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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  February 8, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. there are some signs of slow progress in the french president's efforts to diffuse the ukraine crisis. translation: , , ., translation: during my talks with president boudin, _ translation: during my talks with president boudin, he _ translation: during my talks with president boudin, he told _ translation: during my talks with president boudin, he told me - translation: during my talks with president boudin, he told me he - translation: during my talks with | president boudin, he told me he will not start an escalation and i think that's important.— not start an escalation and i think that's important. after meeting the ukrainian president _ that's important. after meeting the ukrainian president in _ that's important. after meeting the ukrainian president in kyiv, - that's important. after meeting the ukrainian president in kyiv, the - ukrainian president in kyiv, the french president says he sees a pathway forward on trying to ease the stages between russia and the west. meanwhile russia is pressing ahead with military build—up and it sends six assault ships for them mediterranean to the black sea. in canada, took her to continue their protest over co i9 canada, took her to continue their protest over co 19 rules and temporarily they have blocked the
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busiest border crossing into the us. and the uk health of a terry and bell's plans to tackle record nhs waiting lists in england. western shuttle diplomacy to avoid a war between ukraine and russia continue. on monday, the french president emmanuel macron met vladimir putin in moscow. and he gave this assessment of that meeting today from kyiv. translation: during my talks with president putin, _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he told _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he told me - translation: during my talks with president putin, he told me he - translation: during my talks with | president putin, he told me he would not start at escalation. i think that's important. this morning, we've had a confirmation of that promise — and another important element is that there won't be any fixed base or sensitive equipment in belarus. emannuel macron is one of several western leaders who are lending diplomatic support, to avoid further war in eastern ukraine. here he is meeting ukraine's president zelensky in the capital earlier. he's due to meet the german
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chancellor in berlin tonight. and here he is meeting mr putin in moscow on monday. their face—to—face meeting lasted almost six hours. and this was afterwards translation: we are aware today, both of us, translation: we are aware today, both of us. of— translation: we are aware today, both of us, of the _ translation: we are aware today, both of us, of the gravity _ translation: we are aware today, both of us, of the gravity of- translation: we are aware today, both of us, of the gravity of this - both of us, of the gravity of this situation, and of the urgent and imperative necessity in the interest of everyone to find a path of peace and stability in europe. so that's the french perspective. on the russian side, vladimir putin has also hinted progress has been made made. afterwards, he said some of mr macron�*s proposals, "could form the basis of further joint steps" — although it wasn't clear what steps those were. however, we had a different message from the kremlin translation: in the current situation, moscow and parisl could not make any deal. it isjust not possible. france is a member of the european union and has a presidency. france also is a member of nato, not a leader, and leadership belongs to another country in this bloc. so what kind of deals can we speak of?
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the context to this is russia's build—up of forces on its border with ukraine. there are around 125,000 troops. and the us officials says that is around 70% of what's needed for a full—scale invasion. while the nato defence alliance says 30,000 troops have been sent to belarus. russia denies it's planning to invade ukraine. for more on the perspective inside russia, here's caroline davies in moscow. at the kremlin, they are keeping their powder dry about this particular meeting. yes, there were plenty of warm words about president macron, saying today from the kremlin spokesperson that president putin greatly appreciated the fact that president macron had made the effort to come to moscow to have those discussions, that he put a high value on that. however, it doesn't seem that there's been a determined resolution on this. the kremlin spokesperson also said there
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had been some rational seeds in what president macron had presented to them — but crucially, quite a few of their demands, they say, have not been addressed by the west. and he also talked about the fact that the situation is increasing in tension, calling for a de—escalation. no of course, from russia up point of view, the increasing escalation is a result of what the west is doing, rather than the actions of what russia is doing. meanwhile, russia is continuing its build—up around ukraine. six russian assault ships are moving from the mediterranean to the black sea. russia says they're part of planned naval exercises. the economist reports this could be preparation for an "amphibious assault on the ukrainian coast." those are movements on russia's side. and these are nato manouvres. earlier, 1,700 us paratroopers arrived in poland, as the defence alliance beefs up its security in eastern europe. as this crisis plays out across the region, the message from ukraine is this.
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once more, —— it is not only a significant number of troops on the border of ukraine on the russian side, but it is always a significant number of troops, missiles and other weaponry in belarus, in the southern part of belarus. so this is a very worrying situation because this is a completely new development, and this is changing the security situation not only for ukraine, but also for both the countries, poland and the east. , . , . ., ., east. there is a very clear... that we are making — east. there is a very clear... that we are making to _ east. there is a very clear. .. that we are making to our— east. there is a very clear... that | we are making to our international
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partners — we are making to our international partners. there is no room to seat over_ partners. there is no room to seat over one _ partners. there is no room to seat over one table as the aggress off dutch_ over one table as the aggress off dutch aggressor. it's not the aggressor to require these security guarantees. so the first point of any talks— guarantees. so the first point of any talks with russia, based on any pronosals, — any talks with russia, based on any proposals, is a withdrawal from the territory _ proposals, is a withdrawal from the territory of — proposals, is a withdrawal from the territory of ukraine and from the crimea, — territory of ukraine and from the crimea, de—escalation, and withdrawal of troops from the border of ukraine _ withdrawal of troops from the border of ukraine and russia. and then, any other— of ukraine and russia. and then, any other items _ of ukraine and russia. and then, any other items of discussion are possible _ it back to a rebellion in the east of ukraine. one of the flashpoints of ukraine. one of the flashpoints of that place was a place called marika.
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translation: a lot| has changed morally. the hype in the press does not have such an effect on the military, because we directly see the enemy, but calls from home are very disturbing. i have to calm down my relatives. the message to putin is that we know what he is going to do and that we are ready for it. but any military operation must be a surprise only then does it have any chance to succeed. if everyone knows about it and everyone is ready for it, i think it is unlikely to happen. and on the prospect of whether war is likely to happen, it's the economist reports that the build—up has entered a more worrying stage. "satellite images show new tents sprouting up at bases in western russia and belarus, and snow melting on the roof
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it's possible this is an incredibly develop blood put this is a lot for the biggest military build—up we have stayed in europe for probably 40 have stayed in europe for probably a0 years or so. some of the biggest of concentration of firepower and we are seeing individual elements that are seeing individual elements that are completely out of the ordinary. things like the alleged movement of supplies to the front lines according to american officials that also things like some of the enabling forces that you mentioned just now. things like pipeline
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forces but also engineering units, logistics units, radio relay systems, radarsets, logistics units, radio relay systems, radar sets, all these things and russia says it is preparing for a big exercise in belarus but the scale of this and these movements and the nature of these movements and the nature of the units being moved and places they are from, these are all completely anomalous with an explanation, so it may be a bluff but the scale of the bluff, the nature of these movements and the way in which units are moving closer to the ukrainian border even in the preceding days, all of it to me since a number of red flags up. and if those red — since a number of red flags up. and if those red flags turned out to be causes of real concern that the russians then translate into action, what does that action look like was met what would an invasion look like was met with the golsby? the met what would an invasion look like was met with the golsby?_ was met with the golsby? the short answer is we _ was met with the golsby? the short answer is we don't _ was met with the golsby? the short answer is we don't know _ was met with the golsby? the short answer is we don't know and - was met with the golsby? the short answer is we don't know and can - answer is we don't know and can be anything on the scale of greater russian intervention in the eastern
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ukrainian region you mentioned earlier on or more of what the russians have been doing since 201a. all the way up to a major land offensive from russia and belarus aimed at toppling the regime in kyiv and perhaps surrounding or even taking the capital city and other cities in ukraine. that may sound completely outlandish to us and it may sound like a crazy thing to do and it may be costly or difficult or the biggest war in europe we have seen at least since the balkan wars probably since world war ii if that were really the case. but it does not mean it won't happen and the nature of the forces being put in place within a couple of weeks, if not sooner than that, will be sufficient to allow the russian armed forces to if they feel they want to do so said forces all the way to kyiv and receives a city. so it may seem crazy to us but it may not seem crazy to the kremlin. if not seem crazy to the kremlin. if russia decided to do that, help us and is in the match between the
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russian military build—up and what the ukrainians and ukraine's native supporters have at their disposal in eastern europe? the supporters have at their disposal in eastern europe?— eastern europe? the fact of the matter is the — eastern europe? the fact of the matter is the ukraine _ eastern europe? the fact of the matter is the ukraine armed . eastern europe? the fact of the - matter is the ukraine armed forces are tenacious, docketed well—trained but they are not on par with the russians and most importantly in the sense that they don't have solidarity —— excellent air defences, a big air force of russia chose to precede any war with a campaign and missile strikes, air strikes, it could shatter the ukrainian military patter in a matter of weeks before it then sent ground forces into ukraine. that ground forces into ukraine. that ground forces into ukraine. that ground force could go a long way very fast and russia has airborne forces that could travel great distances and airdrop into position. and in a sort of phase one of a conflict i the russians would inflict what i imagine will be fairly swift defeat on the ukrainians if that's a sort of conflict they chose. that of course does not tell us what happens is cells with faces of conflict and it does not tell us about the prospect
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of resistance, about the russians to be dreaded to occupation, about the need to perhaps take and hold cities and i think that would all be exceptionally difficult for the russians to do. they are mobilising the reserves and immobilizing their national guard units that we are seeing move across russia and they will play a role in any occupation if one were to come but it would be an especially difficult operation and of course russia like the us in 2002 ahead of a rock is by no means immune to war optimism, overconfidence and arrogance about these things. to overconfidence and arrogance about these things-— these things. to be clear, if western _ these things. to be clear, if western powers _ these things. to be clear, if western powers decided - these things. to be clear, if - western powers decided ukraine in a conflict like that we would look like an even match reasonably with the buy of the americans and the british in the french and germans and others would be the equal of anything russia can offer. the us won't send _ anything russia can offer. the us won't send troops _ anything russia can offer. the us won't send troops ukraine - anything russia can offer. the us won't send troops ukraine so - anything russia can offer. the us - won't send troops ukraine so ukraine is not going to get any help and it is not going to get any help and it is even asked for more powerful air defences and is not going to get those either because no one in the west wants to send big air defences
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systems to shoot and russian planes. if nato countries begin to support any ukrainian resistance with arms, that's possible and the us officials have said both the cia and department of defence would support ukrainian resistance forces with arms and of course to save the support of the afghans with arms against the soviet invasion in the 19805. but against the soviet invasion in the 1980s. but of course that's fraud with difficulties in the arms to go from somewhere and they have to come through one of the ukrainian neighbouring countries and to get into the country from pipelines in the ukrainians had to have an underground resistance capable of using them and probably have to be training so the question of how you support the ukrainian resistance and which country supports that, whether just the us or countries like poland and the baltic states in the uk and others, may be other countries very nervous, these would be live and important questions in the event of a russian offensive if it were to occur on that scale.—
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a russian offensive if it were to occur on that scale. always preach ou occur on that scale. always preach you coming _ occur on that scale. always preach you coming on _ occur on that scale. always preach you coming on and _ occur on that scale. always preach you coming on and thank- occur on that scale. always preach you coming on and thank you - occur on that scale. always preach you coming on and thank you very| you coming on and thank you very much for your time. the truckers protest in the canadian capital ottawa is becoming a major headache for prime ministerjustin trudeau. the blockade is now affecting the busiest crossing with the united states. and that's bad news for the canadian government because canada sends 75% of its goods exports to the united statesjust to remind you, the protest started after a new rule required truckers to be vaccinated against covid. that was in order to cross the us—canadian border. but some drivers took exception. prime ministerjustin trudeau has spent ten days in isolation
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here are the views of some of the protesters. basically government overreach. what they put in our bodies, we cannot have that. the masks don't _ bodies, we cannot have that. the masks don't make sense. they don't work, _ masks don't make sense. they don't work. we _ masks don't make sense. they don't work, we need freedom and go back to what we were. prime ministerjustin trudeau has spent ten days in isolation after catching covid. he's back in parliament today. but it won't be an easy homecoming. angry lawmakers are demanding the government does more to end the standoff. the behaviour of some of the ottawa protesters has been criticised. ottawa police say they're concerned about extremist rhetoric from far—right groups. that includes nazi symbols being displayed. the police, by their own admission, are also very streched at the moment and have limited resources. no officers are on days off. everyone has been working. we are stretched to the limit, but we are 100% committed to using everything we have to end this demonstration.
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we cannot do it alone — that is why i have been advocating for all three levels of government to bring whatever they can bring to bear on the permanent, sustainable, lawful, safe resolution of this demonstration. the media is also turning up the heat on mr trudeau's government. brian lilley, a columnist for the toronto sun, posted on twitter... with regards to the protest expanding, a protest leader said... let's speak to the bbc�*s samira hussain, who is in ottawa. first of all, give me an idea of the level of disruption still going on in the city. level of disruption still going on in the city-— level of disruption still going on in the ci . �* , ., in the city. look, we've seen that their trucks _ in the city. look, we've seen that their trucks still _ in the city. look, we've seen that their trucks still continue - in the city. look, we've seen that their trucks still continue to - their trucks still continue to remain here, and it's really
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interesting, you know, yesterday in this area, the scene was really very tense. and i think it was because the state of emergency had just been declared in ottawa. now though, you can really sense that there's kind of like a carnival theme going on. there is a stage that set up behind me, there is music, people were dancing at some points during the day — that tense scene that we saw yesterday really hasn't been happening today at all. find yesterday really hasn't been happening today at all. and to what extent are the _ happening today at all. and to what extent are the views _ happening today at all. and to what extent are the views from _ happening today at all. and to what extent are the views from those - extent are the views from those involved in the protests representative of how canadians more broadly feel about vaccine mandates? well look, if you look at the vaccination rates in canada, it's almost at 80% of the country vaccinated. so this is indeed a smaller minority. and if you ask residents around here — and in fact,
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according to recently released opinion polls, most canadians are against what is actually happening right now. i mean, this is still canada, and it's a very surprising scene to have these truckers occupy such large swathes right in front of parliament hill — this is where government decisions are made. but right now, everything around here is at a standstill. one avenue that's been very good in terms of outreach between the protesters and the residents is that there's been an injunction by the courts in order to stop the honking, the incessant levels of noise — that has really made some inroads in terms of truckers being a little more respectful of the residents, and the residents being less angry towards the truckers. residents being less angry towards the truckers-— residents being less angry towards the truckers. ~ ., ,, ., the truckers. when you talked to the truckers, they've already _ the truckers. when you talked to the truckers, they've already been - the truckers. when you talked to the truckers, they've already been there| truckers, they've already been there for a few days, but presumably
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they've got livings to make, they've got to get home to see their family? presumably they are not intending to stay there indefinitely? jt’s presumably they are not intending to stay there indefinitely?— stay there indefinitely? it's really interestin: stay there indefinitely? it's really interesting that _ stay there indefinitely? it's really interesting that you _ stay there indefinitely? it's really interesting that you ask - stay there indefinitely? it's really interesting that you ask that - interesting that you ask that because i actually spent a couple minutes inside the cab with one trucker who said, "look, we are used to this, we are long—haul truckers, we spend weeks on the road without seeing ourfamilies. so the idea that we are going to stay camped out here for the long haul isn't that unrealistic." here for the long haul isn't that unrealistic. "— here for the long haul isn't that unrealistic.“ . , . ., unrealistic." thanks very much for the update _ the bbc�*s andrew harding has this report. we are on deported from
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their home 50 years ago by british. they call that a crime against humanity and are very much looking forward to returning to visit the tagus islands. also a board are a group of scientists, the principal reason for this trip is scientific, they are going to be surveying the reef, the maritime border of the islands. but fundamentally, this is really about politics, it's about mauritius demonstrating that they believe the islands belong to it, he has every right to go there whenever it wants. and it points of course to multiple recent decisions and votes by the un and un courts saying that these islands do indeed belong to mauritius, that britain has no rightful claim to them, and that by giving them back to mauritius, britain will be complying with its
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decolonisation process and duties. so a lot is at stake here, the mauritian government really seeking to some extent to embarrass britain and galvanise the world into continuing to support its claim to the islands. the former pope benedict has asked for forgiveness for any "grievous fault" over his handling of child abuses cases when he was the archbishop of munich. in a letter released by the vatican, benedict denied personal wrongdoing, but acknowledged mistakes. this is his secretary reading benedict's letter. translation: this era, which regrettably _ translation: this era, which regrettably was _ translation: this era, which regrettably was verified, - translation: this era, which regrettably was verified, was l translation: this era, which | regrettably was verified, was not intentionally willed and i hope i'll be excused —— this error. to me, it proved deeply hurtful that this oversight was cast out on my truthfulness and even to label me a liar. this is the former pope benedict xvi. last month, a german report said he'd failed to take action against four priests suspected
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of abusing children sexually when benedict was archbishop of munich and known asjoseph ratzinger. harry, how unusual is a letter of this type? this the first time we've had such a personal response from pope benedict. it's worth putting that into context, that report last month alleging that he had failed to cover up for cases of child abuse, and that he had knowingly allowed a paedophile priest to continue to do a job that meant he came into contact with children, and that priest went on to reoffend. he had attended a meeting where this priest was discussed, and what we sawjust there was pope benedict's spokesperson having to clarify that he initially denied being at that meeting, which he blamed on an editing oversight. but he stood by
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the substance of his demand that he didn't know anything about this priest's history of abuse and he wasn't involved in any cover up. mas wasn't involved in any cover up. was the former — wasn't involved in any cover up. was the former pope _ wasn't involved in any cover up. was the former pope benedict willing to talk to this investigation in germany and cooperate? he talk to this investigation in germany and cooperate? he threw his la ers and germany and cooperate? he threw his lawyers and representatives, - germany and cooperate? he threw his lawyers and representatives, he - germany and cooperate? he threw his lawyers and representatives, he made representations, but the report did criticise his lack of willingness to engage, his lack of openness. and what we had today was essentially a plea for forgiveness from pope benedict. he said that he's had great responsibilities in the church, all greater is his pain for the abuse and errors that occurred in those different places during the time of his mandate. but crucially, no admission of personal responsibility. he asks for forgiveness but still denies that he personally did anything wrong. find personally did anything wrong. and how does this letter in the investigation in germany fit into the broader efforts of pope francis to address historical child abuse? pope francis has very much tried to
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change the tone and how the church response to allegations of child sexual abuse. response to allegations of child sexualabuse. he's response to allegations of child sexual abuse. he's tried to adopt a much more apologetic tone, he's seeking forgiveness, he's involved survivors of abuse in the process and how the church deals with these allegations. as for pope benedict himself, he's 9a and said to be very frail and in poor health, and an indication from him in this statement today of where he sees this going, he says he shall soon find himself before the judge of his life. it is pope francis'sjob to take this on. ah, life. it is pope francis's “0b to take this omfi life. it is pope francis's “0b to take this on. . ., ., ., take this on. a final word about the infestation in _ take this on. a final word about the infestation in germany, _ take this on. a final word about the infestation in germany, is - take this on. a final word about the infestation in germany, is that the | infestation in germany, is that the end of the investigation or does the work go on? this end of the investigation or does the work go on?— work go on? this report looks very much at how— work go on? this report looks very much at how the _ work go on? this report looks very much at how the catholic - work go on? this report looks very much at how the catholic church i work go on? this report looks very much at how the catholic church in germany handled allegations of abuse over the course since i9a5. so that
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work goes on in terms of how it responded, lessons learned, and that will continue in other parts of the world, as you know this is not an issue that's limited just to germany, but a global issue that the catholic church must deal with not only in terms of how it deals with historic allegations of abuse, but very much a current issue and how it deals. ., , very much a current issue and how it deals. . , ., ., , deals. harry, thanks for taking us throu~h deals. harry, thanks for taking us through that- _ deals. harry, thanks for taking us through that. in _ deals. harry, thanks for taking us through that. in a _ deals. harry, thanks for taking us through that. in a few— deals. harry, thanks for taking us through that. in a few minutes, l through that. in a few minutes, we'll turn back to that false claim by borisjohnson and parliament concerning the leader of the opposition, keir starmer and concerning the leader of the opposition, keir starmerandjimmy opposition, keir starmer and jimmy savile. the opposition, keir starmerandjimmy savile. the issue is back in the news because yesterday, you may have seen the leader of the opposition being harassed by protesters, some critics of borisjohnson are drawing a connection between what happened there and his comments in parliament. that is something number ten is very much refuting, as are a number of government ministers. so we'll bring you up—to—date on everything that's being said in connection with that story. plus
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we'll talk about a mini reshuffle in boris johnson's we'll talk about a mini reshuffle in borisjohnson's government, as well. hello. we had some sparkling sunshine to the north and the south of the uk on tuesday, but the day felt quite different depending on where you were. blue skies in the highlands, but arctic air keeping it feeling on the wintry side. brightness across norfolk, some patchy cloud here, but feeling very mild and spring—like — temperatures in the low teens, thanks to atlantic air. dividing the two air masses, a weather front — and that will progressively move its way southwards across the uk now in the next a8 hours. overnight, it will bring some more rain into northern england, eventually pushing some into north wales and the north midlands, i think, by dawn. to the south of the front, a mild night to come with clear spells, lows ofjust 8—9 celsius. to the north of the front, a colder
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night, a frost for scotland, perhaps a patchy frost for parts of northern ireland and northern england, as well. and then, through wednesday, the front pushes further south still, and the arctic air continues to advance its way south. so i think across parts of northern england, the midlands, and wales, temperatures will actually come down through the day as the sun comes out. we'll see the front—draping cloud across southern counties of england and east anglia on into the afternoon, perhaps with some drizzle. a pretty windy day across the board. gusty winds driving showers in from the west across scotland that will be wintry and notjust across the highest ground. certainly cold for scotland — highs ofjust a—5 celsius, ii—i2 further south. now this front looks like it might develop something of a wave wednesday into thursday. when we see one of those, it can slow the front down from clearing the south of the uk. so perhaps a bit more cloud and some rain here through the day. this is of more concern to us, though, this little area of low pressure that will clip scotland overnight wednesday into thursday — a double—pronged attack. some heavier, more persistent snow showers, also some strong gale force winds, perhaps gusting 50—60 mph.
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could do some damage, will also make it feel particularly raw across northernmost reaches of the uk on thursday. thursday into friday, an area of high pressure actually bumps up from the south, though, and will kill the winds off overnight — perfect set—up for a widespread and hard frost to get us into friday. risk of some ice across scotland after some showers overnight. friday daytime promises to bring a lot of sunshine uk—wide, perhaps a bit more cloud into the west later on in the day. perhaps not quite as cold as the wind will be lighter, but still definitely chilly.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. there are some signs of slow progress in the fridge president's efforts to defuse the ukraine crisis. translation: , , ., translation: during my talks with president putin, _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he tell _ translation: during my talks with president putin, he tell him - translation: during my talks with president putin, he tell him he - president putin, he tell him he would not start an escalation. i think that is important. in would not start an escalation. i think that is important.- think that is important. in kyiv toda , think that is important. in kyiv today. the _ think that is important. in kyiv today, the french _ think that is important. in kyiv today, the french president i think that is important. in kyiv l today, the french president met think that is important. in kyiv - today, the french president met his ukrainian counterpart and talk to the pathways forward on easing these tensions between russia and the west. mauricejohnson has done eight mini reshuffle of his cabinet and is trying to move on from the uproar over the number ten lockdown parties and there are questions with usually police as an inquiry is set up into
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reports of pegasus spyware used by officers to hack the mobile phones officers to hack the mobile phones of public figures. more shots and is busy with what i believe it's called a mini reshuffle of ministers as part of efforts to reassert grip on government after a long run of controversies including those parties at number ten during lockdown and a lot of resignations from his team last thursday. the chief whip mark spencer, who would criticise her treatment of rebellious and beats, is moving sideways and becoming leader of the commons and will replace jacob rees mogg who becomes minister for breaks opportunities. let's go to westminster. is that a newjob? that's right. directed opportunities is a new title in government and we are told that jacob reese my will still sit in the cabinet but won't
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necessarily have a sort of department in the same way because this is a newly created position and i think the intention of this position is to focus on one priority for the government at the moment which is trying to look at what domestic changes can be made since brexit. they met a lot in recent weeks over particularly getting rid of certain eu rules and regulations that are still retained in uk law. that is something which i think this a obscenities will be looking at and i think politically wise interesting as well is is this move will perhaps appease some of those more critical pro brexiteers backbench mps who have not necessarily been that happy in recent weeks feeling like some of those domestic priorities of brexit have not been permitted recently and will also not happy about ongoing negotiations over northern ireland protocol. so i think i'm holding this position is quite a clear statement to try and get some of those mps back on side. so statement to try and get some of those mps back on side.- those mps back on side. so mr rees-mogg — those mps back on side. so mr rees-mogg moves _ those mps back on side. so mr rees-mogg moves into - those mps back on side. so mr rees-mogg moves into that i those mps back on side. so mr| rees-mogg moves into that job those mps back on side. so mr- rees-mogg moves into that job and rees—mogg moves into thatjob and into hisjob goes
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rees—mogg moves into thatjob and into his job goes to chief whip which begs the question who is a new chief whip? the which begs the question who is a new chief whi - ? ~ , which begs the question who is a new chief whi - ? . , , chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton _ chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton harris, _ chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton harris, he _ chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton harris, he is - chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton harris, he is going i chief whip? the new chief whip is chris payton harris, he is going to j chris payton harris, he is going to be in charge of party discipline and i think fair to say he has a massive role on his hands really. notjust in terms of trying to win back the support for about backbench mps who have not been happy with the prime minister recently or happy with his handling of dentistry parties but also the chief whip if the person meant to keep the party telling the line and we have seen in recent months going way back before the scandals over dentistry parties problems with discipline in the tory party with her that was over covered regulations before christmas or that was over the suspension of owen patterson, the mp who was found to have breached lobbying rules for the government at the time was trying to prevent from being suspended. so i think he is certainly going to take on that role at number ten have now a sort of suggested that he is somebody who will be a more sort of carrot rather than stick figure after some criticism as you mentioned of the previous chief whip
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mark spencer and some tactics used to keep mps in them before but honestly we will see what happens in practice whether his appointment will be enough to bring back some of those sceptical mps from the fall but as i say i think certainly quite of a transferfor but as i say i think certainly quite of a transfer for him ahead. think ou of a transfer for him ahead. think you very much — of a transfer for him ahead. think you very much indeed. _ on monday afternoon, the leader of the opposition was approached by protesters. they called sir keir starmer a traitor. they shouted aboutjulian assange and aboutjimmy savile. the previous monday, borisjohnson said this in parliament. this leader of the opposition, a former director of public prosectuions, mr speaker, who spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile. this is false. keir starmer had no personal involvement in the decision not to prosecutejimmy savile. the question now is whether that statement risked mr starmer�*s safety. no, says minister chris philp. i don't accept there is any link between the prime minister's
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reference to keir starmer's record as director of public prosecutions and what happened last night, which was totally unacceptable. the prime minister himself tweeted. .. and number 10 has refuted any link whatsoever between that behaviour and the prime minister's words. but if that's number 10, this is the speaker of the house of commons. these sorts of comments only inflame opinion and generate _ disregard for the house. and it is not acceptable. our words have consequences, and we should always be - mindful of that fact. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has also commented, tweeting that. . .. number 10 refutes this categorisation. and to the government, this is part of a broader problem which affected politicians and journalists. that mob yesterday, they were the same mob that surrounded michael gove
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outside his department, they were the same mob that attacked nick watt. these are people who do not discriminate, theyjust hate all of us because we represent the so—called establishment. and while the protest and its causes are debated, so, too, is the broader issue of whether the original claim was acceptable. dan hodges of the mail on sunday picks this up, arguing that... he goes on... we know that the starmer—savile claim has circulated on far—right websites. but after it was used in parliament, ministers have defended its use. here's the bbc�*s chris mason explaining that... they argue if labour holds boris johnson responsible for all lockdown parties at number ten even if he did not attend it so too can they hold the labour leaderfor not attend it so too can they hold the labour leader for things that happened while he was in charge.
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the point is the prime ministers meeting — the point is the prime ministers meeting a — the point is the prime ministers meeting a fairand the point is the prime ministers meeting a fair and reasonable point about— meeting a fair and reasonable point about organisations and who leads them _ no doubt leaders, at times, take responsibility for organisations they lead. but that is not the comparison that was made in parliament. this leader of the opposition, a former director of public, mr speaker, who spent most of his time prosecuting journalists and failing to prosecutejimmy savile. it was reasonable to bring it up in a debate — it was reasonable to bring it up in a debate about _ it was reasonable to bring it up in a debate about accountability. - back in 2013, keir starmer did apologise for the shortcomings of the cps in dealing with allegations againstjimmy savile. but he didn't apologise for his personal conduct. the allegation in parliament was personal. and here's more of the defence we heard from minister chris philp again. well, i'm saying it was capable of being misconstrued. i mean, the words on the face of it were correct, but it was capable not everyone agrees the issue is misinterpreation. there is no evidence to support the claim about the labour leader.
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and that's why boris johnson was very clear in clarifying exactly what he meant a couple days later, which was the right thing to do. but borisjohnson did seek to clarify what he'd said. i was talking not about the leader of the opposition's personal record when he was dpp, and i totally understand that he had nothing to do personally with those decisions. i was making a point about his responsibility for the organisation as a whole. a clarification, but not a retraction or an apology for the original claim. and the tory mpjulian smith now argues... that's what the opposition wants, too. it's trumpian—style politics and legitimises the sort. of political discourse that isn't what we like or deserve - in this country. and i believe he should come to the house of commons - and apologise unreservedly for the slurs that _ he made last week. this, though, was chris mason's assessment of the chances of seeing an apology on tuesday.
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absolutely zero, it is not going to happen. as well as that, a senior source told the bbc... and as all sides traded political blows this week, there was a new arrival in westminister. last year, the conservative mp david amess was stabbed to death during a constituency surgery. now anna firth has been sworn in as his replacement. and while parliament welcomes its newest member, there are sharp differences over where the limits of reasonable political discourse lie. let's turn to israel now and the fallout from the news that police used spyware to gather information on prominent invividuals. the country's chief of police has cut short a foreign visit to face questions over the use of pegasus software to hack mobile phones. pegasus is made by israel's nso group. it was developed intially to spy on palestinian terrorists, but went on to be sold abroad. this washington post investigation
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last year found the spyware used in 50 countries, including authoritarian regimes. now it's emerged it was also used against israelis in israel. the business newspaper calcalist reported dozens of israelis were targeted by police. the list includes government ministers — as well as the advisers and family of benjamin netanyahu — the former prime minister, who's now the leader of the opposition. this was his reaction. translation: something - inconceivable has happened here. police officials spied illegally using the most aggressive tools in the world. citizens were stripped bare here, they were monitored, they were wiretapped, their closest secrets were pried into — and who knows what wrongful use was made of this spying. israel's government has begun an investigation. this is the prime minister. translation: regarding the pegasus affair, the reports allegedly _ describe a very grave situation.
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it is unacceptable in a democratic state. these cyber tools were designed to fight terrorism and serious crime, not to be used against citizens. we will see to a transparent, in—depth and quick inquiry — because all of us, citizens of the state of israel, government ministers, and all establishments �* deserve answers. let's go to israel, and speak to journalist mark weiss. to what and where the police hacking into people's phones? that to what and where the police hacking into people's phones?— into people's phones? that remains to be seen- — into people's phones? that remains to be seen. according _ into people's phones? that remains to be seen. according to _ into people's phones? that remains to be seen. according to this - to be seen. according to this newspaper— to be seen. according to this newspaper report _ to be seen. according to this newspaper report from - to be seen. according to this newspaper report from the l to be seen. according to this - newspaper report from the paper the calcalist _ newspaper report from the paper the calcalist yesterday, _ newspaper report from the paper the calcalist yesterday, no _ newspaper report from the paper the calcalist yesterday, no less - newspaper report from the paper the calcalist yesterday, no less than - newspaper report from the paper the calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 i calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israetis _ calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israetis were — calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israelis were hacked _ calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israelis were hacked by _ calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israelis were hacked by the - calcalist yesterday, no less than 26 israelis were hacked by the police i israelis were hacked by the police iltegatiy— israelis were hacked by the police illegally without _ israelis were hacked by the police illegally without any _ israelis were hacked by the police illegally without any kind - israelis were hacked by the police illegally without any kind of - israelis were hacked by the police illegally without any kind of war. israelis were hacked by the policel illegally without any kind of war or any kind _ illegally without any kind of war or any kind of— illegally without any kind of war or any kind of authorisation, - illegally without any kind of war or any kind of authorisation, these i any kind of authorisation, these included — any kind of authorisation, these included as— any kind of authorisation, these included as the _ any kind of authorisation, these included as the report - any kind of authorisation, these included as the report said i
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included as the report said journalists, _ included as the report said journalists, political- included as the report said i journalists, political activists, senior— journalists, political activists, senior civil _ journalists, political activists, senior civil servants _ journalists, political activists, senior civil servants in - journalists, political activists, senior civil servants in my. journalists, political activists, i senior civil servants in my business people. _ senior civil servants in my business people. the — senior civil servants in my business people. the son _ senior civil servants in my business people. the son of— senior civil servants in my business people. the son of a _ senior civil servants in my business people, the son of a former- senior civil servants in my business people, the son of a former primel people, the son of a former prime minister. — people, the son of a former prime minister. and _ people, the son of a former prime minister. and a _ people, the son of a former prime minister, and a leading _ people, the son of a former prime minister, and a leading witness. people, the son of a former prime minister, and a leading witness in| minister, and a leading witness in the benjamin— minister, and a leading witness in the benjamin that _ minister, and a leading witness in the benjamin that yahoo - minister, and a leading witness in. the benjamin that yahoo corruption that _ the benjamin that yahoo corruption that so _ the benjamin that yahoo corruption trial~ so it— the benjamin that yahoo corruption that so it is— the benjamin that yahoo corruption trial. so it is very— the benjamin that yahoo corruption trial. so it is very much _ trial. so it is very much across—the—board i trial. so it is very much i across—the—board different trial. so it is very much - across—the—board different kinds trial. so it is very much _ across—the—board different kinds of israelis. _ across—the—board different kinds of israelis, different— across—the—board different kinds of israelis, different kinds— across—the—board different kinds of israelis, different kinds of- israelis, different kinds of figures _ israelis, different kinds of figures. now— israelis, different kinds of figures. now there - israelis, different kinds of figures. now there was i israelis, different kinds of figures. now there was al israelis, different kinds of- figures. now there was a clamour yesterday— figures. now there was a clamour yesterday across _ figures. now there was a clamour yesterday across the _ figures. now there was a clamour yesterday across the political- yesterday across the political spectrum _ yesterday across the political spectrum for _ yesterday across the political spectrum for very— yesterday across the political spectrum for very wide - yesterday across the political. spectrum for very wide reaching state _ spectrum for very wide reaching state commission— spectrum for very wide reaching state commission of— spectrum for very wide reaching state commission of inquiry- spectrum for very wide reaching state commission of inquiry to i spectrum for very wide reaching . state commission of inquiry to get to the _ state commission of inquiry to get to the bottom _ state commission of inquiry to get to the bottom of _ state commission of inquiry to get to the bottom of this. _ state commission of inquiry to get to the bottom of this. however. state commission of inquiry to get| to the bottom of this. however the situation _ to the bottom of this. however the situation this — to the bottom of this. however the situation this evening _ to the bottom of this. however the situation this evening is _ to the bottom of this. however the situation this evening is not - to the bottom of this. however the situation this evening is not so i situation this evening is not so clear — situation this evening is not so clear the _ situation this evening is not so clear. the prime _ situation this evening is not so clear. the prime minister- situation this evening is not so clear. the prime minister metl situation this evening is not so i clear. the prime minister met with the justice — clear. the prime minister met with the justice minister, _ clear. the prime minister met with the justice minister, the _ clear. the prime minister met with the justice minister, the new- the justice minister, the new attorney— the justice minister, the new attorney general— the justice minister, the new attorney general and - the justice minister, the new attorney general and other i the justice minister, the new- attorney general and other senior officials _ attorney general and other senior officialsiust— attorney general and other senior officialsjust in— attorney general and other senior officials just in the _ attorney general and other senior officials just in the last _ attorney general and other senior officialsjust in the last hour- attorney general and other senior officialsjust in the last hour or. officialsjust in the last hour or so, officialsjust in the last hour or so. and the _ officialsjust in the last hour or so, and the police _ officialsjust in the last hour or so, and the police informed i officialsjust in the last hour orl so, and the police informed the prime _ so, and the police informed the prime ministerand _ so, and the police informed the prime minister and this- so, and the police informed the prime minister and this panel. so, and the police informed the| prime minister and this panel of their— prime minister and this panel of theirfindings, _ prime minister and this panel of their findings, which— prime minister and this panel of their findings, which reveal- prime minister and this panel of their findings, which reveal a i prime minister and this panel of. their findings, which reveal a very different— their findings, which reveal a very different story. _ their findings, which reveal a very different story. according - their findings, which reveal a very different story. according to i their findings, which reveal a very different story. according to the i different story. according to the police. — different story. according to the police. only— different story. according to the police, only three _ different story. according to the police, only three of _ different story. according to the police, only three of the - different story. according to the police, only three of the people| different story. according to the i police, only three of the people on this list— police, only three of the people on this list of— police, only three of the people on this list of 26— police, only three of the people on this list of 26 were _ police, only three of the people on this list of 26 were actually - police, only three of the people on this list of 26 were actually spied l this list of 26 were actually spied upon. _ this list of 26 were actually spied upon. and — this list of 26 were actually spied
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upon. and only— this list of 26 were actually spied upon, and only one _ this list of 26 were actually spied upon, and only one of— this list of 26 were actually spied upon, and only one of the - this list of 26 were actually spied i upon, and only one of the attempts was successful. _ upon, and only one of the attempts was successful. sonoma _ upon, and only one of the attempts was successful. sonoma have - upon, and only one of the attempts was successful. sonoma have is- upon, and only one of the attempts was successful. sonoma have is a l upon, and only one of the attempts. was successful. sonoma have is a law of~~~ _ was successful. sonoma have is a law of~~~ is _ was successful. sonoma have is a law of~~~ is not _ was successful. sonoma have is a law of~~~ is not clear— was successful. sonoma have is a law of... is not clear exactly— was successful. sonoma have is a law of... is not clear exactly how - was successful. sonoma have is a law of... is not clear exactly how the i of... is not clear exactly how the veracity — of... is not clear exactly how the veracity of — of... is not clear exactly how the veracity of this _ of... is not clear exactly how the veracity of this article, _ of... is not clear exactly how the veracity of this article, so - of... is not clear exactly how the veracity of this article, so the i veracity of this article, so the situation we _ veracity of this article, so the situation we are _ veracity of this article, so the situation we are in _ veracity of this article, so the situation we are in the - veracity of this article, so the . situation we are in the moment veracity of this article, so the i situation we are in the moment is that the _ situation we are in the moment is that the mossad _ situation we are in the moment is that the mossad and _ situation we are in the moment is that the mossad and the - situation we are in the moment is that the mossad and the is - situation we are in the moment is that the mossad and the is reallyl that the mossad and the is really security— that the mossad and the is really security agency. _ that the mossad and the is really security agency, the _ that the mossad and the is really security agency, the internal- security agency, the internal intelligence _ security agency, the internal intelligence branch, - security agency, the internal intelligence branch, are i intelligence branch, are investigating _ intelligence branch, are investigating the - intelligence branch, are investigating the police | intelligence branch, are - investigating the police hacking intelligence branch, are _ investigating the police hacking of phones _ investigating the police hacking of phones to— investigating the police hacking of phones to decide _ investigating the police hacking of phones to decide exactly - investigating the police hacking of phones to decide exactly first i phones to decide exactly first of all who— phones to decide exactly first of all who was— phones to decide exactly first of all who was hacked, _ phones to decide exactly first of all who was hacked, having i phones to decide exactly first of. all who was hacked, having people and only— all who was hacked, having people and only then _ all who was hacked, having people and only then will _ all who was hacked, having people and only then will the _ all who was hacked, having people and only then will the governmentj and only then will the government decide _ and only then will the government decide whether— and only then will the government decide whether or— and only then will the government decide whether or not _ and only then will the government decide whether or not the - and only then will the government i decide whether or not the commission of imwiry— decide whether or not the commission of inquiry is _ decide whether or not the commission of inquiry is needed. _ decide whether or not the commission of inquiry is needed. i— decide whether or not the commission of inquiry is needed.— of inquiry is needed. i went with the police _ of inquiry is needed. i went with the police make _ of inquiry is needed. i went with the police make of— of inquiry is needed. i went with the police make of that - of inquiry is needed. i went with i the police make of that experience. are they willing this offence as the messiah and others investigate what they had been up to? well. messiah and others investigate what they had been up to?— they had been up to? well, the olice they had been up to? well, the police are _ they had been up to? well, the police are not _ they had been up to? well, the police are not being _ they had been up to? well, the police are not being asked, i they had been up to? well, the | police are not being asked, they they had been up to? well, the i police are not being asked, they are being _ police are not being asked, they are being investigated. _ police are not being asked, they are being investigated. the _ police are not being asked, they are being investigated. the police - police are not being asked, they are being investigated. the police are l being investigated. the police are under— being investigated. the police are under a _ being investigated. the police are under a lot— being investigated. the police are under a lot of— being investigated. the police are under a lot of criticism _ being investigated. the police are under a lot of criticism from - being investigated. the police arel under a lot of criticism from across the political— under a lot of criticism from across the political spectrum _ under a lot of criticism from across the political spectrum over- under a lot of criticism from across the political spectrum over their. the political spectrum over their use of—
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the political spectrum over their use of this — the political spectrum over their use of this cutting—edge - the political spectrum over their. use of this cutting—edge technology against _ use of this cutting—edge technology against is _ use of this cutting—edge technology against is really— use of this cutting—edge technology against is really civilians _ use of this cutting—edge technology against is really civilians and - use of this cutting—edge technology against is really civilians and manyl against is really civilians and many people yesterday— against is really civilians and many people yesterday him _ against is really civilians and many people yesterday him anything i against is really civilians and manyl people yesterday him anything your politicians _ people yesterday him anything your politicians like _ people yesterday him anything your politicians like into _ people yesterday him anything your politicians like into the _ people yesterday him anything your politicians like into the situation i politicians like into the situation to the _ politicians like into the situation to the east— politicians like into the situation to the east german _ politicians like into the situation to the east german stridency i politicians like into the situationl to the east german stridency and remember— to the east german stridency and remember israel— to the east german stridency and remember israel boasts - to the east german stridency and remember israel boasts is - to the east german stridency and remember israel boasts is the i to the east german stridency and i remember israel boasts is the only democracy— remember israel boasts is the only democracy in — remember israel boasts is the only democracy in the _ remember israel boasts is the only democracy in the middle _ remember israel boasts is the only democracy in the middle east, i remember israel boasts is the onlyj democracy in the middle east, etc, and these — democracy in the middle east, etc, and these police _ democracy in the middle east, etc, and these police actions _ democracy in the middle east, etc, and these police actions are - democracy in the middle east, etc, and these police actions are clearly out of _ and these police actions are clearly out of sync— and these police actions are clearly out of sync with _ and these police actions are clearly out of sync with what _ and these police actions are clearly out of sync with what should - and these police actions are clearly out of sync with what should be i out of sync with what should be happening _ out of sync with what should be happening in— out of sync with what should be happening in any— out of sync with what should be happening in any democracy. i out of sync with what should be happening in any democracy. thank ou ve happening in any democracy. thank you very much _ happening in any democracy. thank you very much for _ happening in any democracy. thank you very much for taking _ happening in any democracy.- you very much for taking us through that and perhaps we can check in with you again in a few weeks' time. live from jerusalem. stay with us on outside source. still to come, we discussed the leading film with abominations of the oscars and starring benedict cumberbatch. health experts are calling for urgent research to find out why black women are a0% more likely to have a miscarriage than white women.
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the royal college of churches and gynaecologists says the reasons are complex with the current situation is unsuitable. our global health correspondent has been investigating. down we go! littlejudah is getting ready for an afternoon trip to the park. whoop! before his arrival last spring, his parents endured eight miscarriages. how's it been, the first eight months? do you know what? it's been...it�*s been a bit of a journey. natasha says one of the re—occurring themes through many of her losses was a feeling of not being listened to by some clinicians. i haven't always felt that i've been taken seriously. in some cases, i've complained about serious amounts of pain — during procedures, during miscarriages — and it was kind of pooh—poohed. natasha tells me she has questioned whether her race may have been a factor here. it's hard because you have the underlying racism but when it's not blatant...
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it's hard tojudge. here at queen charlotte's and chelsea hospital in west london, dr ekechi specialises in early pregnancy. she's also co—chair of the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists�* race and equality task force. unfortunately, black women are more likely to have a number of conditions that put them at greater risk of miscarriage. but really on a more significant level, what we hear time and time again is that black women never feel heard in this space. without addressing the institutional racism where it exists, we will never be able to truly say that all women receive the care that they so deserve.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is — the french president has been in kyiv as he continues diplomacy trying to defuse the tensions between russia and the west over ukraine. the oscar nominations have been announced. the netflix western the power of the dog leads the field for next month's oscars, closely followed by the sci—fi epic dune. also with a string of nominations are the british 1960s drama belfast and west side story. the power of the dog has 12 nominations, including best picture and best directorforjane campion, 28 years after her nod for the piano. dune is a close second with ten nominations, including best picture and best adapted screenplay. belfast and west side story each have seven nominations, the former — kenneth branagh's drama about a family living amid sectarian conflict in late 1960s northern ireland — competing in best picture and the best director categories. steven spielberg is also in the running for best director with his west side story remake of the 1961 original,
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one of the most honoured movie musicals in oscars history. so let's get a flavour of "the power of the dog", a psychological western about a 1920s cattle rancher. i wonder what little lady made these? actually, i did, sir. my mother was a florist. so i made them to look like the ones in our garden. oh, well, do pardon me. the big box office hit spider—man: no way home got a single nomination for visual effects, while the latestjames bond no time to die got three nods. but the academy will be hoping for better ratings for the march the 27th ceremony than last year, when the pared—down event tanked to a record low of 9.85 million viewers, down 58% on the previous year. that was partly due to the absence of big film releases during lockdown. kj matthews is a journalist in la, who's also a member
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of the hollywood foreign press association. great to programme also but were your initial thoughts? lats great to programme also but were your initial thoughts?— your initial thoughts? lots of surprises _ your initial thoughts? lots of surprises to _ your initial thoughts? lots of surprises to be _ your initial thoughts? lots of surprises to be honest i your initial thoughts? lots of surprises to be honest with l your initial thoughts? lots of i surprises to be honest with them i was a brash litigator i did not receive her nomination for her work in house of gucci. many critics had her at least being on that if not winning best actress so to see her not being nominated was quite a surprise. that was a big snow. we were not surprised to see will smith nominated for king richard, and that is the pivotal role where he played the father of serena and venus williams, the tennis greats. his performance in a king richard was just amazing, so wonderful to see him being omitted. actually very nice also deceived aunjanue ellis being omitted for her role as the mother of the williams sisters so nice to see her get nominated in the
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supporting category. but the oscars really belong to the power —— supporting category. but the oscars really belong to the power —— the power of the dog. can you believe will nominations? l power of the dog. can you believe will nominations?— power of the dog. can you believe will nominations? i have to because it's riaht will nominations? i have to because it's right in — will nominations? i have to because it's right in front _ will nominations? i have to because it's right in front of— will nominations? i have to because it's right in front of me _ will nominations? i have to because it's right in front of me but - will nominations? i have to because it's right in front of me but tell- it's right in front of me but tell me about a field that did not get many, i thought spider—man might do well, it's been filling theatres all over the us but around europe as well. ~ . over the us but around europe as well. . . . , , , well. what happened? here is the thin. you well. what happened? here is the thing. you probably _ well. what happened? here is the thing. you probably have - well. what happened? here is the thing. you probably have heard i thing. you probably have heard before because you probably watch the oscars for many years but there is always this divide, between art house films i get nominated in hollywood that everybody kind of inside the hollywood bubble absolutely loves, and then there is the rest of the world. middle america that have these blockbuster films that they love, spider—man being one of them. blockbuster, people loved it and it was not loved by film critics yes and some say no and that could be the reason why it was not nominated. people were still surprised and we would've loved to see it be nominated and it is a marvel film it is a marvel film and maybe that has to do with it but no, no major nods for spider—man. balsa
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maybe that has to do with it but no, no major nods for spider—man. bison no ma'or nods for spider-man. also i want no major nods for spider-man. also i want to ask — no major nods for spider-man. also i want to ask you _ no major nods for spider-man. also i want to ask you about _ no major nods for spider-man. also i want to ask you about diversity i no major nods for spider—man. also i want to ask you about diversity and i know you were involved in diversifying the golden globes and how it goes about nominations and awards. how do you assess the oscars nomination list in those terms? every year we have someone breaking through and the people of colour brick through. but you know to be honest with you, i'm a member of the hb fa and the lack of diversity is notjust a problem with this organisation or in the academy for the oscars but a problem throughout hollywood. so what i would love to see moving forward is to see people of colour and particularly women of colour being omitted in all of the categories, directing him a best picture, originalscreenplay, but screenplay. all those categories. we start seeing at least a be a0 or 50% of those categories have people of colour, then i think we will have reached a sort of equity in this year was nice to see the denzel washington dominated with his knife nomination and got it for lady macbeth and the best actor category
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and of course you have will smith there as well and aunjanue ellis. so you have some great people of colour being nominated but not as many as i would have liked to see. but it all depends on how many movies are put out and whether or not all of the academy members are willing to watch those films in order to nominate them. in order to have the bit that voted on and that's what it boils down to. t voted on and that's what it boils down to. ., ., ., , ., down to. i have one final question for ou. down to. i have one final question for you- lots— down to. i have one final question for you. lots of _ down to. i have one final question for you. lots of people _ down to. i have one final question for you. lots of people will i down to. i have one final question for you. lots of people will watch | for you. lots of people will watch you've not seen it the power of the dog and theirs and the fact as examinations and are thinking what is the fuss all about? if they have not seen it, what will they get if they go to the theatre?- they go to the theatre? here is what i would they go to the theatre? here is what i would say- — they go to the theatre? here is what i would say- stay _ they go to the theatre? here is what i would say. stay home, _ they go to the theatre? here is what i would say. stay home, want i they go to the theatre? here is what i would say. stay home, want to i i would say. stay home, want to on your streaming networking of people are saying but wait, we cannot see west side and at the home and went to go to theatres but see what you can see at home of the major films that were not met it. you have got belfast, cota, don't look up, the power of the dog, nightmare alley,
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king richard, liquorice pizza, a lot of work to do between now and march 27 to see all these films. every single one of them are worth it and i don't want to put one out over the other but i do have my favourite and i do have my favourite and i do have my pics but i will say for the best picture, i believe is probably going to go to the power of the dog and i think that for best actor i will go out here and say i think it's out here and say i think its will smith and his year and for best actress i think it's going to go to nicole kidman for portraying lucille ball in being the ricardo's. i will put it out there. irate ball in being the ricardo's. i will put it out there.— put it out there. we have those noted down _ put it out there. we have those noted down and _ put it out there. we have those noted down and we _ put it out there. we have those noted down and we will - put it out there. we have those noted down and we will check l put it out there. we have those | noted down and we will check in put it out there. we have those i noted down and we will check in with you after the award ceremony can with a q you after the award ceremony can with a 0 very much great have you on the programme, thanks for your time. we wrap up, let's turn to the philippines were campaigning for the president elections has begun and there are three months to go into there are three months to go into the vote in may and among the candidates are the daughter of the country and pop outgoing president, the son of a former dictator and a
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world famous boxer, so there is an array of talent or otherwise on show. here is bbc in howard johnson. philippine politics have a tradition of it seeing, dancing and personality politics and all of that was on display here today as we also saw goodie bags handed out hashtags promoted and celebrities in the crowd. but we saw today was marco saying he wore run for president alongside the daughter of the incumbent leader rodrygo three so together they are the dynastic duo and call themselves the unity and they are pushing to what they say to make the philippines rise again. know what we also saw was a senatorial slate announced what was interesting was on that slate people including the disgraced former lawyer who was barred from the department ofjustice because he attacked a journalist on social media using expletives and we also
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saw a senator who had been jailed media using expletives and we also saw a senator who had beenjailed in the past for corruption and also a former human rights lawyer who is now defending the president of the country, supporting him while he faces crimes against humanity allegations and investigations by the international criminal court. but we will see in the months ahead before may nine, the day when people go to the vote, is the country historyjudge and boom boom marcos is the son of the dictator ferdinand marcos who had a cruel repressive regime in which to businesses and other dissidents against him were locked up and tortured at times, even assassinated if you are a political rival of his. 50 what the filipinos will do is able go to the vote to decide their version of history. is it the mainstream media, independent media reporting of what happened in the 19705 and 19805 or the sanitised social media version of it promoted by the family? howard
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ends his version _ of it promoted by the family? howard ends his version of— of it promoted by the family? howard ends his version of the _ of it promoted by the family? howard ends his version of the programme i ends his version of the programme and thank you for watching as ever we will see you soon, bye—bye. hello. we had some sparkling sunshine to the north and the south of the uk on tuesday, but the day felt quite different depending on where you were. blue skies in the highlands, but arctic air keeping it feeling on the wintry side. brightness across norfolk, some patchy cloud here, but feeling very mild and spring—like — temperatures in the low teens, thanks to atlantic air. dividing the two air masses, a weather front — and that will progressively move its way southwards across the uk now in the next 48 hours. overnight, it will bring some more rain into northern england, eventually pushing some into north wales and the north midlands, i think, by dawn. to the south of the front, a mild night to come with clear spells, lows ofjust 8—9 celsius. to the north of the front, a colder night, a frost for scotland,
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perhaps a patchy frost for parts of northern ireland and northern england, as well. and then, through wednesday, the front pushes further south still, and the arctic air continues to advance its way south. so i think across parts of northern england, the midlands, and wales, temperatures will actually come down through the day as the sun comes out. we'll see the front—draping cloud across southern counties of england and east anglia on into the afternoon, perhaps with some drizzle. a pretty windy day across the board. gusty winds driving showers in from the west across scotland that will be wintry and notjust across the highest ground. certainly cold for scotland — highs ofjust 11—5 celsius, 11—12 further south. now this front looks like it might develop something of a wave wednesday into thursday. when we see one of those, it can slow the front down from clearing the south of the uk. so perhaps a bit more cloud and some rain here through the day. this is of more concern to us, though, this little area of low pressure that will clip scotland overnight wednesday into thursday — a double—pronged attack. some heavier, more persistent snow showers, also some strong gale force winds,
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perhaps gusting 50—60 mph. could do some damage, will also make it feel particularly raw across northernmost reaches of the uk on thursday. thursday into friday, an area of high pressure actually bumps up from the south, though, and will kill the winds off overnight — perfect set—up for a widespread and hard frost to get us into friday. risk of some ice across scotland after some showers overnight. friday daytime promises to bring a lot of sunshine uk—wide, perhaps a bit more cloud into the west later on in the day. perhaps not quite as cold as the wind will be lighter, but still definitely chilly.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. the government sets out plans to tackle the unprecendented nhs backlog, a5 waiting lists in england are set to continue to rise for at least another two years violet is one of more than 6 million people who've been waiting for routine treatment, many of them in severe pain i can't describe the pain, the discomfort. i cry every day because i can't do what i want to do. bumper profits for the oil giant bp prompt renewed calls for a windfall tax to help households with soaring energy bills. a mini—cabinet reshuffle is under way — jacob rees—mogg becomes minister for brexit opportunities and former chief whip mark spencer replaces mr rees—mogg a5 leader of the commons
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bamber gascoigne — the first host of university

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