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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 9, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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remaining covid restrictions are now set to be lifted england at the end of february — four weeks earlier than previously planned. the shortened timsecale was announced by borisjohnson, who said it depended on the current downward trend continuing. meanwhile, police are to review a decision not to investigate one of the downing street parties, after an image surfaced showing prime minister borisjohnson near a bottle of wine. police in southern india have made 15 arrests after violent protests over moves to ban islamic headscarves from colleges. the state of karnataka has shut down all high schools and colleges for three days. canadian police have threatened to arrest lorry drivers — and other protesters — who've shut down central ottawa for two weeks protesting about covid rules. those are your headlines.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are katy balls, deputy political editor at the spectator, and broadcaster david davies. hello again to you both. a quick look at ourfront hello again to you both. a quick look at our front pages. the metro says the prime minister could end all covid restrictions a month earlier than planned, including the need to self—isolate. the male says the uk will be the first major nation to leave the pandemic behind. —— the daily mail. same story on the guardian, which also has a picture of diane stewart, who was murdered by her husband in 2010. that's the foreign secretary, liz
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truss, in moscow on the telegraph. it also reports that police are beginning to contact more than 50 people, believed to have partied in downing street during lockdowns. an almost identical looking front page from the times. and the same headline on the —, which says the pm and his wife are among those to be contacted. —— on the front of the i. the mirror has that image released today, showing borisjohnson at a number ten quiz night with food and sparkling wine. us authorities are seeking more transparency from hedge funds, according to the ft. and the yorkshire post says the tour of britain is coming to the county later this year, for the first time since 2009.
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let's begin our chat. david, you'll kick us off this time around, please, and we start with the front page of the daily mail. the headline is that england is tearing up the covid rules and is leading the world in doing so. covid rules and is leading the world in doing sm— covid rules and is leading the world in doing so— in doing so. well, the daily mail sa s in doing so. well, the daily mail says that mr— in doing so. well, the daily mail says that mrjohnson _ in doing so. well, the daily mail says that mrjohnson is - in doing so. well, the daily mail says that mrjohnson is said to l in doing so. well, the daily mail- says that mrjohnson is said to have says that mrjohnson is said to have boasted to his allies that he has "got covid done," rather he got brexit done but we shall see now whether this is right or wrong. there are some of the other newspapers who are not, from what i've seen in the daily mail, not sceptical about how this came about. it certainly came as a surprise to many members and the chamber of commons today. for someone who came
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back into the country today, yesterday, i've filled in those passenger locator forms which says to you, when are you coming back into the uk? and you say, today. then it says, when will you leave? of course, when will i leave? i live of course, when will i leave? i live here! there were some very odd things and some of the regulations that have existed, so i don't think people will be sorry to see the back of some of that. the question is, there seems to be a lot of scepticism north of the border in scotland as to whether the english have gone too soon or are planning to go too soon. we shall see how scotland and northern ireland do who don't follow boris. but scotland and northern ireland do who don't follow boris.— don't follow boris. but scotland has led uuite a don't follow boris. but scotland has led quite a bit. _ don't follow boris. but scotland has led quite a bit. i — don't follow boris. but scotland has led quite a bit, i think— don't follow boris. but scotland has led quite a bit, i think it's _ don't follow boris. but scotland has led quite a bit, i think it's fair - led quite a bit, i think it's fair to put it that way, haven't they? nicola sturgeon with her announcements, certainly the early days of the pandemic and the lock
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down, very much at the front of all that, katie. i down, very much at the front of all that, katie-— that, katie. ithink it's that nicola sturgeon _ that, katie. ithink it's that nicola sturgeon has - that, katie. ithink it's that nicola sturgeon has oftenl that, katie. | think it's that - nicola sturgeon has often taken that, katie. i think it's that - nicola sturgeon has often taken a more _ nicola sturgeon has often taken a more cautious approach, so you've had tighter— more cautious approach, so you've had tighter rules in scotland than in england. i think that in the first— in england. i think that in the first stage of the pandemic, you often _ first stage of the pandemic, you often saw— first stage of the pandemic, you often saw england copying scotland 'ust often saw england copying scotland just a _ often saw england copying scotland just a few _ often saw england copying scotland just a few weeks later, much to the dismay— just a few weeks later, much to the dismay of tory mps. just a few weeks later, much to the dismay of tory mp5. i won't say it's the final— dismay of tory mp5. i won't say it's the final stage, even if boris johnson _ the final stage, even if boris johnson says it is, but at this later— johnson says it is, but at this later stage, you see johnson and his government ultimately resist restrictions at christmas, and tighter— restrictions at christmas, and tighter rules across the uk. i feel like that— tighter rules across the uk. i feel like that says to the government in westminster that that decision was vindicated. that's partially driving johnson's — vindicated. that's partially driving johnson's government to go for this
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bil johnson's government to go for this big bang _ johnson's government to go for this big bang earlier than expected. we have to _ big bang earlier than expected. we have to considerjohnson's position, though. _ have to considerjohnson's position, though. and — have to considerjohnson's position, though, and i think this is politically helpful to him to announce because it's something that will please _ announce because it's something that will please his tory mps. what announce because it's something that will please his tory mps._ will please his tory mps. what did ou make will please his tory mps. what did you make of _ will please his tory mps. what did you make of labour's _ will please his tory mps. what did you make of labour's comments, | will please his tory mps. what did l you make of labour's comments, or rather take on how this was handled earlier today? they said it was a way that the minister was stopping digging himself out of a hole. there is a bit of truth _ digging himself out of a hole. there is a bit of truth to _ digging himself out of a hole. there is a bit of truth to this _ digging himself out of a hole. there is a bit of truth to this in _ digging himself out of a hole. there is a bit of truth to this in all - is a bit of truth to this in all degrees, _ is a bit of truth to this in all degrees, and i think it is a help for borisjohnson to degrees, and i think it is a help for boris johnson to do this in terms — for boris johnson to do this in terms of— for boris johnson to do this in terms of his relationship with his party he — terms of his relationship with his party. he said he toured few months, lots of— party. he said he toured few months, lots of questions over whether he'll be able to— lots of questions over whether he'll be able to stay in his position that she's_ be able to stay in his position that she's had — be able to stay in his position that she's had a — be able to stay in his position that she's had a torrid few months. he was clearly intended to rally the troops at — was clearly intended to rally the troops at pmqs — but this was always something that was on the agenda,
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it's been_ something that was on the agenda, it's been moved forward and that's also because if you think about omicron, — also because if you think about omicron, i_ also because if you think about omicron, i think that has changed the landscape in terms of the pandemic, but i think this won't be going _ pandemic, but i think this won't be going back— pandemic, but i think this won't be going back to fully normal because lots of— going back to fully normal because lots of people might think twice about— lots of people might think twice about meeting up with someone they think has_ about meeting up with someone they think has covid. so you can get rid of all— think has covid. so you can get rid of at! the — think has covid. so you can get rid of all the rules on how to legally self—isolate, but i think particularly vulnerable people who've — particularly vulnerable people who've not have the vaccine will be wary _ who've not have the vaccine will be wary that _ who've not have the vaccine will be wary that everything is back to normat — wary that everything is back to normal. its wary that everything is back to normal. �* , ., ., ~' wary that everything is back to normal. �* , ., ., ~ ., ., wary that everything is back to normal. �* , ., ., normal. as we look to the front page ofthe normal. as we look to the front page of the exoress. _ normal. as we look to the front page of the express, for _ normal. as we look to the front page of the express, for those _ normal. as we look to the front page of the express, for those living - of the express, for those living with clinically vulnerable members of the family or the members of the community, that headline there isn't really freedom, is it? they think it's something else. find really freedom, is it? they think it's something else.— really freedom, is it? they think it's something else. and that's the dilemma that _ it's something else. and that's the dilemma that the _ it's something else. and that's the dilemma that the government - it's something else. and that's the dilemma that the government has| it's something else. and that's the - dilemma that the government has had and will have going forward. one of
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the other papers quotes a member of sage, the government's scientific advisers, saying this surprise decision today "was either very brave or very stupid." and we shall find out which. the other thing that's in one of the other papers as well, is that actually it's not britain leading the way in this, the danes in fact have lifted their restrictions a couple weeks ago, i think it was. restrictions a couple weeks ago, i think it was-_ restrictions a couple weeks ago, i think it was. staying with the front .a i e think it was. staying with the front -a~e of think it was. staying with the front page of the _ think it was. staying with the front page of the daily _ think it was. staying with the front page of the daily express, - think it was. staying with the front page of the daily express, surely l page of the daily express, surely boris can raise a glass to that is one of their pictures on the front page. i wonder if we can show it, there it is, which goes very nicely to the front page of the daily mirror. could you take us through that story there, that new probe — or is it?
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that story there, that new probe - or is it? , �* , ., that story there, that new probe - orisit? , ., or is it? yes, there's a few aspects of this and — or is it? yes, there's a few aspects of this and ultimately, _ or is it? yes, there's a few aspects of this and ultimately, boris - of this and ultimately, boris johnson _ of this and ultimately, boris johnson clearly wanted to do this bil johnson clearly wanted to do this big announcement, saying they were moving _ big announcement, saying they were moving on— big announcement, saying they were moving on from partygate. but we're still talking _ moving on from partygate. but we're still talking about partygate — and that's _ still talking about partygate — and that's because during pmqs, this photo _ that's because during pmqs, this photo which was published by the minor— photo which was published by the mirror online, and mp asked boris johnson _ mirror online, and mp asked boris johnson about it, he was very dismissive _ johnson about it, he was very dismissive of it but i don't think he really— dismissive of it but i don't think he really had a chance to see the photograph being referenced at this point _ photograph being referenced at this point. because you have a situation where _ point. because you have a situation where lots — point. because you have a situation where lots of mps in the chamber is started _ where lots of mps in the chamber is started passing phones to see what everyone _ started passing phones to see what everyone was talking about. now this is of the _ everyone was talking about. now this is of the christmas quiz that was talked _ is of the christmas quiz that was talked about previously, and the police _ talked about previously, and the police decided not to investigate. but now — police decided not to investigate. but now there's this photograph with this bottle of champagne or press echo, _ this bottle of champagne or press echo, tinsel and high party hats, and they— echo, tinsel and high party hats, and they are looking again at that
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decision — and they are looking again at that decision. these photos are just a reminder— decision. these photos are just a reminder to tory decision. these photos are just a reminderto tory mps decision. these photos are just a reminder to tory mps that the party story has— reminder to tory mps that the party story has not gone away, and actually — story has not gone away, and actually it'll be around for some weeks _ actually it'll be around for some weeks to— actually it'll be around for some weeks to at the very least when it really _ weeks to at the very least when it really the — weeks to at the very least when it really the drip is very damaging to boris _ really the drip is very damaging to borisjohnson in terms really the drip is very damaging to boris johnson in terms of how he's perceived — boris johnson in terms of how he's perceived by his own mps.- boris johnson in terms of how he's perceived by his own mps. david, i wonder if you've _ perceived by his own mps. david, i wonder if you've managed - perceived by his own mps. david, i wonder if you've managed to - perceived by his own mps. david, i wonder if you've managed to get i perceived by his own mps. david, i wonder if you've managed to get a | wonder if you've managed to get a sense of how the public are viewing partygate this many weeks on. well. partygate this many weeks on. well, ou partygate this many weeks on. well, you su5pect — partygate this many weeks on. well, you su5pect - _ partygate this many weeks on. well, you su5pect - l _ partygate this many weeks on. well, you suspect - i would've _ partygate this many weeks on. j! you suspect — i would've sensed several weeks ago that the public would be getting bored by it. but the problem is that mrjohnson's formerfriend, mr cummings, former friend, mr cummings, continues to formerfriend, mr cummings, continues to warn us that more photographs will keep coming and more interesting photographs will keep on coming. as this endless drip, drip, drip, you know, shows no
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sign ofabating, and if you drip, drip, drip, you know, shows no sign of abating, and if you are a tory strategist and you want to win the next election, at some point you need to ask yourself, "have we got a better chance with somebody else? and if, male orfemale, you come to the conclusion that you would have a better chance," surely it would be better chance," surely it would be better to give that chance the longer period —— as long a period as possible to dig in and turn things around. so my instinct is that the next month at most will be absolutely crucial.- next month at most will be absolutely crucial. same story of the times. _ absolutely crucial. same story of the times, effectively _ absolutely crucial. same story of the times, effectively this - the times, effectively this metropolitan police probe by the special inquiry team. picking up on david's point they are that may be people are looking at other options,
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the headline essentially is that more than 50 people are set to be questioned by the police. but what other options do you think the conservatives have as a leader? part ofthe conservatives have as a leader? part of the reason — conservatives have as a leader? part of the reason borisjohnson is still in the _ of the reason borisjohnson is still in the position — you could say rishi _ in the position — you could say rishi sunak, the chancellor, is a front— rishi sunak, the chancellor, is a front renter, but it's not the same as the _ front renter, but it's not the same as the theresa may years. in the past _ as the theresa may years. in the past there's been a sense of who you might— past there's been a sense of who you might go— past there's been a sense of who you might go to — past there's been a sense of who you might go to. i think in terms of triggers. — might go to. i think in terms of triggers, because i think it also helps _ triggers, because i think it also helps decide who will place boris johnson, — helps decide who will place boris johnson, obviously we expect the prime _ johnson, obviously we expect the prime minister to be interviewed. if he doesm — prime minister to be interviewed. if he does... borisjohnson clearly think— he does... borisjohnson clearly think he — he does... borisjohnson clearly think he can survive that, but number— think he can survive that, but number ten think he can survive that, but numberten are committed think he can survive that, but number ten are committed to telling the public— number ten are committed to telling the public if he does it, that will
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mean _ the public if he does it, that will mean more letters, at which point i think— mean more letters, at which point i think you'd — mean more letters, at which point i think you'd have to get into a contest _ think you'd have to get into a contest. but rishi sunak, liz truss are seen— contest. but rishi sunak, liz truss are seen as — contest. but rishi sunak, liz truss are seen as the front runners, you've — are seen as the front runners, you've also _ are seen as the front runners, you've also gotjeremy are seen as the front runners, you've also got jeremy hunt who was in the _ you've also got jeremy hunt who was in the last— you've also got jeremy hunt who was in the last to last time. unanimity in the last to last time. unanimity in terms _ in the last to last time. unanimity in terms of— in the last to last time. unanimity in terms of boris johnson's replacement means things have to get so had _ replacement means things have to get so had that— replacement means things have to get so bad that mps more or less worry about what— so bad that mps more or less worry about what comes after and focus on getting _ about what comes after and focus on getting rid _ about what comes after and focus on getting rid of him, because there isn't someone that's ready to go yet. isn't someone that's ready to go et. �* , ., isn't someone that's ready to go et. . , ., ., ., ~ yet. as former head of the fa, david, you _ yet. as former head of the fa, david, you will— yet. as former head of the fa, david, you will take _ yet. as former head of the fa, david, you will take us - yet. as former head of the fa, david, you will take us to - yet. as former head of the fa, david, you will take us to the l yet. as former head of the fa, - david, you will take us to the front page of the sun. what are your thoughts on what's transpired? weill. thoughts on what's transpired? well, on a personal — thoughts on what's transpired? well, on a personal level, _ thoughts on what's transpired? well, on a personal level, you _ thoughts on what's transpired? j! on a personal level, you despair at how a 27—year—old french international player, let alone his videoing brother, had any thoughts
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of what they were doing in this circumstance. on a professional level, west ham's decision last night i thought to play zouma was crass in the extreme, because they didn't help either the player or themselves by doing so. in west ham have always been — a lot of football supporters will tell you that west ham as their second favourite team. now that's notjust because they often used to beat them in matches, which were always entertaining, one always or members, as well — but they genuinely had a huge affection for the club and the work that they did in the community, and still do, and if anything have increased in recent times. ijust hope that and if anything have increased in recent times. i just hope that the change of tack that seems to have come from west ham today is a sign of things, of them coming through
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this. the difficulty is finding a punishment that fits the crime, and how you deal with the player going forward. it'll be immensely difficult and made difficult by events last night.— difficult and made difficult by events last night. obviously the sto is events last night. obviously the story is pretty _ events last night. obviously the story is pretty horrible, - events last night. obviously the story is pretty horrible, and - events last night. obviously the story is pretty horrible, and i i story is pretty horrible, and i think— story is pretty horrible, and i think you _ story is pretty horrible, and i think you can see that in terms of the public— think you can see that in terms of the public reaction. i think what's interesting — the public reaction. i think what's interesting is what west ham have done _ interesting is what west ham have done - _ interesting is what west ham have done - lrut— interesting is what west ham have done — but it's interesting what the sponsors— done — but it's interesting what the sponsors have done, you've seen people _ sponsors have done, you've seen people pull out and withdraw, and i think the _ people pull out and withdraw, and i think the messages being sent in that way — think the messages being sent in that wa . g , think the messages being sent in thatwa ., , , ., ., think the messages being sent in that wa -. , , ., ., ., that way. just before we move on from the story. — that way. just before we move on from the story, david, _ that way. just before we move on from the story, david, if- that way. just before we move on from the story, david, if i - that way. just before we move on from the story, david, if i could l from the story, david, if i could come back to you, first off, do you think he's actually worth hanging on to? i spoke to someone earlier and they said they doubt they'll drop him — and in terms of sponsorship, how much of a threat is that to the club, losing sponsorship?- club, losing sponsorship? there is absolutely no _ club, losing sponsorship? there is absolutely no doubt _ club, losing sponsorship? there is absolutely no doubt that _ club, losing sponsorship? there is absolutely no doubt that football |
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absolutely no doubt that football clubs listen to their sponsors, and sometimes people say football and football clubs live in their own ivory tower, if i can mix metaphors in that way. but for me, i think the worst thing about this whole incident was that it seemed it to be witnessed first—hand by a young person, by a child. and i think that may have been one of zouma's children. i mean, the impact on that child, you do wonder about. so for me, i suspect they will want to keep him, there's no question he is an outstanding footballer, but that is not important in these circumstances. and watch what may happen from the french side of the channel, as well — i mean, there are
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very strong feelings in france about this, evidently-— this, evidently. thank you for that. we will end — this, evidently. thank you for that. we will end with _ this, evidently. thank you for that. we will end with a _ this, evidently. thank you for that. we will end with a front _ this, evidently. thank you for that. we will end with a front page - this, evidently. thank you for that. | we will end with a front page of the daily telegraph. now then, david, in the last hour, you were mentioning a certain reminiscing, or rather reminiscent feel to this photo on the front page of the daily telegraph, and that is liz truss in moscow. just remind us what you can said quickly. moscow. just remind us what you can said quickly-— said quickly. well, i said there were echoes _ said quickly. well, i said there were echoes of _ said quickly. well, i said there were echoes of miss _ said quickly. well, i said there were echoes of miss thatcher| said quickly. well, i said there - were echoes of miss thatcher going to see mr gorbachev in the 1980s, and what she's wearing there in red square. and i seem to remember mrs thatcher war that stop what we've done a bit of fact checking, obviously. i5 done a bit of fact checking, obviously-— done a bit of fact checking, obviousl. , ., ., ., done a bit of fact checking, obviousl . , , ., ., ., obviously. is as the photo that you were talking _ obviously. is as the photo that you were talking about? _ obviously. is as the photo that you were talking about? i _ obviously. is as the photo that you were talking about? i regret - obviously. is as the photo that you were talking about? i regret to - obviously. is as the photo that you j were talking about? i regret to say i can't see were talking about? i regret to say i can't see it! _ were talking about? i regret to say i can't see it! welcome _ were talking about? i regret to say i can't see it! welcome our- were talking about? i regret to say| i can't see it! welcome our viewers can see it, — i can't see it! welcome our viewers can see it. katie. _ i can't see it! welcome our viewers can see it, katie, can _
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i can't see it! welcome our viewers can see it, katie, can you - i can't see it! welcome our viewers can see it, katie, can you see - can see it, katie, can you see anything? i can see it, katie, can you see anything?— can see it, katie, can you see an hint? ., ., ., anything? i also have a black screen in front of me. _ anything? i also have a black screen in front of me. well, _ anything? i also have a black screen in front of me. well, our— anything? i also have a black screen in front of me. well, our viewers - in front of me. well, our viewers can see it- _ in front of me. well, our viewers can see it- i _ in front of me. well, our viewers can see it. i can _ in front of me. well, our viewers can see it. i can picture - in front of me. well, our viewers can see it. i can picture it. - in front of me. well, our viewers can see it. i can picture it. what| can see it. i can picture it. what do ou can see it. i can picture it. what do you make — can see it. i can picture it. what do you make of _ can see it. i can picture it. what do you make of liz _ can see it. i can picture it. what do you make of liz truss - can see it. i can picture it. what do you make of liz truss in - can see it. i can picture it. what- do you make of liz truss in moscow and also what's going on with ukraine? this move to put 1000 more british troops on standby last night by britain? i british troops on standby last night b britain? ~ british troops on standby last night b britain? ,, ., �* , by britain? i think what's interesting _ by britain? i think what's interesting is _ by britain? i think what's interesting is actually, i by britain? i think what's. interesting is actually, the by britain? i think what's - interesting is actually, the very fact that — interesting is actually, the very fact that liz truss has gone to moscow — fact that liz truss has gone to moscow received some criticism in the tory— moscow received some criticism in the tory party up you had a foreign minister— the tory party up you had a foreign minister questioning whether you should _ minister questioning whether you should reward russia with attention like this, _ should reward russia with attention like this, if— should reward russia with attention like this, if it's going to be this rogue — like this, if it's going to be this rogue asset. but clearly the approach by the uk government is to try and _ approach by the uk government is to try and get— approach by the uk government is to try and get these negotiations, mirrored — try and get these negotiations, mirrored by a nato ally, you see emmanuel— mirrored by a nato ally, you see emmanuel macron doing similar things. — emmanuel macron doing similar things, and i think again influence that way — things, and i think again influence that way. in terms of her message,
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you mentioned you have borisjohnson advancing _ you mentioned you have borisjohnson advancing more troops to the parts of eastern — advancing more troops to the parts of eastern europe as if to say, "we will be _ of eastern europe as if to say, "we will be there — of eastern europe as if to say, "we will be there to support if russia does _ will be there to support if russia does invade ukraine." but i think the biggest chance of stopping that from happening, preventing it from happening is the message that it won't _ happening is the message that it won't be — happening is the message that it won't be good for anyone, including the people — won't be good for anyone, including the people of russia. i think it's 'ust the people of russia. i think it's just very— the people of russia. i think it's just very hard to predict where this will go. _ just very hard to predict where this will go, february has always been the month— will go, february has always been the month where it was most likely, so we _ the month where it was most likely, so we are _ the month where it was most likely, so we are at— the month where it was most likely, so we are at a high—stakes point. we so we are at a high-stakes point. we will so we are at a high—stakes point. will have to so we are at a high—stakes point. - will have to leave it there now, but thank you for taking us down memory lane, david, this evening. forthose of you who don't know their political history, they got a little lesson there. thank you both, a very good evening, thank you. and thank you for watching us here on bbc news
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for our look at the papers. of course we are back tomorrow— look at that, we've got lucy beresford and joe twyman with my colleague tamara, you can join joe twyman with my colleague tamara, you canjoin us joe twyman with my colleague tamara, you can join us tomorrow, joe twyman with my colleague tamara, you canjoin us tomorrow, and you can stay with bbc news channel all night. for myself and the team, cheerio. hi there, good evening, i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. the champions manchester city are 12 points clear at the top of the premier league tonight, having played two more games than liverpool, after a 2—0 win over brentford. riyad mahrez put away a first—half penalty after raheem sterling was fouled. brentford keeper david raya was to blame for the second, though, eventually gifting it to kevin de bruyne. brentford are nowjust six points above the relegation zone after a sixth straight defeat in all competitions. tottenham's hopes of a top—four finish have been dealt a blow by southampton tonight.
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it was raining goals in north london — spurs were 2—1 up, but the visitors pulled level through mohamed elyounoussi in the 79th minute. and three minutes later came the winner from che adams, who completed the comeback. spurs had a late effort correctly disallowed for offside. they remain four points off the top four. southampton climb to tenth. and villa park saw one of the games of the season, six goals shared. villa were 3—1 up, jacob ramsey scoring twice. but leeds fought back, diego llorente with the goal that ensured it finished 3—3. there was drama at carrow road, where norwich drew 1—1 with crystal palace — the home side singing from the first minute when teemu pukki put them ahead. wilfried zaha levelled on the hour mark with a contender for goal of the season. and he should've won it for palace a couple of minutes later. norwich escaped, thanks to the turf, perhaps, the kick horribly wide. palace remain 13th, and norwich in the bottom three.
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in scotland, celtic remain a point clear of rangers at the top of the table tonight, after both sides won on a busy evening in the premiership. celtic were two up at aberdeen at half—time before the homeside foughtback to draw level. jota's second goal of the night got celtic a 3—2 win. rangers keep up the pressure though with a 2—0 win over hibs, alfredo morelos with their second. dundee united are up to fourth, replacing motherwell, who they beat 2—0. dundee are off the bottom of the table with a 2—1win at hearts. ross county scored late to draw 1—1 with livingston. st mirren beat stjohnstone 2—1. and chelsea are through to the club world cup final, after romelu lukaku's first—half goal saw them beat saudi side al—hillal. and they did it without their manager, too — as ben croucher reports. chelsea's trophy cabinet has been filling fast in the last couple of decades, with one exception. the club world cup is the only major trophy they've never won in the semifinal. playing in yellow against the asian champions al—hillal,
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surely this was an opportunity chelsea couldn't miss. turns out romelu lukaku just needed a side touch. his first goal for a month, and he was providing, too, as chelsea sought to get out of sight, as this effort wasn't out of the goalkeeper�*s reach. and the saudi side grew into the game. kppa arrizabalaga was called into action — and all of a sudden, chelsea were being stretched. well—tipped around the post by kepa. this wasn't about the score line, though, maybe just as well. it was just about reaching that final on saturday. pal mayoress of brazil stand between chelsea and that elusive piece of silverware. ben croucher, bbc news. west ham have fined kurt zouma two weeks' wages, an estimated £250,000, after the france defender was filmed hitting and kicking his pet cat. the fine will be donated to animal welfare charities. essex police are investigating, as is the rspca — it's taken both
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of zouma's cats away from him. west ham say they'll support any investigation, but have been heavily criticised for not dropping zouma from the side that beat watford last night. a number of sponsors have threatened to cut ties with the club. adidas have ended their own association with zouma, saying he is no longer a contracted athlete with them. the manager, david moyes, said zouma played because he's one of their better players. it makes it hard because footballers are commodities that can be bought and sold. so therefore, that has to be taken into consideration. and also, if a footballer is good — and there's no doubting that kurt zouma is a good footballer — the rewards they can bring to a football club. west ham are trying hard to qualify for champions league — if they do that, it's worth a minimum of £30 million. if they proceed in the tournament, it could be worth up to £100 million. and that is something that the owners of the club and senior management have to take into consideration.
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andy murray has made a winning return to action after his second round exit at the australian open. the three—time grand slam champion has beaten alexander bublik, of kazakhstan in the first round of the rotterdam open. murray won in straight sets. the british formula one driver lando norris has signed a new deal that will see him stay at mclaren until the end of 2025. the 22—year—old finished sixth in last seasons standings with four podium finishes, and he also claimed his first pole position as the team finished fourth in the constructors championship. i have good confidence in the team, and the team have good confidence in me. so we want to achieve this together, you know, i want to win a championship with mclaren and win races, at least. and that's our goal, you know, it's notjust mine, it's our goal. so i'm happy to be staying here much longer, spending more time with the boys and girls in mtc and all of mclaren. and red bull have revealed
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the new car they hope will help max verstappen to retain the world title. the team launched the car, the rb18, on social media. they also announced a new title sponsorship with the us technology giant oracle. it's said to be among the most lucrative in f1 history at an estimated £74 million a year for the next five seasons. and that's all your sport for now. from me and the team, good night. hello. a colder day for all of us on thursday, but across the northern half of the country, quite a wild day to come — all due to this amazing swirl of cloud we saw to the south of iceland on wednesday. it's an area of low pressure which, as we start thursday morning, will have moved in across the western half of scotland in particular. to the south, we still have a weather front set to clear that will be sweeping away the last dregs of the milder air. to the north of it, a chilly start risk of ice in places, a few wintry showers — but as i said, a particularly wild start to the day in parts of scotland 60—70 mph gusts across the western isles and those northwestern coast, big seas,
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as well, and blizzards on the mountains. we'll see wintry showers across northern england, northern ireland, and parts of wales, but sunshine in between those and a blustery wind. strongest of the winds in scotland transfer eastwards through the day. winds always lighter further south and, once you've got rid of the morning cloud and patchy rain, it should be a bright and sunny day. the winds, though, will be a key feature — strongest through the afternoon in eastern scotland with gales. and it's here and across northeast england where it will feel substantially colder than the thermometers would suggest, made to feel well below freezing as we go through the afternoon. so a cold end to the day, rain, sleet, snow showers and strong winds clipping eastern parts of england for a time during thursday night, then skies clear, winds fall light. coldest night of the week, coldest commute of the week as we go into friday morning — temperatures could be as low as —10 through some scottish glens, a widespread frost and some ice to watch out for. but a lovely, crisp day to come for many on friday — a few wintry showers in the west, building amounts of cloud, as well, but most staying dry with sunny spells, the best of which in the east.
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temperatures actually a degree so lower than normal for the time of year. but after a cold start to friday night, if you go into the weekend, it'll turn milder — and with it, some wet and windy weather. on saturday, especially in the west, outbreaks of rain coming and going all day long, more persistent through the afternoon in parts of northern and western england and wales. some parts of north east scotland may get away largely dry, staying largely dry to east anglia and the southeast, but even here we will see rain and strong winds sweep through as we go through into saturday night. and then for sunday, we just have to watch the potential development of this area of low pressure. a bit of uncertainty attached, keep watching the forecast, but it could bring some more persistent rain later in the day and strong winds around the english channel. further north, though, something a bit brighter sunshine and showers, but feeling a little bit chillier. that's how it's looking, see you soon.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... protests spread across india and beyond against a ban on the muslim headscarf and some colleges and one southern state. two years of covid restrictions are set to end in england and rules are eased on parts of europe and the us. canadian police threatened to arrest lorry drivers who shut down central ottawa as anger at mandatory vaccines spreads. and scientists in britain make a major new advance in the quest to generate energy from nuclearfusion.
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live from our studio in singapore...

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