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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 10, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. our headlines at 5pm... a fresh british diplomatic offensive to avert a russian invasion of ukraine. as russia begins new military exercises in the region, the prime minister says this is the biggest security crisis europe has faced for decades. labour says the uk must present a united front. the stakes are very high. and this is a dangerous moment, and at stake are the rules that protect every nation, every nation big and small. nobody quite knows what putin is going to do. i do know that what he wants to do, above all else, is to divide the allies, nato and other allies, but we mustn't be divided.
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new figures reveal a record 6.1 million people were waiting to start routine hospital treatment in england at the end of last year. concern in the nhs about the announcement that all covid restrictions in england could end a month earlier than planned. borisjohnson under new pressure over downing street parties, with scathing criticism from a former conservative prime minister. day after day, the public was asked to believe the unbelievable. ministers were sent out to defend the indefensible. and, britain's climate change chief has warned the uk must do more to insulate the country's draughty homes.
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good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. boris johnson warned that the ukraine crisis is "at its most dangerous moment" as he spoke of the importance of a diplomatic push in the coming days. the prime minister has been holding talks with the head of nato in brussels, and the polish prime minister in warsaw. the foreign secretary, liz truss, also met with her russian counterpart, sergei lavrov. russia continues to deny it has any plans to attack ukraine. the talk in ukraine is of possible invasion, and with it a march towards the prospects of a winter war in eastern europe. today, we are seeing british diplomacy on both sides. the foreign secretary in moscow, the prime minister at the headquarters of the nato military alliance in brussels.
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this is probably the most dangerous moment, i would say, in the course of the next few days, in what is the biggest security crisis that europe has faced for decades. we've got to get it right, and i think that the combination of sanctions and military resolve, plus diplomacy, is what is in order. russia has already amassed well over 100,000 combat—ready troops, with heavy equipment, missiles and key enablers such as command and control and medical units. and we are closely monitoring russia's deployment in belarus, which is the biggest since the end of the cold war. looking at the geography of the region really helps us to understand what is going on here. to ukraine's east, russia. to ukraine's west, members of nato.
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as well as geography there is history too, and lots of it. not least russia invading crimea in ukraine eight years ago. this is a dangerous moment for european security. the number of russian forces is going up. the warning time for a possible attack is going down. nato is not a threat to russia, but we must be prepared for the worst. the central point of tension here is russia cannot stomach the idea of ukraine everjoining nato. but ukraine argues it is a sovereign country, it should have the right to choose. given neither of these things are likely to change anytime soon, it's difficult to see how either side can climb down. and from brussels, the prime minister's nick next stop... warsaw, meeting his polish
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counterpart this afternoon. the discussions and the diplomacy continues. chris mason, bbc news. the labour leader was also in brussels to meet the head of nato, and he said that the political parties needed to set aside their differences and remain united in their message to russia. i am very concerned about the situation in ukraine. i think there is a shared concern across the alliance here at nato. nobody quite knows what putin is going to do. i do know that what he wants to do, above all else, is to divide the allies, nato and other allies. but we mustn't be divided, and that is why it is very important for me to be here at nato today. it's also very important for me to make clear is part of my message here that we stand united as the united kingdom and whatever other challenges and arguments we have, but when it comes to russian aggression, we stand together,
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the political parties. as we heard, the foreign secretary, liz truss, is in moscow for talks with her russian counterpart sergei lavrov. she's warned the kremlin that an invasion of ukraine would be disastrous. but russian troops are keeping up the pressure — and today, they're starting ten days of military exercises with their close ally belarus, which has a border with ukraine. from moscow, caroline davies. clearing snow in moscow can be a thankless task. as soon as you're making progress, a new flurry lands. today's meeting between the uk and russia was an icy affair. liz truss' warnings about harsh sanctions if russia were to take action in ukraine were not well received. translation: i'm honestly - disappointed that our conversation turned out like the mute talking to the deaf.
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it seems like we are listening to each other but not hearing each other. at the very least, our very detailed clarifications on the whole fell upon deaf ears. well, first of all, i certainly wasn't mute in our discussions earlier. i put forward the uk's point of view on the current situation, and the fact that as well as seeking to deter russia from an invasion into ukraine, we are also very resolute in pursuing the diplomatic path. explosion. this is what worries the west. russia is flexing its military muscle with joint drills in belarus. nato is concerned about russia building up more troops along its border with ukraine. russia wants guarantees that nato, which it sees as a threat, will not expand.
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meanwhile, the uk and the us have committed to sending more troops to nato countries to protect its eastern flank. but russia still insists that it is not the aggressor. today, the head of russia's secret service chaired a discussion about russian history, but he also has an eye on the current situation in europe. translation: russia has never had and doesn't have any aggressive - plans towards ukraine. we saw these dangerous lies spread from the other shore of the atlantic and these lies have been picked up in a number of western capitals. this disinformation is dangerous. first of all for ukraine and its citizens as well as for european stability and security. building trust while building troops is difficult to do. it is seen as a positive sign that both sides are still talking, but after many weeks, many meetings and many press conferences, it can feel like they are going over old ground with still no sign of resolution. more western politicians will land in moscow over the next week. a frozen conversation is still better than all—out war. caroline davies, bbc news, moscow.
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let's speak to our diplomatic correspondent paul adams, who's in kyiv. another day of intense diplomacy, more talking. i wonder whether you think any of it makes more talking. i wonder whether you think any of it makes any more talking. i wonder whether you think any of it makes any difference to president putin and his plans for ukraine? flat to president putin and his plans for ukraine? ., .,, ., , , to president putin and his plans for ukraine? ., ., , , ., , to president putin and his plans for ukraine? ., ., _ ., , , ukraine? not obviously not 'ust yet. i think we — ukraine? not obviously not 'ust yet. i think we are still * ukraine? not obviously not 'ust yet. i think we are still at h ukraine? not obviously not 'ust yet. i think we are still at the _ ukraine? not obviously notjust yet. i think we are still at the point - i think we are still at the point which particularly british and american officials regarded as the point of maximum danger. with no sign of any kind of russian de—escalation, quite the reverse, 30,000 russian troops in that it was beginning those exercises today. russian warships in the black sea ceiling off parts of the black sea and the adjacent see where the ukrainians are complaining that navigation for their vessels is virtually impossible. and of course there are 100,000 other russian troops ranged around ukraine's east
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eastern borders. the sense of an sacraments of a noose around this country is pretty a few. it is described by the president as psychological pressure and that deputy defence minister cold a black male and of course it's a black male or psychological pressure against ukraine to china and proceeded perhaps in the view of the kremlin, not to look to the rest but to think about a different kind of relationship with pressure but also perhaps more importantly black male against the west to dry and force the kind of dialogue which is actually beginning. that's why i think from vladimir putin's perspective the prospect of the site of these western leaders and officials traipsing to the door of the kremlin to have these conversations is quite gratifying because he believes that he has caught the attention of the rest and that we having a discussion with western leaders on his terms. at
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that we having a discussion with western leaders on his terms. at the root of this is — western leaders on his terms. at the root of this is that _ western leaders on his terms. at the root of this is that vladimir _ western leaders on his terms. at the root of this is that vladimir putin - root of this is that vladimir putin does not want ukraine to be part of nato. the west is saying we will not give you that guarantee. so is there any room for compromise? the? give you that guarantee. so is there any room for compromise? they was this interesting _ any room for compromise? they was this interesting moment _ any room for compromise? they was this interesting moment earlier- any room for compromise? they was this interesting moment earlier in i this interesting moment earlier in the week in which emmanuel macron during his visit to moscow talked or was thought to report that to have talked about their family and of ukraine, renting finland as a model of a country with a close relationship with may with all sorts of benefits coming back and not actually a member of the alliance itself. that's not going to have gone down terribly well here as far as ukraine is concerned, that absolute right to determine its own future is something they cherish and hold to dairy but i suspect private e—mailing perfectly well that membership is a pretty distant prospect at the moment. but that is
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one of the fundamental differences at the heart of this. i think it masks the bigger difference which is the attempt by vladimir putin to address what he sees as 30 years of defeat on 30 years in which russia plus plus interest, security interests of eastern europe has simply not been taking a condo. in his view and he believes correcting the mistakes of the past few days ago. and he has reason to think he is onto something.— is onto something. thank you very much. i'm joined by matthew smith, director of analysis at shephard media, a company that provides information services to the defence sector. let us talk about it enormous russian build—up. more than 100,000, 130,000 troops. could that be for
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anything other than a planned invasion? it’s anything other than a planned invasion? �* , , ., , invasion? it's extremely worrying both from a _ invasion? it's extremely worrying both from a uk _ invasion? it's extremely worrying both from a uk perspective - invasion? it's extremely worrying both from a uk perspective and l invasion? it's extremely worrying - both from a uk perspective and from a european perspective as well. we have seen a lot of attempts at the primacy of the past days and weeks and outlines and activities going on just now but one of the principal concerns is that the more equipment and troops going to the beach and the more difficult it is from vladimir putin to take a step back and so the longer it goes on for negotiation diplomacy is absolutely vital but there is a risk as increasing numbers of troops coming to the area it's becoming difficult to the area it's becoming difficult to de—escalate the situation. russians are effectively just waiting and biding their time and waiting and biding their time and waiting for the ground to harding antifreeze over a bit so that it's easier for them to move their trips
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around and that islam they would strike, that is when they would attack ukraine? it’s strike, that is when they would attack ukraine?— strike, that is when they would attack ukraine? it's certainly the truth that the _ attack ukraine? it's certainly the truth that the russian _ attack ukraine? it's certainly the truth that the russian armed - attack ukraine? it's certainly the - truth that the russian armed forces are probably as capable now as they have been for many years. the kremlin and vladimir putin spent the last of a decade now investing significantly in those areas of capabilities and one of the things is the russian programmes and one of the things we have looked for the last two years is a huge investment particularly in heavy armour and the mobility capabilities we are seeing to an extent deployed in the area just now and to give you a sense of the scale of what we are talking about here, we are looking at maybe 14 about here, we are looking at maybe 1a separate procurement programmes delivering hundreds of vehicles and russian armed forces and personnel carriers and vehicles and battle
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tanks. so this is a culmination of a period of russian investment in technology is. period of russian investment in technology is-— period of russian investment in technology is— period of russian investment in technolo: is. . ~ ., technology is. talk to us about the nato response. _ technology is. talk to us about the nato response. obviously - technology is. talk to us about the nato response. obviously nato - technology is. talk to us about the nato response. obviously nato isl technology is. talk to us about the i nato response. obviously nato is not nato response. 0bviously nato is not sending troops to return to micro defend ukraine if it did come to a russian invasion, but the british have put 1000 troops today on standby in case of a humanitarian emergency? it standby in case of a humanitarian emergency?— standby in case of a humanitarian emeruen ? ,. ., ~ , emergency? if you look at the kinds of weapons — emergency? if you look at the kinds of weapons being _ emergency? if you look at the kinds of weapons being transferred - emergency? if you look at the kinds of weapons being transferred up - emergency? if you look at the kinds of weapons being transferred up to | of weapons being transferred up to now, i think it would be fair to characterise them as defensive systems. so things like anti—tank missile systems. things that are targeted at defeating an incoming force, if you like. so those kinds of capabilities are the ones that nato is providing. it's also worth
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bearing in mind that within nato itself, particularly on the eastern border, for the last few years there's been quite an increase in there's been quite an increase in the other countries in that area investing in their own defensive capabilities. because this threat we are seeing from russia now isn't new, it's been a very clear element for the past few years. the uk and the rest of nato's allies have a clear understanding of that threat from russia. so it's notjust what nato is doing now, it's the investment that's been going on the last few years that's changing the balance of weaponry in the region. good to talk to you, thanks for your analysis, matthew smith there. thanks very much. while borisjohnson is abroad dealing with the crisis in ukraine, here at home, the former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, has said mrjohnson and his officials "broke lockdown laws" over downing street parties. sirjohn says they dreamt up "brazen
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excuses" for their behaviour and asked the public to "believe the unbelievable". sirjohn's damning comments come as police investigate a total of 12 separate gatherings. at number ten, the prime minister and officials broke lockdown rules. brazen excuses were dreamed up. day after day, the public was asked to believe the unbelievable. ministers were sent out to defend the indefensible, making themselves look gullible or foolish as they did so. 0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. helen, i know sirjohn is a long—time critic of borisjohnson, certainly no ally or friend of his. but certainly pretty withering comments today. you but certainly pretty withering comments today.— but certainly pretty withering comments today. you are right, the 've comments today. you are right, they've disagreed _ comments today. you are right, they've disagreed over - comments today. you are right, they've disagreed over many - comments today. you are right, - they've disagreed over many things,
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like brexit, for example, he was very critical ofjohnson's decision to prorogue parliament in 2019. so he is a long—time critic, so there'll be some thinking today that this is just more of same. there'll be some thinking today that this isjust more of same. but there'll be some thinking today that this is just more of same. but some of the language you chose to use was pretty striking when you consider this as a conservative prime minister talking about — a former conservative prime ministers talking about a current conservative prime minister and the government he leads. not only to he quite plainly state what he said about lockdown parties, that must be said in the q&a session afterwards, he seemed to soften his claim a bit suggest he wouldn't be wise, fair or prudent to judge the police reports. but he was pretty strong there, he also used some language that echoed labour�*s attack last, talking about this idea of one rule for them, one rule for another. he was also quite critical, saying this wasn'tjust about another. he was also quite critical, saying this wasn't just about the prime minister — he was also quite
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critical of the cabinet, suggesting that either they weren't giving the sort of advice that perhaps the prime minister would want to hear as he had received as prime minister, as prime minister received —— margaret thatcher received — or if he they had, he didn't understand why no one had resigned. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, had this to say. i leader, sir keir starmer, had this to sa . ~ �* , ., to say. i think it's time for the rime to say. i think it's time for the prime minister _ to say. i think it's time for the prime minister to _ to say. i think it's time for the prime minister to go, - to say. i think it's time for the prime minister to go, that's . to say. i think it's time for the j prime minister to go, that's in to say. i think it's time for the - prime minister to go, that's in the national_ prime minister to go, that's in the national interest. the only people who could — national interest. the only people who could remove him are mps, and that requires them to speak out, and they should — that requires them to speak out, and they should speak out. the important thin- they should speak out. the important thing is _ they should speak out. the important thing is the _ they should speak out. the important thing is the premise or has lost the moral— thing is the premise or has lost the moral authority to lead. he's been distracted — moral authority to lead. he's been distracted for months on end defending against allegations common set of focusing on the things that are rcatty— set of focusing on the things that are really important challenges. lots are really important challenges. lots of— are really important challenges. lots of people have energy bills going _ lots of people have energy bills going up. — lots of people have energy bills going up, there's a serious situation _ going up, there's a serious situation in ukraine. so it is on them _ situation in ukraine. so it is on them to— situation in ukraine. so it is on them to do— situation in ukraine. so it is on them to do what they need to do to ensure _ them to do what they need to do to ensure that — them to do what they need to do to ensure that he falls and, in the
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national— ensure that he falls and, in the national interest, we move on. but do ou national interest, we move on. do you agree national interest, we move on. pm do you agree with that assessment of sirjohn's that the cabinet are somehow doing something seriously wrong? i somehow doing something seriously wron: ? ~ f somehow doing something seriously wron: ? ~' j ., somehow doing something seriously wronu? ~' j ., ., wrong? i think they'll have to look at themselves _ wrong? i think they'll have to look at themselves in _ wrong? i think they'll have to look at themselves in the _ wrong? i think they'll have to look at themselves in the mirror - wrong? i think they'll have to look at themselves in the mirror and i wrong? i think they'll have to look. at themselves in the mirror and ask themselves— at themselves in the mirror and ask themselves whether they can carry on as prime _ themselves whether they can carry on as prime minister. i think in the hearts of— as prime minister. i think in the hearts of a _ as prime minister. i think in the hearts of a number of them, they know— hearts of a number of them, they know - _ hearts of a number of them, they know - i— hearts of a number of them, they know - i can— hearts of a number of them, they know — i can see a divide now between _ know — i can see a divide now between those that are quite prepared to go out and defend the indefensible, and those who are obviously — indefensible, and those who are obviously very uncomfortable now doing _ obviously very uncomfortable now doing that. so sooner or later, this is doing that. so sooner or later, this must— doing that. so sooner or later, this isjust got— doing that. so sooner or later, this is just got to — doing that. so sooner or later, this is just got to come to a head. dominic— is just got to come to a head. dominic raab, the justice secretary, dominic raab, thejustice secretary, has been responding to sirjohn. he says he listens to what he's got to says he listens to what he's got to say what he disagreed with him on this, he said there was transparency and accountability which shows that they're listening. the prime minister too has said that claims made elsewhere in a speech by sir john, that an erosion of trust meant
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that britain's word abroad —— reputation abroad was being shredded, he said that was demonstrably untrue. but ask about some of the other claims in that speech against the parties, for example, this is his response. i'm sure there'll be plenty to say about all that kind i of stuff in due time. but right now, i think people . would understand that the focus of the uk government - is on together our allies in nato and making sure we stand shoulder—to—shoulder. . so it was a pretty remarkable intervention in terms of the strength of language and how much he talked about — while he was talking about trust in politics overall, he said the events of 20 years or so had left a sour taste and feeling. he was very critical about this government and administration in particular. so is the sort of intervention that will radically shift the dial and what people think? not, because sirjohn has
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form and criticising johnson before. but certainly the strength of the language and criticism is pretty striking, and that will cut through. helen, thanks very much indeed. well, we can now speak to the political commentator and author, steve richards who wrote "the prime ministers: reflections on leadership form wilson tojohnson". good to have you with us. i suppose no prime minister like to be criticised by their predecessors, but borisjohnson has been criticised by predecessors from his own party — theresa may in the commons, and now sirjohn major. stand commons, and now sirjohn major. and commons, and now sirjohn ma'or. and it's ve commons, and now sirjohn major. fific it's very interesting in commons, and now sirjohn major. fific it's very interesting in both cases, but certainlyjohn major. he was tormented by attacks from margaret thatcher when he was prime minister. i think all the things he despaired, and there were many when he was prime minister, it was her attacks and gathering mps on the tory benches to go against him. that really angered him. and yet here he
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is, feeling compelled to make an attack of unprecedented range and scale of a former tory prime minister on a current tory prime minister. as was discussed, he's done similar things before — but if you step back from that, it's the rage, undermining britain's place in the world, the lawbreaking — it is pretty astonishing that he felt the need to intervene in this way. is it more wounding — need to intervene in this way. is it more wounding to have criticism from a former prime minister, whoever it is? it a former prime minister, whoever it is? , , ., , ., ., a former prime minister, whoever it is? , , ., ., _ is? it depends what you mean by wounding- _ is? it depends what you mean by wounding- if— is? it depends what you mean by wounding. if you _ is? it depends what you mean by wounding. if you read _ is? it depends what you mean by wounding. if you read it - is? it depends what you mean by wounding. if you read it and - is? it depends what you mean by wounding. if you read it and stepj wounding. if you read it and step back, there are plenty of things and they are too wound. whether it will wound or not i think is a different question. the key group here in deciding the fate of borisjohnson is not a former tory prime minister with whom he never got on well, but tory mps. so how will they respond
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to a? well, most of them might be like dominic raab who say they disagree with him, he's a remainer, and so on. on that level, it probably won't wound. but there is a carefully crafted speech which is on the record forever which is, as i say, i think without precedent in its damning nature of a tory prime ministerfrom a former its damning nature of a tory prime minister from a former tory prime minister. i suspect it won't have a great deal of agency in this key group in the coming weeks, the conservative parliamentary party. and the indications are that boris johnson is pretty determined to tough it out, come what may, even if he gets fined or a fixed penalty notice. he gave this rendition today apparently of" i will survive". do you think you can survive? that's up for tory mps- _
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you think you can survive? that's up for tory mps. the _ you think you can survive? that's up for tory mps. the only _ you think you can survive? that's up for tory mps. the only answer - you think you can survive? that's up for tory mps. the only answer is we j for tory mps. the only answer is we don't know, because i don't think tory mps have fully decided what to do. i think it's certain that he wants and will pull every lever, and there are quite a few prime ministers available to stay in post. but it's up to tory mps — at my own view is the keyjunction will be the publication of the sucre report and the investigation, more than the may local elections. it looks as if the report will be pretty damning of his, numberten, and of him report will be pretty damning of his, number ten, and of him even by implication. so over the conservative mps, it's in their hands, and they must decide. and i think a lot of them haven't decided. i've spoken to some in bewildered agonies of what to do — along those who have said he should go and those who have said he should go and those who are ardently defending him. it's the other group who will decide, but i think it's a very high hurdle for the police investigation and the
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report. and no other prime minister has had to face something... i was auoin to has had to face something... i was going to ask _ has had to face something... i was going to ask you. _ has had to face something... i was going to ask you, as _ has had to face something... i was going to ask you, as an _ has had to face something... i was going to ask you, as an expert - has had to face something... i was going to ask you, as an expert on prime ministers down the years, has there ever been anything like this where we have an occupant of downing street, numberten, being street, number ten, being investigated street, numberten, being investigated by police, potentially being fined? it's extraordinary, isn't it? ., , �* . being fined? it's extraordinary, isn't it? ., , ., , , isn't it? tony blair and his number ten was investigated _ isn't it? tony blair and his number ten was investigated by _ isn't it? tony blair and his number ten was investigated by the - isn't it? tony blair and his numberj ten was investigated by the police, but there hasn't been anything quite as, if you like, tangibly accessible as, if you like, tangibly accessible as this allegation. let's see how it develops — that he set the rules and the biggest emergency since the war, broke them, then lied about breaking them. now that is a sequence that is, i think, them. now that is a sequence that is, ithink, without them. now that is a sequence that is, i think, without precedent. them. now that is a sequence that is, ithink, without precedent. he denies this and tory mps will have to make that decision themselves. but i think that is an unprecedented position, the scale of pressures on
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him. i can't member a prime minister under quite such a range of different pressures. but he wants to keep going is one of the few certain elements to this saga. you keep going is one of the few certain elements to this saga.— elements to this saga. you might need to update _ elements to this saga. you might need to update the _ elements to this saga. you might need to update the book. - elements to this saga. you might need to update the book. steve, | need to update the book. steve, thanks very much indeed.- need to update the book. steve, thanks very much indeed. the head of the metropolitan police has told the bbc she has "absolutely no intention of resigning", and can provide evidence of the improvements she has made to the force. speaking on bbc london, dame cressida dick said she is "seething with anger" at the behaviour of some officers, and wants to "turbo charge" changes to the met�*s culture. lauren moss reports. marching in and fighting on. arriving this morning after weeks of mounting pressure, the commissioner of the country's largest police force says she's going nowhere. i have absolutely no intention of going. and i believe that i am — and have been, actually, for the last five years —
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leading a real transformation in the met. but that transformation isn't happening overnight. just last week, the police watchdog released a string of offensive messages sent between some offices at charing cross police station four years ago — the latest in a series of devastating headlines. speaking to bbc radio london's eddie nester, dame cressida dick admits the force's reputation is tarnished. there is no place in the met for sexism, for racism, for homophobia, for abuse of trust or bullying. and in the last few days, i've gone out extremely strongly to my colleagues and told them, "enough is enough." the mayor of london says he's put the commissioner on notice, demanding a plan of action to restore public confidence — something she knows is crucial if she's to stay in post. there's a phrase that some people have used, "a few bad apples" — i have never used that phrase, i think this is a great police
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service, we have some fantastic people, we do some excellent work. but we've got a problem, and we've got a problem of too much very bad behaviour. it was only in september that the home secretary extended dame cressida's contract by another two years. she insists she is the person to turn things around. i do think trust for some, and perhaps many people has been damaged by the events of the last several months. and it is myjob, ourjob in the met to rebuild that trust. and we have a multiplicity of plans to do that — extensive plans, and eddie, you mentioned that i've been asked to send another plan to the mayor, which i did last friday and i'm looking forward to discussing it with him. but whether she'll see that contract through is hanging in the balance. lauren moss, bbc london. sports news coming up very shortly. now it's time for a
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look at the weather. hi, chris. we had a few issues with the weather earlier this morning with hill snow in scotland and strong winds causing 1—2 problems. but the low pressure that brought that also brought a dusting of snow over some of the higher hills here, you can see that in our weather water from the highlands earlier today. it continues to work out in the north sea, skies will clear out with a widespread frost setting in place as the winds fall light. temptress at their lois, —5 in glasgow. particularly where we see any showers falling on the frozen services, most likely to near coastal areas. tomorrow some decent winter days coming up for many of you, just a few showers near the coastal regions coming in across parts of scotland in northwest england. later in the day, we will see cloud thickened in northern ireland with southerly winds pushing on. after that start, temperatures
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5-9 c, but on. after that start, temperatures 5—9 c, but into the weekend gets milder, but a lot more unsettled, as well with heavy rain and strong winds on the way for many of us as we go through the weekend. that's the latest. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson has warned that europe faces its "biggest security crisis" for decades as russian troops continue to mass on its border with ukraine. the stakes are very high. and this is a dangerous moment, and at stake are the rules that protect every nation, every nation big and small. new figures reveal a record 6—point—1 million people were waiting to start routine hospital treatment in england at the end of last year. the former prime minister sirjohn
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major has delivered a damning speech on borisjohnson and the impact his government is having on the uk's standing around the world. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, four time world champion sebastian vettel sez formula 0ne's four—time world champion sebastian vettel says formula 0ne's decision to remove the time set aside pre—race for the drivers to take the knee was taken for "business reasons". the sport's chief executive announced the move earlier this week after it was introduced in 2020. vettel has told us he was surprised. and hopes that there'll still be a chance to show support for issues they care about. it is not like us taking the need of some driver sticking the meteor pointing out things that are important to them will change everything. that would be nice, but thatis everything. that would be nice, but that is not the case. but it certainly does create a little bit of awareness and if it reaches only a few people, then i think that is a
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success and taking that opportunity away, i hope we get together as drivers and i hope overall, we come up drivers and i hope overall, we come up with an alternative. both the men's and women's curling teams have registered their first wins in the round robin phase of the winter olympics in beijing. it took eve muirhead's rink until their second match. after losing earlier to switzerland they came roaring back this afternoon against sweden, with this on end four from the skip. muirhead's hammer scored and gave them what proved to be a match—winning lead — it finished 8—2 to team gb. i think after this morning, we played well and inuvik kept things very similar, display a little bit we keep the wind out there tonight and taking down the current 0lympic
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champions and such a convincing game will be a nice the fish of the day. the men's team finished strongly to beat italy 7—5 — bruce mouat sending down the final stone. britain are ranked first in the world so there's a lot of expectation on their shoulders — they'll be back tomorrow for matches against the usa and norway. unconfirmed reports in russia have named 15—year—old kamila valieva, as the figure skater who has tested positive for a banned substance at the winter olympics. the presentation of the medals for the team event, won by the russian olympic committee, has been delayed. laura scott has more from beijing. this is fast becoming a major news story here at the beijing winter olympics. in three tabanao we got 0lympics. in three tabanao we got here. by monday afternoon, the team
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from the russian 0lympic here. by monday afternoon, the team from the russian olympic committee won the figure skating team event held by the teenage sensation making 0lympic history when she landed to quadruplejumps and the usa 0lympic history when she landed to quadruple jumps and the usa at the silver medal injapan got the bronze but the metals were due to be handed out on tuesday evening. mysteriously that ceremony didn't happen. we've heard from the committee that there was an active legal case was behind the delay and we are hoping for an update and i attended the briefing ljy update and i attended the briefing by the ioc and be asked the spokesman about this issue. i wondered, are you able to give us any information on who is handling this matter— any information on who is handling this matter and how we may get a decision was green even if i comment on who— decision was green even if i comment on who is— decision was green even if i comment on who is handling this matter, i can only— on who is handling this matter, i can only talk abstractly about responsibility but can only talk abstractly about responsibili_ can only talk abstractly about responsibility but even still, it will tell you —
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responsibility but even still, it will tell you what _ responsibility but even still, it will tell you what type - responsibility but even still, it will tell you what type of - responsibility but even still, it l will tell you what type of matter responsibility but even still, it - will tell you what type of matter it will tell you what type of matter it will he _ will tell you what type of matter it will be there _ will tell you what type of matter it will be. there is _ will tell you what type of matter it will be. there is a _ will tell you what type of matter it will be. there is a legal— will tell you what type of matter it will be. there is a legal issue - will be. there is a legal issue going — will be. there is a legal issue going on— will be. there is a legal issue going on and _ will be. there is a legal issue going on and i_ will be. there is a legal issue going on and i can't- will be. there is a legal issue going on and i can't say- will be. there is a legal issue going on and i can't say any. will be. there is a legal issue - going on and i can't say any more than _ going on and i can't say any more than that — going on and i can't say any more than that at— going on and i can't say any more than that. at the _ going on and i can't say any more than that. at the moment, - going on and i can't say any more than that. at the moment, it- going on and i can't say any more than that. at the moment, it is. going on and i can't say any more . than that. at the moment, it is only speculation— than that. at the moment, it is only speculation and _ than that. at the moment, it is only speculation and i— than that. at the moment, it is only speculation and i cannot _ than that. at the moment, it is only speculation and i cannot comment. i speculation and i cannot comment. sorry. _ speculation and i cannot comment. sorry. we _ speculation and i cannot comment. sorry. we have _ speculation and i cannot comment. sorry. we have to— speculation and i cannot comment. sorry, we have to wait _ speculation and i cannot comment. sorry, we have to wait with - speculation and i cannot comment. | sorry, we have to wait with patience for this— sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case — sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case to _ sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case to find _ sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case to find its _ sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case to find its way - sorry, we have to wait with patience for this case to find its way to - for this case to find its way to create some _ for this case to find its way to create some kind _ for this case to find its way to create some kind of- for this case to find its way to . create some kind of conclusion. for this case to find its way to - create some kind of conclusion. he was create some kind of conclusion. was really calling for create some kind of conclusion. id; was really calling for patients. create some kind of conclusion. was really calling for patients. he was really calling for patients. he was bound by this legal case and he kept repeating that he would not be drawn on speculation. he did say he understands that the athletes involved in this do want answers and everyone wants answers in this case, which is really dominating the agenda here and what is crucial is, the mentalist in that event will be flying out to beijing and at the moment, there is no sign of their metals. yoan zouma has been suspended by his club while the rspca conduct an investigation into the video that shows his brother, kurt, kicking a cat. yoan plays for dagenham and redbridge in the national league, and filmed his brother
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in an incident that has been widely condemned. kurt zouma was fined what west ham called "the maximum amount possible". but was selected for their game against watford on tuesday. the rspca have taken the two cats he owns into their care, and are also co—operating with police. declaring himself fit despite a bruising encounter on the day but will be replaced byjoey in paris on saturday. meanwhile, hamstring injury has written him out of the rest of the competition. you will be replaced by sam and wells on saturday and that's one of five changes they have made, including bringing in an entirely new front row. making for changes to as well team in cardiff, including jack morgan, the defending champion lost their opening match, it was to
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ireland. that is all for me and much more sports day. much later in the day. a record number of patients are facing long waits for a bed when they're admitted to hospital, according to new nhs figures for england. it's the latest sign of pressure on accident and emergency units. 0ur health editor hugh pym is with me. what are these figures and what do you tell us about the winter pressures on the nhs? the real strain on hospitals _ pressures on the nhs? the real strain on hospitals is _ pressures on the nhs? the real strain on hospitals is not - pressures on the nhs? the real strain on hospitals is notjust i strain on hospitals is notjust covid—19, it is patients arriving with a whole lot of other conditions in some way of not come forward before because they're worried about covid—19 and things got worse for them. the figures from nhs england show that those who come into and the decision has been made to admit them to hospitals but then they have weights after that and it's number thatis weights after that and it's number that is up considerably, those
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waiting more than four hours and andy after a decision to admit for hospital bed was right up there above large 20,000 injanuary of which 16 and a half thousand were waiting more than 12 hours you can see how much that is gone up since before the pandemic and the some before the pandemic and the some before any waits to see a doctor when they go in. it is a pretty difficult situation notjust when they go in. it is a pretty difficult situation not just for the staff before the patients, trolley whites before they actually get a hospital bed with the decision is artie been made to admit them. what artie been made to admit them. what is the thinking. _ artie been made to admit them. what is the thinking, what _ artie been made to admit them. what is the thinking, what is the view within the nhs that you are picking up within the nhs that you are picking up about the governments announcement yesterday which was potentially to bring forward the end of all covid—19 restrictions in england to wear them a month early? people are keeping their nhs in
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england. it is a political decision that was released by the prime minister yesterday. the prime minister yesterday. the prime minister said restrictions, including the isolation rules would come to an end in martians being brought forward. but the scientific adviser, they were not involved and we have been told they'll be happening the following decision is made but the virus experts, the epidemiologists, the sage committees have been pretty sceptical about it, saying that it is not a scientific decision. but it remains pretty high and they will made a few more weeks before making any final decisions. that being said, hospital admissions of fallen quite a lot and is ultimately upjudgment of fallen quite a lot and is ultimately up judgment call. $5 of fallen quite a lot and is ultimately upjudgment call. ultimately up 'udgment call. as long as the date ultimately upjudgment call. as long as the date continues _ ultimately upjudgment call. as long as the date continues to _ ultimately upjudgment call. as long as the date continues to be - as the date continues to be encouraging, the lift restrictions.
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, crop and is not causing such a severe impact but as we learn from the national statistics service, it remains pretty high, the virus is still fragmented out there. but it's the balance between leaking legal restrictions and leaving the life that living a life that covid—19. let's bring you the latest covid figures. 66,636 new cases have been reported in the latest 21t hour period. a further 206 deaths were reported within 28 days of a positive covid test and now 65.5% of over 12s have had a booster of third dose of vaccine.
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buckingham palace has confirmed that prince charles — who has covid — recently met the queen. the palace said the monarch is not displaying any symptoms of coronavirus. 0ur royal correspondent nicholas witchell has more details. prince charles tested positive for covid in a routine test this morning. he is now self—isolating. what we now understand is that the prince of wales met the queen at windsor on tuesday — the queen, of course, having just returned from sandringham. the prince of wales was at sandringham for an investiture. they did meet, but we are told by royal sources that the queen is showing no symptoms of covid, having met the prince of wales on tuesday. but the situation of course will continue to be monitored. so the prince of wales — clarence house won't say how he is, but i think we can assume that he is coping with it ok. he is triple—jabbed, i think we can assume the queen is triple—vaccinated, as well. the prince of wales last night was at the british museum, he was there with his wife, the duchess of cornwall, where he met a number of people including royal cabinet ministers —
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it was a reception for the british asian trust. but the duchess of cornwall has tested negative, and she continued with her engagements today. the prince of wales, of course, cancelled his. but the perhaps most important point is, as i say, that the queen, having met the prince of wales on tuesday, is not showing any symptoms of covid, according to sources. the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, has also tested positive for coronavirus and is self—isolating. the news comes a day before he was due to announce his latest review of covid legislation. economy minister vaughan gething will now take friday's news conference with the latest guidance on restrictions in wales. let's get more now on that interview with the labour leader, who was also in brussels today to meet with the nato
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secretary general. he spoke to our political editor laura kuenssberg and she asked him for his thoughts what he might do differently to try to counter the threat to ukraine. i would like to see more done at home because it is fuelling a lot of this in this government is not using the powers it's already got to its fullest extent and i want to see them do more particularly when we're talking about sanctions. because of this moment, it's very important the russian those with the consequences will be of any action that takes and that means being very serious about sanctions we would love to see the government go further on these issues. edit government go further on these issues. , ., , , ., yes, issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the — issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the party — issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the party that _ issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the party that was _ issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the party that was there - issues. of yours believe that? yes, we are the party that was there at i we are the party that was there at the founding of nato that postwar
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labour government and signed for the treaty that is just over there from where we sit. this is labour party history and tradition. 0ne where we sit. this is labour party history and tradition. one of my messages is that i don't to see this as labourers history, it is part of our present values that are commitment to nato is unshakeable. at a to just sit alongside jeremy corbyn many he had a very different view? he corbyn many he had a very different view? . . , ' view? he had a very different view, he was wrong _ view? he had a very different view, he was wrong about _ view? he had a very different view, he was wrong about that. _ view? he had a very different view, he was wrong about that. and - view? he had a very different view, he was wrong about that. and i - view? he had a very different view, i he was wrong about that. and i spoke out of the time. you he was wrong about that. and i spoke out of the time.— out of the time. you are a part of his front bench _ out of the time. you are a part of his front bench team _ out of the time. you are a part of his front bench team and - out of the time. you are a part of his front bench team and you - out of the time. you are a part of. his front bench team and you voted on the ticket to make an prime minister and on this most fundamental issue, you're saying that he was wrong stability was wrong about nato and the salisbury poisoning incident where he did not respond i poisoning incident where he did not resond ., �* respond i said some of the time. but this is my first _
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respond i said some of the time. but this is my first time _ respond i said some of the time. but this is my first time to _ respond i said some of the time. but this is my first time to come - respond i said some of the time. but this is my first time to come here i this is my first time to come here to nato headquarters, to meeting with the secretary—general delivered a very important message from our party and from her country which is the labour party support for nato. talking to her political editor. last month, bbc news revealed there were a hundred people with learning disabilities and autism, who'd been detained in a hospital for more than 20 years. since then, several people across the uk have been in touch, regarding their own battles to have loved ones released. 0ur correspondent, jayne mccubbin, has been to northern ireland to meet a woman who's been fighting for 3h years to bring her brother home. it's a journey i will never forget. there was a lot of crying, weeping and wailing. this was what broke her
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family. i was with her in the ambulance crew were trying to prevent brian from hurting himself. 44 prevent brian from hurting himself. ltlt years ago, this journey took a brother to a hospital where he still detained. ker; brother to a hospital where he still detained. , . , �* brother to a hospital where he still detained. , ., , �* ., brother to a hospital where he still detained. , �* ., ., , detained. key hasn't moved and he is still within the _ detained. key hasn't moved and he is still within the walls. _ detained. key hasn't moved and he is still within the walls. he _ detained. key hasn't moved and he is still within the walls. he needed - still within the walls. he needed hel and still within the walls. he needed help and support. _ still within the walls. he needed help and support. he _ still within the walls. he needed help and support. he needed i still within the walls. he needed i help and support. he needed help but help and support. he needed help but he also needed _ help and support. he needed help but he also needed to _ help and support. he needed help but he also needed to come _ help and support. he needed help but he also needed to come home i help and support. he needed help but he also needed to come home and i help and support. he needed help but he also needed to come home and he | he also needed to come home and he was ready, which is not happened. i travelled to northern ireland. 0ne travelled to northern ireland. one of thousands of families across the world fighting to bring a loved one home. . �* , ., world fighting to bring a loved one home. . �*, ., �* ., . ., ., home. that's our brian. we have a co of home. that's our brian. we have a copy of that _ home. that's our brian. we have a copy of that in _ home. that's our brian. we have a copy of that in every _ home. that's our brian. we have a copy of that in every home. i copy of that in every home. between the famil , copy of that in every home. between the family, brian _ copy of that in every home. between the family, brian had _ copy of that in every home. between the family, brian had originally i the family, brian had originally thrived. thus the family, brian had originally thrived. �* , ' the family, brian had originally thrived._ life l thrived. as he turned 21. life
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chanced thrived. as he turned 21. life changed for— thrived. as he turned 21. life changed for the _ thrived. as he turned 21. life changed for the mall. i thrived. as he turned 21. life i changed for the mall. increasingly unable to cope, he was detained into the mental health act and he was told he'd be back in 12 weeks. 31t years since he had been into the hospital and 25 years since the doctors said he would be discharged, brian is still sitting in the hospital. brian is still sitting in the hospital-— brian is still sitting in the hosital. ,, ., ., . , hospital. quarter of the century. you knew she — hospital. quarter of the century. you knew she needed _ hospital. quarter of the century. you knew she needed to - hospital. quarter of the century. you knew she needed to be i hospital. quarter of the century. j you knew she needed to be here hospital. quarter of the century. i you knew she needed to be here when brian came home.— brian came home. thinking he would come home- — brian came home. thinking he would come home. today, _ brian came home. thinking he would come home. today, they _ brian came home. thinking he would come home. today, they launch i brian came home. thinking he would come home. today, they launch a i come home. today, they launch a 'udicial come home. today, they launch a judicial review _ come home. today, they launch a judicial review to _ come home. today, they launch a judicial review to force _ come home. today, they launch a judicial review to force authoritiesi judicial review to force authorities to provide that. his judicial review to force authorities to provide that.— to provide that. his pull on life has been _ to provide that. his pull on life has been going _ to provide that. his pull on life has been going to _ to provide that. his pull on life has been going to a _ to provide that. his pull on life has been going to a hospital. | to provide that. his pull on life i has been going to a hospital. the hospital at the heart of the largest abuse investigation in the history of the nhs. to date, more than a hundred staff of been suspended. he
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cannot communicate through speech. i just... a public inquiry has opened i can't. eugene will be her brothers voice. ho i can't. eugene will be her brothers voice. ., ., , ., ., ., i can't. eugene will be her brothers voice. .,., , ., ., ., ., voice. no one should follow a hosital voice. no one should follow a hospital or — voice. no one should follow a hospital or home _ voice. no one should follow a hospital or home but - voice. no one should follow a hospital or home but to i voice. no one should follow a hospital or home but to the l hospital or home but to the complex care needs of many, resettlement can be challenging. for her isn't complex. rain needs to be home. rain is been complex. rain needs to be home. ia. “i is been deprived of complex. rain needs to be home. i: “i is been deprived of the love of his family. is been deprived of the love of his famil . ~ , , ., , , is been deprived of the love of his famil. ,, ,, family. wendy, she hopes she will make this journey _ family. wendy, she hopes she will make this journey for _ family. wendy, she hopes she will make this journey for very - family. wendy, she hopes she will make this journey for very last i make this journey for very last time. make this 'ourney for very last time. �* , ., .,, ., make this 'ourney for very last time. �* , ., ., ,, , make this 'ourney for very last time. a ., ., ,, time. as long as we love, we keep on t in: , time. as long as we love, we keep on trying. and — time. as long as we love, we keep on trying. and never— time. as long as we love, we keep on trying, and never give _ time. as long as we love, we keep on trying, and never give up. _ wayne rooney has said he could have either died —
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or killed someone — as a result of his drinking problems. the former manchester united footballer, who's now manager of derby county, has also revealed that when he was a player, he felt he had to keep his struggles with alcohol and mental health a secret. he's been talking to bbc breakfast�*s sally nugent, ahead of the release of a documentary about his life. wayne, the film is really really, very, very honest. why did you decide to do it and why now? i just felt it was an opportunity for people to see me, to see the real me. the good moments, the bad moments, which, of course, have been there as well, and then for people to judge me on knowing a bit more about me, which i feel is more fair. we've always grew up quicker than what we were meant to, really, ithink.
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coleen is such a big part of the film. you met as children, were married really very, very young, and what comes across in the whole of the film is that you have this tremendous partnership. how important has she been in the last 20 years? we have a good relationship. we're friends, obviously, as well. and there is a good balance to the relationship, especially now, to how we are as parents with the four children. and there's been difficult moments we've had, of course, which obviously has come through me, the mistakes i've made, and that i speak about that in the documentary as well. i forgive him. but, yeah, but it wasn't acceptable. but no, it's not something that, you know, if it come up, we talk about it, like we're talking about it now. i haven't got the anger
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that i did at the time. coleen knows there's been influences, in terms of, why i've made mistakes, in terms of... i don't mean people, i mean alcohol. you know, the dressing rooms that you've been in, particularly that manchester united dressing room, was there never a time when anyone put their arm around you and said, "i can help" ? no. ten, 15 years ago, you couldn't... i couldn't go into the dressing room and say "i'm struggling, i'm struggling with alcohol, i'm struggling mental health—wise". i couldn't do that. and when you say you were struggling, what was the darkest time? what was your fear at that point? probably death. i think, you know, as i said before, you make mistakes, which i did, and that could have been... ..girls, it could have been drink—driving, which i have done, it could have been, you know, killing someone. you could kill yourself. erm, and that's a bad place to be.
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so i knew i needed help, i knew i had to get that help, in orderfor... ..to save myself, but also to save my family. wayne, thanks. thank you. 19 million homes in the uk are in need of better insulation, with two in every three leaking heat, according to the climate change committee. it says the government must do better, and that insulation is the way out of the current energy crisis. the uk is believed to have some of the oldest and draughtiest housing stock in europe. 0ur climate editor justin rowlatt reports. so, we've got lots of heat coming out of this window here, and under this window upstairs we've probably got a radiator here. that's money coming through your wall. we are hunting for draughty homes, using this thermal camera, and it's easy pickings here in manchester. virtually every home has insulation issues.
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you can't really see the roof... and here is the difference insulation can make. how would you rate this house? this house is definitely losing less heat, especially from the weak spots that we identified on the other houses. but just look what it took to give the house an insulation makeover. so, there is insulation inside the room here, the windows are double glazed and the space under the floor is insulated too. up here at the top of the house, the entire roof area has been insulated, as well. the walls used to look like this, bare brick. but they've put in this wood fibre insulation, external insulation, and the windows are double glazed. in monetary terms, it's saved 40% of our gas on the heating and it made a really big difference to the comfort of the house as well.
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but here's the rub, even at current energy prices it will still take at least 20 years to cover the 36 grand it cost. down in london, it's this man'sjob to mark the government's homework on climate. so, how is it doing? well, it's a d. could do much better, i think. so, that is something for the government to think about. i think the government's policy on insulation has been very, very ineffective. it really is very poor. we need something that dramatically changes the number of insulations that we do today. so, this year we'll be in the tens of thousands of installations. we really need to scale that up to something like half a million a year. and to do that quickly over the next four or five years. but if it's hard for middle—class homeowners to afford insulation, it's even tougher for local authorities like blackpool. energy efficient homes are popular with tenants, though. perfect. she laughs. but blackpool spent £33,000 insulating jean's one—bedroom flat. the council reckons it would cost some £125 million to bring all blackpool�*s social housing up
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to this standard. it's not financially viable to do it on scale, really. to get stuff to be carbon neutral, there is a big bill to that, and we need support with it. so, what does britain's climate chief think the government should do? we know that we need a sharper incentive from most people to make these investments in improving the energy efficiency of the home that they live in. for most people, the payback for that will be several years. so the government really does need to step in. so when you ask why so few homes in britain are well insulated, here is the answer. it's just so expensive. without some help, most of us will find it tough to get it done. justin rowlatt, bbc news, blackpool. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. low pressure will continue to the north of the uk this evening and
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it's quieterfor all north of the uk this evening and it's quieter for all areas to reach the high pressure both on court hermas, blue skies will be a recipe for a good hard frost in northern areas. this is the low pressure with the gales in the snow from northern areas pushing off the north last. high—speed light pressure and gentle and quiet around northern and eastern areas, quite windy for a time as the low pulls away in the north sea it's see when to the area and the risk of ice across the area, more widespread frost across northern areas. it is a cold, frosty but bright and sunny morning on friday and it stays dry and sunny throughout the day, few showers across northern and western areas and later in the day, the next with the front will be breezy cloud building up. temperature wise for 9
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degrees and around may be just a little below the seasonal norm. so, as you move out of fred and into the start of the week, turns and settled again in a of low pressure hunting enough the atlantic and a bring wet and windy weather, some of the rain in the hills for brighter day and clouds being the buddha and after dark. single figures will start to cease the globe and monitor pushing in across southern and western areas entrance wet and windy here in the southeastern saturday night and then it is quieter for a southeastern saturday night and then it is quieterfor a time in the sunday we got another area of low pressure pushing and across the southwest. so, we start with wanted or two showers around and then it's just to turn wetter and windier across wales and central and southern england through the course of sundays and really heavy rainfall at times a bit milder in the south, tenant maybe 11 degrees but look
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fresh for the north with sunshine and showers. as that low pulls away, and showers. as that low pulls away, and other court largely traded on monday and a series of low pressure ruling in week and wet and windy weather at times.
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today at 6:00pm, boris johnson warns the crisis over ukraine could be entering its most dangerous phase. he was speaking on a visit to nato headquarters in brussels... artillery fire. ..as russia begins new war games, on ukraine's border. i know that in the kremlin and across russia, they must be wondering whether it is really sensible to expend the blood of russian soldiers in a war that i think would be catastrophic. meeting troops in poland, more trouble back home, with criticism from a former prime minister over downing street parties. day after day, the public was asked to believe the unbelievable. ministers were sent out to defend the indefensible.
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