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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 12, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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first, the headlines. us presidentjoe biden warns russian leader vladimir putin that he'll respond with "severe economic sanctions" if ukraine is invaded. russia says the west is creating hysteria and it's absurd to suggest an invasion will happen. the ukrainian president warns against creating panic. there is panic in our country, and all this information, it helps only for panic. doesn't help us. and also ahead — police in canada break up a protest against covid restrictions after several days of a major trade route to the us being blocked. tear gas on the streets of paris, as french police try to disperse a demonstration against covid regulations.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kate maltby, columnist for the i and chair of the theatre critics circle, and jonathan walker, political editor at the birmingham mail. welcome to both of you. let's just have a quick run through those front pages. the sunday express says brexit�*s big wins are coming soon — that's according to new brexit opportunities ministerjacob rees mogg, who's been speaking to the paper. the sunday telegraph claims russia is planning a "false flag" attack as a pretext for an invasion of ukraine as soon as wednesday. the sunday times leads with comments from the defence secretary, ben wallace, who's likened western efforts to counter russian aggression against ukraine to appeasement before world war ii. the sunday mirror quotes a source as saying that murderer levi bellfield's alleged confession to carrying out the murders of lin and megan russell was, in the paper's words, "a sickjoke." the people says a book
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by prince harry do to be published later this year will contain criticism of his stepmother, the duchess of cornwall. let's begin. the first paper we're going to look at is the sunday times. this has the with of munich. the policy in the 1930s trying to stop the war with germany. kate, do you want to begin? what's the article saying in more detail? ~ �* , ., ., ., detail? well, there's quite a lot of coveraue detail? well, there's quite a lot of coverage in _ detail? well, there's quite a lot of coverage in the _ detail? well, there's quite a lot of coverage in the sunday _ detail? well, there's quite a lot of coverage in the sunday times - detail? well, there's quite a lot of coverage in the sunday times this j coverage in the sunday times this weekend of the ukraine crisis. ben wallace's comments are obviously not going to be considered very helpful by our allies, which points to the fact that he's right. i think it's very clear that we've seen a kind of continual failure to stand up to
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russia over several years, which is what he says, because one of the important things that he points out in this article which is often missed is that this has been a long time coming. it's not a question of russia invading ukraine for the first time, they invaded in 2014. they backed separatists, but very dodgy looking people who claimed to be independent, but turned out to have russian markers on their weapons. they've been making incursions into this supposedly free country, and i think ben wallace frankly is not wrong to say that we have collectively failed. but i'm not sure that this desperate last—ditch to form alliances will be helped by his comments. let’s look at the telegraph. john, we'll turn to you for that one. russia
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plot attack to provoke war. false flag, the words used byjoe biden. and i can't help thinking about what we heard from president zelensky, saying the best friend for enemies is panic in our country. ijust wonder whether what we're hearing is creating that panic. yes. wonder whether what we're hearing is creating that panic.— creating that panic. yes, it's all talk coming _ creating that panic. yes, it's all talk coming from _ creating that panic. yes, it's all talk coming from the _ creating that panic. yes, it's all talk coming from the united . creating that panic. yes, it's all. talk coming from the united states and reported in many papers. seen as wednesday. _ and reported in many papers. seen as wednesday, this is what the us believe~ — wednesday, this is what the us believe. ukrainians themselves are not very— believe. ukrainians themselves are not very happy with this toff. they don't _ not very happy with this toff. they don't believe it's very helpful. as you said. — don't believe it's very helpful. as you said. it— don't believe it's very helpful. as you said, it may help russia because it inflates _ you said, it may help russia because it inflates panic and a sense of chaos, — it inflates panic and a sense of chaos, which might be helping vladimir— chaos, which might be helping vladimir putin. the telegraph is reporting — vladimir putin. the telegraph is reporting on concerns that putin
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might— reporting on concerns that putin might invade with a false flag event, — might invade with a false flag event, and the annexation about crimea, — event, and the annexation about crimea, where russia is believed to be creating — crimea, where russia is believed to be creating a bit of theatre. in this case, _ be creating a bit of theatre. in this case, it might be something like a _ this case, it might be something like a tax — this case, it might be something like a tax on the russian—speaking population— like a tax on the russian—speaking population —— attacks. but the soppose — population —— attacks. but the suppose and belief is that russia will stage some sort of interference for invading. but there is... it's unclear— for invading. but there is... it's unclear what exactly people think russia _ unclear what exactly people think russia will do. it's also unclear how— russia will do. it's also unclear how they— russia will do. it's also unclear how they know this. vladimir putin, he's possibly very clever. he's seen as quite _ he's possibly very clever. he's seen as quite skilled in these issues.
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but he's — as quite skilled in these issues. but he's quite hard to predict how he will— but he's quite hard to predict how he will behave. i think the us are doing _ he will behave. i think the us are doing their— he will behave. i think the us are doing their best to work out what's going _ doing their best to work out what's going on. — doing their best to work out what's going on, but i'm not sure what they know _ going on, but i'm not sure what they know i_ going on, but i'm not sure what they know. , ., ., know. i find it bizarre that there is a suggestion _ know. i find it bizarre that there is a suggestion of— know. i find it bizarre that there is a suggestion of a _ know. i find it bizarre that there is a suggestion of a specific- know. i find it bizarre that there | is a suggestion of a specific time and day that a war might start. it seems the very opposite of what might happen if a war was to begin. another very strong image on the telegraph, as there was on today's addition of the family in kyiv. marching in protest against russian troops across the border. it against russian troops across the border. , ., , against russian troops across the border. , . , , ., ~ against russian troops across the border. , , ., ~ ., border. it is a very stark image, but i border. it is a very stark image, but i think— border. it is a very stark image, but i think again, _ border. it is a very stark image, but i think again, it _ border. it is a very stark image, but i think again, it tells - border. it is a very stark image, but i think again, it tells us - border. it is a very stark image, but i think again, it tells us how much the militarisation of ukraine and the experience of ordinary ukrainian people has been part of daily life for the last eight years. there's also a brilliant article in the sunday times, which is trail beneath this. it's already online.
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if i'm allowed to recommend that people go to, which analyses and quite careful detail the importance of the north street —— pipeline project in europe. it's what a lot of this about, who control the oil and gas in europe. the sunday times is particularly good on this coverage. is particularly good on this coverage-— is particularly good on this coveraue. h , .~' coverage. let's stick with the sunday telegraph, _ coverage. let's stick with the sunday telegraph, but - coverage. let's stick with the sunday telegraph, but move| coverage. let's stick with the i sunday telegraph, but move on coverage. let's stick with the - sunday telegraph, but move on from the ukraine story. pm will trust the people, says new number ten chief. the idea of rolling back the state spending less on state aid is appealing, but on the other hand, i wonder if this will win votes. how does this tie in with the idea of leveling up, the suggestion that you need to spend more money, to level “p need to spend more money, to level up parts of the uk?— up parts of the uk? that's a very
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good point- _ up parts of the uk? that's a very good point. this _ up parts of the uk? that's a very good point. this is _ up parts of the uk? that's a very good point. this is stephen - up parts of the uk? that's a very i good point. this is stephen barclay, the new— good point. this is stephen barclay, the new chief of staff, and also a brexiteer, — the new chief of staff, and also a brexiteer, saying the government should _ brexiteer, saying the government should change court —— change course a little _ should change court —— change course a little bit _ should change court —— change course a little bit. 0ne should change court —— change course a little bit. one is to do with what we've _ a little bit. one is to do with what we've seen— a little bit. one is to do with what we've seen over the past few years with covid — we've seen over the past few years with covid. spending huge sums of money, _ with covid. spending huge sums of money, which will change, but there also seems — money, which will change, but there also seems to be an indication of more _ also seems to be an indication of more general shifts and policies because — more general shifts and policies because borisjohnson isn't a small spate _ because borisjohnson isn't a small spate -- _ because borisjohnson isn't a small spate -- a — because borisjohnson isn't a small spate —— a small state politician. hes— spate —— a small state politician. he's a _ spate —— a small state politician. he's a spender. he abandoned austerity _ he's a spender. he abandoned austerity. he was going to increase funding _ austerity. he was going to increase funding for— austerity. he was going to increase funding for police forces, and leveling — funding for police forces, and leveling up is partly about spending money— leveling up is partly about spending money in _ leveling up is partly about spending money in the region. trains, buses,
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roads, _ money in the region. trains, buses, roads. new— money in the region. trains, buses, roads, new schools, that sort of thing _ roads, new schools, that sort of thing it's— roads, new schools, that sort of thing. it's hard to say how that will resonate with what stephen barclay — will resonate with what stephen barclay isn't saying. the pm is in a very difficult situation. he needs to get— very difficult situation. he needs to get mps on his side and he needs to get mps on his side and he needs to get— to get mps on his side and he needs to get the _ to get mps on his side and he needs to get the faction of the party on his side — to get the faction of the party on his side. his natural instincts are little _ his side. his natural instincts are little bit — his side. his natural instincts are little bit different. some of them are small— little bit different. some of them are small state conservatives, and boris _ are small state conservatives, and boris isn't, — are small state conservatives, and boris isn't, but he needs to get them _ boris isn't, but he needs to get them on — boris isn't, but he needs to get them on board. the only thing i'd say about— them on board. the only thing i'd say about this is that it is possible. i don't know, it is quite possible — possible. i don't know, it is quite possible that stephen barclay is telling _ possible that stephen barclay is telling people what he wants to see and telling people that's what boris johnson _ and telling people that's what boris johnson is — and telling people that's what boris johnson is going to do. it's an attempt — johnson is going to do. it's an attempt to push the pm in that direction. it remains to be seen how much _ direction. it remains to be seen how much boris — direction. it remains to be seen how much boris or the government is taking _ much boris or the government is taking on—
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much boris or the government is taking on board. but this isjust there _ taking on board. but this isjust there will— taking on board. but this isjust there will be a shift in direction. the front— there will be a shift in direction. the front page of the sunday express, the paper has an interview with jacob rees—mogg. it declares brexit will transform britain and deliver such dividends that nobody will want to rejoin the european union. tell us more about what he's saying. i european union. tell us more about what he's saying-— what he's saying. i feel like we get this story from _ what he's saying. i feel like we get this story from the _ what he's saying. i feel like we get this story from the express - what he's saying. i feel like we get this story from the express at - this story from the express at least once a week. the wonderfuljacob rees—mogg talks about how wonderful brexit is. but if your aim is in the course of ten years, you might finally win the argument over a referendum that you actually one five years ago, you're not as confident as you might suggest —— you actually won. there's quite a lot of detail. particularly about the legislation which is being
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proposed, not least to the procurement bill, which is being sort of floated as a wonderful way to cut government red tape, although given what a scandal we've just seen at the beginning of the pandemic, i'm not sure that less oversight is going to be as much of a political winner as mr rees—mogg might suggest. it could be. he's also talked a bit about the bill for freeport, which is almost completed, and he's right. there has been a lot through parliament recently without being talked about. but as the article says, after weeks of downing street being under siege over party gate, mr rees—mogg urged his party to stick by the prime minister. this is what everything is about and what the kite floated by stephen barclay, is really all about, this operation
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red meat to try and throw something at the backbenchers that will help them stick with boris and change the subject. the question is whether it will soon exceed. it subject. the question is whether it will soon exceed.— will soon exceed. it talks about opportunities- _ will soon exceed. it talks about opportunities. but _ will soon exceed. it talks about opportunities. but it _ will soon exceed. it talks about opportunities. but it doesn't i will soon exceed. it talks about. opportunities. but it doesn't talk about challenges. —— it will succeed. it wants government to talk about the challenges and be more transparent about what they might be. not so much a focus on the challenges in this particular article. ., ., , , �* challenges in this particular article. ., �* ., article. no. perhaps we're not seeinu article. no. perhaps we're not seeing the _ article. no. perhaps we're not seeing the benefits _ article. no. perhaps we're not seeing the benefits of- article. no. perhaps we're not seeing the benefits of brexit l article. no. perhaps we're not. seeing the benefits of brexit so far. seeing the benefits of brexit so fan the — seeing the benefits of brexit so far. the business community has always— far. the business community has always made it very clear that there are no— always made it very clear that there are no advances they see. they've had to _ are no advances they see. they've had to accept. but i think that...
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because — had to accept. but i think that... because whenjacob had to accept. but i think that... because when jacob rees—mogg had to accept. but i think that... because whenjacob rees—mogg was shuttled _ because whenjacob rees—mogg was shuttled into this role just last week, — shuttled into this role just last week, it — shuttled into this role just last week, it seems like a bit of consolation, a bit of a made—upjob. he's not— consolation, a bit of a made—upjob. he's not even— consolation, a bit of a made—upjob. he's not even a cabinet member any more, _ he's not even a cabinet member any more. but _ he's not even a cabinet member any more. butl— he's not even a cabinet member any more, but i think they made it clear he doesn't — more, but i think they made it clear he doesn't tend to be proactive in the government. making sure that brexit— the government. making sure that brexit appears to be as... everyone says these — brexit appears to be as... everyone says these things are being held to the fire _ says these things are being held to the fire i_ says these things are being held to the fire. i think business will be looking — the fire. i think business will be looking very hard to see what he is able to deliver. gk, looking very hard to see what he is able to deliver.— going to interrupt you. 30 seconds, kate. 0ne billing town homes outside the capital. this kate. one billing town homes outside the caital. , , ., ., the capital. this is all about eo - le the capital. this is all about people moving _ the capital. this is all about people moving to _ the capital. this is all about people moving to the - the capital. this is all about i people moving to the country.
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the capital. this is all about - people moving to the country. we'll see if those house prices hold their value once the city stabilises again. value once the city stabilises aaain. ., , , value once the city stabilises a.ain_ ., , , ., value once the city stabilises aiain. ., , , ., , value once the city stabilises aain. ., , ., again. perhaps a little bit more next time- _ again. perhaps a little bit more next time. thank _ again. perhaps a little bit more next time. thank you _ again. perhaps a little bit more next time. thank you both - again. perhaps a little bit more - next time. thank you both very much. that's it for this hour. kate and jonathan will be back 11.30 for another look at the papers. goodbye for now. can you hear me? hello? yes, can you hear me? are you muted? no, are you frozen? all i'm getting is me back. i can hear me. hang on...
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sorry! hang on! what have you done? have you dropped the phone? yeah, sorry. i can hear you now. hello? you've got me? yes, there we go. i'm more used to talking to you like this than in real life now. yeah, and i'm more used to talking to you while you're walking up and down wherever you're going. did you know that a fifth of all zoom meetings last year took place while people were walking and running? and i reckon that's all you. all me — just think of the steps! but many people have been doing it a bit more horizontally. don't know what you're talking about! but listen, love �*em or hate �*em, these platforms really have kept us together during these tough times, haven't they? and i don't think they're going away any time soon. it is some way towards seeing people properly, but of course, it's not the same, especially with strangers, it can be a bit awkward. yeah, you think of the people that have joined the click team in the last couple of years. i mean, for a long time, they didn't know how tall we were, they'd only ever seen us from the waist up, they couldn't enjoy our sparkling company in person!
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lara chuckles but this is something

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