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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 8, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the government announces details of its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. when we are looking at the fact that somebody at the top of an organisation has a responsibility for what happens in it. that is the point the prime minister was making. i think that is a fair and reasonable point. it's no excuse for people to behave the way that they did last night. these sorts of comments only inflame opinion and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. our words have consequences, and we should always be mindful of that fact. borisjohnson reshuffles his cabinet. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg
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as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg has a new role as minister for brexit opportunities. another oil giant posts bumper profits, bp made almost £10 billion last year. calls for more research into why black women are more likely to suffer a miscarriage during pregnancy. best picture and best director oscar nominations for kenneth branagh�*s autobiographicalfilm belfast, with nods also forjudi dench and ciaran hinds in best supporting roles. good afternoon. the health secretary, sajid javid, has outlined the delayed plans to tackle the backlog of patients
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on nhs hospital waiting lists in england. mrjavid told the commons the number of people waiting for elective care has risen to six million, a figure that would keep growing before it fell. the devolved nations have set out their own recovery plans. here's what mrjavid told mps. the plan sets the ambition of eliminating waits of longer than a year... waits in elective care, by march 2025. within this, no—one will wait longer than two years byjuly this year. and the nhs aims to eliminate the waits of over 18 months by april 2023, and of over 65 weeks by march 2024, which equates to 99% of patients waiting less than one year. 0ur health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, is with me. just tell us a bit more about this plan and what sort of reception it is getting at the moment. this plan and what sort of reception it is getting at the moment.- is getting at the moment. this is the recovery _ is getting at the moment. this is the recovery plan _ is getting at the moment. this is the recovery plan to _ is getting at the moment. this is the recovery plan to set - is getting at the moment. this is the recovery plan to set the - is getting at the moment. this is the recovery plan to set the nhs| the recovery plan to set the nhs back to where it was a pre—pandemic.
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the government said today to take it further than that as well. by 2025, it said the nhs would be carrying out 9 million more diagnostic tests and treatments, and it would also be performing 30% more elective procedures. capacity it said, would be increased by having more health care support workers and making greater use of private providers. and reducing those very long waiting lists is one of the main ambitions of this plan. by march 2024, we were just hearing that weights of more than one year would be eliminated. and byjuly this year, no one would wait longer than two years. and this is the plan for england to recover. what sort of reception is it getting? we saw the labour party in the commons during this announcement were pretty critical. the commons during this announcement were pretty critical-— were pretty critical. absolutely, the were were pretty critical. absolutely, they were pretty _ were pretty critical. absolutely, they were pretty scathing - were pretty critical. absolutely, they were pretty scathing of - were pretty critical. absolutely, j they were pretty scathing of the plant. they said it did not address the workforce shortages that we know
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have been causing so many problems, and also delayed discharges from hospital. in terms of things like the money backing this plan, we know that £10 billion is being provided by the treasury for it. but the health foundation, the think tank suggests that the nhs in england needs a £13 billion in orderjust to stand still, things are not to deteriorate further. and in the nhs itself is very concerned about what itself is very concerned about what it calls these missing patients. it is believed there are about 10 million patients that should be being treated by the nhs at the moment who are not in the system, it is concerned about when these patients might come back. they are people who just did not come forward during the pandemic for all sorts of different reasons. that is why the nhs has been so concerned about having targets but it has to meet in case it then it gets swamped by double the amount of patients then on a waiting list. the double the amount of patients then on a waiting list.— on a waiting list. the staff shortages _ on a waiting list. the staff shortages are _ on a waiting list. the staff shortages are a _ on a waiting list. the staff shortages are a real - on a waiting list. the staff- shortages are a real problem, not only because people are sick and cannot always go to work because of
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the pandemic, but also in general. this has been an ongoing problem. absolutely. staff shortages have been, during a pandemic, reaching really high levels and there have been real concerns about hospital wards just not having enough staff, some of them, to function safely. people who have worked in hospitals throughout the pandemic, many of them say they just throughout the pandemic, many of them say theyjust cannot keep doing this. what the government is asking todayis this. what the government is asking today is that the nhs continue to stretch itself to do 30% more elective care, to go beyond the pre—pandemic levels. so asking staff who are already tired to do that maybe micah challenge.- who are already tired to do that maybe micah challenge. thank you ve much maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. _ maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. -- _ maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. -- it _ maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. -- it may - maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. -- it may be . maybe micah challenge. thank you very much indeed. -- it may be a i very much indeed. -- it may be a challenge- _ a cabinet reshuffle has begun. jacob rees—mogg is leaving his role as leader of the commons to be replaced by the former chief whip, mark spencer.
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mr rees mogg is to become the minister for brexit 0pportunities and government efficiency at the cabinet office. let's get a little bit more from jonathan blake. just tell us more about what has been announced within the last hour or so.— the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about _ the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about an _ the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about an hour— the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about an hour or - the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about an hour or so - the last hour or so. downing street confirmed about an hour or so ago | confirmed about an hour or so ago that they would be a small number of ministerial appointments made this afternoon. this is a limited reshuffle, which borisjohnson is instigating to date, rearranging a few members of his top team. a couple of reasons for that — he has appointed a new chief of staff, steve barclay, he was already a cabinet minister and mp. some officials want abilities may now need to moved around. but largely, this is being driven by boris johnson's need to get his parliamentary party on a side, hence there is a change of roles, as you say. firstly the jacob rees—mogg who was the leader of the house of commons, in charge of getting the government's business through parliament. he becomes a new newly
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created role of the minister for brexit 0pportunities and government efficiency, we are told that will be a cabinet — level post. we get to receive the full job a cabinet — level post. we get to receive the fulljob description. the prime minister's spokesman told us there was an opportunity to further deliver on what it is capable of now we have left the eu. so now i can expect we expect him to take the lead on attempting to identify further areas of opportunity to the uk can take full advantage, as the government would see it, of life after the eu. that may well now appease a lot of conservative mps who are a bit frustrated that some of those opportunities have not yet been embraced. then there is the need for greater party discipline and the borisjohnson to reach out and bring back on side a lot of his mps who frankly are not happy with the way he has been going about his leadership of late. so there is a new chief whip that is the post which is charged with keeping the
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parliamentary in line, making sure the vote in line with government policy. and also are all full square behind the prime minister, he hopes, as much of the time as possible. mark spencer who was the chief whip, he has now departed and stepped into jacob rees—mogg's previous role as leader of the house. and chris heaton—harris is the new chief whip, he was a foreign office minister, he was previously a leading member of the european research group, the influential group of eurosceptic conservative mps. and he now has a very importantjob. borisjohnson very important job. boris johnson putting very importantjob. borisjohnson putting his faith in chris heaton—harris as the new chief whip to try and bring on board mps who have been wavering over boris johnson's leadership recently, some of those who have already submitted letters calling for a vote of confidence in him. and those are the roles that we know about so far, one or two other minor changes stop stuart andrew who was the deputy chief whip, he now becomes a housing
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minister. and that is all we have for now. we are not expecting too much more movement in government in this limited reshuffle under way in westminster this afternoon. most of these names — westminster this afternoon. most of these names are _ westminster this afternoon. most of these names are not _ westminster this afternoon. most of these names are not well _ westminster this afternoon. most of these names are not well known - these names are not well known publicly, but it is about the operation that downing street runs, which has come under so much criticism, underso which has come under so much criticism, under so much pressure. in terms of the chief whip, why him? and who is he specifically going to have to reach out to most? is it the red wool mps in particular? the thing about— red wool mps in particular? tue: thing about the red wool mps in particular? tte: thing about the disquiet red wool mps in particular? t"t2 thing about the disquiet and outright rebellion among conservative mps in terms of their view of borisjohnson and his leadership recently is that it has not really been a coordinated effort to cross the party and different groups of mps on different wings of the parliamentary conservative party have been unhappy with the prime ministerfor many have been unhappy with the prime minister for many different reasons. you have some of his staunchest critics who are may be beyond being
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brought back into the fold and have written their letters and made up their minds. but many others who are wavering and waiting to see if the prime minister can turn things around and can put in place changes which mean that he leads in a style thatis which mean that he leads in a style that is more acceptable to them, both in terms of the way he goes about it and the policy as well, which many mps are not happy about too. a big job for the new chief whip. too. a big “ob for the new chief whi -. ., ~' too. a big “ob for the new chief whi. ., ~ ,, too. a big “ob for the new chief whi. ., y too. a big “ob for the new chief whi. ., , . the commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, has condemned the abuse of sir keir starmer by protesters yesterday and described borisjohnson�*s false claim, that the labour leader had failed to prosecute the paedophile, jimmy savile, as �*unacceptable'. there is growing pressure on the prime minister to withdraw the claim after the labour leader was targeted by an angry mob near parliament. but downing street says the prime minister won't be apologising. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. where's jimmy savile? is what happened outside parliament last night connected to what the prime minister
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said last week? he spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile, as far as i can make out, mr speaker. keir starmer used to be the director of public prosecutions, but there is no evidence for the prime minister's original allegation that sir keir had failed to prosecutejimmy savile. he was not involved at any point in the decision, something borisjohnson has since acknowledged. should the prime ministerl apologise to keir starmer? but number 10 and ministers arriving for a cabinet meeting this morning... do words have consequences? ..insist it is legitimate to ask about the failures of the cps when it was led by sir keir starmer. when you have a debate about the leader of an organisation taking responsibility for that organisation, as keir starmer did, as the prime minister has made clear, as the prime minister has with what happened in downing street, i think that is a reasonable point to make. and we have seen politicians make claims and statements in the chamber to other politicians over the years.
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that is no excuse for people to use that to excuse the way they behaved last night. it simply isn't. but the commons speaker said what happened to sir keir starmer and his colleagues was deplorable, and added... these sorts of comments only inflame opinions and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. 0ur words have consequences, and we should always be mindful of that fact. twice in the last six years, mps have been killed while doing theirjob. sir david amess was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last autumn. in 2016, jo cox was murdered in west yorkshire. of course we should have a robust, passionate political debate in this country. it is the cornerstone of our democracy. but when that descends into abuse, insults, lies, and people screaming at each other in the street, i really hope we can agree that a line has been crossed. labour say what happened here last night has echoes of what we have seen in america in recent years.
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it's trumpian—style politics and legitimises the kind of political discourse which is not what we like or deserve in this country. and i believe he should come to the house of commons and apologise unreservedly for the slurs that he made last week. traitor! but that is not going to happen, despite all of this. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. let's return now to our top story this hour. the health secretary, sajid javid, has outlined the delayed plans to tackle the backlog of patients on nhs hospital waiting lists in england. let's get more on this with tim mitchell, who's the vice president of the royal college of surgeons of england and a consultant ear, nose and throat surgeon. thank you forjoining us. i appreciate that this plan has only just been published. can you give us yoursense just been published. can you give us your sense of reaction to it as you have seen it so far?— your sense of reaction to it as you have seen it so far? good afternoon. we very much _ have seen it so far? good afternoon. we very much welcome _ have seen it so far? good afternoon.
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we very much welcome the - we very much welcome the publication, and particularly welcome its focus on hubs, which we at the royal college of surgeons have been pushing for some time. interference the principle is that surgical hubs are dedicated for routine surgery, therefore routine surgery can carry on when there are pressures on the other parts of the health service. when hospitals are full of patients with emergency conditions, it becomes difficult to maintain surgeries. we believe that by establishing surgical hubs across the country, we can help maintain services. ., , ,
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services. how will these surgical hubs operate? _ services. how will these surgical hubs operate? how _ services. how will these surgical hubs operate? how will - services. how will these surgical hubs operate? how will they - services. how will these surgical. hubs operate? how will they work? the exact specifications will vary across the country. we are already seeing that in different parts of the country. they may be freestanding, either on a hospital site or separate to a hospital, or within the hospital itself. the principle is that there must be facilities which are dedicated to surgery so that, as i say, when there are pressures on other parts of the service, routine surgeries can carry on. realistically, that is the only way we can able to increase to be able to do with the backlog. we welcome the plan laid out in terms of reducing waiting times, we know it will be actually difficult waiting for a routine surgeries, particularly orthopaedics and others. we have seen a massive increase in the number of patient clinic waiting.
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interference the labour party have said they are concerned that there is no plan here to address the huge staff shortages that still exist within the health service. are you worried about having enough people to try and do the work needed? 5tht having enough people to try and do the work needed?— the work needed? staff are clearly im ortant. the work needed? staff are clearly important- the _ the work needed? staff are clearly important. the royal— the work needed? staff are clearly important. the royal college - the work needed? staff are clearly important. the royal college of i important. the royal college of surgeons are ringing, we recognise that the number of staff at the health service has is below the average of other european countries. we have called for an amendment on the health and care bill to look at workforce planning, because it is incredibly important that we should understand how many staff we need to maintain dependable service for the future. that is why it is important to have an independent review on workforce planning, on a two year basis, to look at that. in order to increase the capacity through surgical hubs and other methods, we
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have seen staff across all specialties and disciplines in order to achieve that.— specialties and disciplines in order to achieve that. thank you very much indeed. excuse _ to achieve that. thank you very much indeed. excuse the _ to achieve that. thank you very much indeed. excuse the quality _ to achieve that. thank you very much indeed. excuse the quality on - to achieve that. thank you very much indeed. excuse the quality on the - indeed. excuse the quality on the line there. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, says the protests in the capital 0ttawa against covid restrictions have to stop. for nearly two weeks, hundreds of lorries have brought ottawa's centre to a standstill, forcing many local businesses to close. a state of emergency has been declared. 0ttawa police say they are investigating more than 60 incidents, including alleged hate crimes and property damage, and that they are concerned about some of the extremist rhetoric coming from far—right groups at the rally. ciaran 0'connor is an analyst from the institute for strategic dialogue, a think tank that tracks online extremism and has been following the canadian protests. thank you forjoining us. tell us a bit more about who is involved in the protests and the online activity behind them. fin the protests and the online activity behind them-—
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the protests and the online activity behind them. ., ., behind them. on the ground, the four urou -s behind them. on the ground, the four grouns leading _ behind them. on the ground, the four grouns leading the — behind them. on the ground, the four groups leading the protests _ behind them. on the ground, the four groups leading the protests are - behind them. on the ground, the four groups leading the protests are an - groups leading the protests are an amalgamation of anti—vaccine and anti—government activist organisations who have been active in using and spreading conspiracy theories and alleging that mandate and vaccines are illegal and things like this. it really has blossomed into something much larger, thanks largely to online support. we can see that in a crowdfunding campaign, this was picked up and promoted by various political figures, this was picked up and promoted by various politicalfigures, including president trump and his two sons, in the usa stop but also content creators who have enormous reach on social media. but on the sharp end of the spectrum as well amongst far right and white super mrs groups online as well. it really has created a broad church and far right support and activity, from what started as a protest to achieve a well—defined objective around mandates, it has grown to reflect something that reflects broader
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frustration and anger in these types of communities. t5 it frustration and anger in these types of communities.— of communities. is it financed by others? 0r— of communities. is it financed by others? or governments, - of communities. is it financed by others? or governments, do - of communities. is it financed by others? or governments, do we| of communities. is it financed by - others? or governments, do we know? others? 0r governments, do we know? the initial gofundme campaign was used and promoted by one of the groups are central to the convoy, it has since been taken down by gofundme. but we have seen reports that there were upwards of 120 donations to this, it is enormous. we are all quite aware and used to using... interference prior to the removal of this, myself and some colleagues were able to conduct some research which showed that the gofundme was receiving promotion and the shares from groups within the us. crucially within white super mrs groups as well, a broad alliance of supporters within
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the campaign. following the removal of that campaign, very quickly the organisers behind the initial campaign moves to another platform to set up an alternative crowdfunding campaign. you can see how much of a priority they place on this. �* , ., , , this. are there links with protests, includin: this. are there links with protests, including what _ this. are there links with protests, including what happened _ this. are there links with protests, including what happened last - this. are there links with protests, including what happened last night with sir keir starmer being mobbed? yeah, so the protest movements within canada has quickly morphed into a loose, informal, international coalition of sorts, bringing together various anti—vaccine, anti—lockdown, anti—mandate groups. within the uk, the protest in london were partly inspired by the convoy. you can see that it was not so much trucks and lorries with more camper vans. but central to that protest as well was the belief that mandates, that
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vaccines were illegal, the opposition was... interference we will leave it there. ., ,, interference we will leave it there. . ,, we will leave it there. thank you very much _ we will leave it there. thank you very much indeed. _ there are fresh calls for a windfall tax on energy giants, after bp reported profits of £9.5 billion for last year. the company's boss recently described it as a cash machine. last week shell also posted bumper profits, and labour and the liberal democrats are demanding a one off tax, are demanding a one—off tax, which they say could be used to help households face huge increases in gas and electricity bills. the nominations for this year's oscars are under way, with a great deal of recognition for british talent. let's have a look at some of the nominations.
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best picture, among the nominations are sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographicalfilm belfast, jane campion's western the power of the dog, and sci—fi epic dune. kenneth branagh, and jane campion get another nomination in the best director category, along with steven spielberg for west side story. biggest winners were the power of the dog with 12 nominations and dune with ten nominations. the ceremony takes place on march 27th in hollywood. here to talk us through it all is film criticjason solomons. what is your overall take on what you have seen?— what is your overall take on what ou have seen? �* ., , ., ., . you have seen? amazing performance b ower of you have seen? amazing performance by power of the _ you have seen? amazing performance by power of the dog — you have seen? amazing performance by power of the dog to _ you have seen? amazing performance by power of the dog to get 12 - by power of the dog to get 12 nominations, it is what you would
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call a small movie, i know it has been at it, but not compared tojune and west side story which are big hollywood productions. it has outstripped them with 12 nominations. that is a mixed ordinary hall forjane campion. she has been nominated before for the piano back in 1994, you might remember holly hunter willing for that, and anna paquin winning her support as the youngest ever winner. but champion was not related to director, and best film back then. did not win, i think the momentum seems to be with her now. it will be two years in a row that a female film—maker wins best director and best picture at the oscars. power of the dog seems to be an absolute leading the way. i'm free thrills of the film, it is not a british recliner you mention some of the british films. it was shot in new zealand. benedict cumberbatch
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playing an american cowboy, shot in new zealand. many hands make such films. the globalfilm in that respect. i think we will claim some of it for the brits.— of it for the brits. there are creative _ of it for the brits. there are creative industries - of it for the brits. there are creative industries are - of it for the brits. there are l creative industries are pretty of it for the brits. there are - creative industries are pretty good, aren't they? there are other big british names, just reminds who they are and the big winners in these nominations.— are and the big winners in these nominations. ~ ., , , ., nominations. what is interesting to me is that you _ nominations. what is interesting to me is that you have _ nominations. what is interesting to me is that you have olivia, - me is that you have 0livia, nominated for the lost daughter. you have judi nominated for the lost daughter. you havejudi dench who is always fabulous in everything. she has been nominated for belfast, playing the grandma. they are two similar, very british type actresses. ultimately, that amorous, big hollywood divas are very relatable, down to earth personality is and always deliver superb performances. i think the academy recognised a bit more than we do. i think we take them for granted a little bit. the baftas snapped both of them, it is as if they said, "of course, we know
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they're great, anyone could do that, it is not acting. " believe me,... andrew garfield, benedict, much greater depth of british nominations coming through there as well. and kenneth branagh, let's not overlook him, nominated for director, nominated the screenplay, his former belfast, which i think is terrific and out at cinemas now. i think it will charm a lot of people with those fabulous performances. ciaran hinds nominated who plays those fabulous performances. ciaran hinds nominated who plastudi dench's husband. nice to see them together. th dench's husband. nice to see them touether. , ., together. in terms of the wider nominations, _ together. in terms of the wider nominations, just _ together. in terms of the wider nominations, just looking - together. in terms of the wider. nominations, just looking through the list here. going to the cinema has become much more difficult in recent times. of films that we are seeing, have they had huge take homes on release? triat seeing, have they had huge take homes on release?—
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seeing, have they had huge take homes on release? not huge at the box office- — homes on release? not huge at the box office. the _ homes on release? not huge at the box office. the anyone _ homes on release? not huge at the box office. the anyone set - homes on release? not huge at the box office. the anyone set our- homes on release? not huge at the j box office. the anyone set our huge have been bombed, no time to die and spider—man. ——james bond, no time to die. they are not a huge box office these films, but others we don't know. power of the dog lost daughter. they are on netflix you don't tell us how popular they are. i'm sure that will give this a boost. we are seeing a little tussle there. west side story did not do that were at the box office, mainly because it was skewed towards older audiences. dune did not do amazing at the box office, enough to get a sequel. timing, no one was quite sure about cinema yet. but james bond made everyone go back to the cinema, spider—man inherited from that. i would like to have seen those to recognise a bit more. i thought daniel craig was great as james bond, it would have been nice
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to see him recognised in the acting category. there is still a little arthouse split going on in those best pictures. i can recommend you one, coda is a beautifulfilm about a hearing girl being brought up in a death family. get a terrific film. i don't think there will be any upsets, but if it does,... thank you so much for— upsets, but if it does,... thank you so much for talking _ upsets, but if it does,... thank you so much for talking us _ upsets, but if it does,... thank you so much for talking us through - upsets, but if it does,... thank you so much for talking us through it. l northern ireland's police 0mbudsman has said officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in the murders of at least 11 people in belfast in the 1990s. the watchdog said it was "totally unacceptable" that officers used informants from the ulster defence association, and that evidence and some files had been deliberately destroyed. here's our ireland correspondent, chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an act of sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop.
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the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. they say the ombudsman's inquiry has confirmed their fears. what went on in south belfast, at the hands of loyalist death squads, being protected by the police so they could come into south belfast, into sean graham's bookies, and drive away without being challenged, is sickening. the report identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the killings to the imperial war museum. the security forces had eight informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in 27 murders and attempted murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. these informants were out of control, but it was the police's
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job to make sure that when they engaged with informants that they probed, assessed and questioned what they were doing, and questioned what they were doing. and the continued use of informants, whom police were aware or ought to have been aware were involved in serious criminality and murder is, in my view, unforgivable. in a statement, the police service of northern ireland has offered its sincere apologies to the families. it says policing policies and procedures have greatly improved over the last 30 years. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious, and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. plenty of sunshine across the southern uk today and the northern uk, but two actually very different weather stories. to the south, we're in quite mild atlantic air, to the north, it's colder arctic air. dividing the two, a weather front that will bring further cloud and rain into northern england, eventually down into the north midlands and north wales through the remainder of tuesday, into the early hours of wednesday. to the south of the weather front, a very mild night, lows of eight or nine. to the north, cold with a frost developing, particularly across scotland. further snow showers coming in on the westerly wind and there's more of those to come on wednesday. a breezy day across the uk, the front drifts further south. cloud into southern counties of england through the afternoon. elsewhere, a lot of sunshine. the strength of the wind willjust exacerbate the chilly feel, though, as that arctic air digs further south.
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still in double figures across southernmost uk. further north, though, it will feel closer to freezing. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the government outlines its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini—cabinet reshuffle is under way. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg has a newly—created role, as ministerfor brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. another oil giant posts bumper profits — bp made almost £10 billion last year. the power of the dog leads the way at the oscar nominations, listed for 12 awards. dune has ten.
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and there are seven each for belfast and west side story. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. hello, nice to see you. great britain's search for a medal at this year's winter olympics in beijing continues. it was an olympic debut to remember for 17—year—old kirsty muir, despite finishing outside the medal spots in the big air. and disappointment in the curling mixed—doubles bronze—medal match. jen dodds and bruce mouat lost 9—3 to sweden. 0ur senior sports news reporter laura scott reports. a bronze medal in their sights, the target was clear. but it proved a painful punishing day said bruce mouat and jen dodds. sweden inflicting a hammer blow. sweden in father's form. halfway, britain
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seven points adrift, urgent team talk required. believe, not even that helped. nine having three down with no way back the british pair called it a day, conceding defeat. it is kind of hard to fight back when people from your opposition is playing that well, so congratulations to them, wearing the bronze, they played amazing today. this could not have been much worse in reality and it will be particularly disappointing for team gb given this was one of their best chances of a medal. but four years ago, it took until day seven for great britain to get on the podium and both will be back on this eye is hoping for better. but and both will be back on this eye is hoping for better.— hoping for better. but can she do now? earlier, _ hoping for better. but can she do now? earlier, 17-year-old - hoping for better. but can she do now? earlier, 17-year-old kirstyl now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty muir from _ now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty muir from aberdeen _ now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty muir from aberdeen flow - now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty muir from aberdeen flow in - now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty muir from aberdeen flow in the | now? earlier, 17-year-old kirsty. muir from aberdeen flow in the ski big airfinal. fifth muir from aberdeen flow in the ski big air final. fifth at her first 0lympics, it seems this guy is the limit. tt olympics, it seems this guy is the limit. , ., ., �* limit. it is amazing, i couldn't have hoped — limit. it is amazing, i couldn't have hoped to _ limit. it is amazing, i couldn't have hoped to have _ limit. it is amazing, i couldn't have hoped to have skied - limit. it is amazing, i couldn't. have hoped to have skied better limit. it is amazing, i couldn't- have hoped to have skied better and
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so incredible, all of the girls, honestly. th so incredible, all of the girls, honestly-— so incredible, all of the girls, honestl . ., ., ., honestly. in the front row of the stands was _ honestly. in the front row of the stands was chinese _ honestly. in the front row of the stands was chinese tennis - honestly. in the front row of the stands was chinese tennis star i honestly. in the front row of the - stands was chinese tennis star peng shuai whose sexual assault allegations against a senior communist party official sparked global consent. as she watched as the poster girl of beijing 2022 debuted a trait in her final the poster girl of beijing 2022 debuted a trait in herfinal run the poster girl of beijing 2022 debuted a trait in her final run to claim victory for china. a moment that for many was both unbelievable and uncomfortable. premier league side west ham united have "unreservedly condemned" their defender kurt zouma after a video emerged of him abusing his cat. the video shows the france defender kicking the cat across the floor and slapping it in the face. he has apologised and the club say they will deal with the incident internally. in a statement zouma said...
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england's dismal ashes campaign came to an end this morning with another crushing defeat by australia. the home side had already wrapped up the ashes before play in today's final one day international in melbourne, and theyjust carried on where they'd left off, bowling england out forjust 163 and the hosts reached their target with ease, captain meg lanning smashing a six to finish things off to win the match by 8 wickets, and the series 12—4. england have got to go away, they have got quarantine in new zealand, think about where they can improve, may be some tweaks in the batting order and within the england camp that will have to be made moving forward because things are not going right for them. they have to bring somebody else in the world cup squad. we saw an 0di debut for meghan line, it shows she will be the going to new zealand and be in the going to new zealand and be in the world cup squad but they have to re—evaluate and i think it is more about confidence was up when you
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look at the batting order, they have phenomenal players, matchwinners, but they haven't performed. triat phenomenal players, matchwinners, but they haven't performed. hat a but they haven't performed. not a aood but they haven't performed. not a good series _ but they haven't performed. not a good series for _ but they haven't performed. not a good series for the _ but they haven't performed. not a good series for the men _ but they haven't performed. not a good series for the men or - but they haven't performed. not a good series for the men or women. that's all the sport for now. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at a higher risk of miscarriage. one study found that black women are 40% more likely to suffer pregnancy loss. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says it's unacceptable, but there are complex reasons driving the disparity. our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports. this baby is getting ready for an afternoon trip to the park. before his arrival last spring, his parents and you would eight miscarriages. how has it been? tt and you would eight miscarriages. how has it been?— how has it been? it has been a bit of a journey- _ how has it been? it has been a bit of a journey. natasha _ how has it been? it has been a bit of a journey. natasha says - how has it been? it has been a bit of a journey. natasha says one - how has it been? it has been a bit of a journey. natasha says one of| of a “ourney. natasha says one of the of a journey. natasha says one of the re-occurring _ of a journey. natasha says one of the re-occurring themes - of a journey. natasha says one of the re-occurring themes through | of a journey. natasha says one of - the re-occurring themes through many the re—occurring themes through many of her losses was a feeling of not
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being listened to by some clinicians. t being listened to by some clinicians.— being listened to by some clinicians. ., �* ., clinicians. i haven't always felt taken seriously, _ clinicians. i haven't always felt taken seriously, in _ clinicians. i haven't always felt taken seriously, in some - clinicians. i haven't always felt| taken seriously, in some cases clinicians. i haven't always felt i taken seriously, in some cases i have complained about serious amounts of pain during procedures, during miscarriages, and it was kind of dismissed. she during miscarriages, and it was kind of dismissed-— of dismissed. she tells me she has ruestioned of dismissed. she tells me she has questioned whether _ of dismissed. she tells me she has questioned whether her _ of dismissed. she tells me she has questioned whether her race - of dismissed. she tells me she has questioned whether her race may i of dismissed. she tells me she has - questioned whether her race may have been a factor here. tt is questioned whether her race may have been a factor here.— been a factor here. it is hard because _ been a factor here. it is hard because you _ been a factor here. it is hard because you have _ been a factor here. it is hard because you have the - been a factor here. it is hard - because you have the underlining racism but when it is not blatant, it is hard tojudge. racism but when it is not blatant, it is hard to judge.— racism but when it is not blatant, it is hard to judge. it is hard to 'udge. here at queen charroue-s — it is hard to judge. here at queen charlotte's and _ it is hard to judge. here at queen charlotte's and chelsea _ it is hard to judge. here at queen charlotte's and chelsea hospitali it is hard to judge. here at queen| charlotte's and chelsea hospital in west london, this doctor specialises in early pregnancy. she is also co—chair of the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists race equality task force. unfortunately black women are more likely unfortunately black women are more likeiy to _ unfortunately black women are more likely to have a number of conditions that puts them at greater risk of— conditions that puts them at greater risk of miscarriage. but really more significant — risk of miscarriage. but really more significant level, what we hear time hear time _ significant level, what we hear time hear time and significant level, what we hear time heartime and time significant level, what we hear time hear time and time again is black women _ hear time and time again is black women never feel heard in this
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space — women never feel heard in this space. without addressing the institutional racism where it exists. _ institutional racism where it exists, we will never be able to surely — exists, we will never be able to surely say _ exists, we will never be able to surely say that all women receive the care — surely say that all women receive the care they so deserve. here surely say that all women receive the care they so deserve.- the care they so deserve. here is the care they so deserve. here is the baby is _ the care they so deserve. here is the baby is hard _ the care they so deserve. here is the baby is hard to _ the care they so deserve. here is the baby is hard to beat. - the care they so deserve. here is the baby is hard to beat. in - the baby is hard to beat. in coventry, this professor runs the recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital. she is trying to get funding to get investigations into the many unknowns about why black women are at higher risk, including any potential biological factors. we including any potential biological factors. ~ ~' ., including any potential biological factors. ~ ~ ., including any potential biological factors. ~ ., ., factors. we know if you are black and asian — factors. we know if you are black and asian then _ factors. we know if you are black and asian then you _ factors. we know if you are black and asian then you handle - factors. we know if you are black. and asian then you handle glucose less well, so we know you are at an increased risk of gestation of diabetes was that we also know the balance of bacteria in your regina is different in black and asian women and we know the imbalance has been associated with it miscarriage and preterm birth so that is another area we can look at.— area we can look at. there is a clearly a _ area we can look at. there is a clearly a myriad _ area we can look at. there is a clearly a myriad of— area we can look at. there is a clearly a myriad of complex i area we can look at. there is a l clearly a myriad of complex and difficult issues at play here. but the longer we don't have answers to some of these key questions, the
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longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly. 0ne longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly. one idea already being worked on is an app where women will be able to input their clinical details like ethnicity, weight and when they have had any previous miscarriages. they will then get specific evidence—based advice on how to lower their risk of loss. the black maternal health charity is also carrying out specialist training at maternity units. natasha and her husband say despite their harrowing experiences of loss, they feel like one of the lucky ones. they say women deserve to understand their specific risks during pregnancy and also to simply feel heard. just seeinu also to simply feel heard. just seeing him. — also to simply feel heard. just seeing him, it— also to simply feel heard. just seeing him, it is— also to simply feel heard. just seeing him, it is a _ also to simply feel heard. jt,3t seeing him, it is ajoy, sheerjoy. let's get more on this with nana—adwoa mbeutcha, co—founder of black mums upfront, which aims to create a space
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for black motherhood to be celebrated, including on their own podcast. thank you forjoining us. what are some of this stories told to you about what happens to mothers trying to have a baby. brute about what happens to mothers trying to have a baby-— to have a baby. we must hear about what happens _ to have a baby. we must hear about what happens after _ to have a baby. we must hear about what happens after they _ to have a baby. we must hear about what happens after they have - to have a baby. we must hear about what happens after they have lost . what happens after they have lost the baby or during the pregnancy. —— we must hear about., they don't feel they are being listened to, they are crying out in pain, they are crying out for more advice. and they are just getting brushed aside time and time again. bud just getting brushed aside time and time aaain. �* ., , ., , time again. and who is it that they are t in: time again. and who is it that they are trying to _ time again. and who is it that they are trying to get — time again. and who is it that they are trying to get help _ time again. and who is it that they are trying to get help from - time again. and who is it that they are trying to get help from and - time again. and who is it that they| are trying to get help from and why did they think they are not getting it? it will be from the health care professionals, the consultants. unfortunately i think it always goes down to race and some may say, it
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might not be race. when you have experienced something you're her life, you start to see a pattern, you start to notice when the reaction you get is because maybe you are a woman, you are black, because of something else. and so it is not difficult for us to deduce when it is race —related. abshd is not difficult for us to deduce when it is race -related. and have ou when it is race -related. and have you found — when it is race -related. and have you found any _ when it is race -related. and have you found any means _ when it is race -related. and have you found any means by _ when it is race -related. and have you found any means by which - when it is race -related. and have you found any means by which if. you found any means by which if someone believes that is happening to them they can find a way around it, try to find other health professionals that will listen to them? tt professionals that will listen to them? , , ., , them? it depends on the person. some --eole feel them? it depends on the person. some people feel strong _ them? it depends on the person. some people feel strong enough _ them? it depends on the person. some people feel strong enough to _ them? it depends on the person. some people feel strong enough to speak - people feel strong enough to speak up people feel strong enough to speak up and they are not going to let this injustice pass them by and they will be the advocate for themselves and for other black women. 0ther and for other black women. other black women may be do not have that confidence to be able to do that. it shouldn't have to be that way. we are all that he is the nhs, it is for everyone. as some of us
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shouldn't have to fight harder for equal care. the shouldn't have to fight harder for equal care-— equal care. the health service itself has _ equal care. the health service itself has a — equal care. the health service itself has a very _ equal care. the health service itself has a very diverse - equal care. the health service - itself has a very diverse workforce, so some people might be surprised to hear there is this question of race thatis hear there is this question of race that is still a problem. we hear there is this question of race that is still a problem.— that is still a problem. we live in a diverse multicultural _ that is still a problem. we live in a diverse multicultural society i that is still a problem. we live in i a diverse multicultural society and the problem is still there. th a diverse multicultural society and the problem is still there. in terms ofthe the problem is still there. in terms of the wider _ the problem is still there. in terms of the wider reasons _ the problem is still there. in terms of the wider reasons beyond i the problem is still there. in terms of the wider reasons beyond the i of the wider reasons beyond the problems of race, the other health factors that could be at play, have you had any ideas or suggestions from the people you are in touch with about what could be done, because obviously there are multiple causes you potentially. yes. because obviously there are multiple causes you potentially.— causes you potentially. yes, and i am at a health _ causes you potentially. yes, and i am at a health professional i causes you potentially. yes, and i am at a health professional so i l am at a health professional so i cannot speak so much on that front, but i understand gestation of diabetes are just some of the factors that seem to be more prevalent in black women which could lead to miscarriages. so i guess a lot needs to be done to figure out why is it more prevalent, is it
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something genetic, something systemic that has happened over the decades where maybe our mothers were not treated properly with the right health care and it led on to us having similar problems? there is a trickle—down effect, so really the whole picture needs to be looked at. thank you very much indeed for talking to us today. there are fresh calls for a windfall tax on energy giants after bp reported profits of £9.5 billion for last year. the company's boss recently described it as a 'cash machine'. last week, shell also posted bumper profits, and labour and the liberal democrats are demanding a one—off tax, which they say could be used to help households face huge increases in gas and electricity bills. it's notjust the petrol pumping at bp, but profits too. the oil giant has reported its highest profits for eight years, and it's easy to understand why. a combination of resurgent demand
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and geopolitical tensions has seen oil prices almost double. wholesale gas prices are currently five times higher than they were before the pandemic. last year bp made profits of £9.5 billion. and only last week another oil giant, shell, announced profits of £14 billion. but when economies around the world were shut due to the covid—19 pandemic in 2020, bp made losses of £4 billion. butjust as bp have benefited from these huge rises in energy prices, households are paying the price. jenny has to pay for her gas and electricity in advance and as a prepayment customer, she is already paying the highest rates for her energy. where £10 could have lasted you three or four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget because you are like, hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and i havejust checked and i've only got £7 left,
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surely it should be this? and you are watching the balance go down and you are thinking... there's nothing i can do. when that goes, there is no electric or gas. labour last month proposed that north sea energy producers pay higher corporation tax for a year to fund £1.2 billion of help for households. some want to go even further. we could raise £5 billion at least from the huge profits that the oil and gas companies are making and use that money to cut people's energy bills. how can it be fair that oil and gas companies are making huge profits at the expense of millions of people who are having problems paying their heating bills? bp says it is investing in renewables and one former executive believes a windfall tax is not the solution. oil and gas account for 80% of all the energy britain uses every day, so there needs to be the investment
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in that by companies like bp and shell and others, but they also need, and they are trying to do this, to invest in the move towards low—carbon. only a fraction of bp�*s profits are generated in the north sea, so a windfall tax applied only to those operations would raise limited revenue. but with oil firms making massive profits, many believe they are in an ideal position to help foot the bill for struggling customers. ramzan karmali, bbc news. here with me now is miatta fahnbulleh, who is the chief executive at the new economics foundation. thank you forjoining us. what is your view of a windfall tax? t thank you forjoining us. what is your view of a windfall tax? i think it is a no-brainer. _ your view of a windfall tax? i think it is a no-brainer. when _ your view of a windfall tax? i think it is a no-brainer. when you i your view of a windfall tax? i thinkj it is a no-brainer. when you factor it is a no—brainer. when you factor in the squeeze that is being felt across the country by households and families, we know many families are about to be hit by about £1500 to £2000 over the course of this year. the idea you could have whether it is oil producers or generators,
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energy generators making extraordinary profits and we don't know anything about it and the isn't some spread, it feels absolutely remarkable. the some spread, it feels absolutely remarkable-— some spread, it feels absolutely remarkable. ., ., ., , remarkable. the argument against it, art of it is remarkable. the argument against it, part of it is they _ remarkable. the argument against it, part of it is they have _ remarkable. the argument against it, part of it is they have to _ remarkable. the argument against it, part of it is they have to invest, i part of it is they have to invest, and if you cut the profits, they won't, especially in renewables. t won't, especially in renewables. i don't buy that argument, in part because the level of profits, look at the numbers coming up from bp, from shell, one year, 9 billion, another, 14 billion. these are excess profits, they went banking on them. they already had investment pipelines for things like renewables and these additional profits they are making are not really in the investment plan. i actually think there is the scope to have a windfall tax as well as have a pipeline of a divestment of things like renewables. these companies have been pretty slow at investing in renewables, the investment is
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coming from other waters, so i think you can balance the two. i come back to the point that when people are literally struggling between feeding their families and heating their homes, it cannot be right, it cannot be right orfair way homes, it cannot be right, it cannot be right or fair way so it homes, it cannot be right, it cannot be right orfair way so it is ok for certain areas of the economy to be making those sort of supernormal profits. making those sort of supernormal rofits. ~ ., ., ., ., ., ., profits. what about the adamant that the money goes _ profits. what about the adamant that the money goes into _ profits. what about the adamant that the money goes into people's - profits. what about the adamant that l the money goes into people's pension funds. t the money goes into people's pension funds. ., . the money goes into people's pension funds. ~ ., , ., ., , funds. i think that is a false argument _ funds. i think that is a false argument being _ funds. i think that is a false argument being put - funds. i think that is a false argument being put out i funds. i think that is a false argument being put out in i funds. i think that is a false i argument being put out in order funds. i think that is a false - argument being put out in order to obscure the water. uk pension funds at the moment, only about 6% of ftse 100 as investment that comes from uk pension fund so it is a tiny proportion, so the idea that it is ok for them to make supernormal profits because a tiny fraction goes to pensions does not herald. i think for most people across the country, help now in order to help ease this painful squeeze happening should far take precedence over pension funds
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which will only make a tiny amount of the returns from things like energy providers. ts it of the returns from things like energy providers.— of the returns from things like energy providers. is it really bad for the state _ energy providers. is it really bad for the state to _ energy providers. is it really bad for the state to intervene - energy providers. is it really bad for the state to intervene in i for the state to intervene in business in a free society? t for the state to intervene in business in a free society? i think that is what _ business in a free society? i think that is what it _ business in a free society? i think that is what it is _ business in a free society? i think that is what it is about. _ business in a free society? i think that is what it is about. the i business in a free society? i think| that is what it is about. the entire point of the state is to try to level the playing field and make it fair. i come back to the argument about fairness, it cannot be right that in something as essential, we not talking about a luxury, we are talking about heat, if electricity, these are basic necessities and i think it is the responsibility of the state to ensure everyone has that basic requirement. but the state to ensure everyone has that basic requirement.— that basic requirement. but they also have to _ that basic requirement. but they also have to make _ that basic requirement. but they also have to make a _ that basic requirement. but they also have to make a profit i that basic requirement. but they also have to make a profit and l that basic requirement. but they i also have to make a profit and they made a loss last year. i develop on that, if there was a windfall tax, where would you set it and how much difference would it make to individuals?— difference would it make to individuals? ., , , , , individuals? two things, guess they made a loss. _ individuals? two things, guess they made a loss, but _ individuals? two things, guess they made a loss, but you _ individuals? two things, guess they made a loss, but you have - individuals? two things, guess they made a loss, but you have to i individuals? two things, guess they made a loss, but you have to look i individuals? two things, guess they | made a loss, but you have to look at the private profile over the course of the last ten years and it is not
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like profits have not been healthy. i would argue when you are talking about 10 billion, 14 billion, it more than offset the loss made in the case of what one of the companies we were talking about which was four billion. there is a level you can set that allows the creaming of the excess return and still allows companies to bank a return that would allow them to invest and pare their shell holders. i think the counterfactual is a bogus... where you would set it, i think it is a policy question. you could set it to do level. we have a residence of having windfall tax before so we know how to do this and i think the key thing is it is not just shell, notjust bp, you need to look at the generators across the piece. we have a number of companies that will be on the generating side that will be on the generating side that were making healthy returns. think about how you put a levy on them and how you use that to provide either targeted support to certain
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families, whether that is expanding the warm homes discount or you say rather than the price cap increasing, we lower the cap so we protect families. that is exactly what macrame is doing in france with edf taking the hit and a lower price cap coming into play. —— president macron is doing in france. bamber gascoigne, the original host of the tv quiz show university challenge, has died after a short illness. he was 87. gascoigne's catchphrase of "here's your starter for ten" became a regular feature on television as he presented the programme from 1962 to 1987. 0ur arts correspondent, david sillito, looks back at his life. university challenge theme plays university challenge tournament. asking the questions, bamber gascoigne. i it began in 1962. bamber gascoigne, a 27—year—old eton—educated theatre critic, was chosen to be the host of a new quiz show, university challenge.
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st hilda's, evans? picasso. picasso, ten points, st hilda's. we all thought, i think, that it was a job for about three months. had anyone known that the first run of it was going to last for 25 years, and we were talking about a job for 25 years, i think we would have all been so frightened we could hardly have read the card. let's go straight into the game, here's the first starter for ten. a big one coming up, here's your starter for ten. before each programme he'd go through the questions, learning just enough to give the impression of being all knowing. i didn't want to let them down by revealing gross ignorance. "dear sir, your astonishment�*s odd. "i am always about in the quad..." he was also rather posh. "yours faithfully, god." his family tree had more than a smattering of generals, politicians and aristocrats. and the show had a certain 0xbridge heartiness to it, punctured only by manchester's moment of student rebellion, answering questions with the names of revolutionary leaders. che guevara. karl marx. trotsky.
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starterfor ten, fingers on the buzzers. who is the richest person in the world? and then there was also the famous parody. now, i'll have to hurry you, i'll have to hurry you. who is the richest person in the world? footlights, snot. it's... it's me, isn't it? but by the late 80s, it no longer seemed to fit in the itv schedules and was dropped. that's the end of this one. still, another time, perhaps. there was the short lived and even more highbrow series connoisseur... we have questions ranging from painting and architecture to ceramics and furniture. university challenge | pro—celebrity match. ..and he did return for a celebrity special. bamber gascoigne! but he turned down the bbc revival, choosing instead to devote himself to writing, his history website, and latterly restoring a large country house he inherited. your first starter for ten. starter for ten. but starterfor ten, fingers on the buzzer... two minutes to go.
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..his place in history is behind the desk of one of tv�*s most challenging quizzes. bamber gascoigne, who's died at the age of 87. the duchess of cornwall has carried out her first public engagement since the queen paved the way for her to become queen camilla. the duchess was welcomed at roundhill primary school in bath, where she toured classrooms and joined a range of lessons. on sunday, the queen confirmed that she wants camilla to be named queen consort when charles becomes king. the duchess of cambridge is reading a bedtime story on cbeebies, the first member of the royal family to do so. it's to mark children's mental health week, and she's chosen to read the owl who was afraid of the dark — a story she herself enjoyed as a child. here's tim muffett. the latest famous face to read the cbeebies bedtime story. this sunday, the duchess of cambridge will read the owl who was afraid of the dark
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byjill tomlinson as part of children's mental health week. cbeebies bedtime story. hello, my name's ed. ed sheeran. hello, my name is reese. reese witherspoon. hello, my name's tom. tom hardy. just a few of the household names who have previously signed up for the bedtime story. hi. hello. the duchess of cambridge has also been a keen supporter of early years education. two years ago, she was involved in the bbc�*s tiny happy people campaign, which was aimed at developing children's communication skills. sort of 90% of our adult brain grows before the age of five. and itjust shows what a precious time this is and what an amazing opportunity us as parents have got to really nurture their minds. the theme of this year's children's mental health week
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is "growing together". the story read by the duchess is about a baby barn owl who is helped by others to grow in confidence. her appearance also coincides with the 20th anniversary of cbeebies and cbbc. tim muffett, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. plenty of sunshine to be found across the uk today, and thank you to our weather watchers for these glimpses of the skies where you are. just a few clouds there on the horizon from edinburgh. and as we head to the other end of the country, similarly bright blue skies across kent, just some patchy cloud drifting through on the breeze. big difference, though, in the way things have felt outside arctic air sits across scotland and northern ireland now, atlantic air still clings on to the south, but all the while the cold air is ebbing its way further south
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behind this band of cloud and rain, which is a weather front separating out the two. so more rain this evening for northern england, also getting into north wales and the north midlands, as that front just sinks a little further south. to the south of the front, very mild again, to the north of the front, we're looking at a frost, particularly for scotland. and then through wednesday, the front slowly continues its journey southwards, such that, actually, i think for some parts of northern england, wales and the midlands, temperatures will come down through the day as the skies clear and the front carries its cloud down into southern counties of england. to the south of the uk, it will still be feeling mild, but it's going to be a windy day across the board and the strength of those winds will just add into how chilly it's going to feel, especially across northernmost reaches of the uk through wednesday, temperatures for scotland down the lower end of single figures in many areas. and then by thursday, the front is off into the continent, we are all into the arctic air. this is something we're going to need to watch closely — an area of low pressure that looks like it's going to deal a glancing blow to scotland,
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possibly some heavy and more persistent snow showers. certainly, i think we will have widespread gales with winds gusting up to 50 to 60 miles per hour for some of the more exposed spots. chilly across the board, you have to factor in the wind when you think about how it will feel when you step outside, and for the likes of aberdeen and stornoway, it's likely to feel below freezing. thursday into friday, that little feature is off towards the continent. high pressure builds — that will actually mean the winds fall light and with a still start to friday, a widespread frost, a risk of ice, especially where there will be some showers on into the early hours of friday across scotland. friday, a day of faultless blue skies for the majority of the uk, lighter winds, it may feel a little milder, but overall a cold end to the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the government outlines its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini cabinet reshuffle is underway. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit 0pportunities. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. when we are looking at the fact that somebody at the top of an organisation has a responsibility for what happens in it. that is the point the prime minister was making. i think that is a fair and reasonable point. it's no excuse for people to behave the way that they did last night. these sorts of comments only inflame opinion and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. 0ur words have consequences,
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and we should always be mindful of that fact. another oil giant posts bumper profits — bp made almost £10 billion last year. the power of the dog leads the way at the oscar nominations — in contention for 12 awards. sir kenneth branagh's belfast has seven. good afternoon. the health secretary, sajid javid, has outlined the delayed plans to tackle the backlog of patients on nhs hospital waiting lists in england. mrjavid told the commons the number of people waiting for elective care has risen to six million. the devolved nations have set out their own recovery plans. that figure of six million represents around one in nine
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of the population and is expected to rise further. 100 community diagnostic centres are going to be set up. as will surgical hubs, concentrating on high—volume routine surgery. the measures should help the nhs increase the amount of treatments it carries out by 30% above its pre—pandemic activity levels. it will be paid for by an extra investment of £8 billion over the next three years. here's more of what mrjavid told mps. the plan sets the ambition of eliminating waits of longer than a year — waits in elective care — by march 2025. within this, no—one will wait longer than two years byjuly this year and the nhs aims to eliminate the waits of over 18 months by april 2023, and of over 65 weeks by march 2024, which equates to 99% of patients waiting less than one year. 0ur health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, told us more about the plan.
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this is the recovery plan to set the nhs back to where it was pre—pandemic. and the government said today to take it further than that as well. by 2025, it said the nhs would be carrying out 9 million more diagnostic tests and treatments, and it would also be performing 30% more elective procedures. capacity it said, would be increased by having more health care support workers and making greater use of private providers. and reducing those very long waiting lists is one of the main ambitions of this plan. by march 2024, we were just hearing that waits of more than one year would be eliminated. and byjuly this year, no one would wait longer than two years. and this is the plan for england to recover. what sort of reception is it getting? we saw the labour party in the commons during this announcement were pretty critical.
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absolutely, they were pretty scathing of the plan. they said it did not address the workforce shortages that we know have been causing so many problems, and also delayed discharges from hospital. in terms of things like the money backing this plan, we know that £10 billion is being provided by the treasury for it. but the health foundation, the think tank, suggests that the nhs in england needs £13 billion in orderjust to stand still, things still, for things not to deteriorate further. and the nhs itself is very concerned about what it calls these missing patients. it is believed there are about 10 million patients that should be being treated by the nhs at the moment who are not in the system. it is concerned about when these patients might come back. they are people who just did not come forward during the pandemic for all sorts of different reasons. that is why the nhs has been so concerned about having targets. so concerned about having targets
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that it has to meet in case it then it gets swamped by double the amount of patients then on a waiting list. let's get more on this with matthew taylor, he's the chief executive of the nhs confederation, which is a membership body for organisations that commission and provide nhs services. thanks forjoining us. what is your reaction to this plan?— reaction to this plan? service leaders will _ reaction to this plan? service leaders will welcome - reaction to this plan? service leaders will welcome this i reaction to this plan? service| leaders will welcome this plan reaction to this plan? service i leaders will welcome this plan we are already working flat out to try to get services back to normal as covid continues to decline. in if this plan presents the best case scenario of what we will be able to do over the next three or four years. it is a best case scenario because there are challenges, the challenge of getting the staff to do this work. the nhs has 100,000 or so vacancies, there are labour shortages in the economy. we will need the staff. and also as sophie hutchinson was saying, we just don't know about this big imponderable which is the number of patient who
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did not come forward during? and who are now starting to come forward for primary care. there are also strains on our community services and mental health services, and emergency services and primary care. this addresses one issue which is a long wait. in the public cares about this. we will get the nhs working. in terms of staffing, how is any of this going to be done if they are not more people to do it? there is rovision not more people to do it? there is provision in _ not more people to do it? there is provision in the _ not more people to do it? there is provision in the plan _ not more people to do it? there is provision in the plan to _ not more people to do it? there is provision in the plan to bring i provision in the plan to bring in more people. we are hard at work doing that, recruiting staff, obtaining staff, trying to improve the quality of people's experience working in the nhs and care system. but we are in a situation where we have a tight labour market. so it is notjust have a tight labour market. so it is not just the have a tight labour market. so it is notjust the nhs, it is other parts of the economy that face this challenge. and i think the government could be doing more in
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terms of a real proper costed workforce plan. we still don't have that workforce plan. until we have that, there is a danger of a gap between these aspirations, which are entirely commendable, nhs leaders want to be able to deliver on these, the gap between that and having the people we need to deliver. hagar the gap between that and having the people we need to deliver.— people we need to deliver. how do ou people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? _ people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? is— people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? is it _ people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? is it about _ people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? is it about pay? is i people we need to deliver. how do you recruit? is it about pay? is it. you recruit? is it about pay? is it about the conditions that people work in? is it about visas for people to bring people in from outside? bill people to bring people in from outside? �* ., ., , outside? all of the above. it is about international _ outside? all of the above. it is i about international recruitment, it is about a, it is about people's experience of work. i think working in the nhs can be incredibly rewarding, but we have asked staff to do an awful lot over the last two years. and it is important that we invest in ensuring that the job so that we do are doable, that we look after their broader well—being. because you can't ask people to take on more. the other day, we heard that a very high level of
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paramedics, for example, are feeling completely exhausted and demoralised. there is a job to be done to renew the morale of the nhs and allow people to have jobs which are doable, given what they have been having to do over the last two years. been having to do over the last two ears. . , been having to do over the last two ears. ., , ., ., , years. can i 'ust ask about these sura ical years. can i just ask about these surgical hubs? _ years. can i just ask about these surgical hubs? the _ years. can i just ask about these surgical hubs? the idea - years. can i just ask about these surgical hubs? the idea that i years. can i just ask about these i surgical hubs? the idea that routine surgery is done in a separate centre. is that entirely safe? because there is always a risk that if something goes wrong, if you are not near an intensive care unit whether there is wide expertise? t whether there is wide expertise? i think patient safety is taken incredibly seriously. these surgical hubs enable us to focus on a certain set of procedures and to be able to deliver patient care more quickly. i was at chase farm hospital on friday, for example, which is still one of our newest hospitals. and it focuses on particular procedures. it is very effectively run which is
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able to get more patients through, nearly everybody is treated in a day and is able to return home. being able to concentrate on particular procedures, enabling people to get out of hospital quickly, these are things which improve the productivity of the health system. is there enough money here? this plan was delayed, speculation about whether the treasury were holding it back either the policy reasons or...? back either the policy reasons or. . . ? ~ . back either the policy reasons or...? . . . back either the policy reasons or...? ., ., ., ., ., or. . . ? we are aware of the fact that the whole of — or. . . ? we are aware of the fact that the whole of the _ or. . . ? we are aware of the fact that the whole of the public _ or. . . ? we are aware of the fact that the whole of the public sector i or. . . ? we are aware of the fact that the whole of the public sector is i the whole of the public sector is squeezed financially, but there is an extra squeeze, a pay rise —— tax rise. we will deliver everything we possibly can. i think we are confident that if we have a fair wind, we can deliver on these targets. they are aligned with the targets. they are aligned with the target we have already. we all know from the last two years but there are many things which can happen to upset plans. let's hope that with a
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fair wind, without covid springing up fair wind, without covid springing up again, addressing those issues, that we are able to make the progress that nhs leaders want to make and the public want as well. thanks forjoining us. borisjohnson has begun a mini reshuffle of his ministers. the chief whip mark spencer, who was criticised for his treatment of rebellious mps, is moving sideways to become leader of the commons. he'll replace jacob rees—mogg, who becomes minister for brexit 0pportunities. let's cross to our political correspondent, ione wells, in downing street. this is not really about a big reshuffle some of the shuffle of the other roles in government, not a massive research. part of the reset the borisjohnson had promised, some of his mps that he hopes will help to quieten some of the discontent that has been going on over the last couple of weeks and months amongst his backbench tory mps. in terms of
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the new positions that we have announced today, jacob rees—mogg is taking on a new created position called the brexit 0pportunities minister. this may please a couple of brexiteer mps who may have been concerned that perhaps some of those domestic changes post—brexit had not really been a top priority for the government. the prime minister has already announced that he wants to introduce new laws to try and deregulate certain things post—brexit. and that officials are already looking at which law is inherited from the eu may be scrapped, which regulations may be scrapped, which regulations may be scrapped now that the uk has left the eu. that will certainly be his new responsibility in that new role of brexit 0pportunities minister. replacing him as the leader of the house of commons is not spencer who was formerly the chief whip in charge of party discipline. the reason this has been pretty controversial already today among some tory mps is the lead at the house of commons is a role which is often associated with one which is
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meant to uphold discipline, uphold standards in parliament in particular. also oversee the parliamentary complaints system. mark spencer is somebody who himself is currently under investigation. that was after the conservative mp ms ghani published allegations saying that a whip had told her that her muslim faith was one of the reasons she was sacked as a government minister. mark spencer publicly identified him after these claims as the written question but strongly denied the claims made. in mps have expressed unhappiness with the fact he not essentially be somebody responsible for upholding standards in the house of commons, while he currently is under investigation for his own behaviour. another role significant today is the appointment of chris heaton—harris, replacing mark spencer as the chief whip. he has a massive task on his hands really, there has been of scrutiny on recent months the government's whipping operation, in charge of party discipline. this is notjust over
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the recent allegations of parties in whitehall during lockdown instructions, this stretches further back, i think, instructions, this stretches further back, ithink, to instructions, this stretches further back, i think, to the time when the government was trying to whip its own mps to support 0wen paterson, the mp who was found to have breached lobbying rules, who the government was arguing should not face suspension imminently. which caused a lot of unhappiness among some of the backbench mps. whips have also come under fire on other folks would have been bigger tory rebellions in the last couple of months, notably over covid restrictions as well. he harris they're taking on massivejob restrictions as well. he harris they're taking on massive job to try to get some of those backbench mps back on site in the way the prime minister wants.— back on site in the way the prime minister wants. how much respite does a tent _ minister wants. how much respite does a tent get? _ minister wants. how much respite does a tent get? does _ minister wants. how much respite does a tent get? does boris i minister wants. how much respite i does a tent get? does boris johnson does a tent get? does borisjohnson get? the house pauses for recess, there is pmqs tomorrow, and a huge number of questions, not least of keir starmer and the comments from last week. there is a potential break in the heat, isn't there? perhaps this reshuffle is a bit of a
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distraction as well. figs perhaps this reshuffle is a bit of a distraction as well.— distraction as well. as you say, after thursday, _ distraction as well. as you say, after thursday, parliament i distraction as well. as you say, i after thursday, parliament breaks up for its annual break, a week off for mps to return to their constituencies. however, ithink this will be seen as quite a lot of mps as a bit of a test. remember over the last couple of weeks, some of the discontent that has bubbled up of the discontent that has bubbled up among different factions of conservative mps has happened after they have returned to their constituencies and been faced, in some cases quite literally face—to—face, with some anger from constituents over a number of issues. whether that is cost of living, whether that is fallout over downing street parties during lockdown restrictions. i think certainly the work will continue from number ten's point of view to try to rebuild some of that trust when mps return from recess. as i said before, certainly the whip has a big role at their on his hands, it is notjust any one wing of the conservative party they are trying to get back on side. remember there are brexiteer mps who have not been
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happy recently with how negotiations over the northern ireland protocol have been handled, there are some of the new mps elected in 2019 who have raised the discontent over downing street parties and the cost of living, there are one nation tory mps, so—called, as as the covid mac research group of mps scrutinising the government over restrictions. wings of the party which the government is trying to get back onside. taste government is trying to get back onside. ~ , ., ., government is trying to get back onside. ~ i. ., ., ., onside. we will let you go, it looks like a car is — onside. we will let you go, it looks like a car is reversing _ onside. we will let you go, it looks like a car is reversing into - onside. we will let you go, it looks like a car is reversing into you! i like a car is reversing into you! thanks very much for that. the commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, has condemned the abuse of sir keir starmer by protesters yesterday and described borisjohnson's false claim, that the labour leader had failed to prosecute the paedophile, jimmy savile, as 'unacceptable'. there is growing pressure on the prime minister to withdraw the claim after the labour leader was targeted by an angry mob near parliament. but downing street says the prime minister won't be apologising. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. where's jimmy savile? is what happened outside parliament last night connected
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to what the prime minister said last week? he spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile, as far as i can make out, mr speaker. keir starmer used to be the director of public prosecutions, but there is no evidence for the prime minister's original allegation that sir keir had failed to prosecutejimmy savile. he was not involved at any point in the decision, something borisjohnson has since acknowledged. should the prime ministerl apologise to keir starmer? but number 10 and ministers arriving for a cabinet meeting this morning... do words have consequences? ..insist it is legitimate to ask about the failures of the cps when it was led by sir keir starmer. when you have a debate about the leader of an organisation taking responsibility for that organisation, as keir starmer did, as the prime minister has made clear, as the prime minister has with what happened in downing street, i think that is a reasonable point to make. and we have seen politicians make
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claims and statements in the chamber to other politicians over the years. that is no excuse for people to use that to excuse the way they behaved last night. it simply isn't. but the commons speaker said what happened to sir keir starmer and his colleagues was deplorable, and added... these sorts of comments only inflame opinions and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. 0ur words have consequences, and we should always be mindful of that fact. twice in the last six years, mps have been killed while doing theirjob. sir david amess was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last autumn. in 2016, jo cox was murdered in west yorkshire. of course we should have a robust, passionate political debate in this country. it is the cornerstone of our democracy. but when that descends into abuse, insults, lies, and people screaming at each other in the street, i really hope we can agree that a line has been crossed. labour say what happened here last night has echoes of what we have
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seen in america in recent years. it's trumpian—style politics and legitimises the kind of political discourse which is not what we like or deserve in this country. and i believe he should come to the house of commons and apologise unreservedly for the slurs that he made last week. traitor! but that is not going to happen, despite all of this. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. there are fresh calls for a windfall tax on energy giants after bp reported profits of £9.5 billion for last year. the company's boss recently described it as a "cash machine". last week, shell also posted bumper profits, and labour and the liberal democrats are demanding a one—off tax, which they say could be used to help households face huge increases in gas and electricity bills. ramzan kamali reports. it's notjust the petrol pumping at bp, but profits too.
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the oil giant has reported its highest profits for eight years, and it's easy to understand why. a combination of resurgent demand and geopolitical tensions has seen oil prices almost double. wholesale gas prices are currently five times higher than they were before the pandemic. last year, bp made profits of £9.5 billion. and only last week another oil giant, shell, announced profits of £14 billion. but when economies around the world were shut due to the covid—19 pandemic in 2020, bp made losses of £4 billion. butjust as bp have benefited from these huge rises in energy prices, households are paying the price. jenny has to pay for her gas and electricity in advance and as a prepayment customer, she is already paying the highest rates for her energy. where £10 could have lasted you three or four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget because you are like, hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and i havejust checked
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and i've only got £7 left, surely it should be this? and you are watching the balance go down and you are thinking... "there's nothing i can do." when that goes, there is no electric or gas. labour last month proposed that north sea energy producers pay higher corporation tax for a year to fund £1.2 billion of help for households. some want to go even further. we could raise £5 billion at least from the huge profits that the oil and gas companies are making and use that money to cut people's energy bills. how can it be fair that oil and gas companies are making huge profits at the expense of millions of people who are having problems paying their heating bills? bp says it is investing in renewables, and one former executive believes a windfall tax is not the solution. oil and gas account for 80% of all the energy britain uses every day,
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so there needs to be the investment in that by companies like bp but they also need, and they are trying to do this, to invest in the move towards low—carbon. only a fraction of bp's profits are generated in the north sea, so a windfall tax applied only to those operations would raise limited revenue. but with oil firms making massive profits, many believe they are in an ideal position to help foot the bill for struggling customers. ramzan karmali, bbc news. joining me now isjulianjessop who is a fellow at the institute of economic affairs. thank you forjoining us. is there not a valid argument for a one—off windfall tax, given the unprecedented position that so many people are in it now? first unprecedented position that so many people are in it now?— people are in it now? first of all, i people are in it now? first of all, i certainly _ people are in it now? first of all, i certainly agree _ people are in it now? first of all, i certainly agree that _ people are in it now? first of all, i certainly agree that there i people are in it now? first of all, i certainly agree that there is i people are in it now? first of all, i certainly agree that there is a l i certainly agree that there is a need for more help for low income households. i don't think a windfall tax is the way to raise that money. for a start, is your introduction
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suggested, although oil companies have made quite big profits in 2021, that follows quite big losses in 2020. if you look over the last two years taken together, then they are in a worse position than if the covid pandemic had not happened. arguably, there is no windfall tax there anyway. the second point is that i know these numbers sound absolutely enormous when it is pressed in terms of numbers of billions of pounds or dollars, and indeed they are, but these are massive global companies. if you look at those profits relative to the size of their assets or their turnover, they are not actually that exceptional. the source of profits you would normally expect in these companies to make. i don't think it is right there is some sort of magic pot of money that you can tap into. without that potentially damaging investment or being passed on to customers as higher prices or workers with lower wages. but customers as higher prices or workers with lower wages. but if the com an is workers with lower wages. but if the company is describing _ workers with lower wages. but if the company is describing it _ workers with lower wages. but if the company is describing it as - workers with lower wages. but if the company is describing it as a - workers with lower wages. but if the company is describing it as a cash i company is describing it as a cash machine, these are essential services that they are effectively providing, we are seeing the
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incredible hardship that many people are now facing, isn't there some justification, even though you might not want to roll that forward in future years where profits may not be as high, thatjust at this present moment, rather than increasing everyone's income tax or whatever or national insurance even further, of all the mechanisms for raising cash, this is a valid one for this year, surely?— raising cash, this is a valid one for this year, surely? that is how, it has some _ for this year, surely? that is how, it has some downsides. _ for this year, surely? that is how, it has some downsides. any i for this year, surely? that is how, i it has some downsides. any arbitrary expected windfall taxes damaging the business confidence, because it increases uncertainty about what might happen next. this is notjust an issue for the energy sector, if you start taxing energy companies more and what about other companies that have done relatively well during the pandemic like internet companies, for example? the way these companies have made money is by delivering the goods and services that we needed in extreme in difficult circumstances. i think there is a danger that you send a really bad signal to businesses here that any time you make a bit of extra money when conditions are good
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for you, we will whack you are at the head with an additional tax that you were not expecting.— you were not expecting. energy companies — you were not expecting. energy companies are _ you were not expecting. energy companies are in _ you were not expecting. energy companies are in a _ you were not expecting. energy companies are in a peculiar- companies are in a peculiar position, because they are providing an essential services of heat and light to everybody. that is not a guarantee... they are part of national infrastructure, a service as well as a business.— national infrastructure, a service as well as a business. that is true, but that is — as well as a business. that is true, but that is not _ as well as a business. that is true, but that is not a _ as well as a business. that is true, but that is not a guarantee - as well as a business. that is true, but that is not a guarantee of - but that is not a guarantee of profits, as we saw in 2020 when the oil companies we are talking about now made big losses. it is quite a competitive market, if you switch from one energy supplier to another. it is not as if there is a lack of competition. the reason energy prices have gone up is not the fault of energy companies, it is a big imbalance in supply and demand. on top of that, the government has introduced all sorts of policies over the last few years which have potentially made the problem worse. we will have to leave it there. thank you very much for your time. northern ireland's police ombudsman has said officers colluded with loyalist paramilitaries in the murders of at least 11 people in belfast in the 1990s.
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the watchdog said it was "totally unacceptable" that officers used informants from the ulster defence association, and that evidence and some files had been deliberately destroyed. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an act of sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. they say the ombudsman�*s inquiry has confirmed their fears. what went on in south belfast, at the hands of loyalist death squads, being protected by the police so they could come into south belfast, into sean graham's bookies, and drive away without being challenged, is sickening. the report identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the killings to the imperial war museum.
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the security forces had eight informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in 27 murders and attempted murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. these informants were out of control, but it was the police�*s job to make sure that when they engaged with informants that they probed, assessed and questioned what they were doing. and the continued use of informants, whom police were aware or ought to have been aware were involved in serious criminality and murder is, in my view, unforgivable. in a statement, the police service of northern ireland has offered its sincere apologies to the families. it says policing policies and procedures have greatly improved over the last 30 years. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious,
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and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. the duchess of cornwall has carried out her first public engagement since the queen paved the way for her to become queen camilla. the duchess was welcomed at roundhill primary school in bath, where she toured classrooms and joined a range of lessons. on sunday, the queen confirmed that she wants camilla to be named queen consort when charles becomes king. we spoke to andrew plant earlier who was there. there were lots of excited schoolchildren at this primary school here in bath this morning for camilla's visit. a couple of hundred of them lining the playground there behind me, waving their flags as she arrived shortly after 11 o'clock this
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morning, walking down between them, saying hello to lots of them as she headed towards the entrance to the school. and this visit of course of extra significance, it is camilla's first royal engagement since the queen made it clear that after prince charles becomes king charles, it is her sincerest wish that camilla be known as queen camilla. she had a pretty busy schedule for this visit here today, she went to a language class, we are told, first of all with some three—year—olds. there was some tree—planting with ten—year—olds outside. then she went to the owl reading room to read a story and then was making smoothies for lunch with some eight to ten—year—olds. so, very busy for her here today. but lots of eyes on this visit today because it is herfirst, as i say, after the queen made it completely clear what her wishes are for camilla's title after charles takes the throne. there had been speculation, of course, about what exactly that would be, it really was an unresolved issue within the royal family.
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would she perhaps be known, it was thought, as princess consort? but now the queen has made it very clear that it is her wish that she should be known as queen camilla after charles takes the throne. now, her final tasks here today came in a couple of parts, really. the school had composed and [earned its own unique song called we are proud of our school, which was performed for her and they had also had a plaque installed commemorating camilla's visit here today, which she unveiled. her final task on what was her first royal engagement after the queen made it clear it is her wish that camilla be known as queen camilla after prince charles takes the throne. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. plenty of sunshine across the southern uk today and the northern uk, but two actually very different weather stories. to the south, we're in quite mild atlantic air, to the north, it's colder arctic air. dividing the two, a weather front that will bring further cloud and rain into northern england, eventually down into the north midlands and north wales through the remainder of tuesday,
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into the early hours of wednesday. to the south of the weather front, a very mild night, lows of eight or nine. to the north, cold with a frost developing, particularly across scotland. further snow showers coming in on the westerly wind, and there's more of those to come on wednesday. a breezy day across the uk, the front drifts further south. cloud into southern counties of england through the afternoon. elsewhere, a lot of sunshine. the strength of the wind willjust exacerbate the chilly feel, though, as that arctic air digs further south. still in double figures across southernmost uk. further north, though, it will feel closer to freezing. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the government outlines its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini cabinet reshuffle is under way. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg
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as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg has a newly—created role as minister for brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. another oil giant posts bumper profits — bp made almost £10 billion last year. the power of the dog leads the way at the oscar nominations, listed for 12 awards. sir kenneth branagh�*s belfast has seven nominations. sport and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. good afternoon. great britain's search for a medal at this year's winter olympics in beijing continues. it was an olympic debut to remember for 17—year—old kirsty muir despite finishing outside the medal
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spots in the big air. and disappointment in the curling mixed—doubles bronze—medal match. our senior sports news reporter, laura scott, reports. a bronze medal in their sights, the target was clear. but it proved a painful punishing day for bruce mouat and jen dodds. sweden inflicting a hammer blow. flawless form. halfway, britain seven points adrift, urgent team talk required. believe, not even that helped. 9—3 down with no way back the british pair called it a day, conceding defeat. it is kind of hard to fight back when people from your opposition is playing that well, so congratulations to them, wearing the bronze, they played amazing today. this could not have been much worse in reality and it will be particularly disappointing for team
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gb given this was one of their best chances of a medal. but four years ago, it took until day seven for great britain to get on the podium and both will be back on this ice hoping for better. what can she do now? earlier, 17—year—old kirsty muir from aberdeen flew in the ski big air final. fifth at her first olympics, it seems the sky is the limit. it is amazing, i couldn't have hoped to have skied better and so incredible, all of the girls, honestly. in the front row of the stands was chinese tennis star peng shuai whose sexual assault allegations against a senior communist party official sparked global consent. she watched as the poster girl of beijing 2022 debuted a trick in herfinal run to claim victory for china. a moment that for many was both
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unbelievable and uncomfortable. premier league side west ham united have "unreservedly condemned" their defender, kurt zouma, for after a video emerged of him abusing his cat. the video shows the france defender kicking the cat across the floor and slapping it in the face. he has apologised and the club say they will deal with the incident internally. in a statement, zouma said... are what role is to say that this type of behaviour is not acceptable at all. it is just bad. it should not be happening. i have not seen the video but i have rugby apologise but this type of behaviour is not acceptable, so we really hope... we
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really hope to tell them the truth. sometimes the truth hurts but we want to tell them what is right and what is not right. we wait to see if zouma will feature tonight in west ham's premier league clash with watford, who are looking to pull clear of the relegation zone. it's one of three games later with bottom of the table burnley home to manchester united and a key clash between struggling everton at newcastle united. both sides made new signings in the january transfer window, and newcastle boss eddie howe is excited to see what bruno guimaraes can deliver. he has got that calmness, composure, he has got an intelligent eye, he wants the ball continually, there will be a period of adjustment with a premier league, there always is when you come from a different league. he will have to get up to speed with that very quickly but given his intelligence i think you will. and i think you will be an
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outstanding playerfor will. and i think you will be an outstanding player for us. and manchester city pair ellie roebuck and lucy bronze are back in sarina wiegman�*s england squad for the upcoming and inaugural arnold clark cup later this month, but their city team—mate, steph houghton, misses out. you can find more on that and on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, says the protests in the capital ottawa against covid restrictions have to stop. for nearly two weeks, hundreds of lorries have brought ottawa's center to a standstill, forcing many local businesses to close. a state of emergency has been declared. ottawa police say they are investigating more than 60 incidents, including alleged hate crimes and property damage, and that they are concerned about some of the extremist rhetoric coming from far—right groups at the rally. ciaran o'connor is an analyst from the institute for strategic dialogue — a think tank that tracks online extremism. he has been following the canadian protests.
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on the ground, the four groups leading the protests are an amalgamation of anti—vaccine and anti—government activist organisations who have been active in using and spreading conspiracy theories and alleging that mandates and vaccines are illegal and things like this. it really has blossomed into something much larger, thanks largely to online support. you can see that in a crowdfunding campaign, this was picked up and promoted by various political figures, including president trump and his two sons, in the us, but also content creators who have enormous reach on social media. but at the sharper end of the spectrum as well right and white supremacist groups online as well. it really has created a broad church and far right support and activity, from what started as a protest to achieve a well—defined objective around mandates,
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it has grown to reflect something that shows broader frustration and anger in these types of communities. is it financed by others? or governments, do we know? the initial gofundme campaign that was used and promoted by one of the groups are central to the convoy, it has since been taken down by gofundme. but we have seen reports that there were upwards of 120 donations to this, so it is enormous. we are all quite aware and used to using... prior to the removal of this, myself and some colleagues were able to conduct some research that showed that the gofundme was receiving promotion and shares from groups within the us.
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crucially, within white supremacist groups as well, a broad alliance of supporters within the campaign. following the removal of that campaign, very quickly, the organisers behind the initial campaign moved to another platform to set up an alternative crowdfunding campaign. you can see how much of a priority they place on this. are there links with protests in the uk, including what happened last night with sir keir starmer being mobbed? yeah, so the protest movement within canada has quickly morphed into a loose, informal, international coalition of sorts, bringing together various anti—vaccine, anti—lockdown, anti—mandate groups. within the uk, the protests in london were partly inspired by the convoy. you can see that it was not so much trucks and lorries but more camper vans. but central to that protest as well was the belief that mandates,
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that vaccines, were illegal, the opposition was... at the centre of all of this was a promotion of conspiracies and this supports the arguments for mobilising on the streets. websites that publish pornography will be legally required to verify the age of their users under new plans announced by the government. ministers say the draft online safety bill will be strengthened to include the measure, which would also see sites fined or blocked if they failed to act. to discuss this further, i am now joined by elena martellozzo, an associate professor of criminology at middlesex university. she has done extensive research on preventing children from accessing violent porn online. also, i'mjoined byjim killock. he is the executive director of the open rights group, which campaigns for the protection of rights to privacy and free speech online. what do you think of what has been
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released today in this draft bill? i will start with some positives in the sense that it has been a long three or four years. the sense that it has been a long three orfour years. we have been campaigning with organisations such as the nspcc and barnardo's, and we have worked extremely hard to get some changes in legislation. we were not satisfied the first time round, but we were quite pleased to see that something has happened, the government has listened to our suggestions to fix one of the gaps in the online safety bills to protect children from pornography. and, jim, what is your response? i’m and, jim, what is your response? i'm afraid it is a bit of a dog's breakfast. i'm really annoyed that they have — breakfast. i'm really annoyed that they have not fixed what collapsed last time, — they have not fixed what collapsed last time, particularly the criticisms around the lack of
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prisoner— criticisms around the lack of prisoner —— privacy safeguards or any system — prisoner —— privacy safeguards or any system to ensure that people are not trapped on the internet, information is not leaked or sold or used _ information is not leaked or sold or used for— information is not leaked or sold or used for criminal purposes. and thate— used for criminal purposes. and that's a — used for criminal purposes. and that's a risky run, if this goes ahead, — that's a risky run, if this goes ahead, because the government has decided _ ahead, because the government has decided that the free market... the last time _ decided that the free market... the last time we — decided that the free market... the last time we tried that, the result was that— last time we tried that, the result was that of— last time we tried that, the result was that of a company will attract 20 million — was that of a company will attract 20 million users around the uk, in terms _ 20 million users around the uk, in terms of— 20 million users around the uk, in terms of what they look at on sites, and the _ terms of what they look at on sites, and the result of that could be that information leaks because they have a terrible _ information leaks because they have a terrible record for security and privacy. — a terrible record for security and privacy, these companies, they have a huge _ privacy, these companies, they have a huge commercial incentive to collect — a huge commercial incentive to collect everything they can and monetise it, and the result can be we see _ monetise it, and the result can be we see people's family lives destroyed, you could even see suicides— destroyed, you could even see suicides as a result of that information leaking, so it's deeply irresponsible of the government to repeat— irresponsible of the government to repeat this whole thing again without— repeat this whole thing again without having solved those problems first, so _ without having solved those problems first, so i'm _ without having solved those problems first, so i'm afraid we are quite
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angry— first, so i'm afraid we are quite angry about it. the second thing which _ angry about it. the second thing which is — angry about it. the second thing which is a — angry about it. the second thing which is a real problem is the extensive _ which is a real problem is the extensive finesse of this, it is not 'ust extensive finesse of this, it is not just pornography sites but google searches, — just pornography sites but google searches, twitter, who, because there _ searches, twitter, who, because there is— searches, twitter, who, because there is adult content on those sites. — there is adult content on those sites, literally everybody uses those — sites, literally everybody uses those services, and that is a bit much, — those services, and that is a bit much, frankly, because there is no si-n much, frankly, because there is no sign that— much, frankly, because there is no sign that these companies or sites have a _ sign that these companies or sites have a huge problem for children but what you _ have a huge problem for children but what you will find is a large amount of adult _ what you will find is a large amount of adult users are less inclined to use those — of adult users are less inclined to use those services if they have to id use those services if they have to go through— use those services if they have to go through enormous hoops to be tracked _ go through enormous hoops to be tracked. do go through enormous hoops to be tracked. , ., ., ., , tracked. do you agree that these sites are not _ tracked. do you agree that these sites are not causing _ tracked. do you agree that these sites are not causing huge - tracked. do you agree that these i sites are not causing huge problems for children? i sites are not causing huge problems for children?— for children? i believe a lot of sites can _ for children? i believe a lot of sites can cause _ for children? i believe a lot of sites can cause a _ for children? i believe a lot of sites can cause a lot - for children? i believe a lot of sites can cause a lot of- for children? i believe a lot of i sites can cause a lot of problems for children, and i know it's a very difficult position to be in, but we are conscious that children are
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suffering because of the exposure to online pornography, and children as young as seven, latest research has shown, are seeing this content online that they should not be seen, so to me this is a step forward. is it perfect? possibly not, i'm not a technical engineer, i do not know how technicalities would work in terms of protecting the data, and that's something that to be visited, but i put children at the centre, and i listen to the research that we conducted, and i know there has been a lot of work behind to try to protect them online to ensure they can navigate safely. flan protect them online to ensure they can navigate safely.— protect them online to ensure they can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would _ can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would work? _ can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would work? if _ can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would work? if you i can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would work? if you had . can navigate safely. can you explain me how it would work? if you had a| me how it would work? if you had a teenager who tries to see some pornography, which any parent would want, how does this plan stop them?
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it is an age verification system, so children would have two, or whoever uses those sites, they would have to ensure that they put their data into have access to certain sites. what we are mostly concerned about is not those that try to access those sites but those who stumble across the sites accidentally. find but those who stumble across the sites accidentally.— sites accidentally. and how important _ sites accidentally. and how important is _ sites accidentally. and how important is in _ sites accidentally. and how important is in your - sites accidentally. and how important is in your view i sites accidentally. and how l important is in your view that children are protected from that? it is not only about children viewing pornography but about them getting caught up another more sinister ways, isn't it? caught up another more sinister ways. isn't it?— caught up another more sinister ways, isn't it? absolutely, we have evidence to — ways, isn't it? absolutely, we have evidence to suggest _ ways, isn't it? absolutely, we have evidence to suggest that _ ways, isn't it? absolutely, we have evidence to suggest that those i evidence to suggest that those children who view pornography get distorted understandings of healthy relationships, they cannot distinguish what is right from wrong, and often they try to simulate what they see, getting themselves in trouble by producing material they should not be
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producing, and we know that pornography is one of the triggers that stimulate this kind of behaviour.— that stimulate this kind of behaviour. , , ., , behaviour. jim, is there a way the government _ behaviour. jim, is there a way the government could _ behaviour. jim, is there a way the government could ensure - behaviour. jim, is there a way the government could ensure data i government could ensure data protection, in your view, while still safeguarding children, which i presume you think is important? {iii presume you think is important? of course that could be fixed, but this is the _ course that could be fixed, but this is the second time the government has tried _ is the second time the government has tried to — is the second time the government has tried to do it and for whatever reason _ has tried to do it and for whatever reason refuses to, and i think that is because — reason refuses to, and i think that is because fixing data problems is difficult _ is because fixing data problems is difficult and expensive and would require _ difficult and expensive and would require new regulatory action in supervision. they don't want to pay that cost _ supervision. they don't want to pay that cost. what it does want is headlines. the other thing we have to remember here is that despite what _ to remember here is that despite what has — to remember here is that despite what has been said the chances of teenagers — what has been said the chances of teenagers not seeing this material is extremely low. why teenagers not seeing this material is extremely low.— is extremely low. why is that? because teenagers _ is extremely low. why is that? i because teenagers unfortunately, pornography is something that
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teenagers seek out, and if there is a motivation to seek something out they will— a motivation to seek something out they will find it. but a motivation to seek something out they will find it.— they will find it. but the whole oint is they will find it. but the whole point is to _ they will find it. but the whole point is to stop _ they will find it. but the whole point is to stop that _ they will find it. but the whole point is to stop that and i they will find it. but the whole point is to stop that and make j they will find it. but the whole i point is to stop that and make sure there is an age verification because it's important they are not corrupted. it's important they are not corrupted-— it's important they are not corruted. ., , ., corrupted. you can put pornography onto a data — corrupted. you can put pornography onto a data stick. _ corrupted. you can put pornography onto a data stick. sharing _ onto a data stick. sharing pornography as teenagers in the 90s because _ pornography as teenagers in the 90s because of— pornography as teenagers in the 90s because of electronic technology... not to— because of electronic technology... not to this — because of electronic technology... not to this degree, it is too early now, and it's very damaging. whatever the level of damage, we have to _ whatever the level of damage, we have to think about whether this solution — have to think about whether this solution will work. once this is done, — solution will work. once this is done, assuming it is, we will have to think— done, assuming it is, we will have to think about why it is still not sorted — to think about why it is still not sorted the _ to think about why it is still not sorted the problem out, and the problem — sorted the problem out, and the problem is about education and context— problem is about education and context and children understanding what they— context and children understanding what they are seeing and having defences — what they are seeing and having defences to understand why it is they should not access this in the first place — they should not access this in the first place or what it is that they are seen. — first place or what it is that they are seen, and until we get that point _ are seen, and until we get that point of— are seen, and until we get that point of educating children, the problem — point of educating children, the problem will not be fixed, the
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technology simply will not fix this problem — technology simply will not fix this roblem. , ., technology simply will not fix this roblem. i. .., . ., .,, technology simply will not fix this roblem. . ., problem. everyone could choose not to look at it. — problem. everyone could choose not to look at it, but _ problem. everyone could choose not to look at it, but anyway, _ problem. everyone could choose not to look at it, but anyway, we - problem. everyone could choose not to look at it, but anyway, we will i to look at it, but anyway, we will have to leave it there, thank you so much forjoining us. bamber gascoigne, the original host of the tv quiz show university challenge, has died after a short illness. he was 87. gascoigne's catchphrase of "here's your starter for 10" became a regular feature on television as he presented the programme from 1962 to 1987. our arts correspondent, david sillito, looks back at his life. university challenge tournament. asking the questions, bamber gascoigne. i it began in 1962. bamber gascoigne, a 27—year—old eton—educated theatre critic, was chosen to be the host of a new quiz show, university challenge. st hilda's, evans? picasso. picasso, ten points, st hilda's. we all thought, i think, that it was a job for about three months. had anyone known that the first run
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of it was going to last for 25 years, and we were talking about a job for 25 years, i think we would have all been so frightened we could hardly have read the card. let's go straight into the game, here's the first starter for ten. a big one coming up, here's your starter for ten. before each programme, he'd go through the questions, learning just enough to give the impression of being all knowing. i didn't want to let them down by revealing gross ignorance. "dear sir, your astonishment�*s odd. "i am always about in the quad..." he was also rather posh. "yours faithfully, god." his family tree had more than a smattering of generals, politicians and aristocrats. and the show had a certain 0xbridge heartiness to it, punctured only by manchester's moment of student rebellion, answering questions with the names of revolutionary leaders. che guevara. karl marx. trotsky. starterfor ten, fingers on the buzzers. who is the richest person in the world? and then there was also the famous parody. now, i'll have to hurry you, i'll have to hurry you. who is the richest
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person in the world? footlights, snot? it's... it's me, isn't it? but by the late '80s, it no longer seemed to fit in the itv schedules and was dropped. that's the end of this one. still, another time, perhaps. there was the short—lived and even more highbrow series connoisseur... we have questions ranging from painting and architecture to ceramics and furniture. university challenge | pro—celebrity match. ..and he did return for a celebrity special. bamber gascoigne! cheering and applause. but he turned down the bbc revival, choosing instead to devote himself to writing, his history website, and latterly restoring a large country house he inherited. your first starter for ten. starter for ten. but starterfor ten, fingers on the buzzer... two minutes to go. ..his place in history is behind the desk of one of tv�*s most challenging quizzes. bamber gascoigne, who's died at the age of 87.
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the nominations for this year's oscars have taken place. let's have a look at some of the nominations, starting with best picture — among the nominations are sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographical film, belfast — jane campion's western — the power of the dog and sci fi epic dune. kenneth branagh and jane campion get another nomination in the best director category along with steven spielberg for west side story. best actor in a leading role sees benedict cumberbatch nominated for the power of the dog and will smith for his role as serena & venus william's father in king richard. and finally best actress in a leading role has a nomination for olivia colman in the lost daughter, kirsten stewart for her portrayal of princess diana in spencer and penelope cruz in pedro almodovar�*s parallel mothers. the biggest winners were the power of the dog with 12 nominations followed by dune with 10 nominations. the ceremony takes place on march 27th in hollywood.
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leading the way is jane campion's power of the dog which is nominated in 12 different categories. here's what film critic jason solomon thinks 12 i2 nominations is an extraordinary haulforjane campion, she was nominated before for the piano. but jane campion was nominated director and best film back then and did not win. the momentum seems to be with her now, it would be to years in a row for a full male —— female film—maker winning best picture and best director but power of the dog seems to be leading the way, i'm thrilled for the film, it is not a british film, although it has got a british film, although it has got a british producer, it was shot in new zealand. we have benedict cumberbatch in the lead, playing an american cowboy, shot in new zealand, many hands make such films,
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it's a global film zealand, many hands make such films, it's a globalfilm in zealand, many hands make such films, it's a global film in that respect, so we will claim some of it for the brits as well.— brits as well. other creative industries — brits as well. other creative industries are _ brits as well. other creative industries are pretty - brits as well. other creative industries are pretty good, l brits as well. other creative i industries are pretty good, there are other big british names, remind us who the big winners are. what are other big british names, remind us who the big winners are.- us who the big winners are. what is interestin: us who the big winners are. what is interesting to _ us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me _ us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me is _ us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me is you _ us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me is you have i us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me is you have olivia | interesting to me is you have olivia colman nominated for the lost daughter, she is fabulous and everything, you havejudi dench, fabulous and everything, she has been nominated for belfast, playing the grandma in that, and you have the grandma in that, and you have the two very similar, very british type app the two very similar, very british type app choices, who are not ultimately that glamorous, hollywood divas, very relatable and down to earth personalities, but they always deliver superb performances, and i think the academy recognises the more than we do, i think we take them for granted a little bit, both of them snuffed from the baftas, they think, we know they are great, but anyone could do that sort of stuff, it's not acting. if
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but anyone could do that sort of stuff, it's not acting.— stuff, it's not acting. if only! they are _ stuff, it's not acting. if only! they are both _ stuff, it's not acting. if only! they are both brilliant i stuff, it's not acting. if only! they are both brilliant but i stuff, it's not acting. if only! i they are both brilliant but great to see them being nominated, good depth of british nominations coming through there. and kenneth branagh, of course, nominated for director and screenplay, his form belfast which is terrific and is now in cinemas now, a beautiful black—and—white memoir, that will charm a lot of people, those fabulous performances, and judi dench's husband, who plays her husband and that, nice to see them together in that. in husband and that, nice to see them together in that.— together in that. in terms of the wider nominations, _ together in that. in terms of the wider nominations, i'm - together in that. in terms of the wider nominations, i'm looking l wider nominations, i'm looking through the list here, obviously, going to the cinema has become more difficult in recent times, the film that we are seeing, have they had huge take up?— that we are seeing, have they had huge take up? that we are seeing, have they had hui-etakeu? , ., .y ., ., huge take up? obviously not huge at the box office. _ huge take up? obviously not huge at the box office, the _ huge take up? obviously not huge at the box office, the only _ huge take up? obviously not huge at the box office, the only ones - huge take up? obviously not huge at the box office, the only ones huge i the box office, the only ones huge
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have been bond and spider—man, both nominated in the visual effects, we have seen james nominated in the visual effects, we have seenjames bond's song nominated again, but they are not huge box office these films, but some of them we don't know, power of the dog, they are all non—netflix. —— all on netflix. so we are seeing a little tussle there, west side story did not do that well at the box office, mainly because it is skewed towards older audiences who are tentative at going to the cinema, jane did not amazingly at the box office, did enough to get sequel, no one was quite sure about cinema yet, but band made everyone go back to the cinema, is spider—man imperative, i would like to see those two recognised a bit more, i thought daniel craig was great, i would like to see him recognised in
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the acting category, but they don't give it has that sort of movie, there is still a bit of arthouse thing going on, i can recommend coda, real heart—warming film about a hearing girl brought up in a deaf family and chancel choir. it will not do any upsets but if it could i would wish it all the best. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. plenty of sunshine to be found across the uk today, and thank you to our weather watchers for these glimpses of the skies where you are. just a few clouds there on the horizon from edinburgh. and as we head to the other end of the country, similarly bright blue skies across kent, just some patchy cloud drifting through on the breeze. big difference, though, in the way things have felt outside. arctic air sits across scotland and northern ireland now, atlantic air still clings on to the south, but all the while the cold air is ebbing its way further south
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behind this band of cloud and rain, which is a weather front separating out the two. so more rain this evening for northern england, also getting into north wales and the north midlands, as that front just sinks a little further south. to the south of the front, very mild again, to the north of the front, we're looking at a frost, particularly for scotland. and then, through wednesday, the front slowly continues its journey southwards, such that, actually, i think for some parts of northern england, wales and the midlands, temperatures will come down through the day as the skies clear and the front carries its cloud down into southern counties of england. to the south of the uk, it will still be feeling mild, but it's going to be a windy day across the board and the strength of those winds will just add into how chilly it's going to feel, especially across northernmost reaches of the uk through wednesday, temperatures for scotland down the lower end of single figures in many areas. and then, by thursday, the front is off into the continent, we are all into the arctic air. this is something we're going to need to watch closely —
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an area of low pressure that looks like it's going to deal a glancing blow to scotland, possibly some heavy and more persistent snow showers. certainly, i think, we will have widespread gales with winds gusting up to 50 to 60 miles per hour for some of the more exposed spots. chilly across the board, you have to factor in the wind when you think about how it will feel when you step outside, and, for the likes of aberdeen and stornoway, it's likely to feel below freezing. thursday into friday, that little feature is off towards the continent. high pressure builds — that will actually mean the winds fall light and, with a still start to friday, a widespread frost, a risk of ice, especially where there will be some showers on into the early hours of friday across scotland. friday, a day of faultless blue skies for the majority of the uk, lighter winds, it may feel a little milder, but overall a cold end to the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the government outlines its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini cabinet reshuffle is underway. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. another oil giant posts bumper profits — bp made almost £10 billion last year. whatsapp messages disclosed to the high court show that rebekah vardy 'declared war�* on coleen rooney after the "wagatha christie" claim, and discussed leaking stories about her to the press. we'll be live at the high
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court with the latest. the power of the dog leads the way at the oscar nominations, in contention for 12 awards. sir kenneth branagh's belfast has seven. good afternoon. the health secretary, sajid javid, has outlined the delayed plans to tackle the backlog of patients on nhs hospital waiting lists in england. mrjavid told the commons the number of people waiting for elective care has risen to six million. the devolved nations have set out their own recovery plans. that figure of six million represents around one in nine of the population and is expected to rise further. ministers believe it'll take around two years for the numbers to start falling.
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100 community diagnostic centres are to be set up — these are places you can go for checks, scans and tests for diseases such as cancer — and aim to get people a quicker diagnosis. there will be surgical hubs, concentrating on high—volume routine surgery also. the measures should help the nhs increase the amount of treatments it carries out by 30% above its pre—pandemic activity levels. it will be paid for by an extra investment of £8 billion over the next three years. here's more of what mrjavid told mps. the plan sets the ambition of eliminating waits of longer than a year — waits in elective care — by march 2025. within this, no—one will wait longer than two years byjuly this year. and the nhs aims to eliminate the waits of over 18 months by april 2023, and of over 65 weeks by march 2024, which equates to 99% of patients waiting less than one year.
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our health correspondent, sophie hutchinson, told us more about the plan. this is the recovery plan to set the nhs back to where it was pre—pandemic. and the government said today to take it further than that as well. by 2025, it said the nhs would be carrying out 9 million more diagnostic tests and treatments, and it would also be performing 30% more elective procedures. capacity, it said, would be increased by having more health care support workers and making greater use of private providers. and reducing those very long waiting lists is one of the main ambitions of this plan. by march 2024, we were just hearing, waits of more than one year would be eliminated. and byjuly this year, no one would wait longer than two years. and this is the plan for england to recover. what sort of reception is it getting? we saw the labour party in the commons during this announcement were pretty critical.
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absolutely, they were pretty scathing of the plan. they said it did not address the workforce shortages that we know have been causing so many problems, and also delayed discharges from hospital. in terms of things like the money backing this plan, we know that £10 billion is being provided by the treasury for it. but the health foundation — the think tank — suggests that the nhs in england needs £13 billion in orderjust to stand still, for things not to deteriorate further. and the nhs itself is very concerned about what it calls these missing patients. it is believed there are about 10 million patients that should he being treated by the nhs at the moment who are not in the system. it is concerned about when these patients might come back. they are people who just did not come forward during the pandemic for all sorts of different reasons. that is why the nhs has been so concerned about having targets that it has to meet in case it then it gets swamped by double the amount
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of patients then on a waiting list. let's speak to chris hopson, chief executive of nhs providers — that's the organisation which represents hospitals and ambulance trusts. thanks forjoining us. what do you make of what has been published today? it make of what has been published toda ? , ., , make of what has been published toda ? ,. , ., ., today? it is a very important moment for the today? it is a very important moment forthe nhs. — today? it is a very important moment for the nhs, because _ today? it is a very important moment for the nhs, because we _ today? it is a very important moment for the nhs, because we know - today? it is a very important moment for the nhs, because we know that l today? it is a very important momentl for the nhs, because we know that we have, thanks to the disruption caused by covid, we do have a very large number of people who are waiting for treatment. i think it is very easy to bandy around big numbers, isn't it? but i think we need to remember as a starting point that these weights can have impacts on people, the fact people are waiting in pain, the fact they are with conditions that can worsen, potentially the problems caused become permanent. i think everybody in the nhs realises we have a very importantjob to get through these backlogs as quickly as we can. today's plan is really helpful because it sets out clearly how we
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are going to grow our capacity, how we will support patients who are on a waiting list, and how we are going to get through these waiting lists as quickly as we possibly can. but it is a big challenge, and i think your package you have just run shows there are some big issues we need to address. ., ., address. your twitter thread yesterday — address. your twitter thread yesterday talked _ address. your twitter thread yesterday talked about i address. your twitter thread i yesterday talked about workforce capacity being the key constraint. are there enough staff to work in all these extra centres and get through some of this backlog? what is your view on that? we through some of this backlog? what is your view on that?— is your view on that? we know that at the moment. — is your view on that? we know that at the moment, the _ is your view on that? we know that at the moment, the nhs _ is your view on that? we know that at the moment, the nhs has i is your view on that? we know that at the moment, the nhs has got i is your view on that? we know that i at the moment, the nhs has got very significant workforce constraints. we have actually got vacancy rates of about 100,000 before we went into the pandemic, those have persisted through the pandemic. it is very clear we are going to need to make maximum use of the workforce we already have. we are getting record numbers of nurses and doctors coming into training, but they take some time to come out from the training pipeline. we are going to need to
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make sure that we use our existing workforce as effectively as possible... workforce as effectively as possible. . .— workforce as effectively as ossible... ., , ,, possible... how will these cases be staffed if there _ possible... how will these cases be staffed if there are _ possible... how will these cases be staffed if there are not _ possible... how will these cases be staffed if there are not extra - staffed if there are not extra people immediately available? having extra centres isn't necessarily the only solution, is it?— only solution, is it? what will effectively — only solution, is it? what will effectively do is _ only solution, is it? what will effectively do is we _ only solution, is it? what will effectively do is we will i only solution, is it? what will i effectively do is we will allocate staff to staff the new centres, and obviously will be looking to ensure that existing staff are spread appropriately across both the existing sites and the new centres. it is very important that we build those extra community diagnostics centres because we know we don't have enough capacity to do vital mri scans and the other vital procedures. we know one of the great advantages of creating these new community diagnostic facilities is that we can separate them out from the new hospital where effectively we know those facilities get used for emergency care. we also know we can do important things like make the best use of the independent sector but also that we can create surgical hubs. all of the experience
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it around the world is very clear which is if you can get people to concentrate on those high—volume operations like hips, knees, cataracts, if you get really good at doing them as a bunch of clinicians, you can actually become significantly more productive. what we know is that there is no single silver bullet here, we know there are a number of different things that we are going to need to do in order to get through these waiting lists as quickly as possible, and thatis lists as quickly as possible, and that is exactly what the plan sets out. �* , ., ., ., out. and it is ok to have what eo - le out. and it is ok to have what peeple say — out. and it is ok to have what peeple say is _ out. and it is ok to have what people say is routine - out. and it is ok to have what people say is routine surgeryl out. and it is ok to have what | people say is routine surgery in out. and it is ok to have what. people say is routine surgery in a separate health, your view, even if you have immediate access to more expert facilities if something goes wrong or there are complications? there is always a risk of that, isn't there? it there is always a risk of that, isn't there?— there is always a risk of that, isn't there? , , . ., , , isn't there? it is very much horses for courses. _ isn't there? it is very much horses for courses. in _ isn't there? it is very much horses for courses, in that _ isn't there? it is very much horses for courses, in that you _ isn't there? it is very much horses for courses, in that you don't - isn't there? it is very much horsesi for courses, in that you don't want to do complex surgery which requires access to critical care beds afterwards, in a stand—alone hub. we know there are low risk procedures that can be done as day cases where,
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effectively, concentrating these in surgical hubs makes real sense. don't forget for a number of trusts, those trusts have got two or three sites, so it makes sense. in nhs parlance, it makes sense in some of them to concentrate on emergency care and be hot sites for others it makes sense to be concentrating on planned care and elective activity and therefore they are called sites. one thing this plan sets out very clearly as we need to separate out as much as we can accident and emergency care and planned care. what happens, and we have seen it over this winter, we have seen over the last five or six winters, is when the nhs got very busy over winter, it means we have to pull back on the number of elective surgery cases that we deal with. is surgery cases that we deal with. is there enough money for this? because we heard about the sums needed just to stand still, if it is falling short of that. i to stand still, if it is falling short of that.—
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to stand still, if it is falling short of that. ~ ., , short of that. i think it would be very important _ short of that. i think it would be very important to _ short of that. i think it would be very important to acknowledge l short of that. i think it would be l very important to acknowledge at this point that the government is making a significant extra investment here. it is coming out of your pocket and my pocket in terms of it is the health and social care levy. we will need to see how far that leads, but it doesn't feel right to me at this point for me to come onto your programme and save the nhs need to get more money, just to the point where we have been allocated extra funding. the point i would make, which is where i think the health foundation has been over the health foundation has been over the last few months, is basically saying that if you take a long—term view of the nhs, nifty for example look, as they were arguing, that we may need i million more health and care staff by 2030, in order to meet the demand that we know is coming, and i do think there is an important debate for us to have as a country over the longer term about if we want the right quality of care, we are going to have to fund it, and we
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will need that debate. in terms of the immediate stuff that we need to crack on with now in terms of this elective plan, the government is backing it with more money. ok. backing it with more money. 0k, thank you very — backing it with more money. 0k, thank you very much indeed. borisjohnson has begun a mini reshuffle of his ministers. the chief whip mark spencer, who was criticised for his treatment of rebellious mps, is moving sideways to become leader of the commons. he'll replace jacob rees—mogg, who becomes minister for brexit opportunities. our political correspondent, lone wells, had the latest from downing street. in terms of the new positions that we have had announced today, jacob rees—mogg is taking on a new created position called the brexit opportunities minister. this may please a couple of brexiteer mps who may have been concerned that perhaps some of those domestic changes post—brexit had not really been a top priority for the government. the prime minister has already announced that he wants to introduce new laws to try and deregulate certain things post—brexit.
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and that officials are already looking at which laws inherited from the eu may be scrapped — which regulations may be scrapped now that the uk has left the eu. that will certainly be his new responsibility in that new role of brexit opportunities minister. replacing him as the leader of the house of commons is mark spencer who was formerly the chief whip in charge of party discipline. the reason this has been pretty controversial already today among some tory mps is the leader of the house of commons is a role which is often associated with one which is meant to uphold discipline, uphold standards in parliament in particular. also oversee the parliamentary complaints system. mark spencer is somebody who himself is currently under investigation. that was after the conservative mp nus ghani published allegations saying that a whip had told her that her muslim faith was one of the reasons she was sacked as a government minister. mark spencer publicly identified him
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after these claims as the written after these claims as the whip in question but strongly denied the claims made. mps have expressed unhappiness with the fact he not essentially be somebody responsible for upholding standards in the house of commons, while he currently is under investigation for his own behaviour. another role significant today is the appointment of chris heaton—harris, replacing mark spencer as the chief whip. he has a massive task on his hands really, there has been scrutiny in recent months on the government's whipping operation, in charge of party discipline. this is notjust over the recent allegations of parties in whitehall during lockdown restrictions, this stretches further back, i think, to the time when the government was trying to whip its own mps to support owen paterson, the mp who was found to have breached lobbying rules, who the government was arguing should not face suspension imminently. which caused a lot of unhappiness among some of the backbench mps.
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whips have also come under fire over other votes would have been bigger tory rebellions in the last couple of months, notably over covid restrictions as well. he's taking on a massive job to try to get some of those backbench mps back on side in the way the prime minister wants. the news coming into us from our security correspondent who says that the foreign office he was the target of a serious cyber security incident and details have not emerged through and details have not emerged through a former government and out and put through a tender document published on a government website by mistake, apparently. the document says that cyber security company bae systems was called in the urgent support. the value of the contract was £467,000. and the note says that the contract was awarded without prior publication of a causal competition
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because of the extreme urgency brought about by events unforeseeable. the bbc understands hackers, the identity of which is not yet clear, systems and were detected. classified and highly sensitive material is kept on a separate system which is not understood to have been breached stop we are not clear as yet when this incident began. but the contract finished on january the 12th 2022. buxton has said that we don't comment on security but we have systems in place to detect and defend against potential cyber incidents. —— a spokesman has said. major espionage campaigns by russia and china in the past and the foreign office says a number of states are targeted and breached. we will try to get you more on that as soon as we can. the commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, has condemned the abuse of sir keir starmer by protesters yesterday and described borisjohnson's false
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claim, that the labour leader had failed to prosecute the paedophile, jimmy savile, as 'unacceptable'. there is growing pressure on the prime minister to withdraw the claim after the labour leader was targeted by an angry mob near parliament. but downing street says the prime minister won't be apologising. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. where's jimmy savile? is what happened outside parliament last night connected to what the prime minister said last week? he spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile, as far as i can make out, mr speaker. keir starmer used to be the director of public prosecutions, but there is no evidence for the prime minister's original allegation that sir keir had failed to prosecutejimmy savile. he was not involved at any point in the decision, something borisjohnson has since acknowledged. should the prime ministerl apologise to keir starmer? but number 10 and ministers arriving for a cabinet meeting this morning... do words have consequences? ..insist it is legitimate to ask
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about the failures of the cps when it was led by sir keir starmer. when you have a debate about the leader of an organisation taking responsibility for that organisation, as keir starmer did, as the prime minister has made clear, as the prime minister has with what happened in downing street, i think that is a reasonable point to make. and we have seen politicians make claims and statements in the chamber to other politicians over the years. that is no excuse for people to use that to excuse the way they behaved last night. it simply isn't. but the commons speaker said what happened to sir keir starmer and his colleagues was deplorable, and added... these sorts of comments only inflame opinions and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. our words have consequences, and we should always be mindful of that fact. twice in the last six years, mps have been killed while doing theirjob. sir david amess was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last autumn. in 2016, jo cox was murdered in west yorkshire.
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of course we should have a robust, passionate political debate in this country. it is the cornerstone of our democracy. but when that descends into abuse, insults, lies, and people screaming at each other in the street, i really hope we can agree that a line has been crossed. labour say what happened here last night has echoes of what we have seen in america in recent years. it's trumpian—style politics and legitimises the kind of political discourse which is not what we like or deserve in this country. and i believe he should come to the house of commons and apologise unreservedly for the slurs that he made last week. traitor! but that is not going to happen, despite all of this. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. i'm joined now by our specialist disinformation reporter marianna spring. just tell us a bit more about why we
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are seeing these groups and who they are. a, are seeing these groups and who they are. ~ ., are seeing these groups and who they are. �* ., ., are seeing these groups and who they are. ~ ., ., ., ., are. a lot of them who were gathered outside parliament _ are. a lot of them who were gathered outside parliament are _ are. a lot of them who were gathered outside parliament are anti-vaccine i outside parliament are anti—vaccine protesters, we have seen them at anti knock down rallies as well. we oppose covid vaccination and promote a number of false conspiracy theories about the vaccine, the idea that somehow the vaccine was part of an attempt to harm or control or kill lots of the population. as you may have seen or heard if you have watched that footage, there is a whole hodgepodge of online conspiracies that are present. there is one with a canadian flag, that is because they have been inspired by freedom rallies opposing vaccine passes happening in canada. there are people talking about the magna carta, the magna carta refers to this so—called sovereign citizen movement where these anti—vax activists will serve fake legal papers to teachers and doctors and mps, accusing them of crimes by giving people the vaccine. we also heard mention of paedophile protector and traitor, some violent language which is the kind of rhetoric we have been seeing from this movement, both online and off. the movement that to mention of
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paedophile aimed at sir keir starmer, that is part of their conspiracy hodgepodge. in starmer, that is part of their conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened _ conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened at _ conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened at that _ conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened at that rally, - conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened at that rally, i - conspiracy hodgepodge. in terms of what happened at that rally, i know| what happened at that rally, i know you weren't there, when you see language by the prime minister which has been criticised by many in his own party, does that lead to a spike in online interest or physical activity? is it possible to say that? h activity? is it possible to say that? , ' . ., . that? it is difficult to conclude exactly what _ that? it is difficult to conclude exactly what links _ that? it is difficult to conclude exactly what links to - that? it is difficult to conclude exactly what links to what, . that? it is difficult to conclude| exactly what links to what, but that? it is difficult to conclude - exactly what links to what, but what we do know is that fringe conspiracies about keir starmer, suggesting he was protecting a child abuserjimmy savile, even though there is not the evidence to suggest that, had spiralled and grown online, particularly in conspiratorial circles and far right circles over the course of the past couple of years. cue on related groups, qanon is that unfounded conspiracy that trumped over in the us is waging a secret war against satanic paedophiles, that conspiracy has been hit in the uk too. they have been small rallies around the country, it has often been promoted as anti—vaccine and anti lockdown
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protests. we see have that kind of allegations about starmer had thrived in those circles, we then see how they are mentioned in the houses of parliament by boris johnson, false claims about starmer, implying he has personal response relative. and they hop back to the fringes, you see how there is a celebration in the circles. they say, "look, we were right!" when you hear the calls of trait and the cause of paedophile protector and jimmy savile, it is hard not to draw a line between the comments that were made last week and then coming up were made last week and then coming up in a very aggressive protest rally happening outside parliament. a number of mps and other public figures, private figures as well, journalists, have been targeted by these people. is it growing, this movement? i these people. is it growing, this movement?— these people. is it growing, this movement? ~ ., , . , movement? i think one big concern is that this committed _ movement? i think one big concern is that this committed minority - movement? i think one big concern is that this committed minority are - that this committed minority are becoming increasingly aggressive and violent in the language and tactics they use, both online and off—line. i myself have been targeted with threats, people saying i should be tried for war crimes, but that is
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very widespread. i have spoken to doctors, mps, teachers, who have been targeted in this way, particularly around the pandemic and run the vaccine. language is very frightening, you see how people have become effectively quite radicalised by the online conspiracy movements they are a part of. if you attend some of the big anti lockdown or anti—vax rallies, it does not take long to find posters of politicians being hanged or uses or discussion of death, essentially. and it is really frightening. i think the worry is, going forward, that as the pandemic gets easier, where does this committed minority go? to be latch on to new conspiracies? did they become more aggressive, we hope not. ~ ,, ., not. when you speak to them individually. _ not. when you speak to them individually, who are - not. when you speak to them individually, who are they? i not. when you speak to them i individually, who are they? they not. when you speak to them - individually, who are they? they are a mixture of— individually, who are they? they are a mixture of different _ individually, who are they? they are a mixture of different people. - individually, who are they? they are a mixture of different people. there| a mixture of different people. there are people who are part of hardened anti—vax movements that predate the pandemic. there are some people who have become sucked into this world because they have found lockdown is legitimately very difficult, they
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are critical of government or corruption, and these very legitimate concerns they have are exploited by and become muddled with online conspiracies. and distrust, i'm often asked who believes this stuff, and i think the most common attribute we see are people who are deeply distrustful, who have been let down by systems that have not had their best interests and who have spent a lot of time online, where they are targeted and where that distrust is exploited. they are told "people are out to get you." all of this fold into that conspiracy mentality where you believe there is a sinister plot going on, everything is a part of it, and these conspiratorial tentacles almost grab and hold on to you. the latest claim is about starmer and jimmy savile. thank you ve much starmer and jimmy savile. thank you very much indeed _ starmer and jimmy savile. thank you very much indeed for— starmer and jimmy savile. thank you very much indeed forjoining - starmer and jimmy savile. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. - there are fresh calls for a windfall tax on energy giants after bp reported profits of £9.5 billion for last year. the company's boss recently described it as a "cash machine". last week, shell also posted bumper profits, and labour and the liberal democrats are demanding a one—off tax, which they say could be used to help households face huge increases in gas and electricity bills.
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ramzan kamali reports. it's notjust the petrol pumping at bp, but profits too. the oil giant has reported its highest profits for eight years, and it's easy to understand why. a combination of resurgent demand and geopolitical tensions has seen oil prices almost double. wholesale gas prices are currently five times higher than they were before the pandemic. last year, bp made profits of £9.5 billion. and only last week another oil giant, shell, announced profits of £14 billion. but when economies around the world were shut due to the covid—i9 pandemic in 2020, bp made losses of £4 billion. butjust as bp have benefited from these huge rises in energy prices, households are paying the price. jenny has to pay for her gas and electricity in advance, and as a prepayment customer, she is already paying the highest rates for her energy.
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where £10 could have lasted you three or four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it is difficult to budget because you are like, "hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and i havejust checked and i've only got £7 left, surely it should be this?" and you are watching the balance go down and you are thinking, "there's nothing i can do." when that goes, there is no electric or gas. labour last month proposed that north sea energy producers pay higher corporation tax for a year to fund £1.2 billion of help for households. some want to go even further. we could raise £5 billion, at least, from the huge profits that the oil and gas companies are making and use that money to cut people's energy bills. how can it be fair that oil and gas companies are making huge profits at the expense of millions of people who are having problems paying their heating bills? bp says it is investing in renewables, and one former executive believes a windfall tax
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is not the solution. oil and gas account for 80% of all the energy britain uses every day, so there needs to be the investment in that by companies like bp and shell and others. but they also need — and they are trying to do this — to invest in the move towards low—carbon. only a fraction of bp's profits are generated in the north sea, so a windfall tax applied only to those operations would raise limited revenue. but with oil firms making massive profits, many believe they are in an ideal position to help foot the bill for struggling customers. ramzan karmali, bbc news. whatsapp messages disclosed to the high court show that rebekah vardy and her press agent caroline watt discussed leaking stories about coleen rooney to the press. they were revealed in the latest hearing in the libel case brought by mrs vardy. our correspondent sanchia
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berg is there for us. what has emerged today? what has emerued what has emerged today? what has emerged today _ what has emerged today? what has emerged today has _ what has emerged today? what has emerged today has come _ what has emerged today? what has emerged today has come from - what has emerged today? what has emerged today has come from a - what has emerged today? what has i emerged today has come from a cachet of whatsapp messages, private messages exchanged between rebekah vardy and her press agent then caroline watt. concerning coleen rooney, her instagram posts, and her personality as well. these were private messages. this is part of the run—up to the trial, the libel trial which is currently scheduled for may, although it could well be delayed because of the hearing today has not yet completed, and there is more to discuss. i should say that while coleen rooney's legal team series whatsapp messages are pretty clear, rebekah vardy�*s barrister has just started that they have been edited, presented very selectively by coleen
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rooney's legal team and, in fact, they are presented in quite a misleading way. clearly this is quite a complex matter. it is worth reminding people what they are about. it all started back in 2019 when coleen rooney realised that somebody was leaking items from her private instagram account to the tabloid press, she set up a kind of sting to catch the person responsible. some months later, she believed she had identified the culprit as rebekah vardy�*s account. and rebekah vardy denied this, and they have been discussing it, but mediation failed. and now it is a full libel trial.— full libel trial. obviously the two very well- known _ full libel trial. obviously the two very well-known personalities i full libel trial. obviously the two j very well-known personalities in very well—known personalities in this particular world, where potentially does it go if it goes to full trial? ~ ., ~ full trial? well, i mean, i think we 'ust have full trial? well, i mean, i think we just have to _ full trial? well, i mean, i think we just have to wait _ full trial? well, i mean, i think we just have to wait and _ full trial? well, i mean, i think we just have to wait and see - full trial? well, i mean, i think we just have to wait and see with -
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full trial? well, i mean, i think we. just have to wait and see with cases like this. i don't think anyone predicted that these private whatsapp messages would be disclosed. there may be more material disclosed, there is certainly more being considered, like the role that caroline watt and if she was party to this case. this is being discussed today and what the judge will soon decide, judgment be reserved. i certainly would not predict what would happen, but it certainly could be very interesting. absolutely. thank you very much indeed. let's have a look at the weather. it has been a pretty good looking afternoon out there for many parts of the uk. some sunshine to the south and some sunshine to the south and some sunshine to the north. what is going on in between, we have a weather front at the moment which is dividing some pretty mild athletic air which is across england and wales and made it quite springlike and some arctic air which is across
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scotland and northern ireland, a chillier story. scotland and northern ireland, a chillierstory. i scotland and northern ireland, a chillier story. i think the front will be more active through this evening and overnight, some heavier rain for a while the northern england and ending the night putting into the north midlands and north wales. to the south of the front, a windy night, to the north turning chillier, a frost in scots in particular and wintry showers, the risk of ice. in the cold arctic air sinks further south across the uk on wednesday, just southernmost counties holding mild conditions. blustery across the board. more widespread sunshine. showers putting a cross from scotland with the win, you have to take the wind into account with the temperatures. just five or six for aberdeen and glasgow. factor in the wind, it will be freezing. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the government outlines its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini cabinet
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reshuffle is underway. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. another oil giant posts bumper profits — bp made almost £10 billion last year. the power of the dog leads the way at the oscar nominations — in contention for 12 awards. sir kenneth branagh's belfast has seven. sport and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. good afternoon. to the winter olympics now, and no medals to bring you for team gb on day four, but what an olympic debut for kirsty muir. teenager muir, who isjust 17 years old, was in sensationalform and finished an impressive fifth in a brilliant big air ski final.
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it was an event won in some fashion by chinese skiier eileen gu. and there was bitter disapointment for the mixed curlers, bruce mouat and jen dodds, who missed out on a bronze. they lost 9—3 to sweden. they both get another shot at a medal in the team event. it just itjust got off to start, that is what punished us most, we had to fight back. fair play to her it is such a big game and to make those shots is a great feeling for her, so we will just shots is a great feeling for her, so we willjust have to console ourselves because we have a big week with both of our teams. england manager sarina wiegman has named her squad for the inaugural arnold clark cup, which takes place later this month. manchester city goalkeeper ellie roebuck has returned from injury and makes the squad as has her team—mate, lucy bronze. both players will be playing under wiegman for the first time, but the england boss says it's really disappointing not to be able to select defender steph houghton,
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who misses out through injury. the professional footballers association have condemned any sort of violence in the aftermath of a video released showing west ham defender kurt zouma abusing his cat. the premier league side have also denounced the actions and say they'll deal with the incident internally. in a statement, zouma said... our role is to say that this type of behaviour is not acceptable at all. with or without cameras. it isjust bad. it should not be happening. i have not seen the video but i have read that he has apologised but this
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type of behaviour is not acceptable, so we really hope... we really hope to tell them the truth. sometimes, the truth hurts but we want to tell them what is right and what is not right. we wait to see if zouma will feature tonight in west ham's premier league clash with watford, who are looking to pull clear of the relegation zone. it's one of three games later. bottom side burnley are home to manchester united and everton travel to newcastle. both are desperate for points — newcastle were the big spenders in the january transfer window. their boss eddie howe is excited to see what new signing bruno guimaraes can deliver. he has got a creative eye, he is a very intelligent footballer, his positioning is very good, he wants the ball continually. there will be a period of adjustment for the pace of the premier league, there always is when you come from a different league, so he will have to get up to speed with that very quickly but given his intelligence i think he
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will and i think you will be an outstanding playerfor will and i think you will be an outstanding player for us. that's all the sport for now. a watchdog has found collusive behaviour between police officers and loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police ombudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmakers�* shop and six other fatal shootings. it says the security forces failed to adequately supervise informers who were involved in crimes, including murder. here's our ireland correspondent, chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an act of sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. they say the ombudsman's inquiry has confirmed their fears.
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what went on in south belfast, at the hands of loyalist death squads, being protected by the police so they could come into south belfast, into sean graham's bookies, and drive away without being challenged, is sickening. the report identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the killings to the imperial war museum. the security forces had eight informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in 27 murders and attempted murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. these informants were out of control, but it was the police's job to make sure that, when they engaged with informants that they probed, assessed and questioned what they were doing. and the continued use of informants, whom police were aware or ought
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to have been aware were involved in serious criminality and murder is, in my view, unforgivable. in a statement, the police service of northern ireland has offered its sincere apologies to the families. it says policing policies and procedures have greatly improved over the last 30 years. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. we note that mr macron has said that
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he thinks that president putin assured him that he would not ramp up assured him that he would not ramp up the crisis on the borders but the polish foreign minister and the chairman in office has said, we are ina chairman in office has said, we are in a critical moment, the risk of a european war is now greater than at any time in the last 30 years. that is coming to us from our correspondent who is monitoring events for us. there is a lot of diplomatic activity at the moment to try and calm things are certainly still a lot of concern at the moment on that front. we will update you on that line further. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the situation is unacceptable. one study found that black women are 40% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. here's our global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar. down we go!
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littlejudah is getting ready for an afternoon trip to the park. whoop! before his arrival last spring, his parents endured eight miscarriages. how's it been, the first eight months? do you know what? it's been...it�*s been a bit of a journey. natasha says one of the re—occurring themes through many of her losses was a feeling of not being listened to by some clinicians. i haven't always felt that i've been taken seriously. in some cases, i've complained about serious amounts of pain — during procedures, during miscarriages — and it was kind of pooh—poohed. natasha tells me she has questioned whether her race may have been a factor here. it's hard because you have the underlying racism but when it's not blatant... it's hard tojudge. here at queen charlotte's and chelsea hospital in west london, dr ekechi specialises in early pregnancy.
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she's also co—chair of the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists�* race and equality task force. unfortunately, black women are more likely to have a number of conditions that put them at greater risk of miscarriage. but really on a more significant level, what we hear time and time again is that black women never feel heard in this space. without addressing the institutional racism where it exists, we will never be able to truly say that all women receive the care that they so deserve. there's your baby's heart beating, so that's nice and reassuring. - in coventry, professor quenby runs the recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital. she's currently trying to get funding to investigate some of the many unknowns around why black women are at higher risk, including any potential biological factors. we know, for example, - if you're black and asian, then you handle glucose less well, so we know you're at a muchl more increased risk-
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of gestational diabetes. we also know that the balance of bacteria in your vagina - is different in black and asian women to white women, - and we know an imbalance - in the bacteria in your vagina has been associated with miscarriage i and preterm birth, so that's another area we can look at. there's clearly a myriad of complex and difficult issues at play here, but the longer we don't have answers to some of these key questions, the longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly. one idea professor quenby and her team is already working on is an app where women will be able to input their clinical details, like ethnicity and weight, and whether they have had any previous miscarriages. they'll then get specific evidence—based advice on how to lower their risk of a loss. the black maternal health charity five x more is also carrying out specialist training at maternity units. he's never been before. it's going to be interesting! natasha and her husband jay say, despite their harrowing
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experiences of loss, they feel like one of the lucky ones. they say women deserve to understand their specific risks during pregnancy and also to simply feel heard. just seeing him is justjoy — sheerjoy. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, says the protests in the capital ottawa against covid restrictions have to stop. for nearly two weeks, hundreds of lorries have brought ottawa's center to a standstill, forcing many local businesses to close. a state of emergency has been declared. ottawa police say they are investigating more than 60 incidents, including alleged hate crimes and property damage, and that they are concerned about some of the extremist rhetoric coming from far—right groups at the rally. the brit awards are at the o2 arena tonight. specific categories for male and female artists have been scrapped — the organisers say this year's awards will be gender neutral.
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adele, ed sheeran, dave and little simz are among the nominees. our music correspondent, mark savage, has been talking to comedian mo gilligan, who'll be hosting the ceremony. the british album of the year goes to adele! it's ed sheeran! little mix! dave, psychodrama! dua lipa, future nostalgia. some of the biggest names in pop, and they are all nominated again at this year's brits. but one thing about the ceremony is new — the host, mo gilligan. the brits are known for being chaotic. how sharp do you have to be? oh, you've got to be so sharp, man. i think the brits is known for anything can happen at any time at any place, you know? i remember watching the brits when i was young and seeing geri halliwell with the spice girls wearing the unionjack dress, like, iconic moments. i remember tuning in and seeing dave perform with the piano with all the messages on it. and i think that's what's the cool thing about the brits, you can have moments where it can be a bit chaotic and some carnage, but then you can have iconic moments where you'll be like, "oh, my god, i was there.
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"i seen that live." # never mind, i'll find someone like you...# adele, who gave a career—making performance at the 2011 brits, will be back on stage tonight and could win best album for the third time. others, like becky hill, are up for their first trophy. |a few years ago, i tweeted thatj i wouldn't go to the brit awards again until i was nominated, i due to a high dose of impostor syndrome, so it's really nice to be back and feel like i belong to be i there this year. one of the big changes this year is that the brits have scrapped the best male and female categories and combined them into a single best artist prize. it's just to try to make the award as big as possible. how you choose to define as an artist, there's no barrier, yeah, to stop you from sort of putting your music forward as well. # i still have faith in you...# and returning to the brits for the first time since 1977 are abba, nominated for best international group. i think it feels rather good, i have to say. | i wouldn't mind i getting a brit award. what would it mean to
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you if they opened the envelope and they read out abba's name? i don't know. i can send you a text and tell you. and abba will find out whether they've won when the brits start at eight o'clock tonight. mark savage, bbc news. mark savage, our music correspondent, is live on the red carpet at the brit awards. how can abba not have one already, whatever chances today? the how can abba not have one already, whatever chances today?— whatever chances today? the first brit awards _ whatever chances today? the first brit awards were _ whatever chances today? the first brit awards were in _ whatever chances today? the first brit awards were in 1977, - whatever chances today? the first brit awards were in 1977, that i whatever chances today? the first| brit awards were in 1977, that you, abba were beaten by simon and garfunkel, then they took a break forfour garfunkel, then they took a break for four years, garfunkel, then they took a break forfour years, and at garfunkel, then they took a break for four years, and at that time abba disbanded, so we had to wait for them to reform and release their album in october last year for them to be eligible for a price again. you would have think they would have won a lifetime achievement award at that time. i think they have a good chance tonight, but the other nominees in that category are bts
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and the us so band led by bruno mars, so heavy competition, we will see who wins. bind mars, so heavy competition, we will see who wine— see who wins. and as adele definitely — see who wins. and as adele definitely singing, - see who wins. and as adele definitely singing, we i see who wins. and as adele definitely singing, we saw. see who wins. and as adele definitely singing, we saw aj see who wins. and as adele - definitely singing, we saw a tearful apology online with her las vegas tour cancelled? i apology online with her las vegas tour cancelled?— apology online with her las vegas tour cancelled? i don't know if that is a tale arriving _ tour cancelled? i don't know if that is a tale arriving now, _ tour cancelled? i don't know if that is a tale arriving now, you - tour cancelled? i don't know if that is a tale arriving now, you can i tour cancelled? i don't know if that is a tale arriving now, you can hearj is a tale arriving now, you can hear the crowd in the background, but she is performing tonight, the rehearsals have gone ahead, we don't know what song she's performing, but she is in the running order, and she is up for the four biggest prizes tonight, some of the year, artist of the year, album of the year and best p0p the year, album of the year and best pop act, if she wins all four shoe tie with robbie williams with most awarded artist, 13 trophies in total. ~ ., awarded artist, 13 trophies in total. ., ., ., ., . total. we can hear a lot of excited eo - le total. we can hear a lot of excited people around _ total. we can hear a lot of excited people around you. _ total. we can hear a lot of excited people around you. on _ total. we can hear a lot of excited people around you. on the - total. we can hear a lot of excited i people around you. on the whole... on the whole gender neutral category for artists,
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on the whole gender neutral category forartists, it on the whole gender neutral category for artists, it seems quite belated for artists, it seems quite belated for the brits to do this, it is an obvious thing for them, isn't it? you are right. if you were to establish an award now like the booker prize and say best female and male book people would raise their eyebrows at that, at the mtv awards, the grammys in america, they have all been gender neutral for quite a long time, and those fears a female artist being sidelined or overlooked turn out not to be true, in fact the winner is a 50—50 male and female. so it seems like the brits will go the same way that people will obviously keep a close eye on it. what are the surprise categories or acts people are keeping an eye on today? acts people are keeping an eye on toda ? ~ ., , acts people are keeping an eye on toda? acts people are keeping an eye on toda ?~ ,, ., today? when i was speaking to mcgilli . an today? when i was speaking to mcgilligan yesterday, - today? when i was speaking to mcgilligan yesterday, he i today? when i was speaking to mcgilligan yesterday, he said l today? when i was speaking to i mcgilligan yesterday, he said there might be a special guest or two. and there was a dressing room that said special guest, something is happening tonight, we don't know who that will be, and dave, who won best
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album in 2020, he gave an incredibly powerful performance that year, very politically charged, he is on the show again tonight and it will be interesting to see what he does. it will be along the fan few hours for you, sure, thank you very much indeed. —— it will be a long but fun. the nominations for this year's oscars have taken place. let's have a look at some of them now, starting with best picture. among the nominations are sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographical film, belfast, jane campion's western, the power of the dog, and sci fi epic dune. kenneth branagh and jane campion get another nomination in the best director category along with steven spielberg for west side story. best actor in a leading role sees benedict cumberbatch nominated for the power of the dog and will smith for his role as serena and venus william's father in king richard. and, finally, best actress in a leading role has a nomination for olivia colman in the lost daughter, kirsten stewart for her portrayal of princess diana in spencer, and penelope cruz in pedro almodovar�*s parallel mothers.
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the biggest winners were the power of the dog with 12 nominations followed by dune with ten nominations. the ceremony takes place on march 27th in hollywood. earlier, i spoke to film criticjason solomons about it to see what he made of the nominations. 12 nominations is an extraordinary haulforjane campion, she was nominated before for the piano. butjane campion was nominated for director and best film back then and did not win. the momentum seems to be with her now, it would be two years in a row for a female film—maker winning best picture and best director but power of the dog seems to be leading the way, i'm thrilled for the film, it is not a british film, although it has got a british producer, it was shot in new zealand.
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we have benedict cumberbatch in the lead, playing an american cowboy, shot in new zealand, many hands make such films, it's a global film in that respect, so we will claim some of it for the brits as well. our creative industries are pretty good, there are other big british names, remind us who the big winners are. what is interesting to me is you have olivia colman nominated for the lost daughter, she is fabulous in everything, you havejudi dench, fabulous in everything, she has been nominated for belfast, playing the grandma in that, and you have the two very similar, very british type actresses, who are not ultimately that glamorous, hollywood divas, they're very relatable and down to earth personalities, but they always deliver superb performances, and i think the academy recognises
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them more than we do, i think we take them for granted a little bit, both of them snubbed from the baftas, they think, we know they are great, but anyone could do that sort of stuff, it's not acting. if only! they are both brilliant but great to see them being nominated, good depth of british nominations coming through there. and ken branagh, of course, nominated for director and screenplay, his film belfast which is terrific and is out in cinemas now, a beautiful black—and—white memoir, that will charm a lot of people, those fabulous performances, and judi dench's husband, who plays her husband in that, nice to see them together in that. in terms of the wider nominations, i'm looking through the list here, obviously, going to the cinema has become more difficult in recent
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times, the films that we are seeing, have they had huge take—up? obviously, not huge at the box office, the only ones huge have been bond and spider—man, both nominated in the visual effects, we have seenjames bond's song nominated again, but they are not huge box office, these films, but some of them we don't know, power of the dog, they are all on netflix. so we are seeing a little tussle there, west side story did not do that well at the box office, mainly because it is skewed towards older audiences who are tentative at going to the cinema, dune did not amazingly at the box office, did enough to get a sequel, no one was quite sure about cinema yet, but bobd made everyone go back to the cinema,
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spider—man imperative, i would like to see those two recognised a bit more, i thought daniel craig was great, i would like to see him recognised in the acting category, but they don't give it for that sort of movie, there is still a bit of arthouse thing going on, i can recommend i can recommend coda, a real heart—warming film about a hearing girl brought up in a deaf family and joining a choir. it will not do any upsets but if it could i would wish it all the best. there was interest in the short animated film nomination. fiur there was interest in the short animated film nomination. our first big moment — animated film nomination. our first big moment like _ animated film nomination. our first big moment like this, _ animated film nomination. our first big moment like this, it's _ animated film nomination. our first big moment like this, it's very i big moment like this, it's very humbling. just knowing what all of
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the crew put into making this film during the pandemic, and quite tricky circumstances, to have it honoured in this way, itjust feels really wonderful and affirming for what everyone put into the production, which was difficult. find production, which was difficult. and so hard for everyone working during covid, explained the little chap you have with you there. this covid, explained the little chap you have with you there.— have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief _ have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief star _ have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief star of _ have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief star of the - have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief star of the show, i have with you there. this is robin. he is the chief star of the show, a | he is the chief star of the show, a little robin brought up by a family of mice and tries her best to fit in with her brothers and sisters, so a story based around her and her differences in learning all about them. as she makes a misanthropic magpie who was very materialistic and he has this harebrained scheme about stealing a christmas star and that was so full of their problems, but you have to watch the film.
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guys, it has come out of old man studios who have had great success before the oscars, have you had any advice about what you do at the oscars? it looks different to some of the other films, people used to move for wallace and gromit —type animations, but you have taken a different direction there. that animations, but you have taken a different direction there.- different direction there. that is ri . ht, different direction there. that is riaht, we different direction there. that is right. we are — different direction there. that is right, we are relative _ different direction there. that is | right, we are relative newcomers here, we pitched this project to them a few years ago. we have brought with us a bunch of sensibilities and certain divine —— design approaches and the amazing crafts here worked with us to bring it to life. you did buy a really nice tuxedo!— nice tuxedo! that looks very charming. — nice tuxedo! that looks very charming, doesn't _ nice tuxedo! that looks very charming, doesn't it? i the duchess of cornwall has carried out her first public engagement since the queen paved the way
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for her to become queen camilla. the duchess was welcomed at roundhill primary school in bath, where she toured classrooms and joined a range of lessons. on sunday, the queen confirmed that she wants camilla to be named queen consort when charles becomes king. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan. it has not been too bad, particularly across england and wales. the temperatures were kind. quite a bit of sunshine across the uk as well. in norfolk we saw beautiful blue skies and in the highlands, but there is quite a difference in the way it would have felt if you were standing in these two spots. as we said, across england and wales, a mild day thanks to atlantic air, temperatures in the low teens, a different story, you can see by the contrasting colours on the map behind me, for scotland and northern ireland, here it feels
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distinctly more wintry. between the two, a weather front which will get a new lease of life, heavy rain for a new lease of life, heavy rain for a time for northern england, by the end of the night for north wales. to the south of that, very mild night to come, to the north, colder, a frost, particularly for scotland. on wednesday the front will continue southwards across the uk, pulling more arctic air south, so for the midlands and wales, temperatures could come down for the day despite the fact it will become brighter. the club come the afternoon as the front sits across southern england, a blustery day for everyone, and the wind will add to the cold feel. these are the temperatures you would read on a thermometer, mild for southernmost counties but sliding down into single figures across scotland and northern ireland. and then wednesday night into thursday, two things to pick out, this area of low pressure and this front sticking quite close by to the south coast. this low could be nasty for scotland
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through the small hours of thursday, very strong winds, potentially more intense snowfall, winds gusting 50-60 intense snowfall, winds gusting 50—60 mph, then this front could bring cloud and rain for the far south—east. got to factor the winding to the temperatures. in scotland, it will feel closer to freezing despite highs of three or 4 degrees. on friday a bump of high pressure and that means light winds, a perfect setup for a widespread and hard frost first thing on friday, a cold start to the week, but clearer skies, a lot of sunshine, fog and places, even freezing fog, but the sunshine will be a payoff for the cold but temperatures will struggle throughout the day, highs 3—7. cold but temperatures will struggle throughout the day, highs 3—7 . a different story for the weekend, we look to be atlantic once again, the weather systems are set to be queueing up, rain is sweeping across our shores, queueing up, rain is sweeping across ourshores, but queueing up, rain is sweeping across
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our shores, but temperatures do lift a little.
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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. our headlines at 5pm... the government sets out its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini—cabinet reshuffle is under way. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jeered and jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. bp rejects calls for a windfall tax on energy companies, after posting profits of almost £10 billion last year. footballers wives at the high court. whatsapp messages are disclosed
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showing how rebekah vardy "declared war" on coleen rooney — and discussed leaking stories

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