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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  February 10, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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tonight at ten, the head of the metropolitan police, dame cressida dick, resigns, admitting recent scandals have damaged public confidence. but she maintained she was the one who could bring about change. the mayor of london disagreed. he has left me no choice but to step aside. i say this with deep sadness and regret. it's clear that the only way to start to deliver the scale of the change required is to have new leadership right at the top of the metropolitan police. the policing of mass protests following the death of sarah everard, and claims that misogyny, racism and homophobia are rife in the force took their toll.
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so how can public confidence be restored in the uk's biggest police force? also tonight... a frosty meeting in moscow between liz truss and her russian counterpart to try to avert war in ukraine. translation: the conversation we had was like a deaf— translation: the conversation we had was like a deaf person _ translation: the conversation we had was like a deaf person talking _ was like a deaf person talking to someone — was like a deaf person talking to someone who is mute. borisjohnson meets nato troops in poland, but is criticised back home by former prime ministerjohn major. day after day, the public was asked to believe the unbelievable. ministers were sent out to defend the indefensible. questions tonight over whether the queen has covid after seeing prince charles, who has test positive. and following his collapse on the pitch during the euros, christian eriksson prepares for his brentford debut, lucky to be alive.
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and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel, we'll have a round—up of all the premier league action as liverpool host leicester looking to cut man city's lead at the top. good evening. the uk's most senior police officer, dame cressida dick, has resigned as head of the metropolitan police. in a statement she said it was clear the mayor of london no longer had sufficient confidence in her leadership. and she was left with no choice but to step aside. she had been in thejob since 2017, and had only recently been given a contract extension. but her time as commissioner involved several scandals, including the murder of sarah everard by a serving officer. in the recent report into sexist, racist and homophobic message is being shared between officers at charing cross police station. tonight, london's mayor,
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sadiq khan, said he wasn't satisfied with the commission a's response to the need to rebuild the trust and confidence of londoners in the met, and the scale of change required meant new leadership right at the top. here is our home affairs correspondentjune kelly, and this report contains some flashing images. she made history when she became the first female commissioner of the country's largest force. but tonight, cressida dick's long policing career was brought to a sudden end. policing career was brought to a sudden end-— policing career was brought to a sudden end. ., ., _, w sudden end. following contact with the ma or sudden end. following contact with the mayor of— sudden end. following contact with the mayor of london _ sudden end. following contact with the mayor of london today, - sudden end. following contact with the mayor of london today, it - sudden end. following contact with the mayor of london today, it is . the mayor of london today, it is quite clear that he no longer has sufficient confidence in my leadership of the metropolitan police service for me to continue as commissioner. he has left me no choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadi: choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan. — choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan. had _ choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan, had already _ choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan, had already put - choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan, had already put out - choice but to step aside. the mayor, sadiq khan, had already put out hisl sadiq khan, had already put out his statement. it’s sadiq khan, had already put out his statement. �* , . ., ., ., ,
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statement. it's clear that the only wa to statement. it's clear that the only way to start _ statement. it's clear that the only way to start to — statement. it's clear that the only way to start to deliver _ statement. it's clear that the only way to start to deliver on - statement. it's clear that the only way to start to deliver on the - statement. it's clear that the only | way to start to deliver on the scale of the _ way to start to deliver on the scale of the change required is to have new leadership right at the top of the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive — the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive day _ the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive day on _ the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive day on the _ the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive day on the job - the metropolitan police. what would be a decisive day on the job for - be a decisive day on the job for cressida dick began at the bbc, and a radio phone in. responding to a grilling about her performance, she pledged her determination to carry on. i pledged her determination to carry on. . . , , ., , pledged her determination to carry on. . , ., pledged her determination to carry on. . ., , , ., ., on. i have absolutely no intention of anoin. on. i have absolutely no intention of going- 24 _ on. i have absolutely no intention of going. 24 hours _ on. i have absolutely no intention of going. 24 hours earlier, - on. i have absolutely no intention of going. 24 hours earlier, the . of going. 24 hours earlier, the ma or of of going. 24 hours earlier, the mayor of london, _ of going. 24 hours earlier, the mayor of london, sadiq - of going. 24 hours earlier, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, j of going. 24 hours earlier, the - mayor of london, sadiq khan, had issued an ultimatum. my expectation issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time _ issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i _ issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i see _ issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i see her _ issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i see her i _ issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i see her i want - issued an ultimatum. my expectation is the next time i see her i want to i is the next time i see her i want to see what— is the next time i see her i want to see what her— is the next time i see her i want to see what her response is. but their workin: see what her response is. but their working relationship _ see what her response is. but their working relationship is _ see what her response is. but their working relationship is over. - see what her response is. but their working relationship is over. the i working relationship is over. the finale to a torrid 12 months from the met. it was almost a year ago that one of their own officers, wayne couzens, used his police powers to kidnap sarah everard of a london street and then rape and murder her. with a killer policeman under arrest, as women gathered for
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a vigil in memory of sarah, these were the images which went viral. more bad headlines for the met. the reputation of the net was much more important _ reputation of the net was much more important than — reputation of the net was much more important than the _ reputation of the net was much more important than the people _ reputation of the net was much more important than the people she - reputation of the net was much more important than the people she was . important than the people she was meant _ important than the people she was meant to— important than the people she was meant to serve. _ important than the people she was meant to serve. by _ important than the people she was meant to serve. by not _ important than the people she was meant to serve. by not admitting i meant to serve. by not admitting that there — meant to serve. by not admitting that there are _ meant to serve. by not admitting that there are deep _ meant to serve. by not admitting that there are deep systemic - meant to serve. by not admitting. that there are deep systemic issues, they are _ that there are deep systemic issues, they are not — that there are deep systemic issues, they are not going _ that there are deep systemic issues, they are not going to _ that there are deep systemic issues, they are not going to be _ that there are deep systemic issues, they are not going to be able - that there are deep systemic issues, they are not going to be able to- they are not going to be able to solve _ they are not going to be able to solve them _ they are not going to be able to solve them-— they are not going to be able to solve them. ~ , ,, .,, , solve them. while pressure has been buildin: on solve them. while pressure has been building on cressida _ solve them. while pressure has been building on cressida dick, _ solve them. while pressure has been building on cressida dick, a - solve them. while pressure has been building on cressida dick, a few- building on cressida dick, a few months ago politicians gave her more time, with priti patel extended her contract. now the behaviour at number 10 has led to the partygate investigation, but even in this, the met has gathered more criticism for being flat—footed in its response. and then, in recent days, shocking messages sent by some officers at charing cross police station lifted the lid on racist and sexist attitudes which were redolent in policing in the 19705. in a separate scandal, two officers regarding a murder scene where two sisters had
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been killed also sent abusive messages. tho5e officers ended up in prison. afterfive messages. tho5e officers ended up in prison. after five years at the pri5on. after five years at the helm, cressida dick will soon be leaving scotland yard for the last time. ., ., ., time. the murder of sarah everard and many other— time. the murder of sarah everard and many other awful _ time. the murder of sarah everard and many other awful cases - time. the murder of sarah everard i and many other awful cases recently have, i know, damaged confidence in this fantastic police service. there is much to do, and i know that the met has turned its full attention to rebuilding trust and confidence, and to raising our standards.— to raising our standards. tonight, the home secretary _ to raising our standards. tonight, the home secretary paid - to raising our standards. tonight, the home secretary paid tribute l to raising our standards. tonight, l the home secretary paid tribute to dame cressida. she began thejob i5 dame cressida. she began thejob is a popular pioneer, but her tenure has ended with her losing the faith of both the politicians and the public. june, only this morning cressida dick 5aid june, only this morning cressida dick said she was not going to resign, and now she is leaving. what
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re5ign, and now she is leaving. what happened in the space of a few hours? ~ , ., happened in the space of a few hours? ~ , . ., hours? we understand, clive, that the mayor. — hours? we understand, clive, that the mayor. sadiq _ hours? we understand, clive, that the mayor, sadiq khan, _ hours? we understand, clive, that the mayor, sadiq khan, had - hours? we understand, clive, that. the mayor, sadiq khan, had basically said to dame cressida, come up with a plan to improve this. she came up with a plan obviously worked on with people who were working alongside her. he looked at it, didn't like it. they were supposed to be a meeting at 4:30pm between them, and that meeting didn't happen. shortly afterwards, he pulled the plug. it should be said that this is a case of history repeating itself, because in 2008, the previous commissioner, sir ian blair, his role suddenly came to a halt at that was ended by the then mayor of london, bori5 the then mayor of london, boris johnson. now, of course, tonight, john5on. now, of course, tonight, the search begins for someone johnson. now, of course, tonight, the search begins for someone to take over the toughest at the most difficult job take over the toughest at the most difficultjob in policing. june difficult “0b in policing. june kell , difficult job in policing. june kelly. our — difficult job in policing. june kelly, our home _ difficult job in policing. june kelly, our home affairs - kelly, our home affairs correspondent, thank you. our political correspondent damian 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas is at westminster for
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us. damien, dame cressida �*5 contract and onlyjust been extended tjy contract and onlyjust been extended by priti patel, so how has this gone down in government? yes. by priti patel, so how has this gone down in government?— by priti patel, so how has this gone down in government? yes, and there is some tension _ down in government? yes, and there is some tension in _ down in government? yes, and there is some tension in those _ down in government? yes, and there is some tension in those who - down in government? yes, and there is some tension in those who have i is some tension in those who have the role of overseeing this job,. the met also has national responsibilities like counterterror work, and it was late last year when the home secretary, in consultation with the mayor, extended dame cressida for two years. just last week, the home secretary said that she had confidence in dame cressida, although she said changes were needed. today we saw sadiq khan calling her in to say that he was not satisfied, and the serious concerns of londoners were not being met, so this now leaves the home secretary to find a replacement. but one of those serious concerns was
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that partygate investigation, which dame cressida was criticised at being slow to pick up. dame cressida will be in place for some time while that plays out, sadiq khan said he wouldn't comment but he did say interestingly that he recognised the huge public interest in allegations, that some of the most senior people in the country who are rule makers may be rule breakers, and that was another reason why it was important, he said, to have confidence in the police. of course downing street say that investigation is ongoing, it will be completed and we will see the results of it, but there is tension. . , ., ., the results of it, but there is tension. . , . ., ., tension. damian grammaticas there at westminster. — tension. damian grammaticas there at westminster, thank _ tension. damian grammaticas there at westminster, thank you. _ a5 fears grow of a russian invasion in ukraine, the foreign secretary stepped into the row today when she flew to moscow for talks with her russian counterpart sergei lavrov. the meeting was frosty, with m5 truss warning of tougher sanctions, whilst sergey lavrov described their discussions as like talking to a
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deaf person. russia has amassed 100,000 troops on the border with ukraine, but denies planning to invade. steve rosenberg has the latest from moscow. for liz truss, the day began by the kremlin at the tomb of the unknown soldier, a sign of respect for russia before the difficult diplomacy. she's only been foreign secretary five months. sergey lavrov has been in the job 18 years. a big difference. and there were major differences of opinion. mr lavrov called western politicians "indoctrinated", the british diplomats "unprepared", and on the subject of ukraine... translation: the conversation we had was like a deaf person talking to someone who's mute. we were listening to one another, but not hearing each other. i certainly wasn't mute i
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in our discussions earlier. i put forward the uk's point of view on the current situation _ and the fact that as well as seeking to deter russia from an invasion i into ukraine, we are also very resolute in pursuing _ the diplomatic path. what we saw here today was diplomacy without any of the diplomatic niceties. no hint of compromise. instead, a very public clash between britain and russia over ukraine and over the whole question of european security. it's moscow's military activity near ukraine that's causing concern in the west, like joint drills involving russia and belarus. but mr lavrov insisted russia has no plans for an invasion. it does stretch credulity that there are no plansl when there are 100,000 troops lined up on - the ukrainian border.
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so we need to see those words from sergey lavrov translated i into action of de—escalating and moving those troops i away from the border. it feels a little bit as if it's france and not the uk which is a leading diplomatic efforts. and we had president macron in moscow this week. is it the case that the uk is sort of playing catch—up here or playing second fiddle? it's very important that france, the united kingdom, germany, the united states and all of our| allies are involved in this effort. this is not about alternatives — i this is about all working together. but russian state tv has been working against liz truss, calling her "clueless", "incompetent". i think when people resort to personal attacks, - it's when they have no good political argument to make. this was the first visit by a british foreign secretary to moscow for more than four years. is that called soft power? but after a day of very
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public disagreements, uk—russian relations feel as frosty as ever. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. meanwhile, borisjohnson, on a visit to nato's headquarters in brussels, described the crisis over ukraine, as probably reaching its most dangerous moment so far. he later travelled to poland to meet british troops recently deployed there. but issues back home dogged his trip, with the former prime minister sirjohn major saying attempts to excuse the breaking of lockdown rules in downing street were undermining trust in government and politics, at home and abroad. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has the latest. he was the west working towards a war on the edge of europe, as the russian leader dangles obvious danger to ukraine. good conversations, diplomacy and candour about the risk slow down a slight conflict. the prime minister's promised the nato chief another 1000 troops
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to help with the humanitarian effort if the worst comes to pass. the stakes are very high. and this is a very dangerous moment. and at stake are the rules that protect every nation, every nation, big and small. the number of russian forces is going up. the warning time for a possible attack is going down. nato is not a threat to russia, but we must be prepared for the worst. prime minister, how much further are you prepared to commit the uk on top of what's already happening? would you, for example, in the case of an invasion, give uk military support to some kind of insurgency? you know, the ukrainians are well prepared. there are things that we've offered that they in fact don't seem to need.
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it's possible, and i don't want to rule this out, but at the moment we think that the package is the right one. on top of the pressure abroad, there is pressure at home. the prime minster one of those who could be interviewed and fined over breaking lockdown laws. what then? if you are found to have broken a law, would he resign? that process must be completed, and i'm looking forward to it being completed, and that's the time to say more on that. but while he grapples with the stand—off, downing street has been distracted. borisjohnson met uk troops in warsaw who have been helping on poland's border, but he has had to hire new troops in number 10 to try to calm the chaos. someone who has held the same photo opportunities as prime minister has long been a critic but now condemns the prime minister himself. at number 10, the prime minister and officials broke lockdown laws. brazen excuses were dreamed up.
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day after day, the public was asked to believe the unbelievable. warning the chaos at home has consequences abroad. their reputation overseas has fallen because of their conduct. we are weakening our influence in the world. but the labour leader, in brussels for his own meeting, is trying to maximise his influence. i've got plenty of arguments i with the prime minster on many things particularly in recent months. but when it comes to russian i aggression we stand as one in the wants more than to see division in the united kingdom between the pluto parties. i you say now that labour is the party of nato. how did you sit alongsidejeremy corbyn for so long when he had a very different view? he was wrong about that, and i spoke out at the i time and said he was wrong about that. i you were part of his front bench team, you ran on a ticket to make him prime minister, and when on this most fundamental of issues, the country's security, you're saying
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you thought all along he was wrong? well, he was wrong about nato but it'si very important to me — this is— my first chance as leader— of the labour party to come here and support for nato is unshakeable. fine words on these stages, perhaps, but miles from the cold threat on the edge of this continent. western leaders cannot predict yet hope to prevail. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, brussels. prince charles has tested positive for covid for a second time, and is self—isolating. it's understood he met with the queen just two days ago, but a palace source says she hasn't been displaying any symptoms. it isn't confirmed whether or not she's tested positive or negative. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell has more. a morning there are flashing images. —— a warning. the british museum in london last night, a reception for the british asian trust. the guests of honour, the prince of wales and his wife, the duchess of cornwall. everyone was shaking hands quite freely.
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among the guests the prince met and shook hands with was the chancellor of the exchequer, rishi sunak. roughly 12 hours after these pictures were taken this morning, charles took a routine covid test. it was positive. it's the second time he's caught covid. he's triple—vaccinated. he's thought to be coping well. but two days ago charles was presiding at an investiture at windsor castle, and while he was there he met the queen. she'd just returned from sandringham, where she'd been seen in good spirits at the weekend, marking the 70th anniversary of her accession to the throne. so inevitably a concern. might she have contracted covid during the meeting with the prince of wales? as with all medical or health—related matters, buckingham palace is saying the absolute minimum. all that royal sources will say is that the queen is not displaying any symptoms of covid. it can safely be assumed that the queen has been triple—vaccinated, but it's not known whether she's
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been tested for covid or what any such tests have indicated. all the palace will say is that the situation is being monitored. nicholas witchell, bbc news. the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, has also tested postive. it comes a day before he was due to announce the latest review of covid legislation. wales is to scrap its covid pass scheme in just over a week's time, but masks will be mandatory in shops until the end of march. there are currently no plans to change self—isolation rules. new figures show a record number of patients were facing long waiting times for hospital beds last month. nhs england says 122,000 people, a third of those visiting a&e who were unwell enough to need a hospital stay, waited over four hours injanuary. it's the latest sign of the strain on the health service this winter. last month bbc news revealed
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there were 100 people with learning disabilities and autism who'd been detained in a hospital for more than 20 years. since then, several people across the uk have been in touch regarding their own battles to have loved ones released. 0ur correspondent, jayne mccubbin, has been to northern ireland to meet a woman who's been fighting for 34 years to bring her brother home. it's a journey i will never forget. there was a lot of crying, a lot of weeping and wailing. this was the journey which broke brigene's family. my mother was in the back of the ambulance and i was with her. and the ambulance crew were trying to prevent brian from hurting himself. 34 years ago, this was the journey which took her brother to the hospital where he is still detained today. he hasn't moved, other than to move to a different ward. he is still within the walls of the same place. you needed help, you needed support? yeah, he did need help, but he also needed to come home whenever he was ready to come home.
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which hasn't happened. i've travelled to northern ireland to meet brigene. good morning. good morning, hello. one of thousands of families across the uk fighting to bring a loved one home. that's our brian. we've all now got a copy of that in everybody�*s house. he is still a part of the family. between his mum and seven siblings, brian had originally thrived. at that stage he couldn't even sit up without support. they'd helped him navigate a world which often fails people with autism and learning disabilities. but as brian turned 21, life changed for them all. increasingly unable to cope, he was detained under the mental health act. they were told he'd be back here in 12 weeks. 34 years since he went into the hospital, and 25 years since the doctors said he was fit for discharge, brian is still sitting in the hospital. a quarter of a century. quarter of a century.
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you all stayed close because you all knew you needed to be here when brian came home. we always kept hoping and thinking that he was going to be able to come home. but brian can only leave with the right community support. today they launch a judicial review to force authorities to provide that. mostly his whole adult life has been spent in hospital. and that hospital is muckamore abbey. the hospital at the heart of the largest abuse investigation in the history of the nhs. to date, over 70 staff have been suspended. brian is nonverbal, he can't communicate through speech. people who can't speak up forthemselves, people who can't defend themselves. it's so awful. i just... a public inquiry has opened. i can't. brigene will be her brother's voice. belfast health and social care trust said no one should call
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a hospital their home, but due to the complex care needs of many long—term patients, resettlement can be challenging. for brigene, it isn't complex. it's simple — brian needs to be home. brian has been deprived of the love of his family. one day she hopes she will make this journey for the very last time. we'll never give up. as long as we live, we will keep on trying to get brian to a place where he can live the rest of his life in peace and happiness. never give up. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. it's been a remarkable turnaround in the fortunes of one of europe's best footballers. last summer when the danish footballer christian eriksen collapsed during his side's euro 2020 game against finland, suffering a cardiac arrest. well, now he's back, having signed for brentford in the premier league, after having a cardio—verter defibrillator implant. the device will restart his heart should it stop again.
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in an exclusive interview, he's been speaking to our sports editor, dan roan. they were the shocking scenes that left football fearing the worst. the cardiac arrest suffered by christian eriksen during last summer's euros was among the most distressing moments the sport has witnessed. but with the world watching on, the denmark star survived, and eight months on he's now been handed the chance of a remarkable return with brentford. fresh from training and in his first interview since signing for the premier league club, he told me just how much it meant to be back doing what he loves. it's going to be very special to be able to walk out on the pitch and play a match again. yeah, it's going to be amazing. so you touch the ball again, you get the feeling back, you get the adrenaline, you get the excitement back. yeah, it's been some tough months, but i'm happy where i am now. with his partner sabrina watching on and team—mates forming a protective shield, eriksen was saved by the swift actions of medics who managed to revive him through cpr and a defibrillator. i mean, i was gone, what i've heard,
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from this world, for five minutes until they got my heartbeat back. can you remember what happened in the seconds before that collapse? i do remember everything on the throw—in, the ball hitting my knee and then obviously i don't know what happened after. and then i wake up with with people around me. i feel the pressure on my chest, trying to get my breathing back, and then i wake up, see my... 0pen my eyes and i see people around me. didn't really understand what's going on. and what did you think at that moment when you realised what had happened? weird. i still didn't believe it, i didn't believe that was me. how fortunate do you think you are? for me, it was unlucky in a lucky place. and the doctors there to save me that quickly. so, yeah, like before, i'm really grateful they were in that place. has it changed you as a man, given you a new perspective? no, i do think i see my family in a different view, compared to what i... i loved my family before, but even now i think i love them more. eriksen... 1—0, spurs!
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in seven years at spurs, eriksen established himself as one of the world's best midfielders, but he had his contract at inter milan cancelled as he's now fitted with a small heart—starting device that doesn't allow him to play in italy. but having trained since december, he's confident his fairy tale return with brentford can prove a success. for me, of course, obviously when it happened and the first few days after, i didn't think about playing again, of course, because i didn't know what was going on and i wanted to get all the tests done and get to talk with all the doctors. i think in less than a week then they said, "yeah, we have an icd, but otherwise nothing has changed. you can continue like a normal life and there's no limits to what you want to do." is it sometimes hard to believe still what did occur that day? yeah, definitely. definitely. it's a bit out—of—the—world experience, weird, because it actually did happen and i was where i was. and then to see where i am now, then it's very weird. the danish footballer, christian eriksen, speaking to our sports editor,
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dan roan. an you can listen to the full interview, on the sports desk podcast, over on bbc sounds. that's it. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello there. as low pressure pulls away from the north of the uk tonight, things will turn quieter. under clear skies with light winds, though, it'll turn really cold and very frosty — quite a hard frost in places across central and northern parts of the uk. there is today's low, clearing away from the north of the uk, pushing into the north sea. this ridge of high pressure continues to build down, bringing the lighter winds and clear skies. could see 1—2 showers dotted around western areas, particularly western scotland, there will be wintry elements and an ice risk here by the end of the night. but you can see quite a cold night across the board, a hard frost across northern areas. so it's a cold, frosty, but a crisp, sunny morning to start friday.
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many places stay dry and sunny throughout the day, just a few wintry showers across northern and western areas, and later in the day, thicker cloud and strengthening winds out west as this new low pressure system starts to move in. going to be a cool day across the board. into the weekend, then, it becomes a lot more unsettled, wet and windy weather both days, turning a little less cold for all.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. nato has warned that the crisis over ukraine could be entering its most dangerous moment as russia's military build—up continues. russian forces are carrying out manoeuvres in belarus and its navy is massing off the black sea coast. the commissioner of london's metropolitan police, cressida dick, is to step down. she said she'd been left with "no choice" after london mayor, sadiq khan, made it clear that he had no confidence in her leadership. canada's truck protest has ratcheted up with a further border crossing targetted over covid restrictions. prime ministerjustin trudeau has warned that the two—week—long protests are threatening canada's economy. inflation in the united states has hit an annual rate of 7.5% — the highest in four decades. the price increases were driven by rising food, electricity and housing costs.

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