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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 11, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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who have been blocking a key bridge between ontario and detroit. it comes after the premier of ontario declared a state of emergency. nato allies have been meeting to discuss ukraine. the us has warned that a russian invasion could happen at any time — but says there is nothing yet to indicate vladimir putin has decided to do so. the metropolitan police has contacted uk prime minister boris johnson with a questionnaire to ask what he knew about alleged parties in downing street during coronavirus restrictions. russia says the teenage figure skater kamila valieva should be allowed to compete at the winter olympics — despite a positive doping test. the fifteen year old won the team competition, and is due to compete as an individual.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kevin schofield, who's the political editor at huffpost uk, and rachel watson, the deputy political editor for the scottish daily mail. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... let's start with the telegraph and the warning from the us that russia has troops in place to invade ukraine "any day now". the daily mirror's headline is "get out!" as british nationals are told to leave ukraine immediately as a russian invasion looms. the times�* front page leads on the same warning from the foreign office to british nationals to leave ukraine while �*commercial means are still available. the daily mail cites the 80 minute video call between nato
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and european leaders to discuss the ongoing crisis. in other news — senior tories publicly warn the prime minister against "clinging to power" if the police investigation into no ten parties finds that he broke the law — that's on the front page of the i. and according to the guardian — the treasury is pushing for almost all free covid testing to end as soon as next month to save billions of pounds, despite warnings from experts. so let's begin... rachel, let's begin with you in the front page of the times, that warning and many of the front pages of course lead on ukraine. britain sold to get out of ukraine while commercial means are available. this sto commercial means are available. ti 3 story dominates the front pages tomorrow and you can see why. there's been a real escalation it seems in fares of nato allies. and of course today around what might be happening in russia and whether they could be as some of the front page essay could invade ukraine within days this is a warning that we see
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in a number of countries in including uk government issuing a warning to its citizens to get out now while you still can, while those commercial flights are still there. i watch the briefing in the white house earlier where they explicitly said, get out while the commercial flights are running because we might not be able to come back for you. they said, while you can. and it was made clear that might mean that if there is an invasion, if things do escalate over the weekend, early next week those flights may not happen. i think the mail, another couple of papers have put a figure of the uk of seven and have thousand uk national dependence and dual citizens they believe are in ukraine and all of those people this message is directed at them to get out now as quickly as possible before things escalate. it's obviously in the course of the day that has been intelligence gained by the us to share this. there was this 80 minute
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video call which seems to have ramped up theories and led to these calls today. ramped up theories and led to these calls toda . ., ., ~' ramped up theories and led to these calls toda . ., ., ~ ., ., calls today. looking at the front .a i e calls today. looking at the front -a~e of calls today. looking at the front page of the _ calls today. looking at the front page of the daily _ calls today. looking at the front page of the daily express, - calls today. looking at the front page of the daily express, the l page of the daily express, the headline takes up most of the front page, it positively shouts, invasion fears, britain sold get out now. yes, we are seeing more stuff not all front_ yes, we are seeing more stuff not all front pages certainly on the first editions of tomorrow's papers, a first editions of tomorrow's papers, 6 very— first editions of tomorrow's papers, 6 very stark— first editions of tomorrow's papers, a very stark warning. it's a clear assignment she could possibly get that britain, america, of the western_ that britain, america, of the western allies now believe that a russian _ western allies now believe that a russian invasion of ukraine is bound to happen _ russian invasion of ukraine is bound to happen. they don't want their own citizens_ to happen. they don't want their own citizens being trapped in ukraine when _ citizens being trapped in ukraine when the — citizens being trapped in ukraine when the conflict begins. we are told according to downing street the call earlier between western allies was a _
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call earlier between western allies was a very— call earlier between western allies was a very sobering call. clearly they— was a very sobering call. clearly they were — was a very sobering call. clearly they were given intelligence information that would suggest that russia _ information that would suggest that russia is— information that would suggest that russia is on the verge of invading the uk _ russia is on the verge of invading the uk was — russia is on the verge of invading the uk was of a spokesperson from number— the uk was of a spokesperson from number ten — the uk was of a spokesperson from numberten said that the uk was of a spokesperson from number ten said that borisjohnson feared _ number ten said that borisjohnson feared for— number ten said that borisjohnson feared for security of europe which is also _ feared for security of europe which is also a _ feared for security of europe which is also a chilling warning. i think it's important to be reminded yes, ukraine _ it's important to be reminded yes, ukraine and — it's important to be reminded yes, ukraine and russia appear very far away— ukraine and russia appear very far away but _ ukraine and russia appear very far away but were worse comes to worse and conflict _ away but were worse comes to worse and conflict it happened, we don't feel the _ and conflict it happened, we don't feel the effect of it, maybe not literally— feel the effect of it, maybe not literally on our front doorstep or window— literally on our front doorstep or window but the ramifications would be enormous. and that is why the western— be enormous. and that is why the western allies are moving heaven and earth to— western allies are moving heaven and earth to try— western allies are moving heaven and earth to try and find a diplomatic solution — earth to try and find a diplomatic solution to— earth to try and find a diplomatic solution to this, to try this 11th hour— solution to this, to try this 11th hour to — solution to this, to try this 11th hour to avert war. in solution to this, to try this 11th hour to avert war.— hour to avert war. in the mail, which you've _ hour to avert war. in the mail, which you've already _ hour to avert war. in the mail, which you've already alluded l hour to avert war. in the mail, l which you've already alluded to rachel, with this get out now
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message also talking about what the consequences might be if russia does move against ukraine in terms of this heavy package, talks of heavy package of economic sanctions being ready to go. but of course, the great unknown, the great uncertainty at this point even as people are preparing to leave is whether this build—up actually means an attack, and incursion is imminent or whether it is a means of getting some concessions as the diplomatic route continues. ~ �* , ., ~ concessions as the diplomatic route continues. ~ �* , ., ,, ., continues. we've been talking about this now continues. we've been talking about this new for — continues. we've been talking about this new for a _ continues. we've been talking about this now for a number _ continues. we've been talking about this now for a number of _ continues. we've been talking about this now for a number of weeks - this now for a number of weeks concerns over russia invading ukraine. in the western allies have tried with this. there's been a lot of talk about trying to take the diplomatic route to this end if possible talk about sanctions. but nothing seems to have stopped that because as we see today there has been some kind of ramping up. there's been intelligence gathered that now the us government who
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relayed this to other western countries in nato allies believed that actually in an invasion is imminent, they say within days. i heard somewhere tuesday, as early as tuesday that they see boots on the ground as was said by the national security adviser in the us. they believe aerial bombardment is probably the first thing we would see from russia. so whether these threats of sanctions don't seem to work so far but i think this weekend could be pivotal in what happens next. we know that presidentjoe biden is to speak to put in tomorrow, what will come of that if anything was that there is been a real push this week, we see leaders holding meetings with vladimir putin travelling to russia, travelling to ukraine, holding meetings with each other, there's a real russia because nobody wants to go to war. nobody wants to have a conflict. they want to try and use every means possible to try and use every means possible to stop that. and this weekend with her to see much, much more of this.
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kevin, the front page of the daily telegraph focusing on the photograph, a really striking image of eight ukrainian marine looking to the skies. , . , , , ~ the skies. yes, incredibly striking. a fantastic photograph _ the skies. yes, incredibly striking. a fantastic photograph and - the skies. yes, incredibly striking. a fantastic photograph and it - the skies. yes, incredibly striking. | a fantastic photograph and it really captures _ a fantastic photograph and it really captures where we are right now. this idea — captures where we are right now. this idea as— captures where we are right now. this idea as well that it'sjust captures where we are right now. this idea as well that it's just a case _ this idea as well that it's just a case of— this idea as well that it's just a case of russian tanks rolling into ukraine — case of russian tanks rolling into ukraine and it's all done and dusted ithink— ukraine and it's all done and dusted i think that — ukraine and it's all done and dusted i think that picture shows that would — i think that picture shows that would not be the case. there is a large _ would not be the case. there is a large ukrainian army, it would be conflict, — large ukrainian army, it would be conflict, that would be bloodshed. this is— conflict, that would be bloodshed. this is the — conflict, that would be bloodshed. this is the but borisjohnson has been _ this is the but borisjohnson has been making directly to the russian people _ been making directly to the russian people saying, your sons and daughters will return home having lost their— daughters will return home having lost their lives if this needless, if he _ lost their lives if this needless, if he was — lost their lives if this needless, if he was would describe conflict takes _ if he was would describe conflict takes place with up is not too late
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for vladimir putin to back down and avoid _ for vladimir putin to back down and avoid unnecessary bloodshed. because it's not— avoid unnecessary bloodshed. because it's not a _ avoid unnecessary bloodshed. because it's not a case of the massive russian — it's not a case of the massive russian army but obviously something like hundred and 30,000 russian troops _ like hundred and 30,000 russian troops mass on the ukrainian border but they— troops mass on the ukrainian border but they would meet fierce resistance. and it would be a horrible _ resistance. and it would be a horrible and bloodied conflict. as i say, we've — horrible and bloodied conflict. as i say, we've got to hope that in this 11th say, we've got to hope that in this iith hour— say, we've got to hope that in this 11th hour that discussions are going on, 11th hour that discussions are going on. this— 11th hour that discussions are going on. this in— 11th hour that discussions are going on, this in test two intense discussion will continue up until the last— discussion will continue up until the last possible moment will reach a successful conclusion. let�*s the last possible moment will reach a successful conclusion.— a successful conclusion. let's move on from ukraine _ a successful conclusion. let's move on from ukraine onto _ a successful conclusion. let's move on from ukraine onto the _ a successful conclusion. let's move on from ukraine onto the front - a successful conclusion. let's move | on from ukraine onto the front page of the guardian which is leading with the lead story treasury pushed to end free covid tests. despite warnings these tests have become so much of a familiar part of our lives for longer than we care to remember. really a very controversial move if it goes ahead.
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really a very controversial move if it goes ahead-— it goes ahead. yes, highly controversial. _ it goes ahead. yes, highly controversial. and - it goes ahead. yes, highly i controversial. and something it goes ahead. yes, highly - controversial. and something we've seen spoken about previously. this is a story that was first contested by some government sources a couple weeks ago in some sunday newspapers and disappear quite quickly. but probably as we get to the point, we've heard from borisjohnson this week about how he wants to end coronavirus restrictions in england and scotland is a different matter, we know nicola sturgeon is being more cautious than that, she doesn't want to go that way just yet. but more cautious than that, she doesn't want to go that wayjust yet. but if that's how the uk government wants to go it seems like a logical step that they would begin discussions on whether or not to have the legal requirement to self—isolate, what comes next? is that getting rid of free access to test? it looks like the guardian spoke to a number of sources who say this is what the treasury want to do, they want to move away from pcr test being widely available free to people. and it would be used in high risk and hospital settings. and possibly take
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the uk in line with other european countries and the us where people do have to pay for test. i think we've seen this week from public health experts in the way they reacted from borisjohnson experts in the way they reacted from boris johnson wasn't to experts in the way they reacted from borisjohnson wasn't to end to that legal requirement to self—isolate for think it's far too early to be talking about ending free test with a it's obviously part of the discussion that we have to have those we come out of the pandemic, how long does this go on for, what restrictions to we need, merely two measures, access to various things? i think this will kick—start that conversation. abs, i think this will kick-start that conversation.— i think this will kick-start that conversation. �* ., , , conversation. a really interesting lawn. conversation. a really interesting lawn- let's _ conversation. a really interesting lawn. let's move _ conversation. a really interesting lawn. let's move on _ conversation. a really interesting lawn. let's move on to _ conversation. a really interesting lawn. let's move on to i. - conversation. a really interesting j lawn. let's move on to i. johnson told by top tories, don't try to cling to power is the phrase that's used with them and their quoting iain duncan smith telling the i that if borisjohnson were to receive a fine from the metropolitan police it would be very tough for him to remain as prime minister after that.
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yes and i think it's right. the conservatives historically have always — conservatives historically have always viewed themselves to the public— always viewed themselves to the public as— always viewed themselves to the public as the party of florida order and that— public as the party of florida order and that would be quite difficult for him — and that would be quite difficult for him to go into the next general election— for him to go into the next general election with a leader who had received — election with a leader who had received a fixed penalty notice from the police _ received a fixed penalty notice from the police essentially haven't broken — the police essentially haven't broken the law. so yeah, i think it would _ broken the law. so yeah, i think it would be — broken the law. so yeah, i think it would be politically, it would be incredibly difficult for boris johnson to stay imposed. i think it would _ johnson to stay imposed. i think it would come under massive pressure from his— would come under massive pressure from his own side maybe, a lot of the story— from his own side maybe, a lot of the story mps who have been off of no confidence that might be enough to tip— no confidence that might be enough to tip them over the edge. we know that boris— to tip them over the edge. we know that borisjohnson will to tip them over the edge. we know that boris johnson will go down without— that boris johnson will go down without a — that boris johnson will go down without a fight. the legal argument that he _ without a fight. the legal argument that he will make to defend himself now that _ that he will make to defend himself now that he's been served with this questionnaire by the police for the avenue _ questionnaire by the police for the avenue been told there was briefing
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allies of— avenue been told there was briefing allies of borisjohnson avenue been told there was briefing allies of boris johnson telling one of the _ allies of boris johnson telling one of the newspapers that he wouldn't lo, of the newspapers that he wouldn't go. he _ of the newspapers that he wouldn't go, he wouldn't resign if he were fine _ go, he wouldn't resign if he were fine i_ go, he wouldn't resign if he were fine ijust — go, he wouldn't resign if he were fine. ijust think that the political— fine. ijust think that the political pressure on the prime minister— political pressure on the prime minister were that to take place would _ minister were that to take place would be — minister were that to take place would be huge. ithink could be minister were that to take place would be huge. i think could be very difficult _ would be huge. i think could be very difficult for him to hold on to his 'ob. ,., . ~' difficult for him to hold on to his 'ob. . ,, ., difficult for him to hold on to his 'ob. ,., . ~ ., ., difficult for him to hold on to his 'ob. ., ., ., job. going back to the front page of the telegraph. _ job. going back to the front page of the telegraph, johnson _ job. going back to the front page of the telegraph, johnson to - job. going back to the front page of the telegraph, johnson to deny - the telegraph, johnson to deny breaking the law at downing street flat abba party specifically. of course this was in before the news that boris johnson course this was in before the news that borisjohnson has indeed been sent a questionnaire by the met police, came a bit too late for these first additions. but this story is specifically about the abba party. just remind everyone about that. , , , party. just remind everyone about that. ,, , ., party. just remind everyone about that. , , , ., that. this is the party that was held in the _ that. this is the party that was held in the downing _ that. this is the party that was held in the downing street - that. this is the party that was | held in the downing street flat, just happen to be the night that dominic cummings left downing street. we've heard of various people who attended this and details have come out about abba being
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played, johnson being there and from this telegraph story we understand that boris johnson this telegraph story we understand that borisjohnson is locked to deny that borisjohnson is locked to deny that he was in the number ten flat but what is is going to say is that he was there working, he wasn't taking part in any kind of party already had a social gathering that he was sticking to restrictions as we were, carrying out his work in his flat. which doubles up as his home office, we've all got to use to that recently. just home office, we've all got to use to that recently-— that recently. just time to look at the cartoon _ that recently. just time to look at the cartoon on — that recently. just time to look at the cartoon on the _ that recently. just time to look at the cartoon on the front - that recently. just time to look at the cartoon on the front page - that recently. just time to look at the cartoon on the front page or. the cartoon on the front page or tomorrow morning telegraph. reflecting on another story, cressida dick, the search for metropolitan commissioner if you don't cooperate with can make things very unpleasant for you, we could make you met police chief. somebody being questioned at a police station. it does reflect that whoever does take thatjob, there can have a very difficult set of challenges to face, aren't they? kevin, do you want talk about that?
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yeah, you're right. cressida dick, she lost the confidence of the lender mayor. as somewhat of a poisoned chalice. i can't think of the last commissioner who's come out with the reputation enhanced. i am sure it's very prestigious, it's a hugejob and am sure people sure it's very prestigious, it's a huge job and am sure people would want to take it on. but i think it will come with a maths two massive health warning, it's not a job for the fainthearted. find health warning, it's not a 'ob for the fainthearted.�* health warning, it's not a 'ob for the fainthearted. �* , ., , the fainthearted. and when you begin to talk about — the fainthearted. and when you begin to talk about something _ the fainthearted. and when you begin to talk about something as _ the fainthearted. and when you begin to talk about something as deep - the fainthearted. and when you begin to talk about something as deep as i to talk about something as deep as changing the culture, no quick fixes do that, i imagine. ha. changing the culture, no quick fixes do that, i imagine.— do that, i imagine. no. cressida dick believed _ do that, i imagine. no. cressida dick believed that _ do that, i imagine. no. cressida dick believed that she _ do that, i imagine. no. cressida dick believed that she did - do that, i imagine. no. cressida dick believed that she did have l do that, i imagine. no. cressida| dick believed that she did have a plan in place. she presented it to the mayor of london i think he took one look at it and said that doesn't go far enough. and her position was untenable. whoever comes and has a awful lot on his or her plate, as
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you say, misogyny, racism, sexism, you say, misogyny, racism, sexism, you name it, it's a massive.... band you name it, it's a massive.... and rachel, you name it, it's a massive.... and rachel. on — you name it, it's a massive.... and rachel, on that _ you name it, it's a massive.... and rachel, on that cartoon? kevin - you name it, it's a massive.... and i rachel, on that cartoon? kevin said, this is a job — rachel, on that cartoon? kevin said, this is a job that _ rachel, on that cartoon? kevin said, this is a job that someone _ rachel, on that cartoon? kevin said, this is a job that someone will- rachel, on that cartoon? kevin said, this is a job that someone will have l this is a job that someone will have to take _ this is a job that someone will have to take on — this is a job that someone will have to take on. they are taking it on at a horrible — to take on. they are taking it on at a horrible moment, their huge dues that have _ a horrible moment, their huge dues that have been identified over the past couple years. horrible cases that we've — past couple years. horrible cases that we've seen come from the met police _ that we've seen come from the met police to— that we've seen come from the met police to deal with that culture. this is— police to deal with that culture. this is about going into a job and getting _ this is about going into a job and getting to — this is about going into a job and getting to grips with the day—to—day policing, _ getting to grips with the day—to—day policing, it's about getting the confidence back of the public, of the politicians, so that you can carry— the politicians, so that you can carry out — the politicians, so that you can carry out their day—to—day policing. but having — carry out their day—to—day policing. but having to get to grips with these — but having to get to grips with these huge issues within the met police. this is a huge job, there's a lot— police. this is a huge job, there's a lot of— police. this is a huge job, there's a lot of procedure on her, people will want — a lot of procedure on her, people will want to— a lot of procedure on her, people will want to but it does come with that health warning of you have so much _ that health warning of you have so much on _ that health warning of you have so much on your shoulders as soon as you step into— much on your shoulders as soon as you step into thisjob.— you step into this 'ob. great to have ou you step into this 'ob. great to have you both — you step into this job. great to have you both with _ you step into this job. great to have you both with me - you step into this job. great to have you both with me this - you step into this job. great to - have you both with me this evening to look at tomorrow mornings papers.
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thank you both very much. both very much. that's it for the papers this evening. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with the journalist and author shyama perera and the political editor at the sun on sunday, dave wooding. dojoin us then if you can but for now, goodnight. hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. i'mjane hill, and to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode, as ever. hi again, mark. what have you been watching? very mixed bag. we have death on the nile. hercule poirot and his moustache are back. we have an animated documentary, flee.
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and marry me — what happens when a pop star marries a fan? death on the nile. kenneth branagh's been busy. he has. this was shot in 2019 and it's been delayed because of covid. and then, of course, belfast has come out, done incredibly well with audiences and done incredibly well with awards voters, so it's a bit odd this is coming out now. it is directed by branagh, it stars branagh as hercule poirot. the story is, he is on the nile, there's a steamer. it is full of a variety show cast list of people, all of whom will either be victims or suspects at some point. lots of glitz, lots of glamour. here's a clip. # shout, sister, shout # shout, sister, shout # tell the whole world what it's all about # there's - a reason for a mountain a reason for a hill # a reason why a doctor gives a patient a pill # a reason to stand, a reason to sing #
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but there ain't no reason why a man can't swing... # we have the karnak _ all to ourselves until abu simbel. don't worry about your things. darling louise will go back and pack up all your rooms for you and meet us. happy to, miss. we have a piano tuned, a chef stolen from shepherds of cairo and enough champagne to fill the nile! and it is very much that kind of, "enough champagne to fill the nile!" and then a whole bunch of celebrities and death and murder and hercule poirot, with his moustache. interestingly, in this, hercule poirot�*s moustache get its own backstory. there is literally a whole thing about where that moustache came from. it becomes very important about him being somebody who's hiding behind a mask, because of stuff that is in his past. that should be a twitter handle! poirot�*s moustache? i am sure it probably is already. here's the thing with this.
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you said when you were watching that clip, "it is very star—studded and glittery" — that is what it is. it is also pretty creaky. i mean, the murder mystery is not very mysterious and it feels kind of very mechanical. it's happening on this big steamer with these big paddles going around, and that kind of feels like a metaphor for the film—making itself. it's fine, it's not going to surprise anybody. you go to see this movie, you know what you're going to get. perhaps the stuff about the tragedy that lies by the moustache may be something that surprises some people. great cast, looks all right. never convinced in terms of it being a gripping whodunit, because it's like, "well, who really cares?" i'm here for the glitter. i'm here for the "enough champagne to fill the nile!" it's fine. it's not belfast. and the thing with belfast is belfast feels personal, belfast feels vibrant and like, "i really wanted to tell this story." this one, not so much, but it is what it is. a bit of escapist glamour and perhaps not much more.
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yeah, no, not much more at all. however, flee. now, you've seen flee. loved it! animated documentary byjonas poher rasmussen, and it's a documentary about somebody that he has known since 15 — they met in middle school — called amin here. but that's a pseudonym to protect his identity. he came from afghanistan to denmark. his backstory was always shrouded in mystery, and rasmussen wanted to do a radio documentary about him. he said, "i'm not ready to do it." but then when he started discussing the animated documentary, he realised that he could tell his story and still retain his anonymity, and what we see is a story about somebody growing up, and all the wonderful things about being a child, but then the mujahideen, then having to flee, via moscow, further on then becoming involved in a terrifying human trafficking story which is about cargo containers and boats and visions of drowning. and as the story goes
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from being realist to nightmarish, so the animation reflects that in the way that it changes. i thought this was really powerful, but the main reason i thought it was powerful was because along with that horrifying story, firstly, you're hearing somebody telling this story for the first time, but also it's really a coming—of—age story, a coming—out story. and amidst all of the terror and the horror in the tragedy, there is real warmth and wit and "a—ha!" — i thought it was really moving. did you like it? incredibly moving, very powerful. and no—one should look at it think, "oh, it is animation, why do i want to watch animation?" i think the story actually would've been unbearable... we should all know this story — we do stories all the time in news about human trafficking — but the animation means you can just about cope with the horror of what he went through. i don't want to do any plot spoilers, but it was absolutely gripping. my attention was completely gripped. it's only an hour and a half,
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and your heart's just turning and turning, your stomach's turning, because it's horrific. and the references to the people—traffickers are, obviously, the most troubling, disturbing elements of it. and also to the russian police, who don't come out of it well either! but i think it is really interesting a story dealing with such dark material can be so uplifting in the end, because it is... the message of the story is, to accept the future, you have to... deal with your past, yes. and i thought, you hear in those interviews somebody dealing with the past. it is almost a therapy session. actually, yes, and because the two men are such old friends, the central character is now 36 and, we are told, has a very successful career in denmark. we don't know who he is, quite rightly, and there are flashes of humour. i mean, you couldn't get through it if there weren't. and that's lovely. there's a lovely detail when he is young and looking at a poster ofjohn claude van damme, and thinking, "there's something going on here, but i'm not quite sure what it is!",
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which is a really lovely detail. beautiful. really well—made, i thought. anyway, from the sublime to the ridiculous, marry me. now, have you ever wondered what notting hill would be like if you took away hugh grant and julia roberts and replaced them withjennifer lopez and owen wilson? not really! no, neither had i. and yet, weirdly, now we know. so the story is, jennifer lopez is going to get married onstage to her celebrity boyfriend. just before she goes onstage, she finds he's been cheating. so she's on stage — as a character, not as herself — and she decides to marry somebody in the audience. don't take my word for it — look, here it is! they say if you want something different, you have to do something different. so this time, for the first time, you make a different choice. you jump off a cliff so high, you can't even see the fall. and you just...
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..say yes. sure. i'll marry you. you! gasps i just wish the viewers had been witness to your reaction - to that clip, and incidentally that's one of the better moments in the film! oh, lordy! i was sitting there going, "ok, i know it is based on a graphic novel and i can see it's a rom—com, so, ok, fine, liberties," but it's rubbish. it's utter rubbish! not least because wilson spends the whole movie doing this, "i'm just being mopey!", like owen wilson. and then it is, ok, so he is a mopey maths teacher, but actually that is so much better than the life of celebrity. none of this makes any sense. i don't believe in any of these people. there is no chemistry between them. i don't believe in anything at all, which would be fine if i was laughing
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and if i was watching notting hill, which... i think there's a lot of things wrong with notting hill — i don't care, it's a lovely, funny film! this is absolute rubbish. i have been quite surprised — the reviews have been, "well, it's not citizen kane, but it is all right!" no, it's not! it's terrible! it says something about the levels to which we've descended that this is all right. this is not all right! people have been starved for cinema... between this and moonfall... moonfall, every time! i refer you to last week's episode. yes. so, best out? the souvenir part ii... joanna hogg film. you've seen it? yes, seeing both. 0k. did you...? i really enjoyed this. there's a section towards the end which i didn't fully understand. and they genuinely think i need to rewatch that section, about her graduation... oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. ..but broadly, i really, really enjoyed it, and i really enjoyed it much more even than the first part. great. so the first part is still available on bbc iplayer, and so if you're going to go and see the souvenir part ii, you do have to have seen the souvenir part i.
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it would not make any sense if you haven't seen the first one. the first one is a stand—alone movie, the second one is not. i thought it was great. i know exactly what you're talking about, about... you see a film being made, and then the film that you see isn't that, but it's to do with the artistic licence, and what i love about it is it's deeply personal. it'sjoanna hogg making a film which is semi—autobiographical — i mean, more fiction in this than there was in the first film. but terrific performances. i mean, nobody makes films likejoanna hogg. you can watch two seconds of this and you know that this is a joanna hogg film. i loved it. and there's something very touching about it. it can get criticised, people say it's achingly middle—class, and some people have a problem with that, but this is about the central character coming to terms with a traumatic death of her boyfriend. yes! that's the fundamental thing through it, and i thought it was examined really realy cleverly. i think you should be in this chair and i should be there, and you should be doing this. because, no, that is exactly right, that is exactly what it is. and worth saying, it's a film — in that thing about the middle—class — going, "these are the people,
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this is what they are." it's not making any apologies for them. this is what they are. and i think it's terrific. yes, really terrific. dvd? the story of film: a new generation, which is mark cousins' ramble through the history of film, which has now been updated. also worth mentioning, and i mentioned to bbc iplayer before, if you go to bbc iplayer, the secrets of cinema that i did is also on there! more film history than you can wave a stick at. it's worth checking out. and i've always said film history is a thrillingly interesting subject. dive into it. there are many resources for doing so nowadays. yes. you can never have too much! you can never have too much film history. you can have too much of marry me. i don't think i'm even going to have 15 minutes of marry me. please see moonfall! moonfall is so much better than marry me! also going on the poster. thank you very much, mark. see you next week. enjoy your cinema going, whatever you are brave enough to see. there's...interesting choices there! see you next time. bye— bye.
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hello again. this weekend, we'll see outbreaks of rain and it's often going to be quite windy as well, but choose your moments — there will be a few brighter and drier interludes around. at the moment, we're seeing rain spread in from the west. we did have an early frost to start the night, but that frost is easing out of the way as those winds pick up and the cloud spreads in. so, these are the figures heading into the first part of saturday morning, and the weather kind of slices and dices three ways. we've got this zone of heavy rain pushing into wales and northern england, showers for scotland and northern ireland, a few brighter and drier moments here. for east anglia and southeast england, you might get away with a dry day. it will be pretty blustery, though, and those temperatures range from around 8—1! celsius. the second half of the weekend, another area of low pressure's on the way, this one bringing gales to the south. rain pushes across most of the uk, but perhaps not this time across to the north of scotland,
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where we'll have the best of the dry and bright weather. it will be mild again. again, highs of 8—11. this is bbc news. i'm celia hatton with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a court in canada orders an end the anti—vaccine blockade that's choking off one of country's main connections to the us. britain is among the countries telling their citizens to leave ukraine as america warns an invasion could be imminent. we continue to see signs of russian escalation, including new forces arriving at the ukrainian border. we are in the window when an invasion could begin at any time, should vladimir putin decide to order it. boris johnson receives a legal questionnaire from the police as part of the investigation into parties held at downing street. russia defends a teenage figure skater, despite a failed drug test,
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but could she be frozen out of the winter olympics?

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