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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 8, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. our headlines at 5pm... the government sets out its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini—cabinet reshuffle is under way. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit opportunities. after the labour leader was jeered and jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. bp rejects calls for a windfall tax on energy companies, after posting profits of almost £10 billion last year. footballers wives at the high court. whatsapp messages are disclosed
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showing how rebekah vardy "declared war" on coleen rooney — and discussed leaking stories about her to the press. and i wonder what little lady made these? the brit awards are getting under way this evening. we will be alive to the red carpet later this hour. and i wonder what little lady made these? actually, i did, sir. and coming up — a look at the films that led the way in the oscars nominations. we'll be speaking to the producer from frontrunner the power of the dog. hello. the health secretary, sajid javid, has outlined the delayed plans to tackle the backlog of patients
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on nhs hospital waiting lists in england. mrjavid told the commons the number of people waiting for elective care has risen to six million. the devolved nations have set out their own recovery plans. that figure of six million represents around one in nine of the population, and is expected to rise further. ministers believe it'll take around two years for the numbers to start falling 100 community diagnostic centres are to be set up — these are places you can go for checks, scans, and tests for diseases such as cancer, which aim to get people a quicker diagnosis surgical hubs, concentrating on high—volume routine surgery will be set up. the measures should help the nhs increase the amount of treatments it carries out by 30% above its pre—pandemic activity levels. it will be paid for by an extra investment of £8 billion over the next three years. here's more of what mrjavid told mps.
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the plan sets the ambition of eliminating waits of longer than a year — waits in elective care — by march 2025. within this, no—one will wait longer than two years byjuly this year. and the nhs aims to eliminate the waits of over 18 months by april 2023, and of over 65 weeks by march 2024, which equates to 99% of patients waiting less than one year. let's speak to the shadow health secretary, labour's wes streeting. hejoins me now. the prime minister has talked about tough targets, the government is talking about being unapologetically ambitious on these targets. find unapologetically ambitious on these tar: ets. �* , , unapologetically ambitious on these taraets. �* , , , ., targets. and yet they still fall woefully short _ targets. and yet they still fall woefully short of _ targets. and yet they still fall woefully short of the - targets. and yet they still fall woefully short of the plan - targets. and yet they still fall| woefully short of the plan that targets. and yet they still fall - woefully short of the plan that was needed to deal with the biggest waiting list in the history of the nhs. and don'tjust take my word for it — nhs. and don'tjust take my word for it - nhs nhs. and don'tjust take my word for it — nhs providers have said today,
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quite rightly, that without a workforce strategy, the plan to plug the staffing shortage at the nhs, there's no chance of closing these waiting lists down, and the government is acting with nothing like the urgency needed. when i pressed sajid javid on this today, he said he'll ask the nhs to come up with a workforce plan. now why is it that he doesn't understand the central challenge facing nhs is the staffing shortage? it was 100,000 before the pandemic, it is 93,000 today — and despite everything we've heard today, what the health secretary did reveal is that even by the next general election, the ceiling of his ambition is that people will still be waiting potentially longer than a year for treatment. and that's nowhere near good enough. and unless he deals with the staffing shortage in the nhs, he doesn't have a plan to deal in the waiting list. you nhs, he doesn't have a plan to deal in the waiting list.— in the waiting list. you call those waitin: in the waiting list. you call those waiting lists. _ in the waiting list. you call those waiting lists, rather _ in the waiting list. you call those waiting lists, rather than - in the waiting list. you call those waiting lists, rather than be - in the waiting list. you call those waiting lists, rather than be a . waiting lists, rather than be a covid back log, you call them a tory backlog. but if labour had been in
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power, it would be a labourer backlog. because with government being such a huge crisis over the last few years, the nhs has understandably had to deliver its attention to treating covid. and understandably there have been more people in the waiting list.— people in the waiting list. firstly, i'll acknowledge _ people in the waiting list. firstly, i'll acknowledge no _ people in the waiting list. firstly, i'll acknowledge no there's - people in the waiting list. firstly, i'll acknowledge no there's no - people in the waiting list. firstly, i i'll acknowledge no there's no doubt whatsoever that covid has had an impact on these waiting lists, of course they have, everyone knows that. but that doesn't explain how we went into the pandemic with nhs waiting lists at an already record 4.5 waiting lists at an already record 11.5 million, and nhs staff shortages at 100,000, so it's notjust that the conservatives didn't fix the roof while the sun was shining, they dismantled the roof and the floorboards, and left the ill expense that nhs more ill equipped to tackle the pandemic and they would've either been. but to tackle the pandemic and they would've either been.— to tackle the pandemic and they would've either been. but they are -aushin would've either been. but they are pushing billions _ would've either been. but they are pushing billions of— would've either been. but they are pushing billions of pounds - would've either been. but they are pushing billions of pounds and - would've either been. but they are pushing billions of pounds and it . pushing billions of pounds and it is, around £8 billion. in pushing billions of pounds and it is, around £8 billion.— pushing billions of pounds and it is, around £8 billion. in the lesson from the last _ is, around £8 billion. in the lesson from the last labour— is, around £8 billion. in the lesson from the last labour government | is, around £8 billion. in the lesson | from the last labour government is important, but so is reform. that's how the last labour government got waiting lists for down from eight
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months to 18 weeks. in waiting lists for down from eight months to 18 weeks.— months to 18 weeks. in terms of cancer care. _ months to 18 weeks. in terms of cancer care, there _ months to 18 weeks. in terms of cancer care, there are _ months to 18 weeks. in terms of cancer care, there are targets i months to 18 weeks. in terms of| cancer care, there are targets on that, as well — the vast majority of patients say they should get a diagnosis within 28 days, and there are other targets too. what do you make of that specifically? because you have had personal experience of cancer treatment, haven't you? you had kidney cancer last year. yes. had kidney cancer last year. yes, and about _ had kidney cancer last year. yes, and about half— had kidney cancer last year. yes, and about half a _ had kidney cancer last year. yes, and about half a million - had kidney cancer last year. 13:3 and about half a million people with suspected cancer who are not getting diagnosis fast enough, let alone treatment fast enough. and what disappointed me most was that yesterday, with the targets the prime minister set out, he actually watered down the standards of excitations, talking about how quickly people have been diagnosed, rather than how quickly people will be treated. so watering down the targets, one being about diagnosis in a couple months when the target is meant to be treatment. and that's because they haven't met their own standards and targets, so instead of raising the performance to give
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patients the care that they need in a timely way, which is especially important on cancer, they are lowering the standards because they can't meet them. and that's not the right way to deal with cancer. and the health secretary talks about a war on cancer — the tories have spent more than ten years pre—pandemic disarming the nhs and its capacity, and now they say the nhs into this war on cancer completely unprepared. it is so frustrating to hear the rhetoric from government not match the reality. we know the nhs is under enormous pressure, that's why today was so important. i thought that's why we were waiting so long for this plan because they wanted to get it right. how can they plan to have a plan for waiting lists if they don't have a plan to deal with these staffing shortages? and i'm afraid the lesson and all this is that the longer the conservatives are in government, the longer patients will wait. ~ ., ., , ., , wait. well, one of the plans as part of its overall _ wait. well, one of the plans as part of its overall plan is _ wait. well, one of the plans as part of its overall plan is to _ wait. well, one of the plans as part of its overall plan is to set - wait. well, one of the plans as part of its overall plan is to set up - of its overall plan is to set up this website, a platform called my
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plan to care, which shows if you are waiting for treatment, it shows you where you are on that waiting list. that's a good idea, isn't it? because people want to know where they are in wait to. i because people want to know where they are in wait to.— they are in wait to. i think you are riaht they are in wait to. i think you are right about _ they are in wait to. i think you are right about people _ they are in wait to. i think you are right about people wanting - they are in wait to. i think you are right about people wanting a - right about people wanting a degree of certainty about where they are and not having to hassle their gps or ring busy hospital phone lines for updates. but this was one of the only new ideas in the plan that was set out today. i think it will stick in people cosmic throats, especially the 6 million people on those waiting lists, often serious pain and discomfort, that the big plan today was a website telling them how long... it today was a website telling them how lona . .. , ., ., long... it tells them more than that, it tells — long... it tells them more than that, it tells them _ long... it tells them more than that, it tells them how - long... it tells them more than that, it tells them how long - long... it tells them more than . that, it tells them how long they'll have to wait in the queue, notjust that they're in a waiting list. but i think that they're in a waiting list. but i think the _ that they're in a waiting list. emit i think the thing people want more than anything else is to know they'll be treated faster. and that's why today's plan falls so far short of the expectation will stop and as i say, don'tjust take my
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word for it, let's listen to what the nhs providers are saying, what the nhs providers are saying, what the nhs providers are saying, what the nhs workforce is saying. they are bitterly disappointed too because people are going out into the nhs every day slopping their guts out. they know how important these waiting lists and times are, they know the impact that it's having on patients. they want to see this tackled too. these are people who are really overworked, highly stressed, and they are in this position because there are not enough staff in the nhs. that's why the absence of a workforce plan today i think is highly irresponsible, deeply disappointing, and fails to justify why we've waited so long for a plan that was expected and promised before the end of last year. expected and promised before the end of last ear. ~ , ., ~ i. expected and promised before the end of last ear. ~ , ., ~ ., of last year. wes, thank you for our of last year. wes, thank you for your review- — let's get more on this with siva anandaciva. he's chief analyst at the king's fund, a charitable with expertise on health care. thank you very much for being with us. we've heard labour�*s take on
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this, what's your take on this plan for tackling the backlog of waiting lists in england?— for tackling the backlog of waiting lists in england? good afternoon. so m take is lists in england? good afternoon. so my take is there _ lists in england? good afternoon. so my take is there are _ lists in england? good afternoon. so my take is there are deftly _ lists in england? good afternoon. so my take is there are deftly some - my take is there are deftly some good things in this plan— increased capacity, as her piece already noted, building new surgical hubs that can knock out simple routine... rather than having to go to hospital for an ultrasound, you can go to your high street and a new diagnostic centre. and also plans to give people more choice about how they received care, so when and whether you get an out patient referral. all that is welcome, but i think there are two big caveats. the first is nobody really knows how many of the 10 million or so people who would normally have come forward for care since covid will actually come forward for care, and what impact that will have on the health care system. so there's a big unknown of the demand for health care. and the second big caveat is, as your previous speaker was noting,
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there is a glaring absence of a workforce plan to go alongside this recovery plan. and whatever your ambitions are for tackling long waits, fundamentally it will require more clinical staff. bud waits, fundamentally it will require more clinical staff.— waits, fundamentally it will require more clinical staff. and how do you aet those more clinical staff. and how do you get those tens _ more clinical staff. and how do you get those tens of _ more clinical staff. and how do you get those tens of thousands - more clinical staff. and how do you get those tens of thousands of - get those tens of thousands of clinical staff, as you say, how do you get them quickly, which is what the nhs needs?— you get them quickly, which is what the nhs needs? given it takes about three ears the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to _ the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to train _ the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to train a _ the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to train a nurse - the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to train a nurse and - the nhs needs? given it takes about three years to train a nurse and 15 i three years to train a nurse and 15 years to train a consultant, if you're going to do things quickly, it involves things like international recruitment. but that's not a sustainable strategy, so it can be part of the approach for tackling the workforce crisis, but there must be more to it than that. a longer term plan for growing the domestic supply of clinical staff — and that's what's missing at the moment. the staff - and that's what's missing at the moment-— staff - and that's what's missing at the moment. the government have talked a lot — the moment. the government have talked a lot about _ the moment. the government have talked a lot about tough _ the moment. the government have talked a lot about tough targets, i talked a lot about tough targets, they are unapologetically ambitious targets, as they say, and they're spending a lot of money on this, billions of pounds — is it about money? i mean, £8 billion, will that
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do the trick? i money? i mean, £8 billion, will that do the trick?— do the trick? i think the money on the table of _ do the trick? i think the money on the table of £8 _ do the trick? i think the money on the table of £8 billion _ do the trick? i think the money on the table of £8 billion is _ do the trick? i think the money on the table of £8 billion is probably| the table of £8 billion is probably the table of £8 billion is probably the right amount that you'd want to spend if you are going to have ambitions to get the nhs waiting times back to where it was before the pandemic. so you're not trying to go further and achieve the national targets themselves that are in place, you'rejust trying national targets themselves that are in place, you're just trying to reset to back before the pandemic. but again, at risk of repeating points over and over again, the money will get you so far, but the place you want to spend the money is on more clinical staff. unless you have plans to do that, but on earth with the money be spent on, is the question? with the money be spent on, is the ruestion? ., ., ., ., , question? how have we got to this oint question? how have we got to this point where _ question? how have we got to this point where so _ question? how have we got to this point where so many _ question? how have we got to this point where so many people i question? how have we got to this point where so many people are i point where so many people are waiting so long for pretty basic operations, hip replacements, knee replacements and so on? i mean, covid, yes, that's clearly exacerbated the situation, but even before that and we all know we had huge proms in this area, how do you think the nhs has got to the stage?
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i think the staffing shortages is the simple answer. and you're right, even before covid, waiting time targets were missed. this target to see people within 18 weeks of a referral, if you need a hip or knee operation, hasn't been met since 2016. and the number one factor is the staffing crisis... bud 2016. and the number one factor is the staffing crisis. . ._ 2016. and the number one factor is the staffing crisis... and how do we then compare _ the staffing crisis... and how do we then compare with _ the staffing crisis... and how do we then compare with other _ the staffing crisis... and how do we then compare with other countries, j then compare with other countries, comparable countries in europe or elsewhere in the world? 50. comparable countries in europe or elsewhere in the world? so, probably well, elsewhere in the world? so, probably well. actually- _ elsewhere in the world? so, probably well, actually. if— elsewhere in the world? so, probably well, actually. if you _ elsewhere in the world? so, probably well, actually. if you look— elsewhere in the world? so, probably well, actually. if you look at - well, actually. if you look at our waiting time targets, we have some of the most stringent targets in the world, and many countries come to us to look at how we implement them. so i don't think it's a question of scrapping targets without questioning them, it's a quite a simple case of if you invest in the service, give it the workforce it needs. these targets can be achievable. the plan as they are, the money is there, what's still missing is the workforce. —— the plan is there. missing is the workforce. -- the plan is there-— missing is the workforce. -- the plan is there. missing is the workforce. -- the [an is there. ., ,, . ., plan is there. thank you so much for our
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plan is there. thank you so much for your analysis- _ plan is there. thank you so much for your analysis. thank— plan is there. thank you so much for your analysis. thank you. _ borisjohnson has been holding a mini—reshuffle of his ministers. the chief whip, mark spencer, who was criticised for his treatment of rebellious mps, is moving sideways to become leader of the commons. he'll replace jacob rees—mogg, who becomes minister for brexit 0pportunities. let's speak to our political correspondentjonathan blake, who's in westminster. what do you think is behind this reshuffle? we've heard a lot about the prime minister's reset strategy in the wake of partygate allegations. is that what this is allegations. is that what this is all about was yellow i think it is, yes, it's part oii all about was yellow i think it is, yes. it's par— yes, it's part of the reset the prime minister _ yes, it's part of the reset the prime minister is _ yes, it's part of the reset the prime minister is attempting | yes, it's part of the reset the i prime minister is attempting to perform to shore up support for his leadership to demonstrate to conservative mps that he's got the message, that things need to change in number ten. message, that things need to change in numberten. but message, that things need to change in number ten. but it is pretty limited in scope — this is not one of those days where you see familiar faces walking up downing street, disappearing behind the door to
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number ten with onejob disappearing behind the door to number ten with one job and coming out with another. nevertheless there are a couple of notable moves. jacob rees—mogg, the former leader of the house of commons, steps into a new role which is been created especially — he is now in the position of minister for brexit 0pportunities position of minister for brexit opportunities and government efficiency, and the role that he vacated, leader of the house of commons, which is thejob of vacated, leader of the house of commons, which is the job of getting the government's legislation through parliament broadly speaking, will be done by mark spencer, the former chief whip. and perhaps the most important new announcement today is that chris eaton harris, the mp, former foreign office is now in the chief whip roll, keeping conservative mps in line — and crucially keeping them on board. he's got a big charm offensive to embark upon, you would imagine, after a very turbulent few weeks and
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months for the government. a clear and present danger to borisjohnson with several mps submitting letters calling for a vote of in him. that's about the scope of it apart from another few minor ministerial moves here and there. but definitely part of, as i say, and attempted reset by borisjohnson. but not of, as i say, and attempted reset by boris johnson. but not the of, as i say, and attempted reset by borisjohnson. but not the big moves and sweeping changes that many would like to see — indeed, there's been grumbling amongst conservative mps this afternoon in the aftermath of these changes that they simply don't go far enough. these changes that they simply don't go far enough-— go far enough. jonathan, thank you for that update. _ the commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, has condemned the abuse of sir keir starmer by protesters yesterday and described borisjohnson's false claim — that the labour leader had failed to prosecute the paedophile, jimmy savile — as "unacceptable". there is growing pressure on the prime minister to withdraw the claim, after the labour leader was targeted by an angry mob near parliament. but downing street says the prime
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minister won't be apologising. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. where's jimmy savile? is what happened outside parliament last night connected to what the prime minister said last week? he spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile, as far as i can make out, mr speaker. keir starmer used to be the director of public prosecutions, but there is no evidence for the prime minister's original allegation that sir keir had failed to prosecutejimmy savile. he was not involved at any point in the decision — something borisjohnson has since acknowledged. should the prime ministerl apologise to keir starmer? but number ten and ministers arriving for a cabinet meeting this morning... do words have consequences? ..insist it is legitimate to ask about the failures of the cps when it was led by sir keir starmer. when you have a debate about the leader of an organisation taking responsibility for that organisation, as keir starmer did, as the prime minister has made
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clear, as the prime minister has with what happened in downing street, i think that is a reasonable point to make. and we have seen politicians make claims and statements in the chamber to other politicians over the years. that is no excuse for people to use that to excuse the way they behaved last night. it simply isn't. but the commons speaker said what happened to sir keir starmer and his colleagues was deplorable, and added... these sorts of comments only inflame opinions and generate disregard for the house, and it is not acceptable. 0ur words have consequences, and we should always be mindful of that fact. twice in the last six years, mps have been killed while doing theirjob. sir david amess was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last autumn. in 2016, jo cox was murdered in west yorkshire. of course we should have a robust, passionate political debate in this country. it is the cornerstone of our democracy. but when that descends into abuse, insults, lies, and people screaming
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at each other in the street, i really hope we can agree that a line has been crossed. labour say what happened here last night has echoes of what we have seen in america in recent years. it's trumpian—style politics and legitimises the kind of political discourse which is not what we like or deserve in this country. and i believe he should come to the house of commons and apologise unreservedly for the slurs that he made last week. traitor! but that is not going to happen, despite all of this. chris mason, bbc news at westminster. there are fresh calls for a windfall tax on energy giants, after bp reported profits of £9.5 billion for last year. the company's boss recently described it as a "cash machine". last week, shell also posted bumper profits, and labour and the liberal democrats are demanding a one—off tax, which they say could be used to help households face huge increases
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in gas and electricity bills. ramzan kamali reports. it's notjust the petrol pumping at bp, but profits too. the oil giant has reported its highest profits for eight years, and it's easy to understand why. a combination of resurgent demand and geopolitical tensions has seen oil prices almost double. wholesale gas prices are currently five times higher than they were before the pandemic. last year, bp made profits of £9.5 billion. and only last week another oil giant, shell, announced profits of £14 billion. but when economies around the world were shut due to the covid—19 pandemic in 2020, bp made losses of £4 billion. but, just as bp have benefited from these huge rises in energy prices, households are paying the price. jenny has to pay for her gas and electricity in advance, and as a prepayment customer, she is already paying the highest rates for her energy. where £10 could have lasted
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you three or four days, two weeks later, it can last you two days. so it's difficult to budget because you are like, "hang on, i thought i had £15 on there, and i havejust checked and i've only got £7 left, surely it should be this?" and you are watching the balance go down, and you're thinking, "there's nothing i can do." when that goes, there is no electric or gas. labour last month proposed that north sea energy producers pay higher corporation tax for a year to fund £1.2 billion of help for households. some want to go even further. we could raise £5 billion, at least, from the huge profits that the oil and gas companies are making and use that money to cut people's energy bills. how can it be fair that oil and gas companies are making huge profits at the expense of millions of people who are having problems paying their heating bills?
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bp says it is investing in renewables, and one former executive believes a windfall tax is not the solution. oil and gas account for 80% of all the energy britain uses every day, so there needs to be the investment in that by companies like bp and shell and others. but they also need — and they are trying to do this — to invest in the move towards low—carbon. only a fraction of bp's profits are generated in the north sea, so a windfall tax applied only to those operations would raise limited revenue. but with oil firms making massive profits, many believe they are in an ideal position to help foot the bill for struggling customers. ramzan karmali, bbc news. a watchdog has found "collusive behaviour" between police officers and loyalist paramilitaries in a number of murders in belfast in the 1990s. the northern ireland police 0mbudsman examined the killings of five catholics at a bookmakers' shop, and six other fatal shootings. it says the security forces failed
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to adequately supervise informers who were involved in crimes, including murder. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. on a wednesday afternoon in 1992, there was an act of sectarian carnage at this bookmaker�*s shop. the loyalist group the ulster freedom fighters shot dead five catholics. families have long claimed there was collusion between paramilitaries and the security forces. they say the ombudsman's inquiry has confirmed their fears. what went on in south belfast, at the hands of loyalist death squads, being protected by the police so they could come into south belfast, into sean graham's bookies, and drive away without being challenged, is sickening. the report identifies significant failures in the police investigation. some records were destroyed. police donated the rifle used in the killings to the imperial war museum.
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the security forces had eight informers in the loyalist organisation who were involved in 27 murders and attempted murders. but police intelligence officers didn't pass on relevant information to detectives investigating the shootings. these informants were out of control, but it was the police's job to make sure that when they engaged with informants that they probed, assessed and questioned what they were doing. and the continued use of informants, whom police were aware or ought to have been aware were involved in serious criminality and murder is, in my view, unforgivable. in a statement, the police service of northern ireland has offered its sincere apologies to the families. it says policing policies and procedures have greatly improved over the last 30 years. the conflict largely ended later in the 1990s, but northern ireland is still haunted by its history. the question of how killings from the past should be investigated is complex and contentious,
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and it cuts particularly deep for thousands of bereaved families. the government is planning to end all prosecutions for paramilitaries and former members of state forces. but that is opposed by most victims, including the relatives of those who died here. chris page, bbc news, belfast. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are at higher risk of miscarriage. the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists says the situation is unacceptable. one study found that black women were 40% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. ministers say they committed to tackling disparities in maternity care. our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar has been investigating. these women are sisters in loss. it's the name of their organisation,
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created to help give black women a voice when it comes to maternal health. all have suffered pregnancy loss. i had my loss at 12 weeks, this was in 2018. natrice told me she was inconsolable when she was scanned and told there was no heartbeat. ijust, you know, collapsed. i got sick right there, and then she asked me, "why are you throwing up? did you come in here sick?" and i had to explain to her, "ma'am, you just told me my baby no longer has a heartbeat." so there was no compassion. i woke up, was having really bad back pain, and i was told by my doctor when i called that i wasjust constipated. they told me to come back in a few hours for an ultrasound. i never even made it back to that ultrasound because i miscarried at home. all four women described numerous occasions when they didn't feel their concerns were taken
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seriously by clinicians. i just don't feel that we are being listened to and heard in the spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your skin? absolutely. yes. i mean, it really is a struggle all around when it comes to our maternal care. dr schreiber is an obstetrics and gynaecology doctor in philadelphia, and is working to improve maternal outcomes, with a focus on black women. a black woman's risk of miscarriage after ten weeks of pregnancy is double that of a white woman's risk of miscarriage at that stage. now, the reason behind this disparity is probably multifaceted and still remains unclear. race is socially constructed, so it is probably not a risk factor, but racism and gender bias, these are at the root that underlies most of these health disparities that we see in maternal health. there is your baby's heart beating,
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so that's nice and reassuring. 3,000 miles away, in coventry in the uk, professor quenby runs a recurrent miscarriage clinic at university hospital. she is also a leading researcher in this field. she's currently trying to get funding to investigate some of the many unknowns around why black women are at higher risk, including looking into any potential biological factors. we know, for example, if you are black and asian, then you handle glucose less well, so we know you're at a much more increased risk of gestational diabetes. we also know that the balance of bacteria in your vagina is different in black and asian women to white women, and we know an imbalance in the bacteria in your vagina has been associated with miscarriage and preterm birth, so that's another area we can look at. there is clearly a myriad of complex and difficult issues at play here, but the longer we don't have answers to some of these key questions, the longer so many women will continue to suffer needlessly.
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one idea professor quenby and her team is already working on is an app where women in the uk will be able to input their clinical details like ethnicity and weight, and whether they have had any previous miscarriages. they'll then get specific evidence—based advice on how to lower their risk of a loss. i feel very optimistic, because more conversations are occurring about it and the more exposure this gets, then other women feel more comfortable asking the questions. with me is dr edward morris, president of the royal collegue of obstetricians and gynaecologists. thank you very much for being with us. quite shocking, really, these findings, the up to 40% of black
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women are more likely to have a miscarriage than white women. what do you think are the reasons? to lip, and that report, was talking of a myriad of reasons —— tulip. ben. a myriad of reasons -- tulip. ben, thanks so — a myriad of reasons -- tulip. ben, thanks so much _ a myriad of reasons -- tulip. ben, thanks so much for— a myriad of reasons -- tulip. ben, thanks so much for listening i a myriad of reasons —— tulip. ben, thanks so much for listening to the story. miscarriage is a very stressful and emotional time for any family to go through, and it is really something that we need to learn a lot more about, and that's miscarriage whatever your race or culture. but hearing the stories today brings home the fact that yes, there does appear to be this increased risk of 40% of miscarriage increased risk of 40% of miscarriage in black women. i think it's important to note that racism itself does not cause miscarriage — we don't know what the causes are, it's important we understand that research needs to be expanded to look more into that. we heard from that report that the professor is doing some really important research to get to the bottom of some of these causes, but still there is
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work to be done. but these causes, but still there is work to be done.— these causes, but still there is work to be done. but having said that, do you _ work to be done. but having said that, do you think— work to be done. but having said that, do you think that _ work to be done. but having said that, do you think that there i work to be done. but having said that, do you think that there is i work to be done. but having said that, do you think that there is a | that, do you think that there is a bar that racial bias or in—built racial bias is having in this —— there is a part? racial bias is having in this -- there is a part?— racial bias is having in this -- there is a part? racial bias within there is a part? racial bias within the health of— there is a part? racial bias within the health of the _ there is a part? racial bias within the health of the system - there is a part? racial bias within the health of the system can i there is a part? racial bias within l the health of the system can affect anyone on the receiving end of that. it's important understand that it can be conscious, but also unconscious— and is largely unconscious— and is largely unconscious and unintentional in the health system. i think it is important to anyone working in the health system is taught and trained, and educated in how theirfeelings and educated in how theirfeelings and actions can actually transmit to people having a much worse experience of care within the health system. experience of care within the health s stem. . , ., experience of care within the health s stem. ., ,. ,, ., experience of care within the health sstem. ., ,. ,, ., , ., system. can you discuss for us what miaht be system. can you discuss for us what might be some _ system. can you discuss for us what might be some of _ system. can you discuss for us what might be some of the _ system. can you discuss for us what might be some of the biological i might be some of the biological reasons for this racial disparity? we heard in that report that perhaps higher rates of gestational diabetes, higher blood sugar levels in early pregnancy in black women —
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is that kind of thing possibly part of the reason?— is that kind of thing possibly part of the reason? those are certainly arts of of the reason? those are certainly parts of the _ of the reason? those are certainly parts of the reasons. _ of the reason? those are certainly parts of the reasons. most - parts of the reasons. most miscarriages likely happen very early in pregnancy, and often women are unaware of them happening. and they are likely to be extreme genetic problems with the developing foetus. but when we look at differences in race, yes, there are elements such as small growth within the wombs — they are much more common in black women than white, and they can affect the risk of miscarriage. but also the way that women handle sugar, which is diabetes or prediabetes, can affect miscarriage. there is interesting research at the moment that's looking at the mix of bacteria within the regina, which may be different to your race. it within the regina, which may be different to your race.— different to your race. it sounds like we need — different to your race. it sounds like we need to _ different to your race. it sounds like we need to do _ different to your race. it sounds like we need to do a _ different to your race. it sounds like we need to do a lot - different to your race. it sounds like we need to do a lot more . like we need to do a lot more research quite quickly? absolutely, and one of the _ research quite quickly? absolutely, and one of the things _ research quite quickly? absolutely, and one of the things i'm _ research quite quickly? absolutely, l and one of the things i'm passionate about is addressing both the
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gendered data gap in research, and also the race data cap. we need to do much more about it. the fact that we've heard that research has not looked at things through the lens of sex or race— it's really important that funding is directed towards these areas with real urgency. thank ou, ve these areas with real urgency. thank you, very interesting _ these areas with real urgency. thank you, very interesting to _ these areas with real urgency. thank you, very interesting to talk- these areas with real urgency. thank you, very interesting to talk to i you, very interesting to talk to you, very interesting to talk to you, doctor, thanks for your time. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather. the look and feel of spring, lots of cloud around, especially where the warmest air has been. 0n the other side of this where their front, chillier conditions here, that pushes its way southward through the next 36 hours, and it lies across ireland into the north midlands here, cloud and outbreaks of rain through the night. a splash of drizzle, mostly dry and mild night, temperature is not dropping below
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8-9 c. temperature is not dropping below 8—9 c. colder conditions through scotland and northern ireland, wintry showers continue in north and west scotland, strong winds as well, using just a little bit relative to the in parts of the north midlands as that cloud and optics of rain and drizzle pushes a bit further southwards, it will be a blustery day tomorrow across the board, particularly north of scotland, 60 mph winds possible which will add to what will be a chilly day. still sticking with the mild air for one last day in the south. hello, this is bbc news with me, ben brown. the headlines — the government sets out its delayed plan for cutting record nhs waiting lists in england. a mini—cabinet reshuffle is underway. former chief whip mark spencer replaces jacob rees—mogg as leader of the commons. mr rees—mogg becomes minister
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for brexit 0pportunities. after the labour leader was jeered and jostled by an angry mob, downing street says borisjohnson has no intention of apologising for his false claim that keir starmer failed to prosecute the paedophile jimmy savile. bp rejects calls for a windfall tax on energy companies after posting profits of almost £10 billion last year. footballers' wives at the high court — whatsapp messages are disclosed showing how rebekah vardy "declared war" on coleen rooney and discussed leaking stories about her to the press. and i wonder what little lady made these? actually i did, sir. and coming up, a look at the films that led the way in the oscar nominations. we will be speaking to the producer from frontrunner the power of the dog.
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sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. good to see you. england manager sarina wiegman has named her squad for the arnold clark cup later this month. she won't have captain steph houghton available, though. manchester city goalkeeper ellie roebuck has returned from injury and makes the squad. so has teammate lucy bronze. both players will be playing under wiegman for the first time. houghton will miss the tournament, which features spain, germany and canada, through injury. it's a blow for wiegman, who's won all six matches since taking charge. always disappointed when you cannot bring in a player you really want to bring in a player you really want to bring in. so england is not available either but staff has been out for a long time already. she came in september. she had to leave, and she did well when she came out of the winter break. she played well but still now she needs a little
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more time to get fit again. so that was disappointing. so, this is the squad, which has arsenal's leah williamson, who captained england last year. she returns after missing november's camp. the tournament begins on the 17th of february. england take on canada at middlesbrough's riverside stadium. the professional footballers association have condemned "any sort of violence" in the aftermath of a video released showing west ham defender kurt zouma abusing his cat. the premier league side have also denounced the actions and say they'll deal with the incident internally. in a statement, zouma said... the pfa say they'll work to make players aware of their reponsibilities. 0ur role is to seek the truth which is this behaviour is not editable. not at all with or without camera.
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not at all with or without camera. not at all with or without camera. not a question of its visible so that it's bad, it'sjust not a question of its visible so that it's bad, it's just bad. not a question of its visible so that it's bad, it'sjust bad. it should not be happening and i have not seen the video but i read he apologised which is a side of him acknowledging this behaviour is not suitable. so we really hope because i have in a player myself and really hope to tell them the truth. sometimes the truth hurts but we do tell them what is right and what is not right. we wait to see if zouma will feature tonight in west ham's premier league clash with watford, who are looking to pull clear of the relegation zone. it's one of three games later. bottom side burnley are home to manchester united, and everton travel to newcastle. both are desperate for points. newcastle were the big spenders in the january transfer window. their boss eddie howe is excited to see what new signing bruno guimaraes can deliver. he's got that calmness, composure, certainly a creative eye, he's a very intelligent footballer, his positioning is very good, he wants the ball continually.
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there will be a period of adjustment for the pace of the premier league, there always is when you come from a different league, so i think he'll have to get up to speed with that very quickly, but given his intelligence, i think he will and i think he will be an outstanding player for us. no medals for team gb at the winter olympics as yet, but there really was a debut at the games to remember for teenager kirsty muir. muir, who isjust 17 years old, was in sensational form and finished an impressive fifth in a brilliant big—air ski final. she said she couldn't have skied better in an event won, in some fashion, by chinese skier eileen gu. and there was bitter disapointment for the mixed curlers bruce mouat and jen dodds, who missed out on a bronze. they lost 9—3 to sweden. they both get another shot at a medal in the team event. itjust got off to bad start, that's what punished us most, we just had to fight back.
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she made a good shot for four, and fair play to her, it is such a big game and to make those shots is a great feeling for her, so we willjust have to console ourselves because we have a big week with both of our teams. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6:30pm. thank you very much indeed and now we have a story about footballers's wives. whatsapp messages disclosed to the high court show that rebekah vardy and her press agent caroline watt discussed leaking stories about coleen rooney to the press. they were revealed in the latest hearing in the libel case brought by mrs vardy. the latest instalment in the so—called wagatha christie saga. 0ur correspondent sanchia berg is there for us. talk us through what has happened today then. talk us through what has happened toda then. , ., , .,, talk us through what has happened toda then. , ., , ., ., today then. helpful for people to go back a little — today then. helpful for people to go back a little bit — today then. helpful for people to go back a little bit and _ today then. helpful for people to go back a little bit and remind - today then. helpful for people to go back a little bit and remind people | back a little bit and remind people what this is all about. how coleen rooney three years ago realised that somebody was following her on instagram, where she had a limited
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number of followers, a private account, somebody was looking stories to the tabloid press so she set a trap really. she restricted who can see the stories and posted a few fake stories and after a few months she discovered, she thought, who the culprit was and she said it was rebekah vardy�*s instagram account. now rebekah vardy strongly denied that and that's what brought us to the high court under libel action. so here is a later stage what happened today was the disclosure of a cache of private white sent messages between rebekah vardy and her former press agent and they were discussing coleen rooney and made some very unflattering comments about her which i will not repeat here, and they also discussed potentially leaking stories. i would say that rebekah vardy�*s barrister who is onlyjust begun responding to this said that those messages were being presented in a highly selective and misleading way and
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that there was no evidence that his client had actually leaked those stories and that she was very distressed by the whole affair. as i say, he will respond more and make his own applications when this case continues tomorrow and there is a full trial at the moment scheduled for may of this year. bill full trial at the moment scheduled for may of this year.— for may of this year. all right, thank you _ for may of this year. all right, thank you very _ for may of this year. all right, thank you very much - for may of this year. all right, thank you very much indeed l for may of this year. all right, i thank you very much indeed there from the high court. the nominations for this year's 0scars have taken place. let's have a look at some of them now, starting with best picture. among the nominations are sir kenneth branagh's semi—autobiographicalfilm belfast, jane campion's western the power of the dog and sci—fi epic dune. kenneth branagh and jane campion get another nomination in the best director category, along with steven spielberg for west side story. best actor in a leading role sees benedict cumberbatch nominated for the power of the dog and will smith for his role as serena and venus williams' father in king richard. and finally, best actress
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in a leading role has a nomination for 0livia colman in rhe lost daughter, kirsten stewart for her portrayal of princess diana in spencer and penelope cruz in pedro almodovar�*s parallel mothers. the ceremony takes place on march the 27th in hollywood. where else? the biggest winners were the power of the dog with 12 nominations, followed by dune with ten nominations. let's take a look at the sci—fi epic. i don't believe you're the lisan al—gaib, but i want you to die with honour. this crysknife was given to me by my great aunt. it's made from a tooth
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of shai—hulud, the great sandworm. this will be a great honour for you to die holding it. where's the outworlder? jamis is a good fighter. he won't let you suffer. joining me now is chief film critic at the metro, larushka ivan—zadeh. thank you very much for being with us. those are two front runners, the power of the dog dune and. trier?r power of the dog dune and. very different but _ power of the dog dune and. very different but the _ power of the dog dune and. very different but the one _ power of the dog dune and. - different but the one certainty i have seen here is the power of the dog if the field to beat because i think dune is nipping at his heels so it will likely when things like best sound editing and visual effects and all those kind of
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things. effects and all those kind of thins. ,, ~ ., things. do you think the power of the dog appears _ things. do you think the power of the dog appears to _ things. do you think the power of the dog appears to our _ things. do you think the power of the dog appears to our house i the dog appears to our house instinct? , ~ ., ., ., ., ., instinct? they like a drama although dune is u- instinct? they like a drama although dune is up there. _ instinct? they like a drama although dune is up there. do _ instinct? they like a drama although dune is up there. do you _ instinct? they like a drama although dune is up there. do you like - dune is up there. do you like it? it's ve dune is up there. do you like it? it's very slow- — dune is up there. do you like it? it's very slow. it's _ dune is up there. do you like it? it's very slow. it's very _ dune is up there. do you like it? it's very slow. it's very dramatic| it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a _ it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a crowd _ it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a crowd pleaser- it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a crowd pleaser but i it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a crowd pleaser but it i it's very slow. it's very dramatic but not a crowd pleaser but it isj but not a crowd pleaser but it is when it pulls the rug out from under you. when it pulls the rug out from under ou. , . when it pulls the rug out from under ou, . ., ., , ., when it pulls the rug out from under you. jane campion if the director and she was _ you. jane campion if the director and she was numb _ you. jane campion if the director and she was numb that - you. jane campion if the director and she was numb that it - you. jane campion if the director and she was numb that it for i you. jane campion if the director and she was numb that it for the j and she was numb that it for the piano and lost out to steven spielberg i believe frictionless list. in spielberg i believe frictionless list. , ., , ., list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 _ list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 for _ list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 for that _ list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 for that film - list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 for that film but i list. in my mind that she won the oscar in 94 for that film but she l 0scar in 94 for that film but she won best screenplay but she has made history now as second woman ever, actually first woman ever to be numbered twice for best director. i suppose you could lose out to steven spielberg again. she suppose you could lose out to steven spielberg again-— suppose you could lose out to steven spielberg again._ let's i spielberg again. she could! let's talk about best _ spielberg again. she could! let's talk about best actor _ spielberg again. she could! let's talk about best actor and - spielberg again. she could! let's talk about best actor and i i spielberg again. she could! let's talk about best actor and i loved | talk about best actor and i loved king richard and it's a great movie
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and will smith there. i king richard and it's a great movie and will smith there.— and will smith there. i think you icked and will smith there. i think you picked well _ and will smith there. i think you picked well and _ and will smith there. i think you picked well and i _ and will smith there. i think you picked well and i think— and will smith there. i think you picked well and i think he - and will smith there. i think you picked well and i think he is i and will smith there. i think you picked well and i think he is the | picked well and i think he is the odds on favourite to win. he has not one but has been omitted twice and he is up for denzil washington and his tense nominations as he is in mcbeth. he won best actor for trading day but if you will put money on anything, for this, i think will smith. it’s money on anything, for this, i think will smith. �* , ., ., will smith. it's quite a tour de force. a great _ will smith. it's quite a tour de force. a great story _ will smith. it's quite a tour de force. a great story as - will smith. it's quite a tour de force. a great story as a i will smith. it's quite a tour de| force. a great story as a father will smith. it's quite a tour de i force. a great story as a father of the williams sisters and all he went to the push them to what they became. i to the push them to what they became. ., �* ~' to the push them to what they became. ., �* ~ ., became. i don't think over here we know as much _ became. i don't think over here we know as much of _ became. i don't think over here we know as much of that _ became. i don't think over here we know as much of that story - became. i don't think over here we know as much of that story come l became. i don't think over here we | know as much of that story come to the fact he wrote a 36 page plan for his daughters and it worked. listen about best actress _ his daughters and it worked. listen about best actress and _ his daughters and it worked. listen about best actress and what - his daughters and it worked. listen about best actress and what are i his daughters and it worked. listen about best actress and what are your thoughts? about best actress and what are your thou~hts? �* about best actress and what are your thou~hts? ,., �* ., ,~' about best actress and what are your thou~hts? �* ., , , thoughts? don't ask because the cate . o thoughts? don't ask because the category this _ thoughts? don't ask because the category this year, _ thoughts? don't ask because the category this year, i _ thoughts? don't ask because the category this year, i have - thoughts? don't ask because the category this year, i have not i thoughts? don't ask because the category this year, i have not a l category this year, i have not a clue. you could see nicole kidman playing lucille ball, the legendary american entertainer but she did not even get a sniff at the baptist and the elimination there so will she
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went were you the favourite or is she not? lady gaga was snubbed this year but we thought as she got a better nomination for this performance in house of gucci but she is not in the running here. it is a really open race and i'm not insured but i love kristen stewart and i loved her performance in spencer. i and i loved her performance in sencer. ., ., ., spencer. i thought that was an a- allin: spencer. i thought that was an appalling film- _ spencer. i thought that was an appalling film. she _ spencer. i thought that was an appalling film. she was - spencer. i thought that was an appalling film. she was very i spencer. i thought that was an i appalling film. she was very good, she had a real likeness about the film itself... she had a real likeness about the film itself. . .— film itself... the film has not totten film itself... the film has not gotten enough _ film itself... the film has not gotten enough love. - film itself. .. the film has not gotten enough love. i - film itself... the film has not gotten enough love. i kind i film itself... the film has not gotten enough love. i kind ofj gotten enough love. i kind of thou~ht gotten enough love. i kind of thought leave _ gotten enough love. i kind of thought leave diana - gotten enough love. i kind of thought leave diana alone i gotten enough love. i kind of. thought leave diana alone with gotten enough love. i kind of- thought leave diana alone with my instinct on that film. [30 thought leave diana alone with my instinct on that film.— instinct on that film. do you think is a food instinct on that film. do you think is a good collection _ instinct on that film. do you think is a good collection of— instinct on that film. do you think is a good collection of movies, i instinct on that film. do you thinkl is a good collection of movies, has been a classic year? the is a good collection of movies, has been a classic year?— been a classic year? a lot of films were a hangover— been a classic year? a lot of films were a hangover from _ been a classic year? a lot of films were a hangover from last - been a classic year? a lot of films were a hangover from last year i been a classic year? a lot of films were a hangover from last year as been a classic year? a lot of films i were a hangover from last year as he were a hangoverfrom last year as he thought they were going to be at last year plus my 0scar so a mishmash of films from last year and a few in this year but i think overall a decent year. i suppose one
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of the things is now that we start watching these big movies on our tv the power of the dog screens. i saw on my tv screen. is that not quite the same or is that how movies are not to be in mentioned in your view equipment i would say... i not to be in mentioned in your view equipment i would say. . .— not to be in mentioned in your view equipment i would say... i would say watch the power _ equipment i would say... i would say watch the power of _ equipment i would say... i would say watch the power of the _ equipment i would say... i would say watch the power of the dog - equipment i would say... i would say watch the power of the dog on i equipment i would say... i would say watch the power of the dog on the i watch the power of the dog on the screen if you can but that said netflix will be thrilled if the power of the dog wins best picture because that has eluded them up until now. other nominations in various categories but they have not quite taken home the big one so they will hope for that.— will hope for that. interesting and we will talk _ will hope for that. interesting and we will talk more _ will hope for that. interesting and we will talk more about _ will hope for that. interesting and we will talk more about the - will hope for that. interesting and we will talk more about the the i we will talk more about the the power of the dog right now because we can speak in a moment to... in a moment, we can speak to iain canning, who was a producer on nominations frontrunner the power of the dog, but first, let's take a look at the film itself. here's a clip with benedict cumberbatch and kodi smit—mcphee, who both earned nominations for their acting. i wonder what little lady made these.
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actually i did, sir. my mother was a florist, so i made them to look like the ones in her garden. oh, well, do pardon me. they're just as real as possible. laughter. mm. ah, now, gentlemen, look, see, that's what you do with the cloth. oh, oh, right! it's reallyjust for wine drips. oh, you got that, boys? only for the drips. laughter. now get us some food. and iainjoins me now from la.
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congratulations. you have got 12 oscar nominations, have to be happy with that. , ., , _ with that. very happy. the nominations _ with that. very happy. the nominations are _ with that. very happy. the nominations are at - with that. very happy. the nominations are at 5:18am with that. very happy. the i nominations are at 5:18am in with that. very happy. the - nominations are at 5:18am in la so i nominations are at 5:18am in la sol was saying to my husband i hope i don't wake up in a minute and realise it did not happen. it was a very special day for us and also as a team to get that many nominations has been a really special thing. it's great to share it with the team. �* , . , ., ., , team. i'm usually getting that many nominations — team. i'm usually getting that many nominations opens _ team. i'm usually getting that many nominations opens the _ team. i'm usually getting that many nominations opens the film - team. i'm usually getting that many nominations opens the film up - team. i'm usually getting that many nominations opens the film up to i nominations opens the film up to potentially a wider audience. tell people who don't know much about the film in a nutshell what is about and what is the power of the power of the dog? what is the power of the power of the do ? ., what is the power of the power of the do ? . , the dog? that might be giving it awa , but the dog? that might be giving it away. but i _ the dog? that might be giving it away, but i think— the dog? that might be giving it away, but i think the _ the dog? that might be giving it away, but i think the film - the dog? that might be giving it away, but i think the film is - the dog? that might be giving it away, but i think the film is a - the dog? that might be giving it| away, but i think the film is a sort of very moody western but what it has that is its heart and makes jane a masterful maker if the whole film itself is a mystery. so wrapped up in all of this is what's going to
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happen next and then the film unfolds, you start to try and work that out and see if you are right by the end of the film and that's a realjoy the end of the film and that's a real joy for the end of the film and that's a realjoy for audience is watching, i hope anyway. you realjoy for audience is watching, i hone anyway-— realjoy for audience is watching, i hope anyway. you say is a western but it * hope anyway. you say is a western but it " is hope anyway. you say is a western but it * is a — hope anyway. you say is a western but it . is a brit — hope anyway. you say is a western but it " is a brit and _ hope anyway. you say is a western but it " is a brit and is filmed - hope anyway. you say is a western but it " is a brit and is filmed in - but it * is a brit and is filmed in new zealand. but it " is a brit and is filmed in new zealand.— but it " is a brit and is filmed in new zealand. �* ., ., �* , new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and — new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and the _ new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and the uk, _ new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and the uk, it _ new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and the uk, it does - new zealand. and there are two brits behind it and the uk, it does so - behind it and the uk, it does so well in terms of actors in this business and i think actors can go into the roles and vanished into them and i think that's what benedict has done in the film. find them and i think that's what benedict has done in the film. and i was 'ust benedict has done in the film. and i was just saying to — benedict has done in the film. and i wasjust saying to our— benedict has done in the film. and i wasjust saying to our film - benedict has done in the film. and i was just saying to our film critic that i saw this on my tv at home. are un a way disappointed when people say they watch it on their tv because this is a beautiful movie, fantastic landscapes, it's cinematography at its very best. is it wasted in the sense to watch you
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on a tv rather than in the cinema? i on a tv rather than in the cinema? i think the great thing about the power of the dog is you could actually see it in a cinema and netflix today theatrical release for the film and the film is still in cinemas, so i think there is the option to do that but i think also a lot of people like to watch films at home and that's a great history. i remember being a student in film and watching films that were on channel 4 watching films that were on channel [i or bbc and falling in love with them, so i think as long as there is the option of the two ways of experiencing things, that's fantastic and i was linked with netflix is a wider audience as we would ever dream of. has netflix is a wider audience as we would ever dream of.— netflix is a wider audience as we would ever dream of. has that been hastened by — would ever dream of. has that been hastened by the _ would ever dream of. has that been hastened by the pandemic, - would ever dream of. has that been hastened by the pandemic, do - would ever dream of. has that been hastened by the pandemic, do you i hastened by the pandemic, do you think will make people go into the cinema lesson watching at home more and the rise of the streaming giants like netflix? i and the rise of the streaming giants like netflix? ~ and the rise of the streaming giants like netflix?— like netflix? i think people have been cautious _ like netflix? i think people have been cautious but _ like netflix? i think people have been cautious but i _ like netflix? i think people have been cautious but i hope - like netflix? i think people have been cautious but i hope that'sl been cautious but i hope that's really changing and it feels on the box office in the uk is getting stronger by the week. we make films
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for cinemas and people to experience at home in their lifetime, so for us wejust hope people at home in their lifetime, so for us we just hope people feel confident soon about getting back into the cinema and enjoying in all different ways. cinema and en'oying in all different wa s. , cinema and en'oying in all different wa s. ., ., .,, cinema and en'oying in all different wa s. ., ., ., ., ways. many congratulations and for those nominations _ ways. many congratulations and for those nominations and _ ways. many congratulations and for those nominations and very - ways. many congratulations and for those nominations and very good . ways. many congratulations and for. those nominations and very good luck for the awards itself.— the brit awards are at the 02 arena tonight. specific categories for male and female artists have been scrapped. the organisers say this year's awards will be gender—neutral. adele, ed sheeran, dave and little simz are among the nominees. mark savage, our music correspondent, is live on the red carpet at the brit awards. what sort of evening is it going to be? adele is there. it’s what sort of evening is it going to be? adele is there.— what sort of evening is it going to be? adele is there. it's good to be really spectacular _ be? adele is there. it's good to be really spectacular tonight. - be? adele is there. it's good to be really spectacular tonight. last - really spectacular tonight. last year the brit awards were held under the government pilot scheme and the
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return of lebovitz and it was all distanced and tonight it is a proper gig here at the otsu arena. now covid—i9 has played a part as a team international asked do to be here, a us rapper and the italian eurovision winners, had to pull out but we have an incredible line—up of artists with adele performing like you say and add sharon and little simz and sam, plain and i and up her best album. ., ., ., , album. doing well and lead guitarist and the bandit _ album. doing well and lead guitarist and the bandit so _ album. doing well and lead guitarist and the bandit so it's _ album. doing well and lead guitarist and the bandit so it's more - album. doing well and lead guitarist and the bandit so it's more but - and the bandit so it's more but over me and _ and the bandit so it's more but over me and the — and the bandit so it's more but over me and the boys as we had been together— me and the boys as we had been together since we were 12 people asked _ together since we were 12 people asked me, i'm from north shields and i suspect— asked me, i'm from north shields and i suspect people from north shields are persevering and watching. 29. both the album and the single in the charts now for more than half a year. they have really taken off. did you know what you had when he
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recorded that song equipment i did not even think it was a single. did not even think it was a single. did not literally think it was a single and then everybody in our team was you are an— and then everybody in our team was you are an idiot and i was like ok. thenwe— you are an idiot and i was like ok. then we release it and for the album. — then we release it and for the album. it_ then we release it and for the album, it was amazing and incredible and that— album, it was amazing and incredible and that was ridiculous but to actually have a single hit number three _ actually have a single hit number three is_ actually have a single hit number three isjust beyond anything we can ever think_ three isjust beyond anything we can ever think of. you know, it's like last time — ever think of. you know, it's like last time there was a guitar band in the top _ last time there was a guitar band in the top ten — last time there was a guitar band in the top ten it was like 2013 and it was the _ the top ten it was like 2013 and it was the arctic monkeys or something. that's_ was the arctic monkeys or something. that's ridiculous.— that's ridiculous. they will put out a new album _ that's ridiculous. they will put out a new album and _ that's ridiculous. they will put out a new album and coming - that's ridiculous. they will put out a new album and coming from - that's ridiculous. they will put out | a new album and coming from that part of the country wanted their debut album means you? it was incredible- _ debut album means you? it was incredible. my _ debut album means you? it was incredible. my mum _ debut album means you? it was incredible. my mum got - debut album means you? it was incredible. my mum got that - debut album means you? it was . incredible. my mum got that record and it— incredible. my mum got that record and it was— incredible. my mum got that record and it was a — incredible. my mum got that record and it was a change of pace from celine _ and it was a change of pace from celine dion — and it was a change of pace from celine dion and she liked one of their— celine dion and she liked one of their songs and like to get that first arctic monkeys album and every time we _ first arctic monkeys album and every time we were in the car that was a restrictor— time we were in the car that was a restrictor that was of the childhood that i_ restrictor that was of the childhood that i remember. all
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restrictor that was of the childhood that i remember.— that i remember. all and repeat auoin that i remember. all and repeat going down _ that i remember. all and repeat going down the _ that i remember. all and repeat going down the road. _ that i remember. all and repeat going down the road. we - that i remember. all and repeat going down the road. we grew. that i remember. all and repeat. going down the road. we grew up listenin: going down the road. we grew up listening to _ going down the road. we grew up listening to arctic _ going down the road. we grew up listening to arctic monkeys - going down the road. we grew up listening to arctic monkeys and l going down the road. we grew up l listening to arctic monkeys and use to come _ listening to arctic monkeys and use to come out— listening to arctic monkeys and use to come out of the stuff and try andm — to come out of the stuff and try andm i— to come out of the stuff and try and... i have a pair of wiggle pickles — and... i have a pair of wiggle pickles because al turtle had wiggle pickles _ pickles because al turtle had wiggle pickles. in pickles because al turtle had wiggle ickles. .,, ., , pickles because al turtle had wiggle ickles. ., , , , pickles. in those two big prizes, artist and album _ pickles. in those two big prizes, artist and album of— pickles. in those two big prizes, artist and album of the - pickles. in those two big prizes, - artist and album of the year, you're up artist and album of the year, you're up against the same artists, adele, ed scheer little simz, how do you rate your chances? i ed scheer little simz, how do you rate your chances?— ed scheer little simz, how do you rate your chances? i don't know it. we 'ust rate your chances? i don't know it. we just don't _ rate your chances? i don't know it. we just don't know. _ rate your chances? i don't know it. we just don't know. i _ rate your chances? i don't know it. we just don't know. i think - rate your chances? i don't know it. we just don't know. i think for - rate your chances? i don't know it. | we just don't know. i think for me, i think— we just don't know. i think for me, i think little — we just don't know. i think for me, i think little simz should get that one so— i think little simz should get that one so i'm — i think little simz should get that one so i'm not really... i am whatever, _ one so i'm not really... i am whatever, you know? ifi one so i'm not really... i am whatever, you know? if i get it i will not — whatever, you know? if i get it i will not complain. it will be flowing _ will not complain. it will be flowing with or lose, we are on the booze _ flowing with or lose, we are on the booze. . ~ flowing with or lose, we are on the booze. ., ~' , ., flowing with or lose, we are on the booze. ., ~ i. . booze. thank you so much we will find out who _ booze. thank you so much we will find out who has _ booze. thank you so much we will find out who has won _ booze. thank you so much we will find out who has won all - booze. thank you so much we will find out who has won all of - booze. thank you so much we will find out who has won all of those | find out who has won all of those prizes when the brit awards start at 8pm tonight at the 02 arena in london. 8pm tonight at the o2 arena in london. ., �* ,
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london. en'oy and i'm sure you will and london. enjoy and i'm sure you will and sophie — london. enjoy and i'm sure you will and sophie is _ london. enjoy and i'm sure you will and sophie is up — london. enjoy and i'm sure you will and sophie is up next _ london. enjoy and i'm sure you will and sophie is up next with - london. enjoy and i'm sure you will| and sophie is up next with bbc news at six but here is the weather with matt. good evening good evening to you. temperatures in england and well into the low teens in a bit cooler into the low teens in a bit cooler in us, but still above average in a bit of a shop with us and we thursday as always feeling cooler but saying that, eight or nine is a memo should be at this stage if not a bit above. fine line between the cold today in the north as you see this large shift through tonight and tomorrow and here it is across ireland and into northern england and north wales in the midlands. further outbreaks of red on that and a few spots of rain it to the south but temperatures not dropping a great deal. to the door the risk of ice around him and for the sleet and snow showers across northern and western scotland and still some strong winds. another blowing date tomorrow with frequent showers but brighter day for northern ireland, northern england, north wales and eventually the north midlands in the
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front is shifting to the south. still lots of cloud and patchy rain and drizzle as we go into the afternoon and a breezy day with wind gusts strongest across northern scotland will be could see the top 60 or 70 mph for one or two later on that will make it feel colder than four would suggest. fresher day for northern england was such a compensate. tomorrow night, that cloud and patchy rain just about cleaning on across the english coastal counties in the south but further north, a colder night to come with greater chances of frost and ice are wrapped as we go into thursday morning. the real cold air is going to be tempered somewhat by the strength of the wind soaked tomorrow into thursday we could see a bit of while conditions across northern scotland with strict sleet and snow for a time and blustery elsewhere on thursday but a brighter day for most with sunny spells, a few showers in the west and many will be dry. but it will feel much colder securely with the effect of the wind, it could be feeling like 5
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degrees in liberty and to patricia in the south closer to five or six. widespread frost around to start friday and the coldest morning of the week with temperatures down to -6 the week with temperatures down to —6 or —7 in some parts of scotland but a lovely bright spot in if you missed byjust living away and it sunny spells for most in clouding overin sunny spells for most in clouding over in the west later on in the day and we will see temperatures start to climb as we go into the weekend. that's the forecast more details later.
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at six, record nhs waiting lists in england will continue to rise for at least another two years. violet is one of more than 6 million people who've been waiting for routine treatment — many of them in severe pain. i can't describe the pain, i can't describe the discomfort. i mean, i cry every day because i can't do what i want to do. now the health secretary, sajid javid, has unveiled ambitious plans to tackle the unprecedented backlog during the pandemic and we will have all the details. also tonight... bumper profits for the oil giant bp prompt renewed calls for a windfall tax to help households with soaring energy bills. the northern ireland police watchdog says the security forces colluded —— find evidence of collusive

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