs or alcohol without their knowledge —
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are on the increase. a bbc file on four investigation found unprecedented numbers of cases being reported to police last year, and spoke to those trying to tackle the problem. with me is datshiane navanayagam. thank you very much forjoining us today to tell us about the investigation. what did you find? drink spiking has pretty much been increasing year on year, so figures from the home office for england and wales showed the number of crimes linked to drink spiking rose from 760 in 20161903 in 2019. they did drop to in 2020, but that is not entirely unexpected given we were in lockdown for most of it. the home office had not yet finished going through the figures for all 2020 and 2021, but they told us there were 708 recorded crimes linked to drink spiking up untiljune. but we
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submitted our own freedom of information request to police forces across the uk, asking them how many reports of spiking were made to them. the figures they gave us showed 3715 cases of spiking made and 2a56 of those were in the last three months alone. so and 2456 of those were in the last three months alone.— three months alone. so that is a sharp increase _ three months alone. so that is a sharp increase if _ three months alone. so that is a sharp increase if you _ three months alone. so that is a sharp increase if you look- three months alone. so that is a sharp increase if you look at i three months alone. so that is a i sharp increase if you look at those two sets of figures. do we know why? no one really knows what is behind the rise in spiking, why are more people being spiked? both men and women are targeted, although it does disproportionately affect women, it is very hard to determine whether the increase in spiking is down to more people being spiked or whether it is more people feeling able to now come forward and report it. what we know is in september and october last year, there were a series of high—profile campaigns that swept across the press and social media highlighting the issue. that may well have allowed more people to feel they could come forward and report it. we have also seen this new sinister trend of people saying they had been spiked by an injection, it is called needle
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spiking. the national police chiefs cancel told us that between september and january this year, 1982 cases of needle spiking were made in the uk. it is 1982 cases of needle spiking were made in the uk.— made in the uk. it is a troubling development. _ made in the uk. it is a troubling development. what _ made in the uk. it is a troubling development. what is _ made in the uk. it is a troubling development. what is being i made in the uk. it is a troubling i development. what is being done to tackle this? is there more action from the night—time industries, clubs and so on? from the night-time industries, clubs and so on?— from the night-time industries, clubs and so on? . , , ., ., clubs and so on? last year the home secretary launched _ clubs and so on? last year the home secretary launched an _ clubs and so on? last year the home secretary launched an inquiry - clubs and so on? last year the home secretary launched an inquiry into i secretary launched an inquiry into spiking and the home affairs select committee sacked last month, they heard from victims, police, campaigners, but also police and those in night—time economy. what they heard was that some case of spiking may well be people who think that they have been spiked but have actuallyjust that they have been spiked but have actually just a that they have been spiked but have actuallyjust a dream too much alcohol, and that is the problem. the symptoms are being spiked are very similar to the symptoms of being drunk, so a number of victims we spoke to said they did not feel that their concerns were taken seriously when they came forward to police. they felt they were being underplayed from it was dismissed. the national police chiefs council say they are taking a more coordinated approach to tackle
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spiking at a national level. thank ou ve spiking at a national level. thank you very much — spiking at a national level. thank you very much taking _ spiking at a national level. thank you very much taking us - spiking at a national level. thank you very much taking us through | spiking at a national level. thank you very much taking us through your investigation. and also i'm joined by mair howells, who is the founder of the "i've been spiked" campaign group. thank you so much forjoining us today. tell us first of all about what happened to you.- today. tell us first of all about what happened to you. thank you for havin: me. what happened to you. thank you for having me- i— what happened to you. thank you for having me. i had _ what happened to you. thank you for having me. i had my _ what happened to you. thank you for having me. i had my drink— what happened to you. thank you for having me. i had my drink spiked i what happened to you. thank you for having me. i had my drink spiked in l having me. i had my drink spiked in february 2020. i was at a local club and it resulted in me having multiple physical injuries. i smashed my nose, i had to get stitches in my chin, ifractured my wrist and i had a concussion. i don't remember anything of the night up don't remember anything of the night up until buying a drink at the bar. after that point, it is completely black. luckily my sister was at the same party as me and managed to get me home. she found me and the boys toilets locked in their and i don't remember anything about that night. as well as the physical injuries, a lot of trauma, i guess, wondering
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what on earth had happened to you in that time, the time he cannot remember. that time, the time he cannot remember-— that time, the time he cannot remember. , , ,, , , remember. yes, biking is terrifying because it completely _ remember. yes, biking is terrifying because it completely rips - remember. yes, biking is terrifying because it completely rips you i remember. yes, biking is terrifying because it completely rips you of. because it completely rips you of your autonomy, your control. —— spiking is terrifying. you have no idea what happened to you in the space of several hours. and i think it is the after effects as well as people do not really realise can really affect someone. i understand that ou really affect someone. i understand that you didn't _ really affect someone. i understand that you didn't go _ really affect someone. i understand that you didn't go to _ really affect someone. i understand that you didn't go to the _ really affect someone. i understand that you didn't go to the police i really affect someone. i understand that you didn't go to the police or. that you didn't go to the police or report this to the police because of what had happened to your sister, who had also been spiked a couple of months before that. yes. who had also been spiked a couple of months before that.— months before that. yes, my sister had been spiked _ months before that. yes, my sister had been spiked two _ months before that. yes, my sister had been spiked two months - months before that. yes, my sister| had been spiked two months before and my mum tried to report it to the police and they kind ofjust got ping—pong between services with nobody really taking responsibility for what happened. when it came to me, perhaps with hindsight now i would have approached differently, but i kind of did not really see the point of going to the police because i had seen how they had managed my sister's situation. is
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i had seen how they had managed my sister's situation.— sister's situation. is this what led ou then, sister's situation. is this what led you then. to _ sister's situation. is this what led you then, to then _ sister's situation. is this what led you then, to then set _ sister's situation. is this what led you then, to then set up - sister's situation. is this what led you then, to then set up the i sister's situation. is this what led i you then, to then set up the group i've been spiked, did you want to take some control of the situation? yes, in some ways i started i've been spiked in a kind of selfish way, because i wanted to find answers for myself. through sharing my story on social media, i realise how many people it was happening to, so i started the platform because when i got spiked, there was not anything online that there was literally an nhs choices page that was it. i wanted to a hub of information, allowing a safe space for people to share their stories and access support, and the campaign has grown and grown since then. obviously moving more into the politic side of things, i started a petition last october, and that won and are spoken about in parliament for an urgent review into drink spiking, and now we arejust continuing the conversation. you have developed _ continuing the conversation. you have developed this from trying to find out answers yourself to branching into politics to try to
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bring about change there. in terms of what is happening on the ground in clubs, pubs, night—time venues, are you seeing or hearing that there is really any change yet and what's more can they do to stop this happening in the first place? i work with bars, happening in the first place? i work with bars. pubs— happening in the first place? i work with bars, pubs and _ happening in the first place? i work with bars, pubs and clubs - happening in the first place? i work with bars, pubs and clubs up - happening in the first place? i work with bars, pubs and clubs up and i with bars, pubs and clubs up and down the country and provide them with posters telling you the signs of drink spiking, what you can do to help. however place is trying to make their spaces are safe. i think we cannot put all the responsibility on the nightlife industry, i think a lot of this is a systemic issue. victims cannot get access to testing, people do not know the signs of drink spiking, we are not speaking about it enough. i think it was relatively a taboo subject up until probably october of last year, when it started to come into the press a lot more. i think we need to open the conversation, continue the conversation, and the government must do more. it is all well and good increasing the time that someone gets in prison spiking, but
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these are spiking cases are not reaching court in the first place, so in some ways it is pretty much pointless. i think we need to do more as a ground level and work on some systemic change to really combat this issue otherwise we will see it continuing. irate combat this issue otherwise we will see it continuing.— combat this issue otherwise we will see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on — see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on a — see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on a bus _ see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on a bus very _ see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on a bus very briefly, - see it continuing. we are nearly out of time on a bus very briefly, wouldj of time on a bus very briefly, would you like to see from the prosecutions? because at the moment it is really almost the onus on groups of friends to look out for each other. to stop is happening to themselves or their friends, rather than the onus being on the individuals carrying out this. i would love to see the police take this issue more seriously and people take responsibility when this does happen. but i do think that there is such a power in bystander training in universities and schools and making sure that we are looking out for one another and it is a big issue in our society surrounding violence against women as well, so we need to be looking at that and
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treating it as an act of terrorism that it is. . ., treating it as an act of terrorism that it is. ., ,, , ., treating it as an act of terrorism that it is. ., ,, i, ,., treating it as an act of terrorism that it is. ., ,, i, . treating it as an act of terrorism that it is. ., ,, . ., that it is. thank you so much for shafinu that it is. thank you so much for sharing your _ that it is. thank you so much for sharing your story _ that it is. thank you so much for sharing your story and _ that it is. thank you so much for sharing your story and good i that it is. thank you so much for sharing your story and good luck with your campaign. founder of the i've been spiked group. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. good morning. and i'll start today which will continue through the course of the day, even though it will be cooler in the north, temperature is bang on where they should be or a little bit above. —— mile that started today. we have a weather front, mile that started today. we have a weatherfront, the mile that started today. we have a weather front, the dividing mile that started today. we have a weatherfront, the dividing line between the colder air in the north and milderair in between the colder air in the north and milder air in the south. it's also producing cloud and outbreaks of rain. we have had it all morning. wintry showers persisting across parts of scotland, especially the north. the winter in this mainly on the hills, and gusty winds across northern and western isles today, but in between showers, there will be sunshine. moving south of the weather front, be sunshine. moving south of the weatherfront, quite be sunshine. moving south of the weather front, quite a be sunshine. moving south of the weatherfront, quite a bit be sunshine. moving south of the weather front, quite a bit of cloud around as well, they can up in wales and south—west england for drizzle,
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but wiest should see sunshine coming in across the midlands and south—east and quarter. —— we should see. it will be a breezy day, but the strongest winds will be across the strongest winds will be across the northern and western isles. temperatures today five, ten, 1a in london. through this evening and overnight, here is the weather front. if anything, overnight, here is the weather front. ifanything, it overnight, here is the weather front. if anything, it picks up across parts of north—west england and pennines, bringing heavy rain. wintry showers persisting across scotland in the north especially, even down to sea level, where we will see centimetres, and as we push further south, we are looking at milder conditions in comparison. we could see some nice across parts of the highlands by the time we are finished with the night. —— some ice. here is the weather front sinking southwards through tomorrow. we will have cool air coming our way and the wintry showers in scotland will be down to sea level. still windy across the far north—west, possibly touching as much as 70 mph, a gust of wind exposure. but lots of
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dry weather, lots of sunshine, but note the following temperatures, exceptin note the following temperatures, except in the south where we had our weather front. except in the south where we had our weatherfront. also 11s except in the south where we had our weather front. also 11s and 12s as maximum temperatures. this friend pulls away on thursday, the area of low pressure moves across the north looks like it could bring some strong winds possibly even gale or severe gales, and also some snow, so there is a list of blizzards, and then high pressure starts to build in, say things quietened down. —— there is a risk of blizzards. gales and severe gales in the far north, lots of dry weather but we will have the snow across the north of the country. into friday, all in the cold air, as we are through thursday, and on friday, high—pressure chance to settle things down, we can see a return to night—time frost.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. after the british opposition leader sir keir starmer is harassed by protestors shouting the name of paedophilejimmy savile, downing street says there'll be no apology. there's pressure on the prime minister to withdraw false allegations about sir keir when he was head of public prosecutions. words have consequences. and although there were people talking about anti—vax conspiracy theories and mentioning other things, without a doubt, thejimmy savile issue was brought up. we are looking at the fact that somebody at the top of an organisation has responsibility for what happens in it, that's the point the prime minister's making. i think that's a fair and reasonable point. there is no excuse for people to behave the way they did last night. oil giant bp announces profits
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of £9.5 billion pounds last year — its highest for eight years.

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