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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 10, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. 1,000 british troops are put on standby as the prime minister and foreign secretary head for diplomatic talks over the crisis in ukraine. detectives are to contact 50 people over lockdown parties in downing street, as police widen their investigation. wayne rooney opens up to breakfast about his alcohol and marriage problems, and how he feared his binge drinking could have killed someone. i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help in order to save myself, but also to save my family. has the lorry driver shortage gone away? as one of the government's support measures comes to an end, we ask whether enough new drivers are being trained, and whether shelves are staying well stocked. unstoppable city take a big step towards another
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premier league title, but their manager says his manchester champions aren't the best team around. good morning. some potentially disruptive weather today across the northern half of the country with gales, even severe gales, some rain, sleet, thunder and lightning and also some snow. further south, the fund will clear and then brightening up fund will clear and then brightening up sunshine and showers. it's thursday 10th february. our main story. borisjohnson is embarking on a fresh round of diplomacy in belgium and poland, amid fears of a russian invasion of ukraine. in brussels, the prime minister will tell nato�*s secretary general that britain is putting 1,000 troops on standby in case of a humanitarian crisis. he'll then travel to warsaw to meet poland's prime minister and president. separately, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, will also have talks in brussels.
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0ur political editor, laura kuenssberg, reports. russia has been amassing troops on a snowy border. ukraine and its neighbours worried aboutjust what might come next. the uk's leaders, hoping today to show their support. the prime minister and the labour leader will both be on foreign soil today. in brussels, the prime minister will promise 1000 more british troops in the region to be ready to help if everything goes wrong. if a humanitarian crisis unfolds. this is exactly what the uk government should be doing and this is what eastern allies of the uk, of your atlantic partners, are looking for. poland, the uk and ukraine have agreement they will be mutually supporting each other throughout this crisis, and this is what the uk needs to do, the prime minister needs to show leadership on this, even if the uk
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is no longer in the eu, that the uk is in fact a major player in europe. keir starmer is visiting the nato hq as well to send a similar message, that labour would be prepared to stand firm against russian aggression as well. but he hopes as well to send a different message. things have changed since jeremy corbyn�*s time in charge. the uk may not be the decider in what happens next on europe's edges. but its political leaders, both in their different ways, want to show the uk can lead. that report from our political editor, laura kuenssberg. we'll be joined by defence minister ben wallace at 7:30 and also by shadow defence secretary, john healeyjust before 7am. the metropolitan police is to begin contacting more than 50 people as part of its inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street and whitehall with the prime minister and his wife,
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carriejohnson, expected to be included. it comes after a leaked photograph of borisjohnson at a christmas quiz shows staff in party hats, with a bottle of sparkling wine on the table. 0ur political correspondent chris mason joins us now. good morning. 0k, good morning. ok, so this photograph is a new photograph of the party we had seen with a previous photograph? yes, that's right. we had seen a previous photograph involving the prime minister, a bloke with tinsel around his neck, someone elsejust kind of half out of shot with a santa hat on. this is a different image from the same view, which does include this opened bottle of sparkling wine. and it gives a greater impression of it being a party. not that it looked like a conventional work meeting, it has to be said, in the first photo, that this certainly offers a context which wasn't there before. it appeared bang in the middle of prime
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minister's questions yesterday, the prime minister confronted by it by a couple of labour mps halfway through. meanwhile as you are mentioning, these e—mails are about to drop in the inbox of around 50 people who have been at these various whitehall and downing street do during the pandemic, the metropolitan police calling it operation in helmand, looking into alleged breaches of the law, —— operation hillman, looking at if people have reasonable excuses to be at these things when they should not have been happening. the police talk about it as a questionnaire which gives it a slightly fluffy feel but they acknowledge publicly that this document being sent out has legal status. they expect truthful and honest replies within seven days and then there is the prospect of a fixed penalty notice being handed out to those who at these parties. they are looking at around 12
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different events, we think the prime minister might have been at six of them. downing street is promising it will let us know if borisjohnson is fined. will let us know if boris johnson is fined. . ., , ., ~ fined. 0k, waiting and seeing. thank ou ve fined. 0k, waiting and seeing. thank you very much. _ fined. 0k, waiting and seeing. thank you very much, chris. _ two cats owned by the west ham defender kurt zouma have been taken into the care of the rspca, after videos emerged on social media showing the 27—year old hitting, dropping and kicking one of them. 0ur reporter matt gravelling is at the london stadium for us this morning. good morning. tell us what response there has been from the club. goad there has been from the club. good mornin: , there has been from the club. good morning, charlie. _ there has been from the club. good morning, charlie. we _ there has been from the club. good morning, charlie. we can _ there has been from the club. (13mm morning, charlie. we can tell there has been from the club. (emf. morning, charlie. we can tell you this morning that the club have told us that an internal investigation is still under way, us that an internal investigation is still underway, but us that an internal investigation is still under way, but there have been a lot more developments yesterday in this story following a video which first emerged on monday of the french international heating and kicking a catz. there was huge public outcry on this and then the following day, tuesday, here against
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watford, it raised a few eyebrows when kurt zouma was in the team sheet and played the whole 90 minutes in the 1—0 win, gary lineker saying it was a tone deaf decision and chris packham, the wildlife expert, saying it was a disgrace. since the rspca has taken the cats away, two cats from kurt zouma and there is an investigation being carried out by the police. but there is a petition of more than quarter of a million people asking for a prosecution for kurt zouma and it is hitting the club and the player in the pocket. the vitality have decided to suspend the sponsorship of the club and an american travel firm have dropped the club, and kurt zouma has lost his deal with adidas. it remains to see whether he will be on the team sheet when they visit leicester away on sunday. now, if you were watching yesterday you might remember we brought you the story of 5—year—old beau, who is living with an aggressive
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form of cancer, known as a neuroblastoma. beau, who has been undergoing treatment, joined us on the sofa alongside her mum shirley, who has been trying to raise more than £300,000 for a specialist clinical trial in new york. following their appearance on breakfast, shirley sent us this update. now thanks to that final push of that bbc interview, we have hit the target. but please do not be under any illusion that i do not realise that this is down to you. thanks to your shares, your effort, your dedication, everything that you have done, has sat me on that couch today. and allowed me and given me the opportunity to share beau's story to the nation. we've just hit the target and she sleeps. you're going to sloan, beau—beau. sleep tight, baby. love you.
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and of course we wish them all the best with the upcoming treatment. nine minutes past six. time for carol. good today we have the potential for some disruptive weather across the northern half of the country, gales, severe gales, snow in there as well and we are looking at some showers further south with some rain yet to clear. this area of cloud is a potent area of low pressure which has been working its way towards scotland and northern ireland through the night, producing snow at lower levels, thunder and lightning and some rain, so there is a risk of ice on untreated surfaces. we had conceded gusts the rain rotating around this area, have had gusts at
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68 miles an hour but they have potential to 70 miles an hour, so there could be damage to trees, potentially affecting travel. the weak front taking the winery behind that, and a blustery day. —— taking the rain away. the strong winds will transfer into the pennines, the uplands and eastern england, and some showers in northern ireland, north—west england and wales. colder than yesterday, temperatures from one to 80 degrees, but when you add one to 80 degrees, but when you add on the wind strength, the real —— to 8 degrees, but it will feel like —5 in north scotland. we will have a longer full cut in north scotland. we will have a longerfull cut in half in north scotland. we will have a longer full cut in half an in north scotland. we will have a longerfull cut in half an hour. —— forecast. it's hard to believe, but it's been 20 years since wayne rooney took the football scene by storm as a 16—year—old with everton. a glittering career followed
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as he became both manchester united and england's record goal scorer. however, demons off the pitch have plagued him throughout his career. ahead of the release of a documentary about his life, wayne has told us about his struggles with alcohol and staying faithful to his wife and childhood sweetheart, coleen. wayne, the film is really very, very honest. why did you decide to do it and why now? i just felt it was an opportunity for people to see me, to see the real me. the good moments, the bad moments, which, of course, have been there as well, and then for people to judge me on knowing a bit more about me, which i feel is more fair. we've always grew up quicker than what we were meant to, really, ithink. coleen is such a big part of the film. you met as children,
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really were married very, very young, and what comes across in the whole of the film is that you have this tremendous partnership. how important has she been in the last 20 years? we have a good relationship, and we're friends, obviously, as well. and there is a good balance of the relationship, especially now, into how we are as parents with the four children. and there's been difficult moments we've had, of course, which has obviously come through me and the mistakes i've made and i speak about that in the documentary as well. you're both very, very honest about the dark times, about times you were unfaithful in your marriage. did you have to fight to save your relationship with coleen? yeah, of course. and i think the easy thing for me to do wasjust give up and give up on everything, really. but you get to a point,
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and i was struggling, i was really struggling, i was in a bad place. and i knew had to change, i knew i had to get through that struggle, really, and fight, fight for my marriage, fight for my career. i forgive him. but, yeah, but it wasn't acceptable. but no, it's not something that, you know, if it comes up, we talk about it like we're talking about it now. i haven't got the anger that i did at the time. coleen knows there's been influences, in terms of, why i've made mistakes, in terms of... i don't mean people, i mean alcohol. there is a really interesting moment when you say this, you say, "i could sit at home and have a glass of red wine but no good would come of that". what do you mean by that? yeah, because i knew if i have one glass of wine,
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it leads to two, three, four, and then, that's when i know, that once that happens, no good can come from that. i think about the dressing rooms that you've been in, particularly that manchester united dressing room. was there never a time when anyone put their arm around you and said, "i can help"? no. ten, 15 years ago, you couldn't, i couldn't go into the dressing room and say "i'm struggling, i'm struggling with alcohol, i'm struggling mental health—wise". i couldn't do that. and when you say you were struggling, what was the darkest time? what was your fear at that point? death. i think, you know, as i said before, you make mistakes, which i did, and that could have been girls, it could have been drink—driving which i have done, it could have been killing someone. you could kill yourself. and that's a bad place to be. so i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help, and in order to save myself,
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but also to save my family. rooney. 0h, brilliant goal! coming on for that first game for everton, you really are just a child, aren't you? what would you say to that boy now? you're not prepared. i always thought i was prepared for the football, to play, and i felt i was good enough obviously to play. but for everything else around it, i was nowhere near prepared. wayne rooney! and what do you regret the most? a lot. i think there's a lot. but i also think that sometimes when things happen, that you've got to learn from it. wayne, thanks very much indeed. thank you. the documentary rooney is available to watch on prime video from tomorrow. let's take a look at today's papers. 0ne story dominating today's front
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pages is the met police's plans to email more than 50 people as part of its inquiry into lockdown parties in downing street and whitehall. the daily telegraph says the move suggests its investigation into the 12 events is entering its final stages. the daily mail leads on the planned ending of covid restrictions in england in a fortnight which includes the requirement to self—isolate after a positive test. it describes 2a february as "freedom day". the daily mirror leads with this image of wayne rooney and his wife coleen as the pair open up about their relationship in a new documentary. you can see our full interview with wayne rooney at 8.30 this morning. and remember this, the cat that stopped play between sheffield wednesday and wigan athletic on tuesday night? well, it turns out she'd been missing for months. topsey had escaped injune
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during a trip to a cattery. her owner is looking forward to seeing her again. that is a catch that does not like to be told what to do. escaping on the way to the cattery. storming onto the pitch.— the way to the cattery. storming onto the pitch. and then somehow endin: u- onto the pitch. and then somehow ending up in _ onto the pitch. and then somehow ending up in the — onto the pitch. and then somehow ending up in the middle _ onto the pitch. and then somehow ending up in the middle of - onto the pitch. and then somehow ending up in the middle of a - ending up in the middle of a football match. what an extraordinary story. that is the time when you definitely need one of those mapping things to see where the cat has been. if it those mapping things to see where the cat has been.— the cat has been. if it was micro-chipped, _ the cat has been. if it was micro-chipped, i- the cat has been. if it was micro-chipped, i wonderl the cat has been. if it was| micro-chipped, i wonder if the cat has been. if it was - micro-chipped, i wonder if you the cat has been. if it was _ micro-chipped, i wonder if you could micro—chipped, i wonder if you could do that? the inside pages. stephen hawking always fascinated me, who passed away in 2018 at the age of 76 and he had left loads of stuff to the science museum in london. 0ne and he had left loads of stuff to the science museum in london. one of the science museum in london. one of the things he has left is this blackboard, just down the bottom here, on it are loads of his doodles, he had a really good sense
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of humour. quite cheeky. i5 doodles, he had a really good sense of humour. quite cheeky.— of humour. quite cheeky. is that a werewolf character? _ of humour. quite cheeky. is that a werewolf character? it _ of humour. quite cheeky. is that a werewolf character? it is - of humour. quite cheeky. is that a werewolf character? it is too - of humour. quite cheeky. is that a j werewolf character? it is too small to sa . werewolf character? it is too small to say- the — werewolf character? it is too small to say. the scientists _ werewolf character? it is too small to say. the scientists at _ werewolf character? it is too small to say. the scientists at the - to say. the scientists at the science museum, the curators would live people, when they finally put it on display, there are codes in his doodles, quite humorous codes. he has left loads of memorabilia including a personalised jacket which was given to him by the creators of the simpsons because he appeared on the show so many times. there will be so many things you can see. ~ . there will be so many things you can see. ~ , ., ,, in see. where will it be on display? in the science — see. where will it be on display? in the science museum. _ see. where will it be on display? in the science museum. they - see. where will it be on display? in the science museum. they have . see. where will it be on display? in. the science museum. they have 700 plus items and the staff have built a fun thing. if plus items and the staff have built a fun thing-— a fun thing. if ever there was a worthwhile _ a fun thing. if ever there was a worthwhile doodle, _ a fun thing. if ever there was a worthwhile doodle, it - a fun thing. if ever there was a worthwhile doodle, it would i a fun thing. if ever there was a j worthwhile doodle, it would be there. 15—million homes in the uk
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are in need of better insulation with two in every three leaking heat, according to the climate change committee. it says the way out of the current energy crisis is renewables, as well as better insulation for draughty houses. 0ur climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been finding out more. so you've got lots of heat coming out of this window here, and again, under this window upstairs, you've probably got a radiator here. that's money coming to your wall. that's money coming through your wall. using this thermal camera, we can find out whose house is radiating heat. the lighter the image, the more heat is leaking out. yeah, but look at that porch, that really does. there is a lot coming out there. it's easy pickings for me and marion here in manchester. the government estimates some 50 million uk homes could benefit the government estimates some 15 million uk homes could benefit from better insulation. that is two in every three.
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it feels a bit sneaky and surreptitious. yes, i do love a good bit of draft hunting. here is the difference insulation can make. how would you rate this house? this house is definitely losing less heat, especially from the weak spots that we identified on the other houses. but just look what it took to give the house an insulation makeover. so, there is insulation inside the room here, the windows are double glazed, and the space under the floor is insulated as well. up here at the top of the house, the entire roof area has been insulated as well. the walls look like this, bare brick, but they put in this wood fibre insulation, external insulation, and the windows are double glazed. in monetary terms, it saved 40% of our gas on the heating, and it made a really big difference to the comfort of the house as well. so the variability of the temperature during the day, the way it feels in terms of air quality and comfort really improved. rob's family may be insulated from the energy price hikes
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we all face, and they know they're doing the right thing by the climate. but here's the problem. it'll still take at least 20 years to cover the 36 grand it costs. down in london, it's this man'sjob to mark the government's homework on climate. so how is it doing? well, it's a d, could do much better, i think. so that's something for the government to think about. i think the government's policy or insulation has been very, very ineffective. it really is very poor. we need something that dramatically changes the number of insulation is that we do today. so this year we will be the tens of thousands of installations. we really need to scale that up to something more like half a million a year, and to do that quickly over the next four or five years. but if it's hard for middle—class homeowners to afford insulation, it is even tougher for local authorities like blackpool. energy efficient homes are popular with tenants. perfect! but blackpool spent £33,000 insulating jean's one—bedroom flat.
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0h, now it feels absolutely brilliant. you know, you don't need to go out. you can stop in. you don't need your central heating on. the council reckons it would cost some £125 million to bring all blackpool�*s social housing up to this standard. and remember, jean is the one who benefits from lower energy bills, not the council. it's not financially viable to do it on the scale, really. to get stuff to be carbon neutral, there is a big bill for that and we need support with it. every housing provider needs support with that. when you say need support, you mean the government needs to give you some cash? yeah, there needs to be grant aid to make it happen at scale. so when you ask why so few homes in britain are well insulated, here is the answer. work like this so expensive. we know that we need a sharp incentive for most people to make
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these investments in improving the energy efficiency of the home that they live in. most people, the payback for that will be several years so the government really does need to step in. last year, the government scrapped its 1.5 billion green homes grant scheme, and as yet, there is no replacement. so while those on the lowest incomes do get help, there's very little assistance for everyone else to insulate their homes. justin rowlatt, bbc news, blackpool. many people will be very keen to hear more about those measures. 23 minutes past six.— minutes past six. going back a few months, minutes past six. going back a few months. you _ minutes past six. going back a few months, you will— minutes past six. going back a few months, you will remember- minutes past six. going back a few months, you will remember the i minutes past six. going back a few- months, you will remember the debate about the hgv drivers, there was a real crisis of a shortage, and there would be a plan to get more sake bring us up to date. the would be a plan to get more sake bring us up to date.— bring us up to date. the plan has worked but _ bring us up to date. the plan has worked but has _ bring us up to date. the plan has worked but has the _ bring us up to date. the plan has worked but has the crisis - bring us up to date. the plan has worked but has the crisis gone i bring us up to date. the plan has - worked but has the crisis gone away? not completely.
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you'll remember last summer right through to the run up to christmas we were all talking about the shortage of hgv drivers and noticing the impact. and it was down to different reasons. we were recovering from the pandemic so demand was for goods was rapidly soaring. also leaving the eu cut off a valuable supply of hgv drivers. and older drivers have been retiring and not being replaced. over the past four years the overall number of drivers fell by 53,000. one of the reasons drivers point to is poor facilities. you could be doing a 15 hour day and then you are struggling to park to park up of a night time because everywhere is full. the conditions aren't great, you spend a lot of time parked overnight at services, facilities are pretty poor, or lay—bys, industrial estates where you have got no facilities at all. last year, its estimated that the shortage peaked at 100,000 drivers. you will remember the empty shelves, and those queues around a shortage of petrol. that number has eased slightly.
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partly as the spike in demand began to plateau, but also because of temporary changes to regulations. this included things like allowing deliveries to supermarkets later into the night. and temporarily extending the visa scheme for foreign drivers. it also relaxed the rules around how long drivers can work per day, and shortened the overall fortnightly period drivers are supposed to rest. another blockage was a bottleneck of getting new drivers through the testing system. that number of tests per week has now doubled. you're probably seeing some improvements when you head out shopping. but has the issue gone away? the situation has got better. our members tell us the worst of the crisis has passed although the caveat is that january is the quietest time of the year for logistics. and so we mustn't be complacent as things get busier,
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as demand picks up, as the economy recovers from covid, we do need to make sure that we've got enough drivers who are able to service the economy and provide people with the things people need every day. so you are probably able to get your favourite crisps again. but at a price. it's estimated that haulage costs hit a three year high in december as wages were pushed up, and fuel bills rose. and of course that trickles down to higher cost of living. so easing, but not gone away. we are talking about this almost every day, leaves little incremental bit everywhere, your fuel bills, prices of haulage, their workers, these little bits and bobs means that the general cost of living is going up. we that the general cost of living is auoin u. ~ . that the general cost of living is oiiin u . _ . ., ., that the general cost of living is oiiin u,. ., ., ~' that the general cost of living is oiiin u,. ., ., 4' ., going up. we have made me think of criss. i'm going up. we have made me think of crisps- i'mjust_ going up. we have made me think of crisps. i'mjust remembering, - going up. we have made me think of crisps. i'mjust remembering, a - going up. we have made me think of crisps. i'mjust remembering, a very| crisps. i'm just remembering, a very long time ago, disco, salt and
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vinegar, completely different to the way they are now, they were my favourite crisp.— favourite crisp. they are still delicious- — favourite crisp. they are still delicious. they _ favourite crisp. they are still delicious. they have - favourite crisp. they are still| delicious. they have changed favourite crisp. they are still - delicious. they have changed will sto the delicious. they have changed will stop they are _ delicious. they have changed will stop they are smaller. _ delicious. they have changed willi stop they are smaller. everything delicious. they have changed will. stop they are smaller. everything is smaller. . . . . stop they are smaller. everything is smaller. . , ,, ., stop they are smaller. everything is smaller. . , , , ., ., ., ., , time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. last year saw the highest number of anti—semitic attacks ever recorded in london — up by a third from the previous year. the community security trust, which records such incidents, says there were 1,200 attacks in london in 2021 up from just under a thousand in 2020. new figures suggest more passengers are returning to london's tube and buses since working from home restrictions have been lifted. transport for london says the number of people travelling by tube is up more than 25% since earlyjanuary, and on the bus it's risen by almost 10%. it means on the tube levels are around 60%
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of pre—pandemic levels. it's national apprenticeship week, highlighting the positive impact that apprenticeships make to businesses and the wider economy. the met police apprenticeship scheme has been running for more than a year now, but with the current controversies surrounding the force, what do new recruits think of the organisation's culture and if it can change? so there is no hiding, or hiding behind the recent failures of some of our colleagues, but that is why you need to recruit, you know, good people and good officers that want to be part of the change. and the metropolitan police commissioner dame cressida dick will be taking part in eddie nestor�*s programme on bbc radio london this morning. she'll be answering questions from londoners from 11am. to ask a question call 0800 7312000 or email eddie@bbc.co.uk. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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problems on the tube. the circle line is supended, the district line part suspended between high street kensington and edgware road. the hammersmith and city line also part suspended with severe delays on the metropolitan line. it's because of a signal failure at edgware road. and the victoria line is part suspended because of a track fault at brixton. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday we saw a cold front going through and today that chillier feeling air will start to show its hand. it's already a cool start to this morning, particularly the northern home counties but there's quite a lot of cloud around. we could see a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud but it will sink its way southwards, and behind it lots of sunshine on that cold feeling air. so a largely sunny afternoon and there will be cloud coming and the chilly and brisk north—westerly wind could blow down some showers at times but generally most of us will stay generally dry and temperatures will peak between seven and nine degrees celsius, so a cold feeling day. 0vernight tonight, the winds will lighten and with clear skies in the cold feeling air
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there will be a frost developing into tomorrow morning with temperatures in the rural spots dropping widely below freezing. a cold and frosty start to the day on friday but lots of blue sky and sunshine around and temperatures again a little lower. then we see the high pressure pull away and there will start to be more cloud rolling in from the west. over the weekend, saturday is looking mostly dry and it will turn unsettled, wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning. so, i knew! so, i knew i needed help and i had to get that help, and you know to save myself, but also to save my family.
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ahead of the release of a documentary about his life, footballer wayne rooney tells us about his struggles with alcohol and staying faithful to his wife and childhood sweetheart coleen. to mark 100 years of british broadcasting, strictly�*s 0ti mabuse has been sharing stories with schoolchildren about her own childhood growing up in south africa, in the hope it'll inspire the next generation of storytellers. 0ti joins usjust after 8. he's normally the one who asks the questions, but this morning, documentary—maker louis theroux will be answering ours about his latest series on the impact of social media on all walks of american life. since 2018, deborahjames has used her bbc podcast �*you, me and the big c�* to document her experience of living with incurable bowel cancer. last month she was rushed to hospital — where she was told she may not survive the night, after complications following the growth of her tumour. whilst on the ward, deborah recorded a series of emotional voice memos about her condition.
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she's been speaking to graham satchell ahead of their release on her podcast today. just over a month ago, deborahjames posted some shocking photos on her social media page. she had been rushed to hospital after suffering a massive haemorrhage. i rushed to hospital after suffering a massive haemorrhage.— massive haemorrhage. i don't fall for a million _ massive haemorrhage. i don't fall for a million years _ massive haemorrhage. i don't fall for a million years where - massive haemorrhage. i don't fall for a million years where my - massive haemorrhage. i don't fall for a million years where my life i for a million years where my life would end with a medical drama where you are walking and talking woman and the next minute you don't know if you will survive the next hour and i can't believe i am alive. i cannot believe i am here. on day one of this pod cast we wanted to share the reality of cancer.— the reality of cancer. deborah is one of the _ the reality of cancer. deborah is one of the presenters _ the reality of cancer. deborah is one of the presenters of - the reality of cancer. deborah is one of the presenters of the - the reality of cancer. deborah is| one of the presenters of the pod cast you, me and the big c and has incurable bowel cancer. when she was taken to hospital she decided to record her thoughts on a series of
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voice memos on her phone. it became a kind of coping mechanism. i remember coming downstairs and saying to my children, i love you, i love you, i love you for ever. and i thought i would never see them again. that is horrible to listen to, because what do you say to somebody when you have ten seconds of energy to say it and you don't think you will ever see them again? and there's only a few things that you do say, which is i love you and then you use your energy to in my case, keep conscious. it then you use your energy to in my case, keep conscious.— case, keep conscious. it was deborah's — case, keep conscious. it was deborah's daughter - case, keep conscious. it was deborah's daughter who - case, keep conscious. it was i deborah's daughter who ended case, keep conscious. it was - deborah's daughter who ended up calling the ambulance. my husband found me
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with eloise screaming down the phone, saying you have to help my mummy, because i was unable to articulate things anymore and the only response that we got was, "do you still want an ambulance? "there will be a 30 minute delay on it. "we understand that you are worried, but we cannot get anybody to you sooner." i now know, had i waited for help, i wouldn't be here now. iamso i am so angry about that. had i actually had to wait for the ambulance crew, i would not be alive. and i think that is what upsets me, because i keep on playing out the what if scenario. find upsets me, because i keep on playing out the what if scenario.— out the what if scenario. and the what if scenario _ out the what if scenario. and the what if scenario is _ out the what if scenario. and the what if scenario is that _ out the what if scenario. and the what if scenario is that i - out the what if scenario. and the | what if scenario is that i wouldn't be here. ., ., what if scenario is that i wouldn't behere. ., ., ~ , be here. the london ambulance service told _ be here. the london ambulance service told us _ be here. the london ambulance service told us this _ be here. the london ambulance service told us this must - be here. the london ambulance service told us this must have . be here. the london ambulance i service told us this must have been a very distressing experience and said they had advised that help was on its way but, as is normal in periods of high demand, there could be a potential weight. in the end
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deborah's husband drove her to hospital and she was resuscitated and then had emergency surgery. figs and then had emergency surgery. s harrowing and then had emergency surgery. is harrowing as the whole experience was, i'm in orabout harrowing as the whole experience was, i'm in or about how 20 people can actually save you from dying. that is when people need to be praised and that is when actually the nhs is incredible. yeah, medical science is pretty awesome. people are awesome. the skills that they can do, it'sjust mind blowing, actually. bloody amazing. hyde, deborah, actually. bloody amazing. hyde, deborah. i— actually. bloody amazing. hyde, deborah, i am _ actually. bloody amazing. hyde, deborah, i am dallas. _ actually. bloody amazing. hyde, deborah, i am dallas. welcome| actually. bloody amazing. hyde, l deborah, i am dallas. welcome to deborah, lam dallas. welcome to trinity _ deborah, i am dallas. welcome to trini . , ., ., trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer _ trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five _ trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five years _ trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five years ago - trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five years ago and i trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five years ago and has| bowel cancer five years ago and has had time to think about her own death. . , ., , death. have you seen the film one flew over the _ death. have you seen the film one flew over the cuckoos _ death. have you seen the film one flew over the cuckoos nest? i death. have you seen the film one flew over the cuckoos nest? we i flew over the cuckoos nest? we filmed her _ flew over the cuckoos nest? - filmed her three years ago from visiting her local hospice. she was
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keen to see what good end—of—life can look like. the keen to see what good end-of-life can look like-— can look like. the thing that upset me the most _ can look like. the thing that upset me the most was, _ can look like. the thing that upset me the most was, and _ can look like. the thing that upset me the most was, and you - can look like. the thing that upset me the most was, and you know, | can look like. the thing that upset i me the most was, and you know, i've talked about my death and i've accepted at some point my cancer is going to get me, i never planned for it to be like that. i thought i would have a day, a moment, a week, whatever, to say goodbye, not shouted down the stairs to my children. i think it's a really stark reminder of don't leave things unsaid on a daily basis, and it's quite amazing how much you wish for another sunset or another day or another sunset or another day or another cuddle, or whatever it is, and you can't leave things until tomorrow because there just might not be a tomorrow.
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when she was finally royal from the royal marsden, she posted this. hervoice from the royal marsden, she posted this. her voice recordings made in hospital will be released today as a you, me and the big c pod cast. she remains determined to share every part of her cancerjourney to help others. we've followed herjourney closely, so many people have and every time, and on this occasion it is her ability to share things that you might think you would choose to keep private, and she knows the value of that to other people. that's why she does what she does, and as always, thank you deborah and i hope you are ok at the moment and
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as said there, you can hear those voice memos in full from today. the podcast is you, me and the big c and is available on bbc sounds.— is available on bbc sounds. where are we going _ is available on bbc sounds. where are we going to — is available on bbc sounds. where are we going to go. _ is available on bbc sounds. where are we going to go, mike? - is available on bbc sounds. where are we going to go, mike? lots i is available on bbc sounds. where are we going to go, mike? lots to | are we going to go, mike? lots to et are we going to go, mike? lots to get through- _ are we going to go, mike? lots to get through. the _ are we going to go, mike? lots to get through. the winter _ are we going to go, mike? lots to get through. the winter olympics| get through. the winter olympics shorily— get through. the winter olympics shorily on — get through. the winter olympics shortly on a massive day for rugby league _ shortly on a massive day for rugby league fans and the start of the new season_ league fans and the start of the new season but— league fans and the start of the new season but the premier league is doing _ season but the premier league is doing its— season but the premier league is doing its best to compete with the other— doing its best to compete with the other sport going on. the title race in england — other sport going on. the title race in england and scotland, much tighier— in england and scotland, much lighter in — in england and scotland, much tighter in scotland, but both leaders _ tighter in scotland, but both leaders winning last night. talk about— leaders winning last night. talk about mind games, pep guardiola is doing _ about mind games, pep guardiola is doing his _ about mind games, pep guardiola is doing his best to play down his side's — doing his best to play down his side's march to another title. saying his team are not the best in the world, and that chelsea are better but theres no debating the stats after they extended their runaway lead.
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performance of the night goes to southampton with the boss saying it's the _ southampton with the boss saying it's the best they played under his charge _ it's the best they played under his charge coming back from 2—1 down to beat tottenham. they climb to tenth and spurs _ beat tottenham. they climb to tenth and spurs stay seventh and it is a blow— and spurs stay seventh and it is a blow for— and spurs stay seventh and it is a blow for a — and spurs stay seventh and it is a blow for a champions league place. crystal— blow for a champions league place. crystal palace fans witnessed the sublime — sublime from wilfried zaha. how about this — sublime from wilfried zaha. how about this for an equaliser? brilliant. _ about this for an equaliser? brilliant, but then the ridiculous as he _ brilliant, but then the ridiculous as he wasted a chance to win the game _ as he wasted a chance to win the game a _ as he wasted a chance to win the game a couple of minutes later. how about _ game a couple of minutes later. how about this _ game a couple of minutes later. how about this for a penalty? absolutely awful although he did seem to blame the turf— awful although he did seem to blame the turf by— awful although he did seem to blame the turf by the penalty spot. how can you _ the turf by the penalty spot. how can you put it that wide? it had to be the _ can you put it that wide? it had to be the turf. in his defence. a fast and furious — be the turf. in his defence. a fast and furious game at aston villa with villa and _ and furious game at aston villa with villa and leeds sharing six goals, jacob _ villa and leeds sharing six goals, jacob ramsay with two for villa and llorente _ jacob ramsay with two for villa and llorente made to share the points in one of— llorente made to share the points in one of the _ llorente made to share the points in one of the best games of the season. madness _ one of the best games of the season. madness at _ one of the best games of the season. madness at villa park. celtic survived _ madness at villa park. celtic survived a dramatic fightback at amity— survived a dramatic fightback at amity to —
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survived a dramatic fightback at amity to cling onto top spot in the scottish— amity to cling onto top spot in the scottish premiership and they were 2-0 up— scottish premiership and they were 2—0 up cruising before aberdeen league _ 2—0 up cruising before aberdeen league -- — 2—0 up cruising before aberdeen league —— drew level only for the leaders _ league —— drew level only for the leaders unbeaten run went to 20 games— leaders unbeaten run went to 20 games with a goal from jota but rangers— games with a goal from jota but rangers are a point behind after beating — rangers are a point behind after beating hibernian. it's a massive year ahead for rugby league, with the world cup being staged in england, and tonight, the men's super league gets underway, with the reigning champions st helens taking on catalans dragons, with saints looking to make history, by winning a fourth consecutive title. adam wild reports. there's no stopping st helens. super league winners again. st helens, the super league champions. and again. it's a hat—trick of titles. and again. champions three times in a row, the much—vaunted three—peat. now the new season, the new challenge is opening up. tonight it begins here. st helens against the team they beat in last year's grand final, the french, catalan dragons. much of the talk is around making history and that fourth successive super league title.
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remember, no team has ever done that before. there is, of course, long way to go. but when you've been as dominant as st helens have been over recent seasons, confidence can be hard to contain. it's a feel—good factor, a buzz, felt by the whole town. it may be their bitter rivals up the road, wigan, who are famously associated with pies, but burchill�*s has been in st helens for 100 years and they are saints through and through. it's an enormous part of the town, yes it is. we find in our small business here that when saints play, our trade goes up. it makes everybody feel a bit happier. and it all adds to the community spirit of the town, and that is what lifts the atmosphere up for the club and for the term itself. the only thing saints didn't win last season was the league leader's shield. that went to tonight's opponents catalan, one of two french teams in this seasons competition.
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again built on local rivalries, and now forging new ones. but back in st helens, they are not short of sporting inspiration. darts superstar michael smith returning to his old school in the town, launching an education campaign for children. you are born with it. you don't support saints, you are born supporting saints and first and foremost you love any sport in st helens, especially rugby league. yeah, i do support saints, because they are the best in the world. and with st helens winning, also reigning champions, the kids have plenty to look up to. jack wellsby grew up down the road, a local lad who found global attention as a teenager when his last—gasp try sealed st helens the 2020 season. you will never see a finish to a rugby league game like that ever again. being a young lad you dream
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of winning one, and then i've gone and won to win two years, then three in three years, and i think that taste, that desire doesn't become any smaller because of that. i don't see why i can't do four or at least challenge for it. but reaching the top is one thing, staying there, something else altogether. towering above the town, above it all, a sculpture — the dream. as the new season starts and history potentially awaits, it feels perhaps more fitting than ever. adam wilde, bbc news, saint helens. we are nearly a week into the winter olympics in beijing, and still no sign of a first medal for team gb overnight. but as the chair of uk sport, dame katherine grainger, told us yesterday says she's not panicking yet — let's speak to our reporter katherine reporter katherine downes in beijing. the figure skating has been mind blowing. we were here to cover one of the big stories on the games, not
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just in figure skating that the games overall, the final chapter of the huge rivalry between nathan chen and the three—time world champion against the two—time olympic champion and it was advantage to nathan chen coming into the final event today with an 18 point advantage against his opponent and his opponent had to, and lay the big gun and tried the never before attempted quad axle, didn't get it, attempted quad axle, didn't get it, a huge high—stakes gamble from the japanese superstar but it was nathan chen who came out and skated absolutely exquisitely and here he is in his eltonjohn rocket man free skate, and not a foot wrong and he is the olympic champion after heartbreakfour years is the olympic champion after heartbreak four years ago when a short programme, disaster sent him backin short programme, disaster sent him back in 17th place and managed to fight back into fifth but now he's at the top. the big gamble pulled
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him from eighth to fourth but no olympic medal now and nathan chen is the olympic champion. it's been incredible. the olympic champion. it's been incredible-— the olympic champion. it's been incredible. ., , ., incredible. compelling viewing. can ou ive incredible. compelling viewing. can you give us— incredible. compelling viewing. can you give us some — incredible. compelling viewing. can you give us some hope _ incredible. compelling viewing. can you give us some hope for - incredible. compelling viewing. can you give us some hope for team i incredible. compelling viewing. can i you give us some hope for team gb? i know there is hugh nightingale today and the curlers in the round robin action. where can we look for a sniff of a medal now? it’s action. where can we look for a sniff of a medal now?— action. where can we look for a sniff of a medal now? it's been a bit of a slow _ sniff of a medal now? it's been a bit of a slow burn, _ sniff of a medal now? it's been a bit of a slow burn, hasn't - sniff of a medal now? it's been a bit of a slow burn, hasn't it? it i sniff of a medal now? it's been a bit of a slow burn, hasn't it? it is only day six. have faith. team gb only day six. have faith. team gb only won theirfirst only day six. have faith. team gb only won their first medal of the last olympics on day seven so there's plenty to come in the next ten days and as you say, there are chances for medals elsewhere as dominic parsons one is first medal in it for years ago and then was lizzie yarnold and laura dees winning those medals. no lizzie yarnold laura dees is around so they could be a medal there. brad hall, his crew in the two—man bobsleigh, they are in the top five in the
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world rankings, so they could be a possibility there. kirsty muir goes in the slopestyle and came fifth in the big air, and a huge young talent for tv —— team gb and you mention the curlers but it's not looking too good as the men are currently 2—1 down against italy and eve muirhead who won a brunch eight years ago, she is back at the games but the women's rink lost their first match to switzerland —— won a bronze. so while the team gb bosses are not panicking yet, they will beginning to wonder when the games will get going for the team.— to wonder when the games will get going for the team. thanks. we will let ou io going for the team. thanks. we will let you go up _ going for the team. thanks. we will let you go up to _ going for the team. thanks. we will let you go up to giving _ going for the team. thanks. we will let you go up to giving us _ going for the team. thanks. we will let you go up to giving us some i going for the team. thanks. we willl let you go up to giving us some hope and snatching it away from us. lovely stuff. great to see you. i'd forgotten that it was seven days before we won a medal last time. we can calm before we won a medal last time. - can calm down. before we won a medal last time. we can calm down. but _ before we won a medal last time. we can calm down. but the _ before we won a medal last time. we can calm down. but the curlers, i can calm down. but the curlers, there is still— can calm down. but the curlers, there is still time, _ can calm down. but the curlers, there is still time, only - can calm down. but the curlers, there is still time, only the i can calm down. but the curlers, | there is still time, only the early stages and time to get it right. we are stages and time to get it right. - are getting close because we got into the final of the speed skating
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yesterday and tentacles coming out. time to have a look at the weather. good morning. no n o te nta cles no tentacles in the weather, more like icicles on a cold start for some of us with rain, sleet, snow, thunder and lightning and ice on the forecast but also some sunshine as well for some. you can see on the satellite this weather front continues to push away from the south and it's this area of low pressure, a potent area i want to draw your attention to because it has been producing snow at low levels as you come through the night, some rain, some hail, thunder and lightning on the risk of ice in scotland, northern ireland and northern england. we also have gusty winds around this area of low pressure, especially around the outer hebrides where there will be gusts of 70 up to 75 miles an hour but inland we are looking at gusts up but inland we are looking at gusts up to gale force and that will transfer east through the course of the day, showers and windy conditions in northern ireland but the england and wales we will say
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goodbye to the cloud and the rain from the morning and it will brighten up with some sunshine but where ever you are it is going to be a blustery day and by the afternoon as the low pressure pushes towards the north sea the stronger winds will be across southern scotland, the pennines and in through the north—east of england. temperatures ranging from one in lerwick up to six in newcastle and nine in plymouth but because of the wind in the direction of the wind it will feel colder than that and for example in lerwick it will feel more like —5. through the evening and overnight the low pressure does move away and it will be windy for a time on the east coast and we have clear skies, wintry showers on high ground in the west and we are looking at a widespread frost, a sharp frost across scotland where we have lying snow, the temperature could fall away to —10 degrees, so a cold start with a risk of ice and a lot of sunshine to start with and a few showers in the west but through the course of the day the cloud will start to build ahead of our next
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band of rain and once again it will feel cold with temperatures between four and 9 degrees. as we head into saturday the front i showed you on friday is going to be making its progress, pushing southwards and eastwards, taking rain with it and windy conditions as well. it looks at this stage like it will stay dry for most of the south—east during daylight hours and the temperature range is between six and 8 degrees, so that front there, as we head into sunday, we have an area of low pressure coming up from the south and there is still an element of uncertainty as to how far north of the area of low pressure will travel but it's what we think at the moment and it will coming across southern parts of england, south wales, into the midlands and east anglia and quite easily it could travel further north, so if you have outdoor plans on sunday, well worth staying in touch with the weather forecast and as we push further north, on current thinking, once again we are looking at drier conditions, some sunshine
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and a few showers. the wind changes direction to more of a southerly component to it so it won't be as cold and looking at nine or ten in the south and between five and nine pushing north, just a heads up, the middle of next week is looking rather wet and windy as well. when the weather is like that, because charlie noticed you are almost like the weather forecast today, you are wearing what it is. thank you, charlie. it's like snowdrops or raindrops or something on your blue dress. it is look like you have been incorporated into it. i approve of that. you flatter me. sadly not that much thinking goes into it. it is what has been ironed. there you go, charlie. thanks. we will see later. _ sir keir starmer will meet nato's secretary general in brussels
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today, to discuss the tensions between russia and ukraine. he is the first labour leader to visit the headquarters in more than 10 years — marking a change in policy from his predecessor, jeremy corbyn, who was a vocal critic of nato. we're joined now by the shadow defence secretary, john healey. good morning. welcome to the programme. what is the significance of keir starmer and this visit, considering the comments made by his predecessor, jeremy corbyn? what should we read into it? i predecessor, jeremy corbyn? what should we read into it?— should we read into it? i think you should we read into it? i think you should read _ should we read into it? i think you should read into _ should we read into it? i think you should read into it _ should we read into it? i think you should read into it what _ should we read into it? i think you should read into it what keir i should read into it what keir starmer— should read into it what keir starmer will tell the secretary general— starmer will tell the secretary general this afternoon that labour is the _ general this afternoon that labour is the party of nato and it was a labour— is the party of nato and it was a labour government post—war that founded _ labour government post—war that founded nato 70 years ago and our commitment to it is unshakeable because — commitment to it is unshakeable because this is an essential alliance _ because this is an essential alliance that defends our democracy and security in western europe and underlining that to the secretary general. — underlining that to the secretary general, in person, is an important
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move _ general, in person, is an important move which— general, in person, is an important move which keir starmer places the highest _ move which keir starmer places the highest priority on. is move which keir starmer places the highest priority on.— highest priority on. is the relationship _ highest priority on. is the relationship the - highest priority on. is the relationship the labour . highest priority on. is the i relationship the labour party highest priority on. is the - relationship the labour party have with nato strong at the moment or does it need bolstering? it is show does it need bolstering? it is strong and — does it need bolstering? it is strong and unshakeable commitment. and deep— strong and unshakeable commitment. and deep in_ strong and unshakeable commitment. and deep in our roots as the labour party _ and deep in our roots as the labour pa _ , ., and deep in our roots as the labour pa . , ., , , party. sorry to interrupt, but jeremy corbyn _ party. sorry to interrupt, but jeremy corbyn obviously i party. sorry to interrupt, but jeremy corbyn obviously did | party. sorry to interrupt, but i jeremy corbyn obviously did not party. sorry to interrupt, but - jeremy corbyn obviously did not hold those values when he led the labour party which is why i ask now if the relationship needs bolstering? i understand that but from neil kinnock— understand that but from neil kinnock tojeremy understand that but from neil kinnock to jeremy corbyn, labour has ione kinnock to jeremy corbyn, labour has gone into— kinnock to jeremy corbyn, labour has gone into elections unshakeable in the membership of nato and its needed — the membership of nato and its needed more now than ever and the russian _ needed more now than ever and the russian aggression against ukraine underlines the need for nato unity and part— underlines the need for nato unity and part of— underlines the need for nato unity and part of the reason that keir starmer— and part of the reason that keir starmer and i and part of the reason that keir starmerand i are and part of the reason that keir starmer and i are seeing the secretary general this afternoon in nato headquarters is to underline that the _ nato headquarters is to underline that the government has labour's full support for what it is doing to help ukraine defend itself and what
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it is doing _ help ukraine defend itself and what it is doing in standing up to russia. _ it is doing in standing up to russia. if— it is doing in standing up to russia, if it does invade, with the toughest — russia, if it does invade, with the toughest sanctions, and we also offer— toughest sanctions, and we also offer the — toughest sanctions, and we also offer the government the full support— offer the government the full support for any moves necessary to reinforce _ support for any moves necessary to reinforce nato allies against further— reinforce nato allies against further aggression from russia. when ou sa ou further aggression from russia. when you say you are _ further aggression from russia. when you say you are for— further aggression from russia. when you say you are for the _ further aggression from russia. levies! you say you are for the government. or, you recently said that the prime minister is, and i quote, incapable of playing the statesman role and offering the british leadership required. that doesn't sound like full support? it doesn't sound like a united front. brute full support? it doesn't sound like a united front.— full support? it doesn't sound like a united front. we are offering full su- iort a united front. we are offering full support for— a united front. we are offering full support for the — a united front. we are offering full support for the sceptics _ a united front. we are offering full support for the sceptics trying i a united front. we are offering full support for the sceptics trying to l support for the sceptics trying to take to _ support for the sceptics trying to take to back ukraine and put in place _ take to back ukraine and put in place tough sanctions if russia does invade. _ place tough sanctions if russia does invade. but— place tough sanctions if russia does invade, but that is a big weakness for britain — invade, but that is a big weakness for britain. we are not providing the top — for britain. we are not providing the top international diplomacy required — the top international diplomacy required to try and help deter russia. — required to try and help deter russia, pursue the diplomatic path and when — russia, pursue the diplomatic path and when you have a prime minister that is— and when you have a prime minister that isjust _ and when you have a prime minister that isjust trying and when you have a prime minister that is just trying to get and when you have a prime minister that isjust trying to get by and when you have a prime minister that is just trying to get by day to day and _ that is just trying to get by day to day and has been able to do the job
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we require — day and has been able to do the job we require is a nation, the defence secretary— we require is a nation, the defence secretary has done his best, but we need _ secretary has done his best, but we need the _ secretary has done his best, but we need the prime minister offering the sort of— need the prime minister offering the sort of leadership that other countries have because holding the western— countries have because holding the western alliance and strengthening nato and _ western alliance and strengthening nato and being determined to confront — nato and being determined to confront russia both abroad and at home _ confront russia both abroad and at home is— confront russia both abroad and at home is absolutely essential to our security— home is absolutely essential to our security and the future of ukraine as welt _ security and the future of ukraine as well. ., ,, . ., , as well. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is as well. the foreign secretary, liz truss. is in — as well. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is in moscow _ as well. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is in moscow meeting i as well. the foreign secretary, liz l truss, is in moscow meeting leaders and ben wallace is also travelling to moscow today. boris johnson and ben wallace is also travelling to moscow today. borisjohnson has been involved in talks already. what more do you expect the government to do? �* ., , more do you expect the government to do? , ., more do you expect the government to do? boris johnson sadly has not done what other western _ do? boris johnson sadly has not done what other western leaders - do? boris johnson sadly has not done what other western leaders like i do? boris johnson sadly has not done what other western leaders like the l what other western leaders like the us and _ what other western leaders like the us and germany and france have been trying _ us and germany and france have been trying to— us and germany and france have been trying to do _ us and germany and france have been trying to do. what britain now needs to do— trying to do. what britain now needs to do and _ trying to do. what britain now needs to do and boris johnson trying to do. what britain now needs to do and borisjohnson now needs trying to do. what britain now needs to do and boris johnson now needs to make _ to do and boris johnson now needs to make sure _ to do and boris johnson now needs to make sure that for too long we have not put _ make sure that for too long we have not put in _ make sure that for too long we have not put in place the legislation that will— not put in place the legislation that will close down london as the weak—
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that will close down london as the weak link— that will close down london as the weak link in laundering some of the dirty money that keeps vladimir putin— dirty money that keeps vladimir putin in— dirty money that keeps vladimir putin in powerand dirty money that keeps vladimir putin in power and we need to have this legislation which is an urgent and overdue in order that we have the tough — and overdue in order that we have the tough sanctions ready to go if russia _ the tough sanctions ready to go if russia does invade ukraine but also at the _ russia does invade ukraine but also at the moment to help deter russia by saying _ at the moment to help deter russia by saying that the economic and financial— by saying that the economic and financial cost to you and your country — financial cost to you and your country will be severe if you do. just one — country will be severe if you do. just one question to you about the announcement by the prime minister in the house of commons yesterday that it in the house of commons yesterday thatitis in the house of commons yesterday that it is likely, or possible, but the final date for isolation rules will be brought forward and we will learn about that in about two weeks, ten days. do you agree that this is the right time or it soon will be the right time or it soon will be the right time to scrap the covid restrictions we have lived with? what we want to see is the medical and scientific basis on which decisions _
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and scientific basis on which decisions like that need to be taken — decisions like that need to be taken if— decisions like that need to be taken. if we can lift the restrictions, all well and good, but we want _ restrictions, all well and good, but we want to— restrictions, all well and good, but we want to be able to make sure that we want to be able to make sure that we keep— we want to be able to make sure that we keep the — we want to be able to make sure that we keep the protections in place and do not _ we keep the protections in place and do not lose _ we keep the protections in place and do not lose the impetus behind the vaccination — do not lose the impetus behind the vaccination and booster programmes that have _ vaccination and booster programmes that have been so successful to date _ that have been so successful to date. . ~ that have been so successful to date. ., ,, i. ., that have been so successful to date. ., ,, ., date. thank you for your time with us on breakfast. _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. last year saw the highest number of anti—semitic attacks ever recorded in london up by a third from the previous year. the community security trust, which records such incidents, says there were over 1,200 attacks in london in 2021 up from just under1,000 in 2020. new figures suggest more passengers are returning to london's tube and buses since working from home restrictions have been lifted. transport for london says the number of people travelling by tube is up
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more than 25% since earlyjanuary, and on the bus it's risen by almost 10%. it means on the tube levels are around 60% of pre—pandemic levels. it's national apprenticeship week, highlighting the positive impact that apprenticeships make to businesses and the wider economy. the met police apprenticeship scheme has been running for more than a year now, but with the current controversies surrounding the force, what do new recruits think of the organisation's culture and if it can change? so there is no hiding, or hiding behind the recent failures of some of our colleagues, but that is why you need to recruit, you know, good people and good officers that want to be part of the change. and the metropolitan police commissioner dame cressida dick will be taking part in eddie nestor�*s programme on bbc radio london this morning. she'll be answering questions from londoners from 11am. to ask a question call 0800 7312000 or email eddie@bbc.co.uk. if you're heading out on public
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transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. problems on the tube. the circle line is suspended, the district has severe delays. the hammersmith and city line is part suspended with severe delays on the metropolitan line. it's because of a signal failure at edgware road. and the victoria line is part suspended because of a track fault at brixton. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday we saw a cold front going through and today that chillier feeling air will start to show its hand. it's already a cool start to this morning, particularly the northern home counties but there's quite a lot of cloud around. we could see a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud but it will sink its way southwards, and behind it lots of sunshine on that cold feeling air. so a largely sunny afternoon and there will be cloud coming and the chilly and brisk north—westerly wind could blow down some showers at times but generally most of us will stay generally dry and temperatures will peak between seven and nine degrees
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celsius, so a cold feeling day. overnight tonight, the winds will lighten and with clear skies in the cold feeling air there will be a frost developing into tomorrow morning with temperatures in the rural spots dropping widely below freezing. a cold and frosty start to the day on friday but lots of blue sky and sunshine around and temperatures again a little lower. then we see the high pressure pull away and there will start to be more cloud rolling in from the west. over the weekend, saturday is looking mostly dry and it will turn unsettled, wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. 1,000 british troops are put on standby as the prime minister and foreign secretary head for diplomatic talks over the crisis in ukraine. detectives are to contact 50 people over lockdown parties in downing street, as police widen their investigation. wayne rooney opens up to breakfast about his alcohol and marriage problems, and how he feared his binge drinking
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could have killed someone. i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help in order to save myself, but also to save my family. mind the gap. it's growing and manchester city get a helping hand from brentford, as they extend their big lead in the premier league title race. good morning. some potentially disruptive weather across the northern half of the country today, gales, even severe gales, and some snow showers for a time. further south the rain will clear and for most it will be a day of sunshine and a few showers. all of the details throughout the programme. it's thursday 10th february. our main story. borisjohnson is embarking on a fresh round of diplomacy in belgium and poland, amid fears of a russian invasion of ukraine. in brussels, the prime minister will tell nato's secretary general that britain is putting 1,000 troops
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on standby in case of a humanitarian crisis. we're joined now from brussels by our europe correspondent nick beake. good morning. so, what should we expect on the agenda and in terms of timing today?— timing today? good morning, naga, charlie. timing today? good morning, naga, charlie- the — timing today? good morning, naga, charlie. the prime _ timing today? good morning, naga, charlie. the prime minister - timing today? good morning, naga, charlie. the prime minister has i timing today? good morning, naga, charlie. the prime minister has a i charlie. the prime minister has a day of diplomacy ahead of him, and the message we are told he wants to be sending is reinforcing western support for ukraine in the face of what they see as russian aggression. he is coming to brussels to meet the head of nato, and worth remembering all of this, ukraine is not part of nato. if there were to be an attack on ukraine, it would be a case of an attack on one country is an attack on all, which is the case if you are in the club. russia doesn't want ukraine tojoin at in the club. russia doesn't want ukraine to join at all in the future. borisjohnson will send a message today that any country in europe can make the decision whether it wants tojoin. europe can make the decision whether it wants to join. he will be sending that message here in brussels. then
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he is under poland, because we have seen western allies sent troops to the front line there, certainly to some of the areas they have got, military places, in response, they say, to the russian build—up of troops on the border with ukraine. we are specifically hearing that more military assets from the uk are moving to that area. worth stressing that both sides say there can be a diplomatic solution to this, there is a keen sense that they want de—escalates. but there are war games or military drills taking place between russian and belarusian troops. these are rehearsals, not for real, but at a time of increased tension, there is an increase of many people thinking they could be a mishap or misunderstanding. everyone will be extremely keen to avoid that to the diplomacy continues. thank ou ve to the diplomacy continues. thank you very much. — to the diplomacy continues. thank you very much, nick. _ meanwhile, the foreign secretary, liz truss is due to meet her russian counterpart, sergei lavrov, in moscow today.
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the visit is the first by a british foreign secretary for more than four years. she's vowed to make clear that russia must immediately withdraw its forces and respect ukraine's sovereignty, "or face severe consequences". the metropolitan police is to begin contacting more than 50 people as part of its inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street and whitehall with the prime minister and his wife, carriejohnson, expected to be included. it comes after a leaked photograph of borisjohnson at a christmas quiz, shows staff in party hats, with a bottle of sparkling wine on the table. our political correspondent chris mason joins us now. talk to me a little bit about the picture and where this leaves the investigation.— investigation. good morning, charlie. investigation. good morning, charlie- so — investigation. good morning, charlie. so bubbly— investigation. good morning, charlie. so bubbly on - investigation. good morning, charlie. so bubbly on the i investigation. good morning, i charlie. so bubbly on the table, tinsel around the neck of one of the people photographed. someone else in a santa hat. in mitigation there does appear to be a bottle of sanitiser on the table as well. this
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is an alternative view of a do that we already knew about, the alternative view does offer us an image of the bottle, though, which rather cranks up the idea that this wasn't exactly a conventional work event. so the police are reviewing whether or not to look at this whole event again, just as they tell us under operation hillman, as they call it, that they are about to send about 15 about 50 e—mails who were at the parties which should not have been happening because of a time of lockdown. they call them questionnaires which is a bit fluffy but they say it is illegal document and they expect truthful answers provided within a week. —— they say it is a legal document. and unless there is a legitimate excuse for people being at these occasions, a fixed penalty notice could come the way of those the police are looking
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into. rememberthe way of those the police are looking into. remember the scale of what the police are looking at, 500 documents and 300 pictures that they have been sent by the cabinet office, and they say, the police, they are willing to go back to the cabinet office, the government department that looked into all of this, to ask them for more information if necessary. downing street promises as they will tell us if the prime minister does receive a fixed penalty notice. speaking to them this morning, they are not confirming whether or not the prime minister is standing by his inbox awaiting an e—mailfrom the police. his inbox awaiting an e-mail from the iolice. . ~ two cats owned by the west ham defender kurt zouma have been taken into the care of the rspca, after videos emerged on social media showing the 27—year old hitting, dropping and kicking one of them. our reporter matt gravelling is at the london stadium for us this morning. matt, good morning. lots of people
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commenting about the decision to play zouma yesterday, and waiting for a response from the club. that’s for a response from the club. that's ri i ht, for a response from the club. that's right. naga- — for a response from the club. that's right. naga. we _ for a response from the club. that's right, naga. we know— for a response from the club. that's right, naga. we know that - for a response from the club. that's right, naga. we know that the i for a response from the club. t'isgt�*s right, naga. we know that the club are undertaking an internal investigation after this video emerged on social media on monday, which showed the french international punching and kicking and hitting a cat. we know that after that the club were quick to condemn the actions, and they find the defender two weeks wages, £250,000. eyebrows were raised following a 2k hours later here when he was in part of the team, he played 90 against watford and they won the game 1—0 to stop gary lineker said the decision to field the player was tone deaf. the wildlife presenter chris packham said it was a disgrace. following this, the two cats owned by mr zouma
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have been taken into care of the rspca, the police are also investigating. 250,000 people and counting have taken to an online petition saying they want kurt zouma to be prosecuted. the decision to field him is hitting the club in the pocket with an american travel firm is dropping sponsorship of the club, and vitality, another sponsor, dropping their sponsorship. and a devious dropping kurt zouma for the foreseeable future. —— and i adidas also dropping their sponsorship of kurt zuma. it remains to be seen whether he will be played in their game at the weekend. former footballer wayne rooney says he feared he could have died or killed someone because of his binge drinking. rooney says he felt he had to keep his struggles with alcohol and mental health secret during his time as a player. he's been speaking to breakfast ahead of the release
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of a new documentary about his life. you make mistakes, which i did, and that could have been girls, it could have been drink—driving which i have done, it could have been killing someone. you could kill yourself. and that's a bad place to be. so i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help, and in order to save myself, but also to save my family. you can see that full interview here on breakfast at 8.30am this morning. now, if you were watching yesterday you might remember we brought you the story of 5—year—old beau, who is living with an aggressive form of cancer, known as a neuroblastoma. beau, who has been undergoing treatment, joined us on the sofa alongside her mum shirley, who has been trying to raise more than £300,000 for a specialist clinical trial in new york. following their appearance on breakfast, shirley sent us this update. now thanks to that final push after that bbc interview,
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we have hit the target. but please do not be under any illusion that i do not realise that this is down to you. thanks to your shares, your effort, your dedication, everything that you have done, has sat me on that couch today. and allowed me and given me the opportunity to share beau's story to the nation. we've just hit the target and she sleeps. you're going to sloan, beau—beau. sleep tight, baby. love you. we wish the whole family are very successful trip to new york for the clinical trial. i am seeing snow in the corner of my eye, what's going on, where is that?
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it is at livingston, some of hers have had some snow overnight, even at sea level, this is from one of our weather watchers. there are so much stronger wind to come today, already we have got them in the outer hebrides, gusts of up to 75 miles an hour potentially, as well as snow at lower levels, some hail, thunder and lightning and some rain. all of that is pushing east through the day, the strongest winds will transfer towards southern scotland and north—east england later. we also have a band of cloud and made it clear from the south—east, as it does so, it will brighten up and we will see some sunshine. a few showers in northern ireland and north—west england. and blustery wherever you are. the strongest winds are moving east, so there could be some travel disruption. the
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temperatures are two to 9 degrees, and on the winter chill, and it will feel like —2 in northern scotland. a few wintry showers on higher ground towards the west. —10 is what you can expect in the snow fields in scotland. a risk of ice in the morning, dry weather, showers in the west, the cloud builds in and we will see some rain later. tomorrow will see some rain later. tomorrow will feel a little bit cold. all remaining covid restrictions in england, including the legal requirement to self—isolate, could be lifted within a matter of weeks. the current rules are due to expire on 24th march but borisjohnson says he plans to bring that forward by a month, as long as "encouraging trends" in the data continue. so is this the time to start thinking about living with covid? we're nowjoined by epidemiologist, professor mike tildesley.
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good morning to you, nice to see you. on that big question first of all, many people scratching their heads, going, what about this timing? what do you make of that? i think the timing is the key question here. we would all agree that at some point, we need to go back into living with covid in a way that we have a relaxation of all of these restrictions. but whether it is the right time now is more up for debate. if we look at the data, we are seeing that cases are going down, we are reporting 60 or 70,000 per day as compared with 200,000 at the peak. hospital admissions are quite a long way below where they were at the peak and significantly below where they were in january and february last year. so that certainly is feeding into, presumably, these decisions that are likely to happen. but the key thing is, what will happen if indeed these relaxations come into place? how are people going to behave, are people still going to isolate, if they have
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symptoms, and our employer is going to support people to do that? that is where the uncertainty lies. it's still very important that if people have symptoms, they don't go into work when they are sick and increased risk by doing so. 50. work when they are sick and increased risk by doing so. so, you went through _ increased risk by doing so. so, you went through in _ increased risk by doing so. so, you went through in some _ increased risk by doing so. so, you went through in some detail i increased risk by doing so. so, you went through in some detail where increased risk by doing so. so, you i went through in some detail where we are in terms of the figures. are we flatlining now in terms of where things are? is it stabilising, effectively?— things are? is it stabilising, effectively? well, we are still seeini effectively? well, we are still seeing the — effectively? well, we are still seeing the trends _ effectively? well, we are still seeing the trends are - effectively? well, we are still seeing the trends are going l effectively? well, we are still- seeing the trends are going down in terms of hospital admissions. we are down to about 1500 hospital admissions per day compared to the peak at the start of january which is about 2000. the trend suggests they are still going down. but of course what we find is, whenever there is a relaxation or a policy change, that doesn't slow the rate of decline. and we might that that —— that does slow the rate of decline and we might expect that to
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happen if these isolation rules change. figs happen if these isolation rules chanie. �* . . happen if these isolation rules chanie. . , ., , happen if these isolation rules chanie. a. , ., ,, , change. as and when this happens, ou talk change. as and when this happens, you talk about _ change. as and when this happens, you talk about how— change. as and when this happens, you talk about how people - change. as and when this happens, you talk about how people will i change. as and when this happens, | you talk about how people will react and how that will affect the spread then. do they try and model to any degree how people react and what impact that will have? do you know anything about modelling around this decision? . , anything about modelling around this decision? ., , ., decision? certainly there are attem its decision? certainly there are attempts to _ decision? certainly there are attempts to try _ decision? certainly there are attempts to try and - decision? certainly there are attempts to try and model i decision? certainly there are i attempts to try and model people's behaviour but as an epidemiologist, that's probably the hardest thing to try and build into a model. there is always huge levels of uncertainty in terms of how people will behave and quite a lot of variability. we see this with mask wearing. when the legal requirement around masks is dropped, even anecdotally, if you go to the supermarket, you will see that there are a lot of variability is in people who still wear masks and people who do not. when we build that into models, it important to put in uncertainty around that and try to predict what we might expect
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for a range of different assumptions regarding how people are going to behave. ., ,,., regarding how people are going to behave. ., . ., , , behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen _ behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen ahead _ behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen ahead of _ behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen ahead of time, i behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen ahead of time, as i behave. professor, clearly, if this does happen ahead of time, as is| does happen ahead of time, as is suggested by the prime minister, that would make the uk the first country to fully relax restrictions. that would be, i think in the world. clearly that is a bold claim to have against your name, but at the same time it means you cannot look anywhere else and ask what the effect has been of that.- effect has been of that. that's absolutely _ effect has been of that. that's absolutely right, _ effect has been of that. that's absolutely right, and - effect has been of that. that's absolutely right, and i- effect has been of that. that's absolutely right, and i think . effect has been of that. that's l absolutely right, and i think this is where we need to be a little bit cautious and if indeed this does happen, very carefully monitor the data. scientists would say the pandemic is clearly not over. we are obviously in a much better position this year than we were this time last year with very high levels of vaccination, but it's not over yet. in the longer term, i think we all very much hope we are living alongside covid without restrictions in place and hopefully with good
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levels of vaccination for the vulnerable, but it's very important that we do monitor any changes as we get back to normality to determine what effect that might have. what what effect that might have. what have we learned _ what effect that might have. what have we learned about _ what effect that might have. what have we learned about the time of year, the climate, about what relationship that has with how covid spreads? this clearly will be coming in in springtime, february into march and april?— in in springtime, february into march and april? in in springtime, february into march and aril? ~ , ., ., march and april? absolutely and that does have an — march and april? absolutely and that does have an effect _ march and april? absolutely and that does have an effect stop _ march and april? absolutely and that does have an effect stop we - march and april? absolutely and that does have an effect stop we do - march and april? absolutely and that does have an effect stop we do know| does have an effect stop we do know that all respiratory viruses tend to spread more in the winter when people are indoors more, the virus likes spreading in indoor settings, where people are in close passivity. as we tend to move into warmer weather, we saw it last year as well, we seek cases come down, we do generally see the pressure coming off of the hospitals. as we get into march and april we will hopefully see this coming right down. we are not quite there yet. we are talking about the end of february potentially when the restrictions
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might change so we do have a while before we get to the warmer weather. always good to talk to, professor mike tildesley, an epidemiologist, talk to us this morning. —— talking to us. west ham has issued defender, kurt zouma, with a fine for "the maximum amount possible", after a video emerged online of him drop—kicking and hitting one of his pet cats. the club has been criticised for its decision to play the 27—year—old earlier this week. we're joined now by the chairman of league two club tranmere rovers, and former chief executive of the fa, mark palios. good morning to you. i understand you have not seen the video, but you are aware of what happened in it. i suppose my question is, if one of your players did this, at tranmere rovers, and it came to light before a game, do you think it is right to play them? i a game, do you think it is right to play them?—
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a game, do you think it is right to -la them? ~ , , , , play them? i think the issues, it is difficult for — play them? i think the issues, it is difficult for the _ play them? i think the issues, it is difficult for the club. _ play them? i think the issues, it is difficult for the club. david - play them? i think the issues, it is difficult for the club. david moyes| difficult for the club. david moyes when he spoke gave the answer with what he looks after, that's the technical aspect of the club, playing the game, and the football perspective, he gave his decision that he thought it was right to play the player concerned. i think if you then look at the club as a whole, it's the duty of the club to look at the more long—term aspect and that the more long—term aspect and that the short—term aspects to some extent which had emigrated —— which i delegated to the manager. the long—term aspect of things like the brand value. i think the phrase they used was disappointing, i think if you look at the statement that west ham have made, they hinted at further sanctions, depending on the outcome of an investigation by the rspca. i'm not sure come in a normal case, you would stand back and look at the outcome of the investigation,
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in the city until proven guilty but here i am not so sure that the —— innocent until proven guilty. but here i am not so sure that the investigation will add anything to the debate. you then come down to the debate. you then come down to the decision of playing or not playing the player or even suspending them pending the investigation. the only thing that i can say is that i think the best description of it is it is tone deaf, if you look at the outcry that has come along, to allow the player to play. the thing that would be at the back of my mind, and i don't know the facts, is whether or not the police investigation, i think essex police might investigate, and the potential criminal investigations coming where a frenchman abroad can be done for criminal acts. a lot of things in the background we don't know. the maximum fine that they have applied is the maximum allowed by the pf ncc, which is the professional
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footballers negotiating consulting committee. that is a commission of the fa, the pfa, and the leaks, the premier league etc. the player will have in his contract that he cannot win the game of the club into disrepute. the maximum fine given is to recline. subject to —— is a two—week fine. they might be able to go back to the pfa if they think an increased file is appropriate. that is why i think they are sitting back and waiting to hear what goes on in terms of the investigation. i am surrised terms of the investigation. i am surprised you — terms of the investigation. i am surprised you have _ terms of the investigation. i am surprised you have made - terms of the investigation. i am surprised you have made a - surprised you have made a distinction between the board at west ham and the manager david moyes when it comes to a moral compass, looking after, as you say, one of the contract lines, bringing the club into disrepute. so often we hear from footballers who praise their managers, previous managers, for guiding them and offering a
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moral compass. surely that is the role of the manager. i moral compass. surely that is the role of the manager.— moral compass. surely that is the role of the manager. i would argue that it is partly _ role of the manager. i would argue that it is partly a _ role of the manager. i would argue that it is partly a role _ role of the manager. i would argue that it is partly a role of _ role of the manager. i would argue that it is partly a role of the - that it is partly a role of the manager. i think at the end of the day, the moral compass of the manager himself is something that you take into account when you recruit somebody and see how they carry themselves around the club. that is certainly for david moyes to argue. clearly in his press conference he indicated that he took what he considered, he was asked the question, would you play him, he will consider whether the guy can take what was clearly going to come which was going to be a lot of abuse from the crowd. is he strong enough to stand up to that and perform? he was stressing the fact that he was looking at it from a technical perspective and passed it across to the board to take the longer term interest. . , , , ., ., , interest. the assumption would be that mo es interest. the assumption would be that moyes david _ interest. the assumption would be that moyes david had _ interest. the assumption would be that moyes david had the - interest. the assumption would be that moyes david had the supportl interest. the assumption would be. that moyes david had the support of the board at that point. but since
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then we have seen sponsors pulling out or suspending deals with the club. is it purely then that money talks? �* ., , ., talks? i'm not in the minds of the board of west _ talks? i'm not in the minds of the board of west ham _ talks? i'm not in the minds of the board of west ham united. - talks? i'm not in the minds of the board of west ham united. the . talks? i'm not in the minds of the . board of west ham united. the thing that would be in the back of my mind is the long—term interest of the club. the financial aspects is something you have to take into account and these players have a value and a long—term contract. but you are looking at the sponsorship aspect of the club as well, and you are looking at the brand of the club. your sponsors try to align with the brand that is quite important. here we talk about ourselves as we will�*s family club. something like this would be contrary to something we stand for. and one of the things that we try to promote the club with. so you have to take these things into account. in the background, i do know that whenever things like this happen, because of the high—profile nature of football itself, it is always
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very cautious about doing things like not interfering with due process and criminal investigations. as regarding the fine, for example, i'm not sure what the rspca investigation added. and you can see on the video and the play has admitted that he has committed the act and the offence, —— the player has admitted it. everybody deplores that and there is enough to go straight to the pfa and talk to them about the damage to potentially the club and the game itself. in that regard, i think they did take the short term, and they are right in saying that is the maximum fine they could give but there could be further sanctions if i agree with the pf ncc right. —— if further sanctions if i agree with the pf ncc right. -- if i further sanctions if i agree with the pf ncc right. —— if i read the agreement of the pf ncc right. the pf ncc right. -- if i read the agreement of the pf ncc right. thank ou for agreement of the pf ncc right. thank you for your — agreement of the pf ncc right. thank you for your time _ agreement of the pf ncc right. thank you for your time this _ agreement of the pf ncc right. thank you for your time this morning. -
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port isaac is picturesque village on the cornish coast probably best known as the home of the sea shanty group fisherman's friends and tv drama doc martin. the cost of maintaining the harbour is largely down to the two remaining fishing vessels, but it's fallen into disrepair and without additional funding there are fears it could be soon at risk of flooding. anna varle reports. the sort of work they and their families have been doing for many generations. families have been doing for many generations-— families have been doing for many generations. port isaac has been a fishina generations. port isaac has been a fishing port _ generations. port isaac has been a fishing port for— generations. port isaac has been a fishing port for generations. - generations. port isaac has been a fishing port for generations. it - generations. port isaac has been aj fishing port for generations. it was once bustling with working boats, but now only two remain. tom and callum have been making a living from these waters for most of their lives, but it is a very different picture now than it was just 12 years ago. maintaining the harbour has been largely paid for by commercialfishermen, but withjust commercial fishermen, but with just two commercialfishermen, but withjust two of them left, callum says they cannot support the harbour alone. we cannot support the harbour alone. 7 cannot support the harbour alone. 7 cannot afford to pay for the upkeep.
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so the harbour will fall into disrepair and the bottom of the village will flood. things are changing rapidly, it was a slow walk and it is now a sprint, we have to do something now. the and it is now a sprint, we have to do something now.— and it is now a sprint, we have to do something now. the only modern note in an old _ do something now. the only modern note in an old wall— do something now. the only modern note in an old wall setting _ do something now. the only modern note in an old wall setting is - do something now. the only modern note in an old wall setting is a - note in an old wall setting is a fine _ note in an old wall setting is a fine new— note in an old wall setting is a fine new breakwater which could security— fine new breakwater which could security against the frequent storms _ security against the frequent storms. , ., ~ ., security against the frequent storms. , .,~ ., ., . security against the frequent storms. , ., , , storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new, storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new. has _ storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new, has taken _ storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new, has taken a _ storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new, has taken a battering - storms. the breakwater, once shiny and new, has taken a battering in i and new, has taken a battering in the cracks are starting to show. a large chunk of concrete has already come off the eastern side and needs repairing. jeremy browne has been fishing out of the sport since he was a boy. he is now retired and split his time running bird—watching tours and performing in the fishermans friends. —— boat watching tours. but he continues to help his son tom went in the harbour. ii son tom went in the harbour. if there were no breakwaters, they would _ there were no breakwaters, they would not — there were no breakwaters, they would not be buildings here. the storms_ would not be buildings here. the storms now, the way it has crashed i’ilht storms now, the way it has crashed right over— storms now, the way it has crashed right over the top into the buildings. right over the top into the buildings-— right over the top into the buildings. right over the top into the buildinus. ., ., ., ., buildings. the filming of a drama here has helped _ buildings. the filming of a drama here has helped contribute - buildings. the filming of a drama here has helped contribute to - buildings. the filming of a drama| here has helped contribute to the maintenance of the harbour that the
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series is coming to an end and with thatis series is coming to an end and with that is an end to that source of income. , , ., , .,. income. they used to run the beach as a car park _ income. they used to run the beach as a car park in _ income. they used to run the beach as a car park in the _ income. they used to run the beach as a car park in the summer- income. they used to run the beach | as a car park in the summer months, but really— as a car park in the summer months, but really to — as a car park in the summer months, but really to help the village, because _ but really to help the village, because it was causing a lot of congestion, they closed the car park and there _ congestion, they closed the car park and there was another source of income — and there was another source of income for— and there was another source of income for us. from the fishing industry. — income for us. from the fishing industry, there's not a lot of money available _ industry, there's not a lot of money available. ., , , , available. the hope is the fishing fleet here at _ available. the hope is the fishing fleet here at port _ available. the hope is the fishing fleet here at port isaac _ available. the hope is the fishing fleet here at port isaac will - available. the hope is the fishing i fleet here at port isaac will bounce back, and the harbour commission is trying to get an apprenticeship scheme off the ground to encourage the next generation into the industry. work will be starting shortly to repair the harbour wall, but the next stage for the village is to start funding page to raise enough money for the ongoing maintenance of this harbour. it's a very beautiful place. places are worth saving. _ still to come on breakfast. he's normally the one who asks the questions but this morning, documentary—maker louis theroux
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will be answering ours about his latest series on the impact of social media on all walks of american life. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. this good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. a teenager killed in north london earlier this week has been named by police. 18—year—old donovan allen from hemel hempstead was found with stab wounds just after 6 o clock on monday evening in ayley croft in enfield. he died at the scene. police are appealing for information about what happened. new figures suggest more passengers are returning to london's tube and buses since working from home restrictions have been lifted. transport for london says the number of people travelling by tube is up more than 25% since earlyjanuary, and on the bus it's risen by almost 10%. it means on the tube levels are around 60% of pre—pandemic levels.
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it's national apprenticeship week, highlighting the positive impact that apprenticeships make to businesses and the wider economy. the met police apprenticeship scheme has been running for more than a year now, but with the current controversies surrounding the force, what do new recruits think of the organisation's culture and if it can change? so there is no hiding between, or hiding behind the recent failures of some of our colleagues, but that is why you need to recruit, you know, good people and good officers that want to be part of the change. and the metropolitan police commissioner dame cressida dick will be taking part in eddie nestor�*s programme on bbc radio london this morning. she'll be answering questions from londoners from 11am. to ask a question call 0800 7312000 or email eddie@bbc.co.uk. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services
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are looking right now. problems on the tube. there are severe delays on the circle, district, hammersmith and city and metropolitan lines because of a signal failure at edgware road. and the victoria line is part suspended because of a track fault at brixton. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini good morning. yesterday we saw a cold front going through and today that chillier feeling air will start to show its hand. it's already a cool start to this morning, particularly the northern home counties but there's quite a lot of cloud around. we could see a few spots of drizzle from the thickness of the cloud but it will sink its way southwards, and behind it lots of sunshine and that cold feeling air. so a largely sunny afternoon and there will be cloud coming and gping and the chilly and brisk north—westerly wind could blow down some showers at times but generally most of us will stay generally dry and temperatures will peak between seven and nine degrees celsius, so a cold feeling day. overnight tonight, the winds will lighten and with clear skies in the cold feeling air
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there will be a frost developing into tomorrow morning with temperatures in the rural spots dropping widely below freezing. a cold and frosty start to the day on friday but lots of blue sky and sunshine around and temperatures again a little lower. then we see the high pressure pull away and there will start to be more cloud rolling in from the west. over the weekend, saturday is looking mostly dry and it will turn unsettled, wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. borisjohnson is embarking on a fresh round of diplomacy in belgium and poland, amid fears of a russian invasion of ukraine. in brussels, the prime minister will tell nato's secretary general that britain is putting 1,000 troops on standby in case of a humanitarian crisis.
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he'll then travel to warsaw to meet poland's prime minister and president. separately, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, will also have talks in brussels. meanwhile, the foreign secretary, liz truss is due to meet her russian counterpart, sergei lavrov, in moscow. the visit is the first by a british foreign secretary for more than four years. she's vowed to make clear that russia must immediately withdraw its forces and respect ukraine's sovereignty, "or face severe consequences". we're joined now by the defence secretary ben wallace. morning. and thank you for your time. i morning. and thank you for your time- i know _ morning. and thank you for your time. i know you _ morning. and thank you for your time. i know you have _ morning. and thank you for your time. i know you have a - morning. and thank you for your time. i know you have a busy . morning. and thank you for your| time. i know you have a busy day ahead. can i ask you about the prime minister's meeting, and what is the message she will to brussels? figs minister's meeting, and what is the message she will to brussels? as one of nato's biggest _ message she will to brussels? as one of nato's biggest members _ message she will to brussels? as one of nato's biggest members and - of nato's biggest members and certainly— of nato's biggest members and certainly europe's biggest defence partner— certainly europe's biggest defence partner in— certainly europe's biggest defence partner in europe, we stand side by
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side with— partner in europe, we stand side by side with the nato position of being unified. _ side with the nato position of being unified. of— side with the nato position of being unified, of a defensive alliance and that we _ unified, of a defensive alliance and that we will not let threats push us around _ that we will not let threats push us around and — that we will not let threats push us around and i think that's incredibly important — around and i think that's incredibly important and to also offer to nato a range _ important and to also offer to nato a range of— important and to also offer to nato a range of forces that can be used should _ a range of forces that can be used should nato require it to provide resilience — should nato require it to provide resilience and reinforcement on the borders, _ resilience and reinforcement on the borders, should russia take the step of invading _ borders, should russia take the step of invading ukraine and that's an important — of invading ukraine and that's an important message to send to russia as well~ _ important message to send to russia as well~ so _ important message to send to russia as well. so that announcement, to be clear to _ as well. so that announcement, to be clear to people. you as well. so that announcement, to be clear to people-— clear to people. you can tell me more, clear to people. you can tell me more. that _ clear to people. you can tell me more. that is — clear to people. you can tell me more, that is 1000 _ clear to people. you can tell me more, that is 1000 more - clear to people. you can tell me more, that is 1000 more troopsj clear to people. you can tell me i more, that is 1000 more troops to clear to people. you can tell me - more, that is 1000 more troops to be put out readiness is the tray is being used in case they are needed. tell us what that means —— is the phrase being used. it tell us what that means -- is the phrase being used.— tell us what that means -- is the phrase being used. it means at short notice we can — phrase being used. it means at short notice we can deploy _ phrase being used. it means at short notice we can deploy troops, - notice we can deploy troops, potentially anywhere in nato, to deal with— potentially anywhere in nato, to deal with a whole range of consequences. what we expect if russia _ consequences. what we expect if russia were to invade ukraine is first of— russia were to invade ukraine is first of all— russia were to invade ukraine is first of all there are millions potentially displaced people
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crossing into neighbouring states which _ crossing into neighbouring states which in — crossing into neighbouring states which in itself can have a severe destabilising effect on them and we would _ destabilising effect on them and we would expect quite a lot of anxiousness from the neighbouring states— anxiousness from the neighbouring states in— anxiousness from the neighbouring states in the baltics who already feel quite a threat from russia and again— feel quite a threat from russia and again we _ feel quite a threat from russia and again we need to provide confidence building _ again we need to provide confidence building and reassurance and we also need to— building and reassurance and we also need to demonstrate to president putin— need to demonstrate to president putin that — need to demonstrate to president putin that while ukraine is in nato, nato will— putin that while ukraine is in nato, nato will stand by the member states, — nato will stand by the member states, big or small and that is something where our armed forces are bil something where our armed forces are big enough— something where our armed forces are big enough and have enough capability to do lots of these tasks unlike _ capability to do lots of these tasks unlike a _ capability to do lots of these tasks unlike a of— capability to do lots of these tasks unlike a of others we put forward to the nato _ unlike a of others we put forward to the nato secretary—general and the supreme _ the nato secretary—general and the supreme allied commander in europe, we put _ supreme allied commander in europe, we put forward forces they could choose _ we put forward forces they could choose to — we put forward forces they could choose to deploy should they wish to and its— choose to deploy should they wish to and it's like _ choose to deploy should they wish to and it's like a donor conference and we put _ and it's like a donor conference and we put into— and it's like a donor conference and we put into the mix 1000 troops on standby— we put into the mix 1000 troops on standby and we've also deployed 350 troops _ standby and we've also deployed 350 troops or— standby and we've also deployed 350 troops or up to two poland to show
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solidarity _ troops or up to two poland to show solidarity and bilateral training with the — solidarity and bilateral training with the polish people and also put into the _ with the polish people and also put into the pot with nato some extra typhoon _ into the pot with nato some extra typhoon aircraft to show police airspace — typhoon aircraft to show police airspace around bulgaria and romania and seeking to put more unable —— naval— and seeking to put more unable —— naval vessels into the black sea and mediterranean if it was something we were asked to do and if you think 30 members _ were asked to do and if you think 30 members putting forward some of their offers, it does give nato more room _ their offers, it does give nato more room to— their offers, it does give nato more room to manoeuvre and capability to deploy— room to manoeuvre and capability to deploy should it need to.— room to manoeuvre and capability to deploy should it need to. those 1000 troo s, deploy should it need to. those 1000 troops. and — deploy should it need to. those 1000 troops. and you've — deploy should it need to. those 1000 troops, and you've explained - deploy should it need to. those 1000 troops, and you've explained clearly. troops, and you've explained clearly how they are designated, is there a caveat around that which is those troops are to be used for humanitarian needs only or is it open ended? were there to be some kind of warfare which is ultimately what everyone is trying to avoid and we completely understand that, but is there a caveat around what the troops could be used for? film
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is there a caveat around what the troops could be used for? our troops are effectively _ troops could be used for? our troops are effectively trained _ troops could be used for? our troops are effectively trained in _ troops could be used for? our troops are effectively trained in 360, - troops could be used for? our troops are effectively trained in 360, so - are effectively trained in 360, so we can— are effectively trained in 360, so we can deploy them on a humanitarian basis, _ we can deploy them on a humanitarian basis, for— we can deploy them on a humanitarian basis, for example be sent 100 engineers _ basis, for example be sent 100 engineers to stand shoulder to shoulder— engineers to stand shoulder to shoulder with the polish when the belarus _ shoulder with the polish when the belarus government were forcing families— belarus government were forcing families across the wire into poland to help _ families across the wire into poland to help with the polish on their border— to help with the polish on their border and showed that they were not alone and _ border and showed that they were not alone and we have a lot of skill sets, _ alone and we have a lot of skill sets, but — alone and we have a lot of skill sets, but a _ alone and we have a lot of skill sets, but a soldier is always trying to defend — sets, but a soldier is always trying to defend him and herself and indeed the partners they are working with and that— the partners they are working with and that is— the partners they are working with and that is the versatility of the forces, — and that is the versatility of the forces, and i think fundamentally the key— forces, and i think fundamentally the key point is the invasion of ukraine — the key point is the invasion of ukraine would spark a humanitarian crisis _ ukraine would spark a humanitarian crisis but _ ukraine would spark a humanitarian crisis but soldiers are able to deal with that — crisis but soldiers are able to deal with that and provide multiplies to the allies— with that and provide multiplies to the allies on the front line but
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should — the allies on the front line but should something go badly wrong, the soldiers _ should something go badly wrong, the soldiers are able to defend those countries — soldiers are able to defend those countries and defend themselves and it's important to recognise that this is— it's important to recognise that this is defensive, not offensive. all of— this is defensive, not offensive. all of the — this is defensive, not offensive. all of the deployment is part of the nato defensive alliance and that means _ nato defensive alliance and that means we are always positioned to be defenders, _ means we are always positioned to be defenders, not offenders. | defenders, not offenders. i understand the differentiation but my question, and i think you've alluded to it is you are effectively making a thousand british troops available to fight, if required. we are sending troops that can do a whole _ are sending troops that can do a whole range of tasks. we already have _ whole range of tasks. we already have a _ whole range of tasks. we already have a battle group in estonia, the enhanced — have a battle group in estonia, the enhanced forward presence, part of four groups, multinational groups that are _ four groups, multinational groups that are there to provide reassurance in that part of eastern europe _ reassurance in that part of eastern europe we — reassurance in that part of eastern europe. we have regularly performed exercises _ europe. we have regularly performed exercises in _ europe. we have regularly performed exercises in the north and in norway and we _ exercises in the north and in norway and we have — exercises in the north and in norway and we have exercised periodically through— and we have exercised periodically through the last two —— three or four— through the last two —— three or four years — through the last two —— three or four years throughout europe and that is— four years throughout europe and that is the — four years throughout europe and that is the messaging, that we are
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able to— that is the messaging, that we are able to deploy war fighting troops but also _ able to deploy war fighting troops but also a — able to deploy war fighting troops but also a humanitarian set of troops — but also a humanitarian set of troops and that is the key of defensive forces, that they are trained — defensive forces, that they are trained to— defensive forces, that they are trained to do all of these things but we — trained to do all of these things but we are not deploying them first and foremost to fight a war, we are deploying _ and foremost to fight a war, we are deploying them first and foremost to provide _ deploying them first and foremost to provide resilience and reassurance to nato _ provide resilience and reassurance to nato partners. | provide resilience and reassurance to nato partners.— to nato partners. i know you are havin: to nato partners. i know you are having discussions _ to nato partners. i know you are having discussions with - to nato partners. i know you are having discussions with your - to nato partners. i know you are - having discussions with your russian counterparts today. relating back, people might remember the comments of borisjohnson, the prime minister, when he issued a warning to president putin and i will remind people of what he said and he said it would be futile to invade due to the scale of ukraine's resistance and told mps that if russia pursues this path, many russian mothers, sons, will not be coming home. those are the words of the prime minister. so when you go into your discussions today, how useful is it to you that
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the prime minister has used that kind of language very recently? i think it is an important message to tell the _ think it is an important message to tell the russians. this is not a cost _ tell the russians. this is not a cost free — tell the russians. this is not a cost free exercise. they have amassed _ cost free exercise. they have amassed over half an hour of russia's_ amassed over half an hour of russia's ground combat capability, the whole — russia's ground combat capability, the whole of russia's combat capability on the borders of ukraine and the _ capability on the borders of ukraine and the ukrainian people will fight. i have _ and the ukrainian people will fight. i have been to visit ukraine on five occasions, — i have been to visit ukraine on five occasions, twice as defence secretary and previously, and these are people — secretary and previously, and these are people who quite rightly take the sovereignty of their country very seriously and lost nearly 15,000 — very seriously and lost nearly 15,000 people since the conflicts have started through snipers from either— have started through snipers from either separatism or potentially russians— either separatism or potentially russians and they are going to fight — russians and they are going to fight it— russians and they are going to fight. it may be that they are going to fight— fight. it may be that they are going to fight against overwhelming odds, but there _ to fight against overwhelming odds, but there is a cost in that and it's really— but there is a cost in that and it's really important to send a message to russia _ really important to send a message to russia that these people are not waiting _ to russia that these people are not waiting for— to russia that these people are not waiting for some liberation. these people _ waiting for some liberation. these
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people are — waiting for some liberation. these people are going to protect their rights _ people are going to protect their rights as— people are going to protect their rights as best as they can and i think— rights as best as they can and i think that _ rights as best as they can and i think that is why we took the decision— decision in the uk, supported by all parties to— decision in the uk, supported by all parties to supply the ukrainians with defensive tactical weapons because — with defensive tactical weapons because i think it's important that we mean — because i think it's important that we mean what we say when we stand by those values _ we mean what we say when we stand by those values and they will fight and ithink— those values and they will fight and i think it's — those values and they will fight and i think it's really important that russia — i think it's really important that russia understands a number of things — russia understands a number of things. number one, that the west will not _ things. number one, that the west will not stand by as a sovereign country— will not stand by as a sovereign country is — will not stand by as a sovereign country is invaded and that will mean — country is invaded and that will mean serious sanctions and number two, mean serious sanctions and number two. that— mean serious sanctions and number two, thatjust like all of mean serious sanctions and number two, that just like all of the conflicts— two, that just like all of the conflicts that we will get involved in, conflicts that we will get involved in. there — conflicts that we will get involved in, there is a cost, human cost. russia — in, there is a cost, human cost. russia will— in, there is a cost, human cost. russia will remember the soviet union, _ russia will remember the soviet union, the human cost of afghanistan and the _ union, the human cost of afghanistan and the likes of the chechnya war is and the likes of the chechnya war is and just— and the likes of the chechnya war is and just like britain reflects on the cost — and just like britain reflects on the cost of afghanistan and iraq and all of those conflicts we were involved _ all of those conflicts we were involved in. it's really important that we — involved in. it's really important that we understand russian people, because _ that we understand russian people, because we have no quarrel with the people _ because we have no quarrel with the people of— because we have no quarrel with the people of russia but we obviously
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have an _ people of russia but we obviously have an issue with the kremlin and its activities but i think that's an important — its activities but i think that's an important statement to make and for people _ important statement to make and for people to _ important statement to make and for people to hear that.— people to hear that. obviously eve one people to hear that. obviously everyone is — people to hear that. obviously everyone is trying _ people to hear that. obviously everyone is trying to _ people to hear that. obviously everyone is trying to avoid - people to hear that. obviously everyone is trying to avoid any people to hear that. obviously - everyone is trying to avoid any kind of conflict. that's the priority of everything you will be doing today. liz truss told parliament on the slst liz truss told parliament on the 31st of january, looking back, liz truss told parliament on the 31st ofjanuary, looking back, but they were putting together a package which was due to be released on the 10th of february, which is today, which was about sanctions. where are we with sanctions? that is deemed as one of the areas that could be used as a bargaining tool or diplomacy, so is that package complete in terms of what we might do to russian money, principally, in london and the uk? , ., ., ., the uk? there is a range of sanctions — the uk? there is a range of sanctions that _ the uk? there is a range of sanctions that are - the uk? there is a range of sanctions that are almost i the uk? there is a range of- sanctions that are almost complete for the _ sanctions that are almost complete for the uk — sanctions that are almost complete for the uk to present to parliament and the _ for the uk to present to parliament and the foreign secretary will set those _ and the foreign secretary will set those out — and the foreign secretary will set those out and i think it's important to demonstrate that we are ready with sanctions, notjust having a
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discussion— with sanctions, notjust having a discussion about, but should russia choose _ discussion about, but should russia choose to _ discussion about, but should russia choose to invade the us, the eu and the united _ choose to invade the us, the eu and the united kingdom will lay sanctions that will cost the russian government and that is just perfectly right otherwise it would be an _ perfectly right otherwise it would be an empty threat to talk about it and not _ be an empty threat to talk about it and not prepare for it, so that is what _ and not prepare for it, so that is what it— and not prepare for it, so that is what it would cover. the foreign secretary — what it would cover. the foreign secretary and the foreign office set out the _ secretary and the foreign office set out the details, but russia is vulnerable in a range of areas and we have _ vulnerable in a range of areas and we have seen the public debates about— we have seen the public debates about gas prom, the gas supplier in russia, _ about gas prom, the gas supplier in russia, from russia to germany and other— russia, from russia to germany and other parts— russia, from russia to germany and other parts of the eu and the us and many— other parts of the eu and the us and many other— other parts of the eu and the us and many other members including ourselves— many other members including ourselves have been quite strident on that, _ ourselves have been quite strident on that, so— ourselves have been quite strident on that, so energy supplies is one area to _ on that, so energy supplies is one area to target and financial institutions is another and as you say. _ institutions is another and as you say, potentially individuals which we sanctioned after 2014 and in the uk after— we sanctioned after 2014 and in the uk after salisbury with the use of nerve _ uk after salisbury with the use of nerve agents being deployed, it's important — nerve agents being deployed, it's important that the people in that regime _ important that the people in that regime or— important that the people in that regime or government feel the cost of their— regime or government feel the cost
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of their actions as well.— of their actions as well. thank you for our of their actions as well. thank you for yourtime- _ of their actions as well. thank you for your time. ben _ of their actions as well. thank you for your time. ben wallace, - of their actions as well. thank you for your time. ben wallace, the i for your time. ben wallace, the defence secretary. we need to be updated some more. fir we need to be updated some more. 5r much. we got the winter olympics, so much. we got the winter olympics, so much. in much. we got the winter olympics, so much. ., ., ., ., , much. in scotland and england big matches in the _ much. in scotland and england big matches in the title _ much. in scotland and england big matches in the title race _ much. in scotland and england big matches in the title race is - much. in scotland and england big matches in the title race is in - much. in scotland and england big matches in the title race is in very| matches in the title race is in very different— matches in the title race is in very different stories as both leaders won but— different stories as both leaders won but very tight for celtic, not so much — won but very tight for celtic, not so much for— won but very tight for celtic, not so much for manchester city and pep guardiola _ so much for manchester city and pep guardiola is— so much for manchester city and pep guardiola is doing his best to play down _ guardiola is doing his best to play down his— guardiola is doing his best to play down his side's march towards another— down his side's march towards another premier league title say his team _ another premier league title say his team are _ another premier league title say his team are just normal and to say we are the _ team are just normal and to say we are the best — team are just normal and to say we are the best is stupid, he claims. not all— are the best is stupid, he claims. not all teams will be as generous as brentford _ not all teams will be as generous as brentford were, they'd given away a penalty _ brentford were, they'd given away a penalty and then providing a helping hand with _ penalty and then providing a helping hand with kevin o'brien saying thank you -- _ hand with kevin o'brien saying thank you -- kevin— hand with kevin o'brien saying thank you —— kevin de bruyne r. it's now down — you —— kevin de bruyne r. it's now down to— you —— kevin de bruyne r. it's now down to liverpool to respond against leicester _ down to liverpool to respond against leicester but if liverpool win their games— leicester but if liverpool win their games in— leicester but if liverpool win their games in hand, they will be six points— games in hand, they will be six points ahead, so it's not all over. there _ points ahead, so it's not all over. there is— points ahead, so it's not all over. there is something special starring at southampton.
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their boss ralph hassenhuttl said it was the best they had played, under his charge, coming from 2—1 down to beat tottenham 3—2. che adams with the winner — they climb to tenth, but spurs stay seventh. you know the saying from the sublime to ridiculous _ you know the saying from the sublime to ridiculous and wilfried zaha does after scoring a wonder goal and then had a _ after scoring a wonder goal and then had a penalty, a chance to win it, but what — had a penalty, a chance to win it, but what a — had a penalty, a chance to win it, but what a howler it was. he just completely miss hits it, although he seems _ completely miss hits it, although he seems to— completely miss hits it, although he seems to blame the turf by the side of the _ seems to blame the turf by the side of the spot— seems to blame the turf by the side of the spot for the mess and it finished — of the spot for the mess and it finished 1—1. it was chaos at villa park— finished 1—1. it was chaos at villa park as— finished 1—1. it was chaos at villa park as aston villa and leeds shared six goals— park as aston villa and leeds shared six goals and jacob ramsey scored two of— six goals and jacob ramsey scored two of them for villa diego llorente made _ two of them for villa diego llorente made sure — two of them for villa diego llorente made sure leeds took home a point in one of— made sure leeds took home a point in one of the _ made sure leeds took home a point in one of the best league matches of the season so far. i one of the best league matches of the season so far.— the season so far. i think chaos is the season so far. i think chaos is the riaht the season so far. i think chaos is the right word. _ the season so far. i think chaos is the right word. the _ the season so far. i think chaos is the right word. the first - the season so far. i think chaos is the right word. the first half - the season so far. i think chaos is the right word. the first half was | the right word. the first half was played _ the right word. the first half was played at — the right word. the first half was played at such _ the right word. the first half was played at such a _ the right word. the first half was played at such a pace _ the right word. the first half was played at such a pace and - the right word. the first half was played at such a pace and tempo the right word. the first half was - played at such a pace and tempo and even i _ played at such a pace and tempo and even i needed — played at such a pace and tempo and even i needed a _ played at such a pace and tempo and even i needed a breather— played at such a pace and tempo and even i needed a breather at - even i needed a breather at half-time _ even i needed a breather at half—time. it— even i needed a breather at half—time. it was _ even i needed a breather at half—time. it was certainly i even i needed a breather at| half—time. it was certainly a even i needed a breather at - half—time. it was certainly a game for the _ half—time. it was certainly a game for the fans— half—time. it was certainly a game for the fans and _ half—time. it was certainly a game for the fans and a _ half—time. it was certainly a game for the fans and a great— half—time. it was certainly a game
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for the fans and a great dane - half—time. it was certainly a game for the fans and a great dane —— l for the fans and a great dane —— great _ for the fans and a great dane —— great day— for the fans and a great dane —— great day for _ for the fans and a great dane —— great day for the _ for the fans and a great dane —— great day for the premier- for the fans and a great dane —— i great day for the premier league. leeds— great day for the premier league. leeds played _ great day for the premier league. leeds played their— great day for the premier league. leeds played their parts - great day for the premier league. leeds played their parts and - great day for the premier league. | leeds played their parts and there was lots _ leeds played their parts and there was lots of— leeds played their parts and there was lots of attacking _ leeds played their parts and there was lots of attacking play- leeds played their parts and there was lots of attacking play and - was lots of attacking play and fantastic _ was lots of attacking play and fantastic goals. _ was lots of attacking play and fantastic goals. a _ was lots of attacking play and fantastic goals. a fantastic. was lots of attacking play and i fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not _ fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not a — fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not a game _ fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not a game for— fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not a game for coaches, - fantastic goals. a fantastic game but not a game for coaches, a i fantastic goals. a fantastic game . but not a game for coaches, a game for fans _ but not a game for coaches, a game for fans. �* .,, ., ., . ., for fans. almost as dramatic at celtic as they _ for fans. almost as dramatic at celtic as they showed - for fans. almost as dramatic at celtic as they showed great - celtic as they showed great character to survive a fightback at aberdeen— character to survive a fightback at aberdeen and to cling onto spot in the scottish premier league and they were 2-0 _ the scottish premier league and they were 2—0 and then it was 2—2 and then— were 2—0 and then it was 2—2 and thenjota — were 2—0 and then it was 2—2 and thenjota scored his second to extend — thenjota scored his second to extend their unbeaten run to 20 games — extend their unbeaten run to 20 games. rangers are just a point behind — games. rangers are just a point behind after beating hibernian. chelsea are playing somewhere a little warmer right now. they're in abu dhabi for the club world cup. and they're throu-h to the final after a 1—) win over asian champions al hil—al. romelu lukaku's goal sets up a showpiece on saturday against brazilian side, palmeiras. nearly a week into the winter olympics in beijing and teamgb are waiting _ olympics in beijing and teamgb are waiting for— olympics in beijing and teamgb are waiting for their first medal. they do have _ waiting for their first medal. they do have high hopes in the curling still in _ do have high hopes in the curling still in the — do have high hopes in the curling still in the men's and women's team events— still in the men's and women's team events have — still in the men's and women's team events have got under way overnight and it— events have got under way overnight and it was— events have got under way overnight and it was nail—biting for the
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women's _ and it was nail—biting for the women's team led by eve muirhead who had the _ women's team led by eve muirhead who had the final shot in the opening group _ had the final shot in the opening group stage match against switzerland who are the world champions and itjust had to hit the centre _ champions and itjust had to hit the centre to _ champions and itjust had to hit the centre to score the point, but look, itiust _ centre to score the point, but look, itiust goes — centre to score the point, but look, it just goes fractionally too far, so close — it just goes fractionally too far, so close which meant that the swiss took the _ so close which meant that the swiss took the final point and the victory in the _ took the final point and the victory in the opener but it's a chance for the british— in the opener but it's a chance for the british to redeem themselves when _ the british to redeem themselves when they play sweden. the british men are _ when they play sweden. the british men are now 4—3 down to italy in their— men are now 4—3 down to italy in their first — men are now 4—3 down to italy in their first round robin match. next to one _ their first round robin match. next to one of— their first round robin match. next to one of our favourites and we've been _ to one of our favourites and we've been talking about this at the winter— been talking about this at the winter games, the snowboard cross race _ winter games, the snowboard cross race i_ winter games, the snowboard cross race iwill— winter games, the snowboard cross race. i will take you on the right of your— race. i will take you on the right of your life _ race. i will take you on the right of your life here, and everyone else as well~ _ of your life here, and everyone else as well~ few — of your life here, and everyone else as well. few nightingale couldn't quite _ as well. few nightingale couldn't quite manage to get into one of the final races— quite manage to get into one of the final races this morning and this is what _ final races this morning and this is what it— final races this morning and this is what it is— final races this morning and this is what it is like to be in the thick of these — what it is like to be in the thick of these helter—skelter races. organisers installed a helmet cam on one of— organisers installed a helmet cam on one of the _ organisers installed a helmet cam on one of the spanish riders and this race was— one of the spanish riders and this race was to — one of the spanish riders and this race was to decide who comes between fourth _ race was to decide who comes between fourth and _ race was to decide who comes between fourth and eighth and was look at the back— fourth and eighth and was look at the back of the pack. involved in a pile-up _ the back of the pack. involved in a pile-up. you — the back of the pack. involved in a pile—up. you get an idea of what it
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can be _ pile—up. you get an idea of what it can be like — pile—up. you get an idea of what it can be like crashing down at the speed — can be like crashing down at the speed. they can get up to 60 miles an hour— speed. they can get up to 60 miles an hour and — speed. they can get up to 60 miles an hour and sometimes it is not your fault _ an hour and sometimes it is not your fault. someone goes down in front of you, fault. someone goes down in front of you. nothing— fault. someone goes down in front of you, nothing you can do and he is out of— you, nothing you can do and he is out of the — you, nothing you can do and he is out of the race. it's like a lottery at times, — out of the race. it's like a lottery at times, it's like the wacky races, if you _ at times, it's like the wacky races, if you remember that. we've also had a final, _ if you remember that. we've also had a final, and _ if you remember that. we've also had a final, and an incredible enter the race as _ a final, and an incredible enter the race as it— a final, and an incredible enter the race as it was a photo finish. after all of— race as it was a photo finish. after all of the — race as it was a photo finish. after all of the effort, they nearly shared _ all of the effort, they nearly shared the gold medal. look at that. how do _ shared the gold medal. look at that. how do you — shared the gold medal. look at that. how do you split them? wow. after all that— how do you split them? wow. after all that they should both get a goal~ — all that they should both get a coal. . , all that they should both get a ioal ., , ., all that they should both get a coal. ., , ., all that they should both get a ioal ., , ., when goal. the images are so vivid. when ou see goal. the images are so vivid. when you see the — goal. the images are so vivid. when you see the helmet _ goal. the images are so vivid. when you see the helmet camera - goal. the images are so vivid. when j you see the helmet camera footage, it is so— you see the helmet camera footage, it is so amazing.— it is so amazing. have you snowboarding? _ it is so amazing. have you snowboarding? you - it is so amazing. have you snowboarding? you know| it is so amazing. have you - snowboarding? you know how fast it is so amazing. have you _ snowboarding? you know how fast it is when you go straight down, terrifying. ida is when you go straight down, terrifying-— is when you go straight down, terri inc. .,, ., , terrifying. no breaking, no stopping and ou terrifying. no breaking, no stopping and you don't _ terrifying. no breaking, no stopping and you don't even _ terrifying. no breaking, no stopping and you don't even think _ terrifying. no breaking, no stopping and you don't even think about - terrifying. no breaking, no stoppingj and you don't even think about what is happening, you just get to the bottom — is happening, you just get to the bottom in— is happening, you just get to the bottom in whatever fashion. it shows how addictive — bottom in whatever fashion. it shows how addictive the _ bottom in whatever fashion. it shows how addictive the winter _ bottom in whatever fashion. it shows how addictive the winter olympics i bottom in whatever fashion. it shows how addictive the winter olympics is | how addictive the winter olympics is
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at the moment. you find a sport and you become obsessed with it. time for carol to — you become obsessed with it. time for carol to tell _ you become obsessed with it. time for carol to tell us _ you become obsessed with it. time for carol to tell us about _ you become obsessed with it. i he: for carol to tell us about the weather and i understand that the winter olympics comes to scotland, is that right? scotland and northern ireland have had snow _ scotland and northern ireland have had snow overnight and snow in northern— had snow overnight and snow in northern england mostly on the hills _ northern england mostly on the hills this— northern england mostly on the hills. this weather watcher is actually — hills. this weather watcher is actually from northern ireland and we've _ actually from northern ireland and we've also— actually from northern ireland and we've also had snow in scotland and the roads— we've also had snow in scotland and the roads may be a bit treacherous first thing — the roads may be a bit treacherous first thing this morning, notjust in scotland but northern ireland and northern— in scotland but northern ireland and northern england with the risk of ice, northern england with the risk of ice so _ northern england with the risk of ice, so that's something to watch out for~ _ ice, so that's something to watch out for. what's been happening is we have had _ out for. what's been happening is we have had a _ out for. what's been happening is we have had a potent area of low pressure _ have had a potent area of low pressure which will push east through— pressure which will push east through the day and we have another front in— through the day and we have another front in the _ through the day and we have another front in the south producing some rain which — front in the south producing some rain which will clear but the area of low— rain which will clear but the area of low pressure has brought in snow, thunder— of low pressure has brought in snow, thunder and — of low pressure has brought in snow, thunder and lightning, some of low pressure has brought in snow, thunderand lightning, some hailand also some _ thunderand lightning, some hailand also some rain and some gusty winds and it— also some rain and some gusty winds and it is— also some rain and some gusty winds and it is gusting at the moment at about— and it is gusting at the moment at about 70 — and it is gusting at the moment at about 70 miles an hour, but you can
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see wrapped — about 70 miles an hour, but you can see wrapped around that area of low pressure _ see wrapped around that area of low pressure the winds are between 40 and 60. _ pressure the winds are between 40 and 60, and it will be pushing steadily— and 60, and it will be pushing steadily east as we go through the rest of— steadily east as we go through the rest of the — steadily east as we go through the rest of the day, so the strongest winds— rest of the day, so the strongest winds will— rest of the day, so the strongest winds will transfer to the east, especially the southern uplands and north—east england. in northern ireland _ north—east england. in northern ireland and parts of western england and wales— ireland and parts of western england and wales a few showers around and we say— and wales a few showers around and we say goodbye to the weather front with the _ we say goodbye to the weather front with the cloud and rain and then we see some _ with the cloud and rain and then we see some sunshine coming up. these are the _ see some sunshine coming up. these are the gusts of wind, the strength of the _ are the gusts of wind, the strength of the gusts, so it will be a blustery— of the gusts, so it will be a blustery day where ever you are with temperatures between 2 degrees and 9 degrees, _ temperatures between 2 degrees and 9 degrees, but when you add on the wind _ degrees, but when you add on the wind chill— degrees, but when you add on the wind chill from the blustery wind it will feel— wind chill from the blustery wind it will feel more like —4 in lerwick and -2— will feel more like —4 in lerwick and -2 in— will feel more like —4 in lerwick and —2 in stornoway and six in cardiff — and —2 in stornoway and six in cardiff. through the evening and overnight— cardiff. through the evening and overnight there goes the low pressure _ overnight there goes the low pressure so it will be windy for a time _ pressure so it will be windy for a time in — pressure so it will be windy for a time in the — pressure so it will be windy for a time in the north sea coastline but under— time in the north sea coastline but under clear— time in the north sea coastline but under clear skies we are looking at a widespread and sharp frost where we have _ a widespread and sharp frost where we have lying snow, temperatures could _ we have lying snow, temperatures could fall— we have lying snow, temperatures could fall as low as —10, so a cold start to _ could fall as low as —10, so a cold start to the — could fall as low as —10, so a cold start to the day tomorrow with the risk of—
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start to the day tomorrow with the risk of ice — start to the day tomorrow with the risk of ice. and a lot of sunshine, but you _ risk of ice. and a lot of sunshine, but you will— risk of ice. and a lot of sunshine, but you will find as the cloud bills out towards the west, it will strengthen and later we will see rain _ strengthen and later we will see rain. tomorrow will also be a nippy day and _ rain. tomorrow will also be a nippy day and temperatures between five and 9 _ day and temperatures between five and 9 degrees. if we pick up this band _ and 9 degrees. if we pick up this band of— and 9 degrees. if we pick up this band of rain, through friday and overnight— band of rain, through friday and overnight and into saturday it pushes — overnight and into saturday it pushes southwards and eastwards and we don't _ pushes southwards and eastwards and we don't expect it to get into the far south—east until late in the day and its— far south—east until late in the day and it's going to be a windy day with— and it's going to be a windy day with a _ and it's going to be a windy day with a chance we could see gales and with a chance we could see gales and with exposure out towards the west. windy— with exposure out towards the west. windy and _ with exposure out towards the west. windy and wet sums up nicely and as we head _ windy and wet sums up nicely and as we head towards sunday there goes the weather front but we have an area of— the weather front but we have an area of low — the weather front but we have an area of low pressure coming our way and we _ area of low pressure coming our way and we think— area of low pressure coming our way and we think at the moment it's going _ and we think at the moment it's going to — and we think at the moment it's going to be affecting the southern half of— going to be affecting the southern half of the country but this could change _ half of the country but this could change the position as we move further— change the position as we move further north we are into blustery showers. — further north we are into blustery showers. a — further north we are into blustery showers, a little bit of sunshine around — showers, a little bit of sunshine around but _ showers, a little bit of sunshine around but not as cold because the wind will _ around but not as cold because the wind will have changed direction and it will— wind will have changed direction and it will have _ wind will have changed direction and it will have more of a southerly component to it by then.
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more than 100,000 people are living with hiv in the uk, and one of them is former wales rugby captain gareth thomas. since revealing his diagnosis in 2019, he's been determined to address any stigma which surrounds the condition. he's teamed up with the duke of sussex — whose mother, princess diana famously challenged attitudes and they're both determined to continue her work. let's hear what they have to say. i happily tell everyone that you were there for me when i was in a difficult spot with my journey. were there for me when i was in a difficult spot with myjourney. what is it that makes you the strength ally you are?— is it that makes you the strength ally you are? good question. once ou meet ally you are? good question. once you meet people _ ally you are? good question. once you meet people and _ ally you are? good question. once you meet people and see - ally you are? good question. once you meet people and see the - you meet people and see the suffering around the world. you cannot — suffering around the world. you cannot turn your back on that. then add in _ cannot turn your back on that. then add in the _ cannot turn your back on that. then add in the fact that my mum's work was unfinished. i feel obligated to
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try to _ was unfinished. i feel obligated to try to continue that as much as possible — try to continue that as much as possible and i could never follow her. especially in this space, but because — her. especially in this space, but because of— her. especially in this space, but because of what she did and what she stood _ because of what she did and what she stood for— because of what she did and what she stood for and how vocal she was about _ stood for and how vocal she was about the — stood for and how vocal she was about the issue. it's the converging of all— about the issue. it's the converging of all of— about the issue. it's the converging of all of these different pieces and the work— of all of these different pieces and the work she was doing and trying to continue _ the work she was doing and trying to continue that and finish the job, right? _ continue that and finish the job, right? but— continue that and finish the job, right? but once you have met so many people _ right? but once you have met so many people and _ right? but once you have met so many people and heard people stories and see the _ people and heard people stories and see the suffering, especially in lesotho — see the suffering, especially in lesotho and botswana where i saw it most, _ lesotho and botswana where i saw it most, there — lesotho and botswana where i saw it most, there is a way out of it and if there _ most, there is a way out of it and if there is— most, there is a way out of it and if there is a — most, there is a way out of it and if there is a way out of it and a solution, — if there is a way out of it and a solution, i_ if there is a way out of it and a solution, ijust want to help fix things — gareth joins us now. lovely to see you. i know you will say all of this is about the conversation and raising awareness but i will first ask, how you. i’m but i will first ask, how you. i'm actually doing — but i will first ask, how you. i'm actually doing very well. how could i not do _ actually doing very well. how could i not do well? i live in the most but -- — i not do well? i live in the most but —— beautiful part of wales, the best country in the well, look behind — best country in the well, look behind me, how could i not be well?
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fair point~ _ behind me, how could i not be well? fair point. how important was it for you to have this conversation with prince harry? it’s you to have this conversation with prince harry?— you to have this conversation with prince harry? it's really important because he's _ prince harry? it's really important because he's such _ prince harry? it's really important because he's such a _ prince harry? it's really important because he's such a strong - prince harry? it's really important because he's such a strong ally i prince harry? it's really importantl because he's such a strong ally and when _ because he's such a strong ally and when i _ because he's such a strong ally and when i spoke about my diagnosis and i started _ when i spoke about my diagnosis and i started the conversation i found it really— i started the conversation i found it really difficult to keep the conversation going and that is why i created _ conversation going and that is why i created tackle hiv and with the ally ship that _ created tackle hiv and with the ally ship that harry brings and his commitment to use this platform to create _ commitment to use this platform to create better environments, notjust create better environments, not just for people _ create better environments, notjust for people living with hiv but for everybody affected whether that be families, _ everybody affected whether that be families, friends and it's really lovely— families, friends and it's really lovely to— families, friends and it's really lovely to hear him say that he needs the commitment to take from his mother— the commitment to take from his mother because we think 35 years ago when his— mother because we think 35 years ago when his mother famously opened the first hiv _ when his mother famously opened the first hiv aids unit in london, people — first hiv aids unit in london, people were shocked that she was actually _ people were shocked that she was actually going and shaking hands because — actually going and shaking hands because people thought at that time you could _ because people thought at that time you could contract the virusjust by
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contacting — you could contract the virusjust by contacting the reality is that stigma _ contacting the reality is that stigma still exists people still have — stigma still exists people still have those thought processes and people _ have those thought processes and people still live in fear of getting tested _ people still live in fear of getting tested or— people still live in fear of getting tested or telling people about their hiv status because of how they will be treated by others and harry is a really _ be treated by others and harry is a really great person who wants to not 'ust really great person who wants to not just progress, he wants attitudes to change _ just progress, he wants attitudes to change because science, medicine has changed _ change because science, medicine has changed the way people with hiv live yet the _ changed the way people with hiv live yet the stigma and attitudes are still there and they haven't changed. we feel like we are progressing but they haven't changed. it progressing but they haven't chanced. , . , progressing but they haven't chanced. , ., , , changed. it is really interesting how ou changed. it is really interesting how you describe _ changed. it is really interesting how you describe it _ changed. it is really interesting how you describe it like - changed. it is really interesting how you describe it like that. l changed. it is really interesting i how you describe it like that. can you tell us without naming individuals, that stigma and concern over going for a test lies ahead for someone, so give us a sense of how that plays out in people's real lives? that plays out in people's real fives? that plays out in people's real lives? . , that plays out in people's real lives? ., , , ., ., ., lives? the reality is a lot of --eole lives? the reality is a lot of people don't _ lives? the reality is a lot of people don't go _ lives? the reality is a lot of people don't go for- lives? the reality is a lot of people don't go for tests i lives? the reality is a lot of - people don't go for tests firstly because — people don't go for tests firstly because they don't think they are in a category— because they don't think they are in a category that is at risk of contracting hiv. people assume that
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the only— contracting hiv. people assume that the only people who live with hiv are gay— the only people who live with hiv are gay or— the only people who live with hiv are gay or bisexual men or black african _ are gay or bisexual men or black african men and women and the reality— african men and women and the reality is— african men and women and the reality is even from the numbers this year. — reality is even from the numbers this year, we have realised there are more — this year, we have realised there are more new cases of hiv among heterosexuals than gay or bisexual men so _ heterosexuals than gay or bisexual men so a _ heterosexuals than gay or bisexual men so a lot of people don't go for the test _ men so a lot of people don't go for the test and then going for the test is a fearful— the test and then going for the test is a fearful event because if you don't _ is a fearful event because if you don't understand what living with hiv is, _ don't understand what living with hiv is, you — don't understand what living with hiv is, you assume that if it's a positive — hiv is, you assume that if it's a positive test you are going to die and then— positive test you are going to die and then when you decide to tell people _ and then when you decide to tell people about your diagnosis because you don't— people about your diagnosis because you don't want to live in fear of people — you don't want to live in fear of people knowing you are lying or not telling _ people knowing you are lying or not telling you — people knowing you are lying or not telling you something, you leave in fear of _ telling you something, you leave in fear of them becoming vulnerable and i are someone who openly lives with hiv, i_ i are someone who openly lives with hiv, i face _ i are someone who openly lives with hiv, i face discrimination and stigma — hiv, i face discrimination and stigma constantly. there are times when _ stigma constantly. there are times when i _ stigma constantly. there are times when i go — stigma constantly. there are times when i go to a restaurant and we sit at a table _ when i go to a restaurant and we sit at a table and i get up to leave the table _ at a table and i get up to leave the table because we have finished and people _ table because we have finished and people are going to sit down after and they— people are going to sit down after and they ask for a different table
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because — and they ask for a different table because they don't want to sit at the table — because they don't want to sit at the table i— because they don't want to sit at the table i sat on or if i come out of the _ the table i sat on or if i come out of the toilet _ the table i sat on or if i come out of the toilet and people are standing waiting to go, they will ask if— standing waiting to go, they will ask if there is a different toilet because — ask if there is a different toilet because they fear from what they think— because they fear from what they think they know that they are going to contract— think they know that they are going to contract the virus just by touching _ to contract the virus just by touching the same things i touched or sitting _ touching the same things i touched or sitting on the same toilet seat. these _ or sitting on the same toilet seat. these myths still exist so if those myths _ these myths still exist so if those myths still exist it's a fearful place — myths still exist it's a fearful place for— myths still exist it's a fearful place for somebody to live, living with hiv — place for somebody to live, living with hiv. ., ., _, ., ., with hiv. how do you deal with that, gareth? i deal— with hiv. how do you deal with that, gareth? i deal with _ with hiv. how do you deal with that, gareth? i deal with it _ with hiv. how do you deal with that, gareth? i deal with it by _ with hiv. how do you deal with that, gareth? i deal with it by doing - gareth? i deal with it by doing thins gareth? i deal with it by doing things like _ gareth? i deal with it by doing things like this. _ gareth? i deal with it by doing things like this. by _ gareth? i deal with it by doing things like this. by having - gareth? i deal with it by doing - things like this. by having friends, by having — things like this. by having friends, by having a — things like this. by having friends, by having a voice, because i could easily— by having a voice, because i could easily choose to be a victim in all of it _ easily choose to be a victim in all of it i_ easily choose to be a victim in all of it i could _ easily choose to be a victim in all of it. i could easily choose to be angered — of it. i could easily choose to be angered by— of it. i could easily choose to be angered by all of it but what i do is i realise — angered by all of it but what i do is i realise that, actually, there discrimination is because they believe — discrimination is because they believe they are at risk. if they are willing to listen to me, if they are willing to listen to me, if they are willing — are willing to listen to me, if they are willing to listen to me, if they are willing to understand that actually — are willing to understand that actually they are not at risk. i live with _ actually they are not at risk. i live with hiv and i have a beautiful, amazing husband who i have been—
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beautiful, amazing husband who i have been married to five years, the best five _ have been married to five years, the best five years of my life and my husband — best five years of my life and my husband is — best five years of my life and my husband is hiv negative so as long as i take _ husband is hiv negative so as long as i take my medicines, one tablet a day, then— as i take my medicines, one tablet a day, then that means that i cannot transmit— day, then that means that i cannot transmit hiv to a sexual partner, but people — transmit hiv to a sexual partner, but people are discriminated against and they— but people are discriminated against and they don't know this. if they were _ and they don't know this. if they were willing to listen to me, people i prince _ were willing to listen to me, people i prince harry who have great platforms, if they are willing to listen _ platforms, if they are willing to listen and — platforms, if they are willing to listen and learn, they will realise there _ listen and learn, they will realise there does not need to be for you but i _ there does not need to be for you but i understand the discrimination because _ but i understand the discrimination because so— but i understand the discrimination because so many people, science and the last— because so many people, science and the last 20 _ because so many people, science and the last 20 or 30 years in medicine has moved — the last 20 or 30 years in medicine has moved on and has advanced and people _ has moved on and has advanced and people can _ has moved on and has advanced and people can live happy, healthy lives with hiv _ people can live happy, healthy lives with hiv but the misunderstanding and stigma hasn't kept up with the progress _ and stigma hasn't kept up with the progress of the science and that is what _ progress of the science and that is what we _ progress of the science and that is what we need to do. | progress of the science and that is what we need to do.— progress of the science and that is what we need to do. i think maybe ou are what we need to do. i think maybe you are alluding _ what we need to do. i think maybe you are alluding to _ what we need to do. i think maybe you are alluding to this _ what we need to do. i think maybe you are alluding to this that - what we need to do. i think maybe you are alluding to this that there l you are alluding to this that there might be people listening and thinking that gareth thomas seems a lovely guy and it's lovely hearing your story but it's got nothing to do with me. what he is talking about
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doesn't really cross into my world. do you think there are a lot of people who think that way? yes. people who think that way? yes, absolutely- _ people who think that way? yes, absolutely- i— people who think that way? yes, absolutely. i know _ people who think that way? yes, absolutely. i know that _ people who think that way? yes, absolutely. i know that there's a lot of _ absolutely. i know that there's a lot of people who think that way. i live and _ lot of people who think that way. i live and i— lot of people who think that way. i live and i am passionate about this space _ live and i am passionate about this space so— live and i am passionate about this space, so because i'm passionate about— space, so because i'm passionate about this — space, so because i'm passionate about this space and i live in this space _ about this space and i live in this space i— about this space and i live in this space i do— about this space and i live in this space, i do a lot of work with people — space, i do a lot of work with people who are living with hiv and understand it but also you come across _ understand it but also you come across a — understand it but also you come across a lot of people who don't want _ across a lot of people who don't want to — across a lot of people who don't want to be — across a lot of people who don't want to be a part of this world. they— want to be a part of this world. they don't— want to be a part of this world. they don't want to understand it and the reality _ they don't want to understand it and the reality is, as i said, for the first— the reality is, as i said, for the first time — the reality is, as i said, for the first time in— the reality is, as i said, for the first time in a decade there are more _ first time in a decade there are more new— first time in a decade there are more new cases of hiv among heterosexual people than there are among _ heterosexual people than there are among gay or bisexual men, and that should _ among gay or bisexual men, and that should be _ among gay or bisexual men, and that should be a _ among gay or bisexual men, and that should be a realisation to us as a society— should be a realisation to us as a society that if you are sexually active — society that if you are sexually active then, regardless of your category. _ active then, regardless of your category, you are at risk and there's— category, you are at risk and there's nothing wrong with knowing your status. for me, the fear should be not _ your status. for me, the fear should be not knowing your status.-
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be not knowing your status. gareth, toda , be not knowing your status. gareth, today. someone _ be not knowing your status. gareth, today, someone will— be not knowing your status. gareth, today, someone will watch - be not knowing your status. gareth, today, someone will watch this - be not knowing your status. gareth, today, someone will watch this and | today, someone will watch this and hopefully think i have been putting this off and i didn't want to know, but i've listened and i've heard and i'm better off knowing, and at least i'm better off knowing, and at least i know where i am out. they go for that diagnosis and they get the result and it is positive. what happens next to them? what reassurance can you offer them? you have been through it. the reassurance can you offer them? you have been through it.— have been through it. the best reassurance _ have been through it. the best reassurance you _ have been through it. the best reassurance you can _ have been through it. the best reassurance you can get - have been through it. the best reassurance you can get is - have been through it. the best reassurance you can get is to i reassurance you can get is to realise — reassurance you can get is to realise that it is, i'm not going to lie and _ realise that it is, i'm not going to lie and say— realise that it is, i'm not going to lie and say it is not a scary, scary experience _ lie and say it is not a scary, scary experience, but the reality is you make _ experience, but the reality is you make it _ experience, but the reality is you make it scary because you make it isolating — make it scary because you make it isolating. you make it kind of an alone _ isolating. you make it kind of an alone experience but the reality is there _ alone experience but the reality is there are — alone experience but the reality is there are so many organisations out there _ there are so many organisations out there to _ there are so many organisations out there to help you, so at no point and at _ there to help you, so at no point and at no — there to help you, so at no point and at no time in that process do you ever— and at no time in that process do you ever need to be on your own. there's— you ever need to be on your own. there's always the terrence higgins trust, _
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there's always the terrence higgins trust, 50 _ there's always the terrence higgins trust, so many people working within the nhs _ trust, so many people working within the nhs in _ trust, so many people working within the nhs in the sexual health clinics who are _ the nhs in the sexual health clinics who are like councillors, who can absolutely — who are like councillors, who can absolutely guide you through it and to realise _ absolutely guide you through it and to realise that you can, and i want to realise that you can, and i want to be _ to realise that you can, and i want to be i— to realise that you can, and i want to be, i really want to be the living — to be, i really want to be the living example that people look and say, there _ living example that people look and say, there is somebody who has been through— say, there is somebody who has been through a _ say, there is somebody who has been through a tough time but has found his voice _ through a tough time but has found his voice, has found his energy and is a living _ his voice, has found his energy and is a living example of what you can achieve _ is a living example of what you can achieve and — is a living example of what you can achieve and how you can continue to live a _ achieve and how you can continue to live a normal, happy, healthy life with hiv — live a normal, happy, healthy life with hiv. you should never, ever feel like — with hiv. you should never, ever feel like you are on your own with this virus— feel like you are on your own with this virus because you are not. gareth, — this virus because you are not. gareth, lovely to hear your words this morning and lovely to look at the view behind you, frankly. and i am not being rude and i was listening to every word you are saying, but lovely. thanks for talking to us this morning and have a lovely day. god talking to us this morning and have a lovely day-— talking to us this morning and have a lovely day._ gareth - a lovely day. god bless. gareth thomas there. _ a lovely day. god bless. gareth thomas there. we _ a lovely day. god bless. gareth thomas there. we will - a lovely day. god bless. gareth thomas there. we will have i a lovely day. god bless. gareth| thomas there. we will have the headlines shortly.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. the prime minister and foreign secretary head for diplomatic talks over the crisis in ukraine, as 1.000 british troops as 1,000 british troops are put on standby. we're not deploying them first and foremost to war fight, we are deploying them first and foremost to provide resilience and reassurance to our nato partners. detectives are to contact 50 people over lockdown parties in downing street, as police widen their investigation. wayne rooney opens up
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to breakfast about his alcohol and marriage problems, and how he feared his binge drinking could have killed someone. i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help in order to save myself, but also to save my family. has the lorry driver shortage gone away? as one of the government's support measures comes to an end, we ask whether enough new drivers are being trained, and whether shelves are staying well stocked. chasing a place in rugby league history. st helens kick off their attempt to win a fourth title in a row tonight. we will look ahead to the new season, after 8.30. good morning. we have got some potentially disruptive weather across the northern half of the country today, gales, even severe gales with exposure and some snow for a time. further south, the rain will clear, then sunshine and a few showers. all of the details later.
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it's thursday 10th february. our main story. in the last few minutes borisjohnson has set off on a fresh round of diplomacy in belgium and poland, amid fears of a russian invasion of ukraine. in brussels, the prime minister will tell nato's secretary general that britain is putting 1,000 troops on standby in case of a humanitarian crisis. we're joined now from brussels by our europe correspondent nick beake. the prime minister is on his way and then when he gets there, it's a busy day, notjust for him.— day, not 'ust for him. goodman, nara, it day, notjust for him. goodman, naga, it certainly _ day, notjust for him. goodman, naga, it certainly is _ day, notjust for him. goodman, naga, it certainly is and - day, notjust for him. goodman, naga, it certainly is and the - naga, it certainly is and the weather is miserable in brussels, it is cold and wet. the prime minister will get a warm welcome because he is meeting allies today, the heads of nato, and the idea we are told is to shore up the support of the west for ukraine. this comes at a time as we have been hearing this morning,
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how the uk is pledging more troops and military assets in the region as part of a deterrence against russia. ben wallace the defence secretary was explaining the role of these 1000 troops being put on standby. latte 1000 troops being put on standby. we are able to deploy war fighting troops, — are able to deploy war fighting troops, we are also able to deploy humanitarian troops or troops to do humanitarian troops or troops to do humanitarian tasks. that's the key of defence — humanitarian tasks. that's the key of defence forces, they are trained to do— of defence forces, they are trained to do all— of defence forces, they are trained to do all these things. we are not deploying — to do all these things. we are not deploying them first and foremost to war fight, _ deploying them first and foremost to war fight, we deploying them first and foremost to warfight, we are deploying them first and foremost to war fight, we are deploying the first and — war fight, we are deploying the first and foremost to provide resilience and reassurance to our nato _ resilience and reassurance to our nato partners. resilience and reassurance to our nato partners-— nato partners. there are other measures _ nato partners. there are other measures the _ nato partners. there are other measures the uk _ nato partners. there are other measures the uk is _ nato partners. there are other measures the uk is taking, - nato partners. there are other - measures the uk is taking, offering other military support in the region, mirroring what other western allies are doing sending troops to the likes of poland where the prime minister will be visiting today. as well as all of this movement of troops which the rest says is in response to what russia have been doing, the talking continues —— the
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west says that is in response to what russia have been doing. the foreign secretary and prime minister will be talking to their respective politicians on the russian side today. the metropolitan police is to begin contacting more than 50 people as part of its inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street and whitehall with the prime minister and his wife, carriejohnson, expected to be included. it comes after a leaked photograph of borisjohnson at a christmas quiz, shows staff in party hats, with a bottle of sparkling wine on the table. our political correspondent chris mason joins us now. good morning, chris. tell us a little bit more about this new image, and any reaction and what might happen next.— image, and any reaction and what might happen next. good morning, charlie. might happen next. good morning, charlie- we — might happen next. good morning, charlie. we know _ might happen next. good morning, charlie. we know there _ might happen next. good morning, charlie. we know there is - might happen next. good morning, charlie. we know there is a - might happen next. good morning, charlie. we know there is a bounty| charlie. we know there is a bounty of these photos floating around, the police have got hold of a couple of hundred of them. the latest to see the light of day courtesy of the daily mirror popped up during prime
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minister's questions yesterday lunchtime, it is one from a bash that we knew about, a quiz that took place in downing street before christmas 2020. but a different angle on that quiz. what we see in the photo? an open bottle of bubbly, open with a certain amount of enthusiasm, with a tinfoil dangling off the side. a big packet of crisps, in mitigation, there is hand sanitiser on the table, and a bloke draped in tinsel. the police looking at whether to look again at that particular event. they are looking at around about 12 events in and around downing street and whitehall. with the expectation that about 50 people will get a questionnaire sent to them via e—mail. it sounds quite fluffy, questionnaire, they are insisting, the police, that this has formal legal status. around 50 people in westminster will be keeping an eye on the inbox, perhaps
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the prime minister as well, given that we know he was at some of these bashers. downing street say they will tell us if the prime minister gets a fine. the met police tellers unless there is a reasonable explanation why people are at these dos, that is likely to happen. and then the big question is raised, can then the big question is raised, can the prime minister survive getting a fixed penalty notice, reaching his own covid rules, if that is what the police conclude? —— breaching his own covid rules. this is hanging over the premise that as he heads on a diplomatic tour around europe today with his fate still sitting in the police plasma candice. —— sitting in the police plasma cannons. two cats owned by the west ham defender kurt zouma have been taken into the care of the rspca. it comes after videos emerged on social media showing
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the 27—year old hitting, dropping and kicking one of them. the club says the french international has been fined "the maximum amount possible" with the fee being donated to animal welfare charities. now, if you were watching yesterday you might remember we brought you the story of 5—year—old beau, who is living with an aggressive form of cancer, known as a neuroblastoma. beau, who has been undergoing treatment, joined us on the sofa alongside her mum shirley, who has been trying to raise more than £300,000 for a specialist clinical trial in new york. following their appearance on breakfast, shirley sent us this update. now thanks to that final push after that bbc interview, we have hit the target. but please do not be under any illusion that i do not realise that this is down to you. thanks to your shares, your effort, your dedication, everything that you have done, has sat me on that couch today. and allowed me and given me the opportunity to share beau's story to the nation. we've just hit the target and she sleeps. you're going to sloan, beau—beau.
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sleep tight, baby. love you. and of course, as they will be travelling to new york for that clinical trial, we wish them all the best of luck. clinical trial, we wish them all the best of luck-— clinical trial, we wish them all the best of luck. let's get the weather now. it isa it is a picture of two halves today. we have a lovely sunrise this morning in bolton, and for many parts of the england and wales, from the south it is a dry and bright start, some of us seeing some sunshine. on the other end of the country we have a lying snow. it's notjust in scotland, we have it in northern ireland and northern england as well. a potent area of low pressure moving from the west to the east, gusty winds. up to 70
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miles an hour this morning already. through the day the low pressure will drift eastwards taking its rain, snow and thunder and lightning and hail with it, and the strongest winds will transfer to the east, widely looking at gusts at 40 to 50 miles an hour. locally it will be a bit more than that. the strongest winds will be in the southern uplands and north—east england in the afternoon. south parts of the country, the rain will clear and it will brighten up. a few showers in northern ireland and north—west england and wales. temperature is nothing to write home about, and with the wind chill it will feel much colder. this evening and overnight the low pressure drifts down the north sea coastline, clear skies, wintry showers in the west, and widespread frost where we have got lying snow. the temperatures will fall away to —10. the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. a cold but sunny start with a few showers
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in the west, later the wind picks up, the card bills and we will see some rain. tomorrow will also be quite chilly. —— the cloud will build and we will see some rain. since 2018, deborahjames has used her bbc podcast 'you, me and the big c�* to document her experience of living with incurable bowel cancer. it has been the most extraordinary journey she has been on, when she had shared, just remarkable. it has had shared, 'ust remarkable. it has been a had shared, just remarkable. it has been a privilege — had shared, just remarkable. it has been a privilege to _ had shared, just remarkable. it has been a privilege to have _ had shared, just remarkable. it has been a privilege to have it - had shared, just remarkable. it ya; been a privilege to have it shared with us. last month she was rushed to hospital where she was told she may not survive the night, after complications following the growth of her tumour. whilst on the ward, deborah recorded a series of emotional voice memos about her condition. she's been speaking to graham satchell ahead of their release on her podcast today. just over a month ago, deborahjames posted some shocking photos on her social media page. she had been rushed to hospital after suffering a massive haemorrhage.
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i don't think i ever in a million years thought my life would end with a medical trauma where you are walking and talking woman and the next minute you don't know if you will survive the next hour and i can't believe i am alive. i cannot believe i am here. from day one of this podcast we wanted to share the reality of cancer. deborah is one of the presenters of the bbc podcast you, me and the big c and has incurable bowel cancer. when she was taken to hospital she decided to record her thoughts on a series of voice memos on her phone. it became a kind of coping mechanism. i remember coming downstairs and saying to my children, i love you, i love you, i love you for ever. and i thought i would
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never see them again. that is horrible to listen to, because what do you say to somebody when you have ten seconds of energy to say it and you don't think you will ever see them again? and there's only a few things that you do say, which is i love you and then you use your energy to in my case, keep conscious. it was deborah's daughter who ended up calling the ambulance. my husband found me with eloise screaming down the phone, saying you have to help my mummy, because i was unable to articulate things anymore and the only response that we got was, "do you still want an ambulance? "there will be a 30 minute delay on it. "we understand that you are worried, but we cannot get anybody to you sooner." i now know, had i waited for help, i wouldn't be here now.
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i am so angry about that. had i actually had to wait for the ambulance crew, i would not be alive. and i think that is what upsets me, because i keep on playing out the what if scenario. and the what if scenario is that i wouldn't be here. the london ambulance service told us this must have been a very distressing experience and said they had advised that help was on its way but, as is normal in periods of high demand, there could be a potential wait. in the end deborah's husband drove her to hospital and she was resuscitated and then had emergency surgery. as harrowing as the whole experience was, i'm in awe about how 20 people can actually save you from dying. that is when people need to be praised and that is when actually the nhs is incredible. yeah, medicalscience is pretty awesome.
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people are awesome. the skills that they can do, it'sjust mind blowing, actually. bloody amazing. hi, deborah, lam dallas. welcome to trinity. deborah was diagnosed with bowel cancer five years ago and has had time to think about her own death. have you seen the film one flew over the cuckoos nest? iliken it i liken it to that. we filmed her three years ago from visiting her local hospice. she was keen to see what good end—of—life can look like. the thing that upset me the most was, and you know, i've talked about my death and i've accepted at some point my cancer is going to get me, i never planned for it to be like that. i thought i would have a day, a moment, a week, whatever,
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to say goodbye, not shout it down the stairs to my children. i think it's a really stark reminder of, don't leave things unsaid on a daily basis, and it's quite amazing how much you wish for another sunset or another day or another cuddle, or whatever it is, and you can't leave things until tomorrow because there just might not be a tomorrow. when she was finally discharged from the royal marsden, she posted this. her voice recordings made in hospital will be released today as a you, me and the big c podcast. she remains determined
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to share every part to share every part of her cancer journey to help others. a big thank you to deborah for sharing her experience with us. she really shares it with filters, she does it so that people know what she does it so that people know what she is going through, what she thinks about, what her family think, and she does it openly and we are always grateful. you can hear her memos in full from today on the podcast, 'you, me and the big c', which is available on bbc sounds. from strictly�*s ballroom to a london classroom, professional dancer oti mabuse is hoping to inspire school children to tell their own stories, by sharing her memories of growing up in south africa. alongside writing a children's book and hosting a new podcast, oti is also taking part in a project to mark 100 years of british broadcasting. shejoins us now.
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good morning, oti. good morning! peole good morning, oti. good morning! people will — good morning, oti. good morning! people will be _ good morning, oti. good morning! people will be thinking _ good morning, oti. good morning! i people will be thinking immediately, where are you? i understand you are in a school and i'm guessing you are in a school and i'm guessing you are in the library!— in the library! yes, i am in the libra , in the library! yes, i am in the library, surrounded _ in the library! yes, i am in the library, surrounded by- in the library! yes, i am in the library, surrounded by many i in the library! yes, i am in the - library, surrounded by many books, many. _ library, surrounded by many books, many. many— library, surrounded by many books, many, many words, inspiring words, actually _ many, many words, inspiring words, actuall . �* many, many words, inspiring words, actuall . . , ., many, many words, inspiring words, actuall . . ., many, many words, inspiring words, actuall. . ., many, many words, inspiring words, actuall.�* ., actually. and your task today as i understand it _ actually. and your task today as i understand it is _ actually. and your task today as i understand it is to _ actually. and your task today as i understand it is to stand - actually. and your task today as i understand it is to stand in - actually. and your task today as i understand it is to stand in front| understand it is to stand in front of the school and took about how things have been for you, tell us a bit about what your message is today. bit about what your message is toda . ,, ., bit about what your message is toda . , ,., bit about what your message is toda. ., , , today. so, the message actually is, because we — today. so, the message actually is, because we are _ today. so, the message actually is, because we are celebrating - today. so, the message actually is, because we are celebrating 100 - today. so, the message actually is, i because we are celebrating 100 years of the _ because we are celebrating 100 years of the bbc, _ because we are celebrating 100 years of the bbc, it's inspiring children to achieve — of the bbc, it's inspiring children to achieve their dreams storytelling. i know it's something that is very— storytelling. i know it's something that is very important to the bbc, and for— that is very important to the bbc, and for me — that is very important to the bbc, and for me as well, i'd been given so many— and for me as well, i'd been given so many opportunities, i wouldn't be here so many opportunities, iwouldn't be here today— so many opportunities, i wouldn't be here today without it. i'm really
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grateful — here today without it. i'm really grateful and i think for me, it's a privilege — grateful and i think for me, it's a privilege to — grateful and i think for me, it's a privilege to actually come to these schools _ privilege to actually come to these schools and talk to these kids and hopefully — schools and talk to these kids and hopefully get them to share their stories— hopefully get them to share their stories and for them to go back and tell their— stories and for them to go back and tell their friends and family and encourage them to feel good and also for people _ encourage them to feel good and also for people to listen to kids because they are _ for people to listen to kids because they are the next generation. absolutely. oti, one of the things you are going to be talking about is your own life, and going to your dream. born and grew up in south africa, came over to the uk. i did it pursue your dreams despite many obstacles. == it pursue your dreams despite many obstacles. ., , ., , , obstacles. -- and you did pursue our obstacles. -- and you did pursue your dreams- _ obstacles. -- and you did pursue your dreams. yes, _ obstacles. -- and you did pursue your dreams. yes, it's _ obstacles. -- and you did pursue your dreams. yes, it's not - obstacles. -- and you did pursue your dreams. yes, it's not easy. | obstacles. -- and you did pursue| your dreams. yes, it's not easy. i left home — your dreams. yes, it's not easy. i left home i— your dreams. yes, it's not easy. i left home, i left my mum, dad, sisters, — left home, i left my mum, dad, sisters, ail— left home, i left my mum, dad, sisters, all the infrastructure that i sisters, all the infrastructure that i was _ sisters, all the infrastructure that i was used — sisters, all the infrastructure that i was used to come because i had this dream — i was used to come because i had this dream of wanting to dance and loving _ this dream of wanting to dance and loving to _ this dream of wanting to dance and loving to dance so much. and it wasn't — loving to dance so much. and it wasn't easy. and hopefully me talking — wasn't easy. and hopefully me talking to them and telling them that they have to work hard and strive _ that they have to work hard and strive for — that they have to work hard and strive for their dreams and be ambitious, and really go after their goals, _ ambitious, and really go after their goals, will— ambitious, and really go after their goals, will help them in achieving
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whatever— goals, will help them in achieving whatever they want to achieve. i was talking _ whatever they want to achieve. i was talking to _ whatever they want to achieve. i was talking to a _ whatever they want to achieve. i was talking to a young girl and her dream— talking to a young girl and her dream is— talking to a young girl and her dream is to be in the west end and to be— dream is to be in the west end and to be a— dream is to be in the west end and to be a doctor at the same time and ithink— to be a doctor at the same time and i think that — to be a doctor at the same time and i think that is very power. and i was _ i think that is very power. and i was asking _ i think that is very power. and i was asking her, why doesn't she do both? _ was asking her, why doesn't she do both? and — was asking her, why doesn't she do both? and she was like, i never thought— both? and she was like, i never thought of— both? and she was like, i never thought of it! and hopefully she will be — thought of it! and hopefully she will be able to do both! | thought of it! and hopefully she will be able to do both! i imagine ou will will be able to do both! i imagine you will be _ will be able to do both! i imagine you will be talking _ will be able to do both! i imagine you will be talking about - will be able to do both! i imagine you will be talking about your - you will be talking about your resilient as well. it's notjust about working hard, it's about coping when people are perhaps not so pleased to you when you do well and how you face criticism and how you bounce back from that and how you bounce back from that and how you put yourself in that place. it is, it is for me it is all in the head — is, it is for me it is all in the head as _ is, it is for me it is all in the head as well. just how you take information or criticism or even people — information or criticism or even people having an opinion on you. it's people having an opinion on you. it's not _ people having an opinion on you. it's not always easy, you have to work _ it's not always easy, you have to work on — it's not always easy, you have to work on your mental health all the time, _ work on your mental health all the time, constantly. ithink work on your mental health all the time, constantly. i think it's something that children should be
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able to— something that children should be able to feel ok to talk about and i will be _ able to feel ok to talk about and i will be talking to them today about that. will be talking to them today about that i _ will be talking to them today about that. . , ~ will be talking to them today about that. ., a , ., will be talking to them today about that. ., a i. i. will be talking to them today about that. ., y., y., ., will be talking to them today about that. ., a i. i. ., ., that. i will ask you, you are on strictl , that. i will ask you, you are on strictly, whenever _ that. i will ask you, you are on strictly, whenever you - that. i will ask you, you are on strictly, whenever you dance, | that. i will ask you, you are on i strictly, whenever you dance, you are brilliant, but still people criticise you. you have been fat shamed, your body has been criticised, you have had racial abuse, misogyny. these children you are talking to will be aware of that. what are you going to say to them about how you first felt when it happened, because it is always a shock when it happens at first and then continuing to happen, and how you deal with that? it is then continuing to happen, and how you deal with that?— you deal with that? it is a shock, especially _ you deal with that? it is a shock, especially because _ you deal with that? it is a shock, especially because you _ you deal with that? it is a shock, especially because you know- you deal with that? it is a shock, especially because you know it. i especially because you know it. whatever— especially because you know it. whatever your feeling, however you are feeling, deep down you know it. and when— are feeling, deep down you know it. and when other people mention it, we feel very— and when other people mention it, we feel very exposed. it's not the best feeling _ feel very exposed. it's not the best feeling in _ feel very exposed. it's not the best feeling in the world. and i'm really lucky— feeling in the world. and i'm really lucky that— feeling in the world. and i'm really lucky that i— feeling in the world. and i'm really lucky that i have great people around — lucky that i have great people around me that support me and
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constantly encourage me and fill me with positive thoughts. first, about myself, _ with positive thoughts. first, about myself, about the work that i'm doing. — myself, about the work that i'm doing. and _ myself, about the work that i'm doing, and i am working, sol myself, about the work that i'm doing, and i am working, so i get tired _ doing, and i am working, so i get tired and— doing, and i am working, so i get tired. and that little voice inside which _ tired. and that little voice inside which is — tired. and that little voice inside which is quite negative sometimes -ets which is quite negative sometimes gets guite — which is quite negative sometimes gets quite loud and you start to believe — gets quite loud and you start to believe those things about yourself as welt _ believe those things about yourself as well. and today hopefully i will be able _ as well. and today hopefully i will be able to — as well. and today hopefully i will be able to tell those kids to just not listen, stay focused on what they— not listen, stay focused on what they want — not listen, stay focused on what they want to achieve. and also, be kind. _ they want to achieve. and also, be kind. reaily — they want to achieve. and also, be kind, really. ithink they want to achieve. and also, be kind, really. i think that is the message _ kind, really. i think that is the message that we want to still continue _ message that we want to still continue telling people about. reminding people to be kind to themselves and each other. and the ones raivin themselves and each other. and the ones giving the _ themselves and each other. and the ones giving the nasty _ themselves and each other. and the ones giving the nasty messages - themselves and each other. and the ones giving the nasty messages are | ones giving the nasty messages are the ones with the problem. yes! exactl . the ones with the problem. yes! exactly- itut _ the ones with the problem. yes! exactly. but we're _ the ones with the problem. yes! exactly. but we're not _ the ones with the problem. yes! exactly. but we're not talking about them! _ exactly. but we're not talking about them! i_ exactly. but we're not talking about them! ., ., them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if ou ro into them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if you go into a — them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if you go into a classroom _ them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if you go into a classroom or— them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if you go into a classroom or a - them! i am mindfulthat whenever, if you go into a classroom or a school. you go into a classroom or a school as you and say, i'm here now, ask me
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anything you like. you are likely to get a few questions that weren't expecting. because young people tend to just say things more openly possibly than others do, because they want to know answers to questions. is it a complete open brief, to ask whatever you want? yeah, they get to ask whatever they want _ yeah, they get to ask whatever they want. usually, what's my favourite dress. _ want. usually, what's my favourite dress. or— want. usually, what's my favourite dress. or my— want. usually, what's my favourite dress, or my favourite dance. what is it like _ dress, or my favourite dance. what is it like being on different shows. it's is it like being on different shows. its really— is it like being on different shows. it's really nice, because they are inquisitive — it's really nice, because they are inquisitive, and it's their opportunity to ask me anything they want _ opportunity to ask me anything they want so— opportunity to ask me anything they want so i— opportunity to ask me anything they want. so i am quite open with them and quite _ want. so i am quite open with them and quite honest with them. who want. so i am quite open with them and quite honest with them.- and quite honest with them. who is the best dancer _ and quite honest with them. who is the best dancer on _ and quite honest with them. who is the best dancer on strictly, - and quite honest with them. who is the best dancer on strictly, for- the best dancer on strictly, for example. bill the best dancer on strictly, for examle. �* ., the best dancer on strictly, for example._ that's i the best dancer on strictly, for. example._ that's not the best dancer on strictly, for- example._ that's not a example. all of them! that's not a ro er example. all of them! that's not a proper answer! — example. all of them! that's not a proper answer! you _ example. all of them! that's not a proper answer! you can't - example. all of them! that's not a proper answer! you can't say - example. all of them! that's not a l proper answer! you can't say them! they are all good in their different ways _ they are all good in their different ways you — they are all good in their different ways. you have asked me this before, and i— ways. you have asked me this before, and i tell— ways. you have asked me this before, and i teliyoui — ways. you have asked me this before, and i tell you! just ways. you have asked me this before, and i tell you!— and i tell you! just checking! you are very busy _ and i tell you! just checking! you are very busy at _ and i tell you! just checking! you are very busy at the _ and i tell you! just checking! you are very busy at the moment. i and i tell you! just checking! you. are very busy at the moment. just checkinr
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are very busy at the moment. just checking if — are very busy at the moment. just checking if the _ are very busy at the moment. just checking if the answer is still the same! _ checking if the answer is still the same! ., . , checking if the answer is still the same! ., ., , , _ checking if the answer is still the same! ., ., __ , same! you are very busy, i suppose that is what — same! you are very busy, i suppose that is what you _ same! you are very busy, i suppose that is what you are _ same! you are very busy, i suppose that is what you are saying, - same! you are very busy, i suppose that is what you are saying, you - that is what you are saying, you don't have to be one thing, you can don't have to be one thing, you can do a whole bunch of different things. do a whole bunch of different thins. ., ., �*, ., ., things. yeah, that's another thing that really put _ things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it _ things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it to _ things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it to me. _ things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it to me. i - things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it to me. i grew i things. yeah, that's another thing that really put it to me. i grew up| that really put it to me. i grew up in south — that really put it to me. i grew up in south africa where people did different — in south africa where people did different things, you were a presenter, an actress, singer, dancer. — presenter, an actress, singer, dancer. and i am so lucky that i got to this _ dancer. and i am so lucky that i got to this country and people opened doors _ to this country and people opened doors for— to this country and people opened doors for me especially being on strictly — doors for me especially being on strictly. the door was opened because — strictly. the door was opened because of this amazing show. i really— because of this amazing show. i really feel— because of this amazing show. i really feel strongly about the fact that i_ really feel strongly about the fact that i think kids should not box themselves, they should try everything and see what they really love _ everything and see what they really love even — everything and see what they really love. even if they might not be great _ love. even if they might not be great at — love. even if they might not be great at it. _ love. even if they might not be great at it, just work hard and perfect — great at it, just work hard and perfect their craft as much as possible _ perfect their craft as much as possible. the things that i am doing. — possible. the things that i am doing. it's _ possible. the things that i am doing, it's many things, i'm still learning — doing, it's many things, i'm still learning and still trying to get better. — learning and still trying to get better, even though they are completely different which is what i
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love _ completely different which is what i love. every day is very different, no day _ love. every day is very different, no day is — love. every day is very different, no day is the same. you launched our no day is the same. you launched your books. _ no day is the same. you launched your books, dance _ no day is the same. you launched your books, dance with _ no day is the same. you launched your books, dance with oti, - no day is the same. you launched your books, dance with oti, and i no day is the same. you launched i your books, dance with oti, and you have had a book read on cbeebies bedtime stories which is the biggest accolade ever! are you writing another? it accolade ever! are you writing another? . accolade ever! are you writing another? , , , ., . . ., ., another? it is the biggest accolade! i am another? it is the biggest accolade! i am writing — another? it is the biggest accolade! i am writing another— another? it is the biggest accolade! i am writing another one, _ another? it is the biggest accolade! i am writing another one, this - another? it is the biggest accolade! i am writing another one, this one i i am writing another one, this one will come — i am writing another one, this one will come out later in the year. this— will come out later in the year. this one — will come out later in the year. this one is _ will come out later in the year. this one is not about a jive, but the sambar. _ this one is not about a jive, but the sambar, so people get to shimmy and shake _ the sambar, so people get to shimmy and shake about and it is set in the jungle _ and shake about and it is set in the jungle it _ and shake about and it is set in the jungle it is— and shake about and it is set in the jungle. it is to encourage kids to dance _ jungle. it is to encourage kids to dance, read, do it with the parents, have _ dance, read, do it with the parents, have a _ dance, read, do it with the parents, have a book— dance, read, do it with the parents, have a book where they can get up and learn — have a book where they can get up and learn a — have a book where they can get up and learn a dance routine. that's what _ and learn a dance routine. that's what i _ and learn a dance routine. that's what i love — and learn a dance routine. that's what i love about dancing, it brings people _ what i love about dancing, it brings people together. what i love about dancing, it brings people together-— what i love about dancing, it brings people together. always good to talk to ou, people together. always good to talk to you. thank — people together. always good to talk to you. thank you _ people together. always good to talk to you, thank you for _ people together. always good to talk to you, thank you for the _ people together. always good to talk to you, thank you for the positive - to you, thank you for the positive messages. brace yourselves, because out of the mouth of babes, the questions that come! they don't hold
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back! i’m questions that come! they don't hold back! �* ,., ., , ., questions that come! they don't hold back! �* ., , ., ., . back! i'm so nervous, i have danced in front of— back! i'm so nervous, i have danced in front of millions _ back! i'm so nervous, i have danced in front of millions of _ back! i'm so nervous, i have danced in front of millions of people - back! i'm so nervous, i have danced in front of millions of people but - in front of millions of people but this makes me the most nervous! i this makes me the most nervous! completely this makes me the most nervous! i completely understand why, take care of yourself. it is 826 am. it is 826 am. i knew i needed help, i had to get that help. and in orderfor... to save myself, but also to save my family. ahead of the release of a documentary about his life, footballer wayne rooney tells us about his struggles with alcohol and staying faithful to his wife and childhood sweetheart coleen. we will bring you the full interview straight after this. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. a teenager killed in north london earlier this week has been named by police. 18—year—old donovan allen from hemel hempstead was found with stab wounds just after 6 o clock on monday evening in
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ayley croft in enfield. he died at the scene. police are appealing for information about what happened. last year saw the highest number of anti—semitic attacks ever recorded in london — up by a third from the previous year. the community security trust, which records such incidents, says there were over 1,200 attacks in london in 2021 up from just under a thousand in 2020. it's national apprenticeship week, highlighting the positive impact that apprenticeships make to businesses and the wider economy. the met police apprenticeship scheme has been running for more than a year now, but with the current controversies surrounding the force, what do new recruits think of the organisation's culture and if it can change? so there is no hiding between, or hiding behind the recent failures of some of our colleagues, but that is why
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you need to recruit, you know, good people and good officers that want to be part of the change. and the metropolitan police commissioner dame cressida dick will be taking part in eddie nestor�*s programme on bbc radio london this morning. she'll be answering questions from londoners from 11am. well if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. problems on the tube. there are minor delays on the circle line, the waterloo and city line and the picadilly line. severe delays on the hammersmith and city line and metropolitan line because of a signal failure at edgware road. and the victoria line is part suspended between victoria and brixton because of a track fault at brixton. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday we saw a cold front going through and today that chillier feeling air will start to show its hand. it's already a cool start to this morning, particularly the northern home counties but there's quite a lot of cloud around. we could see a few spots of drizzle
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from the thickness of the cloud but it will sink its way southwards, and behind it lots of sunshine and that cold feeling air. so a largely sunny afternoon and there will be cloud coming and gping and the chilly and brisk north—westerly wind could blow down some showers at times but generally most of us will stay generally dry and temperatures will peak between seven and nine degrees celsius, so a cold feeling day. overnight tonight, the winds will lighten and with clear skies in the cold feeling air there will be a frost developing into tomorrow morning with temperatures in the rural spots dropping widely below freezing. a cold and frosty start to the day on friday but lots of blue sky and sunshine around and temperatures again a little lower. then we see the high pressure pull away and there will start to be more cloud rolling in from the west. over the weekend, saturday is looking mostly dry and it will turn unsettled, wet and windy on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom around 9am. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back
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to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's hard to believe, but it's been 20 years since wayne rooney took the football scene by storm as a 16—year—old with everton. a glittering career followed as he became both manchester united and england's record goal scorer. however, demons off the pitch have plagued him throughout his career. ahead of the release of a documentary about his life, wayne, the film is really very, very honest. why did you decide to do it and why now? i was doubtful at first about doing it. even though it might sound a bit
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strange, i'm a really private person. i just felt it was an opportunity for people to see me, to see the real me. the good moments, the bad moments, which, of course, have been there as well, and then for people to judge me on knowing a bit more about me, which i feel is more fair. do you want a snack or a wrap or a bagel? — do you want a snack or a wrap or a barel? ., , , . ., do you want a snack or a wrap or a barel? ., ,, . ., , ., bagel? colleen is such a big part of the film. there's _ bagel? colleen is such a big part of the film. there's a _ bagel? colleen is such a big part of the film. there's a brilliant - bagel? colleen is such a big part of| the film. there's a brilliant moment when she describes you, saying he's a romantic, charmer, used to love writing the poems. do you remember any of them? used to write poems for her? do you still? i any of them? used to write poems for her? do you still?— her? do you still? i think i wrote her? do you still? i think i wrote her one not— her? do you still? i think i wrote her one not so _ her? do you still? i think i wrote her one not so long _ her? do you still? i think i wrote her one not so long ago, - her? do you still? i think i wrote. her one not so long ago, actually. her? do you still? i think i wrote i her one not so long ago, actually. i used to love writing poems, and writing poems to her. i was quite romantic. in some ways it was a way
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of me getting things out because i was quite shy at times. i was cheeky, but i was quite shy at times, so that was a way of me getting my words out and putting them down. we've always grew up quicker than what we were meant to, really, ithink. you met as children, really were married very, very young, and what comes across in the whole of the film is that you have this tremendous partnership. how important has she been in the last 20 years? very important. we have a good relationship, and we're friends, obviously, as well. and there is a good balance to the relationship, especially now, into how we are as parents with the four children. and there's been difficult moments we've had, of course, which has obviously come through me and the mistakes i've made and i speak about that
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in the documentary as well. you talk about the dark times a lot. you're both very, very honest about the dark times, about times you were unfaithful in your marriage. did you have to fight to save your relationship with coleen? yeah, of course. and i think the easy thing for me to do wasjust give up and give up on everything, really. but you get to a point, and i was struggling, i was really struggling, i was in a bad place. and i knew had to change, i knew i had to get through that struggle, really, and fight, fight for my marriage, fight for my career. i forgive him. but, yeah, but it wasn't acceptable. but no, it's not something that, you know, if it comes up, we talk about it like we're talking about it now.
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i haven't got the anger that i did at the time. there could have been times when coleen could have walked away, but we love each other. i made a mistake. she knows, coleen knows. coleen knows there's been influences, in terms of, why i've made mistakes, in terms of... i don't mean people, i mean alcohol. there is a really interesting moment when you say this, you say, "i could sit at home and have a glass of red wine but no good would come of that". what do you mean by that? yeah, because i knew if i have one glass of wine, it leads to two, three, four, and then, that's when i know, that once that happens, no good can come from that. what happens? you end up going out, you end up being in peoples company that you shouldn't be all you don't need to be in and that's where you make mistakes. and yourjudgment completely goes. iloathed make mistakes. and your 'udgment compieteiygoeah completely goes. what is your relationship — completely goes. what is your relationship with _ completely goes. what is your relationship with alcohol - completely goes. what is yourj
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relationship with alcohol now? completely goes. what is your - relationship with alcohol now? it's fine. i'm relationship with alcohol now? it�*s fine. i'm really in control of it. i had to be. as i said, i was never an alcoholic, it was more binge drinking, and if! alcoholic, it was more binge drinking, and if i had two days off i would literally drink for two days, and i dust myself down, eye drops, chewing gum, mouthwash to go into work and then run around the pitch and train, so i wasn't giving the best version of me to my club at times. . . the best version of me to my club at times. . , . , ., the best version of me to my club at times. ., , ., , ., , , ., times. has anyone ever suggested to ou that times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you — times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you might — times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you might want _ times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you might want to _ times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you might want to talk - times. has anyone ever suggested to you that you might want to talk to i you that you might want to talk to someone about your relationship with alcohol? has that ever happened? i've spoken to people, yes. iloathed i've spoken to people, yes. what ha--ened i've spoken to people, yes. what happened then? _ i've spoken to people, yes. what happened then? it _ i've spoken to people, yes. what happened then? it helped. i i i've spoken to people, yes. what| happened then? it helped. i think it's important _ happened then? it helped. i think it's important for— happened then? it helped. i think it's important for anyone - happened then? it helped. i think it's important for anyone having i it's important for anyone having these issues, people who are struggling, especially in the last few years, financially, with what has happened with the pandemic, if anyone has any issues it helps a lot when you speak to someone and you
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let your feelings out because i know i struggled to do that. i didn't do that. and it builds up and no good can come from it. i think about the dressing rooms that you've been in, particularly that manchester united dressing room. was there never a time when anyone put their arm around you and said, "i can help"? no. ten, 15 years ago, you couldn't, i couldn't go into the dressing room and say "i'm struggling, i'm struggling with alcohol, i'm struggling mental health—wise". i couldn't do that. and when you say you were struggling, what was the darkest time? what was your fear at that point? probably death. i think, you know, as i said before, you make mistakes, which i did, and that could have been girls, it could have been drink—driving which i have done, it could have been killing someone. you could kill yourself. and that's a bad place to be. so i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help, and in order to save myself,
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but also to save my family. iimagine i imagine lots of people from normal backgrounds would look at footballers and think, well, what's wrong with them? they've got more money that they could ever spend in their lives, so how can they be sad, unhappy, dissatisfied? how can they behave so badly? can you explain that? i behave so badly? can you explain that? “ behave so badly? can you explain that? ~ , ., ., behave so badly? can you explain that? ~ _, ., ., y that? i think you can have money, ou can that? i think you can have money, you can have _ that? i think you can have money, you can have cars, _ that? i think you can have money, you can have cars, houses, - that? i think you can have money, you can have cars, houses, but i that? i think you can have money, i you can have cars, houses, but what you can have cars, houses, but what you lose is your freedom. you can have cars, houses, but what you lose is yourfreedom. you lose that freedom, for me, for instance, taking my kids to blackpool is very difficult and i went a few days ago with my children and i had to leave after ten minutes, and that's not me not wanting to connect with fans.
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i've literally don't hundred pictures and i actually look after my children, so i left after ten minutes. you lose a lot of the normal stuff, so you try and be normal, but you can't, and it's very difficult and i think if you ask a lot of people who are players, a lot of players would say, right, i'd rather be a normal person than have this. rooney. oh, brilliant goal! looking back at those old images now at 16, i7. coming on for that first game for everton, you really are just a child, aren't you? what would you say to that boy now? what i do know is, you are not prepared. i always thought i was prepared for the football, to play, and i felt i was good enough obviously to play. but for everything else around it,
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i was nowhere near prepared. rememberthe name! wayne rooney! might have said in the movement —— in the movie, i can't david beckham and victoria, i think the press were looking for the next version of them and me and coleen could not be further from that if i'm honest. what do you regret the most? a lot. i think there's a lot. but i also think that sometimes when things happen, that you've got to learn from it. so there's a lot of things i regret, a lot of things i think i've happened for a reason and a lot of things that have put me here today where i am and allows me to share them experiences. wayne, thanks very much indeed. thank you. sally, ijust sally, i just found sally, ijust found out did wayne rooney's first interview when she was at bbc north west 20 years ago, so it's like they have come full
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circle. ~ ., , ., , ., circle. when he was that young -la er circle. when he was that young player with _ circle. when he was that young player with everything - circle. when he was that young player with everything to i circle. when he was that young player with everything to play i circle. when he was that young i player with everything to play for. the documentary 'rooney�* is available to watch on prime video from tomorrow. 20 years ago, but it seems like yesterday— 20 years ago, but it seems like yesterday when he made such an impact _ yesterday when he made such an impact at — yesterday when he made such an impact at such a young age and such an honest _ impact at such a young age and such an honest and open interview and so important _ an honest and open interview and so important to be open like that as he said he _ important to be open like that as he said he could not have been ten or 15 years— said he could not have been ten or 15 years ago. and he's doing it on the pitch— 15 years ago. and he's doing it on the pitch in— 15 years ago. and he's doing it on the pitch in football terms, he's doing _ the pitch in football terms, he's doing miracles at derby. a 21 point deduction— doing miracles at derby. a 21 point deduction and they are four points from _ deduction and they are four points from safety now. incredible. | deduction and they are four points from safety now. incredible. i was 'ust from safety now. incredible. i was just surprised _ from safety now. incredible. i was just surprised he _ from safety now. incredible. i was just surprised he writes _ from safety now. incredible. i —" just surprised he writes poetry still. . , ,., y just surprised he writes poetry still. . , , ., ., still. absolutely. part of the zen and keeping _ still. absolutely. part of the zen and keeping calm. _ still. absolutely. part of the zen and keeping calm. something i still. absolutely. part of the zen i and keeping calm. something here manchester united couldn't do was win four— manchester united couldn't do was win four titles in a rate which is what _ win four titles in a rate which is what is — win four titles in a rate which is what is happening in rugby league. it's such a big year ahead, for the sport, with england staging the world cup, and tonight, the new superleague season begins, with, champions st helens taking
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on catalans dragons, looking to make history, as adam wild reports. there's no stopping st helens. super league winners again. st helens, the super league champions. and again. it's a hat—trick of titles. and again. champions three times in a row, the much—vaunted three—peat. now the new season, the new challenge is opening up. tonight it begins here. st helens against the team they beat in last year's grand final, the french, catalan dragons. much of the talk is around making history and that fourth successive super league title. remember, no team has ever done that before. there is, of course, a long way to go. but when you've been as dominant as st helens have been over recent seasons, confidence can be hard to contain. it's a feel—good factor, a buzz, felt by the whole town. it may be their bitter rivals up the road, wigan, who are famously associated with pies, but burchill�*s has been in st helens for 100 years and they are saints through and through. it's an enormous part
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of the town, yes, it is. we find in our small business here that when saints play, our trade goes up. it makes everybody feel a bit happier. and it all adds to the community spirit of the town, and that is what lifts the atmosphere up for the club and for the term itself. the only thing saints didn't win last season was the league leader's shield. that went to tonight's opponents catalan, one of two french teams in this seasons competition. a game built on local rivalries, and now forging new ones. but back in st helens, they are not short of sporting inspiration. darts superstar michael smith returning to his old school in the town, launching an education campaign for children. you are born with it. you don't support saints, you are born supporting saints and first and foremost you love any sport in st helens, especially rugby league. yeah, i do support saints,
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because they are the best in the world. and with st helens winning, also reigning champions, the kids have plenty to look up to. jack wellsby grew up down the road, a local lad who found global attention as a teenager when his last—gasp try sealed st helens the 2020 season. you will never see a finish to a rugby league game like that ever again. being a young lad you dream of winning one, and then i've gone and won two in two years, then three in three years, and i think that taste, that desire doesn't become any smaller because of that. i don't see why i can't do four or at least challenge for it. but reaching the top is one thing, staying there, something else altogether. towering above the town, above it all, a sculpture — the dream. as the new season starts and history potentially awaits, it feels perhaps more fitting than ever. adam wild, bbc news, st helens.
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so much to look forward to for rugby league _ so much to look forward to for rugby league fans. we are nearly a week into the winter olympics in beijing, and team gb are still waiting for their first medal. they do have high hopes, in the curling. the men's and women's team, events, have got under way overnight. britain's men are closing in on victory against italy. they're 6—5 up in the final end with the advantage of the final stone. shot of the match, from bruce mowatt, scoring 2 to put his team in front a short time ago in a contest that has swung one way and then the other. nail—biting for the women's team led by eve _ nail—biting for the women's team led by eve muirhead who had the final shot in— by eve muirhead who had the final shot in the — by eve muirhead who had the final shot in the opening match against switzerland and had to hit the centre — switzerland and had to hit the centre butjust switzerland and had to hit the centre but just went too far and that point— centre but just went too far and that point for the swiss, current world _ that point for the swiss, current world champions meant they took victory _ world champions meant they took victory a — world champions meant they took victory. a chance to redeem themselves when they play sweden. this is what it's like to be in the chaos of a snow board cross
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race. organisers installed a helmet cam on one of the riders. and he was at the back of the pack when he was involved in a pile—up — you can get an idea of what it's like when you come crashing down at that speed — they can get up to 60 miles an hour in the men's final and incredible finishing — in the men's final and incredible finishing the race and it went to the photo — finishing the race and it went to the photo and it was so close they nearly— the photo and it was so close they nearly had — the photo and it was so close they nearly had to share the gold medal. millimetres between them on the line but after— millimetres between them on the line but after lots of analysis of the photo — but after lots of analysis of the photo it — but after lots of analysis of the photo it was austria who took gold. so unfair. _ photo it was austria who took gold. so unfair, isn't it, on the canadian. _ so unfair, isn't it, on the canadian, who misses out by a whisker~ — canadian, who misses out by a whisker. ., ., ., ., , whisker. going into that final leap, that leap of — whisker. going into that final leap, that leap of faith, _ whisker. going into that final leap, that leap of faith, the _ whisker. going into that final leap, that leap of faith, the one - whisker. going into that final leap, that leap of faith, the one seemed | that leap of faith, the one seemed to be quite a bit behind and imagine yourself in the air, unable to get any faster, knowing the guy who was behind you... it’s any faster, knowing the guy who was behind you- - -_ behind you... it's all about the technique _ behind you. .. it's all about the technique of— behind you... it's all about the technique of the _ behind you... it's all about the technique of the take-off. it's| behind you... it's all about the i technique of the take-off. it's on the ice. technique of the take-off. it's on the ice- you _ technique of the take-off. it's on the ice. you pick _ technique of the take-off. it's on the ice. you pick up _ technique of the take-off. it's on the ice. you pick up the - technique of the take-off. it's on the ice. you pick up the speed, i technique of the take-off. it's on i the ice. you pick up the speed, but in the air you _
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the ice. you pick up the speed, but in the air you can _ the ice. you pick up the speed, but in the air you can lose _ the ice. you pick up the speed, but in the air you can lose ground i the ice. you pick up the speed, but in the air you can lose ground on i in the air you can lose ground on time _ in the air you can lose ground on time it— in the air you can lose ground on time. . . in the air you can lose ground on time._ fantastic i in the air you can lose ground on time._ fantastic to| time. it is great tv. fantastic to watch and _ time. it is great tv. fantastic to watch and seeing _ time. it is great tv. fantastic to watch and seeing that _ time. it is great tv. fantastic to watch and seeing that bird's i time. it is great tv. fantastic to watch and seeing that bird's eye view— watch and seeing that bird's eye view of— watch and seeing that bird's eye view of what it is like to be in that— view of what it is like to be in that melee.— view of what it is like to be in that melee._ a| view of what it is like to be in i that melee._ a last that melee. thanks, mike. a last look at the _ that melee. thanks, mike. a last look at the weather _ that melee. thanks, mike. a last look at the weather with - that melee. thanks, mike. a last look at the weather with carol i that melee. thanks, mike. a last| look at the weather with carol this morning and a lot going on as she is matching the weather with her choice of clothing today and you are among friends. good morning. good morning everybody. look at this lovely _ good morning everybody. look at this lovely flock _ good morning everybody. look at this lovely flock of sheep and i want to show _ lovely flock of sheep and i want to show you — lovely flock of sheep and i want to show you the snow. we had snow falling _ show you the snow. we had snow falling last — show you the snow. we had snow falling last night across northern ireiand _ falling last night across northern ireland and scotland and you might wake _ ireland and scotland and you might wake up _ ireland and scotland and you might wake up to— ireland and scotland and you might wake up to that this morning but pictures— wake up to that this morning but pictures from the scottish borders here and — pictures from the scottish borders here and we've also had snow on higher— here and we've also had snow on higher routes across northern england — higher routes across northern england so first thing this morning the risk— england so first thing this morning the risk of— england so first thing this morning the risk of ice on untreated surfaces— the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and it's because of this potent — surfaces and it's because of this potent area of low pressure which is moving _ potent area of low pressure which is moving west to east across the country — moving west to east across the country and has produced snow and rain and _ country and has produced snow and rain and also some hail and thunder and lightning and windy. we have had -usts and lightning and windy. we have had gusts in _ and lightning and windy. we have had gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the _ gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the outer— gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the outer hebrides first thing and we —
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in the outer hebrides first thing and we could still see every time yet, looking at gales, even severe gales _ yet, looking at gales, even severe gales with — yet, looking at gales, even severe gales with exposure which will be tracking _ gales with exposure which will be tracking eastwards through the course — tracking eastwards through the course of— tracking eastwards through the course of the day. meanwhile in the south _ course of the day. meanwhile in the south we _ course of the day. meanwhile in the south we have a weather front sinking — south we have a weather front sinking south taking the patchy li-ht sinking south taking the patchy light rain— sinking south taking the patchy light rain and drizzle with it and on friday— light rain and drizzle with it and on friday it will brighten up and a few showers in north—west england and northern ireland and they will be blustery but the main action is across— be blustery but the main action is across scotland where we see the rain, _ across scotland where we see the rain. the — across scotland where we see the rain, the snow and also thunder and lightning _ rain, the snow and also thunder and lightning pushing towards the east and by— lightning pushing towards the east and by the time we get to the afternoon the strongest winds will be across — afternoon the strongest winds will be across the southern uplands and north-east — be across the southern uplands and north—east england so if you are travelling — north—east england so if you are travelling on a high sided vehicles take extra — travelling on a high sided vehicles take extra care today as you might find some — take extra care today as you might find some disruption to transport. but as— find some disruption to transport. but as i— find some disruption to transport. but as i mentioned, blustery day and temperatures ranging from two down to nine _ temperatures ranging from two down to nine in— temperatures ranging from two down to nine in cardiff but when you add on the _ to nine in cardiff but when you add on the windshield it will feel sub zero across the northern half of scotland — zero across the northern half of scotland and where ever you are it will feel— scotland and where ever you are it will feel colder than yesterday. through— will feel colder than yesterday. through the evening and overnight, there _ through the evening and overnight, there goes— through the evening and overnight, there goes the area of low pressure tracking _ there goes the area of low pressure tracking down the coastline and
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there _ tracking down the coastline and there will— tracking down the coastline and there will be wintry showers peppering the north, mostly on high ground _ peppering the north, mostly on high ground and — peppering the north, mostly on high ground and it will be a cold night with a _ ground and it will be a cold night with a sharp, widespread frost and where _ with a sharp, widespread frost and where we — with a sharp, widespread frost and where we have underlying snow in scotland _ where we have underlying snow in scotland temperatures could go 2—10, so once _ scotland temperatures could go 2—10, so once again there will be the risk of ice _ so once again there will be the risk of ice first— so once again there will be the risk of ice first thing tomorrow morning and a _ of ice first thing tomorrow morning and a cold — of ice first thing tomorrow morning and a cold start to the day tomorrow but there _ and a cold start to the day tomorrow but there will be a lot of crisp sunshine _ but there will be a lot of crisp sunshine and if you wintry showers and through the day the wind is going _ and through the day the wind is going to — and through the day the wind is going to pick up across the west and we will— going to pick up across the west and we will see _ going to pick up across the west and we will see some cloud arrive and then— we will see some cloud arrive and then later— we will see some cloud arrive and then later again we will see rain pushing — then later again we will see rain pushing in _ then later again we will see rain pushing in. going to be between four and 9 _ pushing in. going to be between four and 9 degrees as a top temperature. as we _ and 9 degrees as a top temperature. as we move — and 9 degrees as a top temperature. as we move into saturday, we have more _ as we move into saturday, we have more weather fronts coming in from the atiantic— more weather fronts coming in from the atlantic bringing in all of this rain across— the atlantic bringing in all of this rain across parts of the north and also the _ rain across parts of the north and also the west and heading towards the south — also the west and heading towards the south and east, but not arriving at the _ the south and east, but not arriving at the moment during daylight hours. another— at the moment during daylight hours. another feature of the weather will be the _ another feature of the weather will be the wind and we could have gales with exposure in the west and these temperatures are six to 10 degrees. later— temperatures are six to 10 degrees. later on _ temperatures are six to 10 degrees. later on saturday and sunday the weather — later on saturday and sunday the weather front crosses the far
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south—east taking the rain with it and then— south—east taking the rain with it and then we have low pressure heading — and then we have low pressure heading northwards and still a level of uncertainty about the northern extent _ of uncertainty about the northern extent but this is what we think at the moment, getting on across southern — the moment, getting on across southern england and south wales and to the _ southern england and south wales and to the north of that, some blustery showers. _ to the north of that, some blustery showers, brightness, but not the change _ showers, brightness, but not the change in — showers, brightness, but not the change in temperatures. the wind will be _ change in temperatures. the wind will be coming up from the south as opposed _ will be coming up from the south as opposed to — will be coming up from the south as opposed to coming in from the north. thanks, carol. for more than 25 years film—maker, louis theroux has been documenting the more curious, misunderstood and controversial corners of society. the united states is the focus of his new series — the first in four years — which revisits some of his previous themes including guns and the far right. let's take a look. at his parents house where he lives, recording his streams from the basement, i decided to challenge him on his comments. i saw the monologue you did about me.— you did about me. yes, i did do a monologue _ you did about me. yes, i did do a monologue about _ you did about me. yes, i did do a monologue about you. _ you did about me. yes, i did do a
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monologue about you. i - you did about me. yes, i did do a monologue about you. i just i you did about me. yes, i did do a j monologue about you. i just want you did about me. yes, i did do a i monologue about you. i just want you monologue about you. i 'ust want you to know that — monologue about you. i 'ust want you to know that r — monologue about you. i just want you to know that i fundamentally - to know that i fundamentally disagree with what you promote and what you stand for. but i am here because i am curious about you. does that make sense?— that make sense? totally. you disatree that make sense? totally. you disagree with _ that make sense? totally. you disagree with what _ that make sense? totally. you disagree with what i _ that make sense? totally. you disagree with what i stand i that make sense? totally. you disagree with what i stand for, j that make sense? totally. you | disagree with what i stand for, i disagree with what i stand for, i disagree with what you stand for, but i tend to operate with people in good faith. i but i tend to operate with people in tood faith. ., , good faith. i wonder if it is hel-ful good faith. i wonder if it is helpful to _ good faith. i wonder if it is helpful to almost - good faith. i wonder if it is helpful to almost like i good faith. i wonder if it is helpful to almost like put| good faith. i wonder if it is i helpful to almost like put the good faith. i wonder if it is - helpful to almost like put the cards on the table, in a way. because you've been characterised as white nationalist repeatedly and sometimes you come near to embracing the term, and through much of your commentary is an idea is the idea of white racial identity being caught your belief system. and louisjoins racial identity being caught your belief system. and louis joins us now. good morning. just establishing communications and we are all set. you have your headphones and microphone and you are sorted. i am still livint microphone and you are sorted. i am still living the — microphone and you are sorted. i am still living the lockdown dream, working — still living the lockdown dream, working from home, but enjoying being _ working from home, but enjoying being with you virtually. working from home, but en'oying being with you virtually.i working from home, but en'oying being with you virtually. good. we best do a little _ being with you virtually. good. we best do a little explaining - being with you virtually. good. we best do a little explaining becausej best do a little explaining because in a way we leapt quite deep into
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the documentary, the first one which is about the far right in america and its influences. give us the broadview first of all. what were you trying to explore?— broadview first of all. what were you trying to explore? well, these are themes. _ you trying to explore? well, these are themes, as _ you trying to explore? well, these are themes, as i _ you trying to explore? well, these are themes, as i think— you trying to explore? well, these are themes, as i think you - you trying to explore? well, these i are themes, as i think you mention, that i— are themes, as i think you mention, that i have _ are themes, as i think you mention, that i have looked at over many years. — that i have looked at over many years. the — that i have looked at over many years, the idea of extreme beliefs, extreme _ years, the idea of extreme beliefs, extreme lifestyles, forms of behaviour, mindsets that are in some way either— behaviour, mindsets that are in some way either dangerous or self sabotaging. i'm sure you have noticed — sabotaging. i'm sure you have noticed in— sabotaging. i'm sure you have noticed in the last few years that the world — noticed in the last few years that the world has become in many ways even more — the world has become in many ways even more weird, notjust with respect — even more weird, notjust with respect to— even more weird, notjust with respect to the pandemic, but this kind of— respect to the pandemic, but this kind of condition of virality that exists — kind of condition of virality that exists on — kind of condition of virality that exists on the internet with social media _ exists on the internet with social media and — exists on the internet with social media and the way in which a belief system _ media and the way in which a belief system that might previously have been very— system that might previously have been very marginalare system that might previously have been very marginal are now increasingly in the mainstream and we only— increasingly in the mainstream and we only need to look at someone like donald _ we only need to look at someone like donald trump to see how social media can create _ donald trump to see how social media can create a _ donald trump to see how social media can create a kind of huge
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mainstream, and arguably dangerous cultural— mainstream, and arguably dangerous cultural and political phenomenon. so the _ cultural and political phenomenon. so the idea was to go and look at things— so the idea was to go and look at things i— so the idea was to go and look at things i had looked at before, the far right. — things i had looked at before, the far right, rappers in florida who are involved in violent beefs, or allegedly— are involved in violent beefs, or allegedly involved, and the adult film industry, and look at how the internet _ film industry, and look at how the internet and the impact of social media _ internet and the impact of social media and — internet and the impact of social media and the increased reach, the platforms _ media and the increased reach, the platforms of these people now have have turbo—charged some of the behaviours. in a way, you could argue _ behaviours. in a way, you could argue this — behaviours. in a way, you could argue this is _ behaviours. in a way, you could argue this is a kind of fringe cultural— argue this is a kind of fringe cultural phenomenon, some would say, but what _ cultural phenomenon, some would say, but what i've _ cultural phenomenon, some would say, but what i've noticed is that increasingly this is something that very much— increasingly this is something that very much occupies the centre ground of culture _ very much occupies the centre ground of culture. so, very much occupies the centre ground of culture. , ., , , of culture. so, the phrase used in the cli . , of culture. so, the phrase used in the clip. the _ of culture. so, the phrase used in the clip, the cards _ of culture. so, the phrase used in the clip, the cards on _ of culture. so, the phrase used in the clip, the cards on the - of culture. so, the phrase used in the clip, the cards on the table, i the clip, the cards on the table, the clip, the cards on the table, the cards on the table in terms of those people you go to spend time with, do some alarm bells ring sometimes when they are almost too keen to have the bbc�*s louis theroux
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giving them attention, bearing in mind some of these individuals, far right individuals, have their own broadcast channels and are trying to reach people and have a message they are trying to get out there. do you sometimes have to stop and think, am i doing exactly what they want? whether people draw their own conclusions, is that a thought process for you that just conclusions, is that a thought process for you thatjust by doing the documentary are giving them a platform? the documentary are giving them a tlatform? ., �* . the documentary are giving them a tlatform? ., v ., the documentary are giving them a latform? ., �* , ., ., the documentary are giving them a tlatform? ., �*, ., ., , ., platform? that's a great question and one that _ platform? that's a great question and one that we _ platform? that's a great question and one that we have _ platform? that's a great question and one that we have thought i platform? that's a great question i and one that we have thought about, as im _ and one that we have thought about, as im sure _ and one that we have thought about, as i'm sure you can imagine, a great deal over— as i'm sure you can imagine, a great deal over the — as i'm sure you can imagine, a great deal over the last few years. the strange — deal over the last few years. the strange thing is reflecting, it's a si-n strange thing is reflecting, it's a sign of— strange thing is reflecting, it's a sign of the time so i, is reflecting on how— sign of the time so i, is reflecting on how 25— sign of the time so i, is reflecting on how 25 years ago i would go and do the _ on how 25 years ago i would go and do the stories and we didn't think too hard — do the stories and we didn't think too hard about whether it in any way it might _ too hard about whether it in any way it might be — too hard about whether it in any way it might be construed as irresponsible to give airtime to guys _ irresponsible to give airtime to guys living in montana and idaho who were going _ guys living in montana and idaho who were going to declare war on the
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federal— were going to declare war on the federal government because they viewed _ federal government because they viewed the government as tyrannical and were _ viewed the government as tyrannical and were hoarding guns stop they were _ and were hoarding guns stop they were so— were so fringe is to be laughable. now we are in a world where those views— now we are in a world where those views are _ now we are in a world where those views are much closer to positions of power. — views are much closer to positions of power, and i think i should pick up of power, and i think i should pick up on _ of power, and i think i should pick up on briefly is that it was very far from — up on briefly is that it was very far from the case that they were very keen — far from the case that they were very keen to have asked. the process of getting _ very keen to have asked. the process of getting access took a long time and it— of getting access took a long time and it took— of getting access took a long time and it took a couple of years of careful— and it took a couple of years of careful negotiation. they viewed the bbc not _ careful negotiation. they viewed the bbc not as— careful negotiation. they viewed the bbc not as their friend. clearly they— bbc not as their friend. clearly they consider themselves, mainstream media _ they consider themselves, mainstream media to _ they consider themselves, mainstream media to them is inimical and in some _ media to them is inimical and in some ways _ media to them is inimical and in some ways they don't need the platform — some ways they don't need the platform of the mainstream broadcasters they have their own platform — broadcasters they have their own platform already, but to your greater— platform already, but to your greater point, yes, we absolutely needed _ greater point, yes, we absolutely needed to— greater point, yes, we absolutely needed to think through for their reach. _ needed to think through for their reach. the — needed to think through for their reach, the reach of these groups that are — reach, the reach of these groups that are spreading anti—democratic or divisive — that are spreading anti—democratic
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or divisive ideas, they are obviously making a calculation that it benefits — obviously making a calculation that it benefits them in some way, and i think— it benefits them in some way, and i think we _ it benefits them in some way, and i think we as — it benefits them in some way, and i think we as a — it benefits them in some way, and i think we as a production were making a calculation — think we as a production were making a calculation that this was an important enough story and we could handle _ important enough story and we could handle it— important enough story and we could handle it in— important enough story and we could handle it in such a way that we could — handle it in such a way that we could report on it with sufficient context — could report on it with sufficient context and that people would understand the true nature of the phenomenon and be informed as to what was _ phenomenon and be informed as to what was going on in the world. good mornint. what was going on in the world. good morning- it — what was going on in the world. good morning- it got _ what was going on in the world. good morning. it got to _ what was going on in the world. good morning. it got to a _ what was going on in the world. (13mg morning. it got to a point where with one of the people you are interviewing, they got quite aggressive and you are kicked off his property and then he went on further to threaten you via his pod cast or his platform. how do you deal with stuff like that? this bears out _ deal with stuff like that? this bears out a — deal with stuff like that? this bears out a greater _ deal with stuff like that? this bears out a greater point that these are young _ bears out a greater point that these are young guys, and they are not, they don't— are young guys, and they are not, they don't really resemble the far i’ilht they don't really resemble the far right of— they don't really resemble the far right of old. there —— they are
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influences. _ right of old. there —— they are influences, hipster, and can be quite _ influences, hipster, and can be quite humorous and charismatic characters— quite humorous and charismatic characters at time. that might explain — characters at time. that might explain their appeal. i characters at time. that might explain theirappeal. i had characters at time. that might explain their appeal. i had found images — explain their appeal. i had found images of— explain their appeal. i had found images of him online giving what appeared — images of him online giving what appeared to my eyes to be nazi salutes — appeared to my eyes to be nazi salutes and, obviously, i brought that up— salutes and, obviously, i brought that up when i went to see him and he took— that up when i went to see him and he took offence and threw me out stop which, on one level, you could say. stop which, on one level, you could say i'm _ stop which, on one level, you could say i'm a _ stop which, on one level, you could say. i'm a human being and i don't enjoy— say. i'm a human being and i don't enjoy upsetting people, so it was kind of— enjoy upsetting people, so it was kind of awkward. and to have the interview — kind of awkward. and to have the interviewjumped the tracks, i don't enjoy— interviewjumped the tracks, i don't enjoy being — interviewjumped the tracks, i don't enjoy being thrown out of somebody's home _ enjoy being thrown out of somebody's home or— enjoy being thrown out of somebody's home or property but at the same time _ home or property but at the same time it— home or property but at the same time it was— home or property but at the same time it was also a revelation about him, _ time it was also a revelation about him. about— time it was also a revelation about him, about what he really stood for, and also _ him, about what he really stood for, and also in _ him, about what he really stood for, and also in a — him, about what he really stood for, and also in a bizarre way, how thin—skinned he was. there is a real
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distance _ thin—skinned he was. there is a real distance about someone who is willing — distance about someone who is willing to — distance about someone who is willing to embrace far right imagery but won't _ willing to embrace far right imagery but won't answer questions about it. do you _ but won't answer questions about it. do you ever— but won't answer questions about it. do you ever get concerned for your own safety on the safety of your crew when you go into, potentially, when you approach people you have this laconic way of approaching thing with a real innocence and you ask the simplest questions which, on the surface, seem harmless but actually they often unearth ugly truths which sometimes the interviewee does not want to be seen and that is when situations can escalate because they find themselves wrong—footed in some way. when that happens, do you ever worry about your own safety and the safety of your crew and what contingencies are in place? it is of your crew and what contingencies are in place?— are in place? it is something you need to think _ are in place? it is something you need to think through. _ are in place? it is something you need to think through. my i are in place? it is something you i need to think through. my director, i have _ need to think through. my director, i have different directors on different shows, but we will get together, and different producers and series— together, and different producers and series producers, and you know there _ and series producers, and you know there is_ and series producers, and you know
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there is a _ and series producers, and you know there is a kind of committee of people — there is a kind of committee of people who are all stakeholders in the safety of the team, and i am one of them, _ the safety of the team, and i am one of them, and — the safety of the team, and i am one of them, and oddly, in this day and a-e of them, and oddly, in this day and age especially with this community it's less _ age especially with this community it's less about physical danger. in the days— it's less about physical danger. in the days of— it's less about physical danger. in the days of old it would have been, is he _ the days of old it would have been, is he going — the days of old it would have been, is he going to have a gun, is the lui'i is he going to have a gun, is the gun going — is he going to have a gun, is the gun going to follow safety procedures, how likely is it that the gun— procedures, how likely is it that the gun is— procedures, how likely is it that the gun is illegal or illegal? in this world, especially with the far right, _ this world, especially with the far right, it _ this world, especially with the far right, it is — this world, especially with the far right, it is more it is a digital menace _ right, it is more it is a digital menace like a menace that relates to being _ menace like a menace that relates to being trolled, to being boxed, doxxed — being trolled, to being boxed, doxxed or hacks. in a weird way, and i doxxed or hacks. in a weird way, and i don't _ doxxed or hacks. in a weird way, and i don't wish _ doxxed or hacks. in a weird way, and idon't wish to— doxxed or hacks. in a weird way, and i don't wish to sound like a doom mongers, — i don't wish to sound like a doom mongers, we will see what happens when _ mongers, we will see what happens when the _ mongers, we will see what happens when the shows go out because there have ireen— when the shows go out because there have been online whispers of what they intend to do. i think, maybe naively, — they intend to do. i think, maybe naively, because we are honest brokers — naively, because we are honest brokers and we tell the stories honestly, _ brokers and we tell the stories honestly, i would like to imagine that there — honestly, i would like to imagine that there is a world in which the
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contributors don't completely go nuts and — contributors don't completely go nuts and come after us. but clearly that's— nuts and come after us. but clearly that's not _ nuts and come after us. but clearly that's not always the case. i have had a _ that's not always the case. i have had a backlash in the past, so we will see _ had a backlash in the past, so we will see what happens after the programmes go out.— will see what happens after the programmes go out. well, take care. it's fascinating _ programmes go out. well, take care. it's fascinating and _ programmes go out. well, take care. it's fascinating and i've _ programmes go out. well, take care. it's fascinating and i've seen - programmes go out. well, take care. it's fascinating and i've seen the - it's fascinating and i've seen the first of the three, and it is fascinating. really enlightening, and as usual, you do a greatjob. thank you so much. thanks for joining us. 'louis theroux's forbidden america' is on bbc two on sunday at 9pm and all three episodes of the new series will also be available on the iplayer. you're watching bbc breakfast. and here are the headlines: hello, good morning, hello, good morning,
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welcome to bbc news. welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire i'm victoria derbyshire and here are the headlines: borisjohnson travels to brussels and warsaw as the uk steps up diplomatic efforts to resolve the ukraine crisis. the foreign secretary, liz truss, is in moscow to meet the man who does herjob in russia — it's the first visit there by a british foreign secretary for more than four years. we'll be live for a joint news conference — expected in the next few minutes. police investigating lockdown parties in downing street are sending questionnaires to more than 50 people to ask them what happened. the ioc refuse to comment on why the medals ceremony for the figure—skating team event has been delayed at the winter games in beijing — following reports of a failed drugs test on the russian team. wayne rooney — an incredible career on the pitch

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