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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 12, 2022 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

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hello. this is bbc news with me, annita mcveigh. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines — us presidentjoe biden warns russian leader vladamir putin that he'll respond with "severe economic sanctions" if ukraine is invaded. as russian military drills continue with belarus, the kremlin has accused the west of "hysteria". meanwhile, the ukrainian president warns against creating panic. the best friend for enemies — that is panic in our country. and all this information, that helps only for panic. it doesn't help us. police in paris fire tear gas to clear demonstrators protesting against the government's covid restrictions. doctors say thousands more lives could be saved by paying attention to earlier symptoms of heart attacks. a new campaign to spot the signs
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is launched by nhs england. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are kate maltby, columnist for the i and chair of the theatre critics circle, and jonathan walker, political editor at the birmingham mail. i'll be speaking to them in just a moment. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the sunday express says brexit�*s big wins are coming soon. that's according to new brexit opportunities ministerjacob rees—mogg, who's been speaking to the paper. the sunday telegraph claims russia is planning a "false flag" attack as a pretext for an invasion of ukraine as soon as wednesday. the sunday times leads with comments from the defence secretary, ben wallace, who's likened western efforts to counter russian
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aggression against ukraine to appeasement before world war ii. the independent has president biden calling on russia to pull its troops back. its front page also marks the occasion of chelsea becoming football's world champions. the sunday mirror quotes a source as saying that murderer levi bellfield's alleged confession to carrying out the murders of lin and megan russell was, in the paper's words, "a sickjoke". the people says a book by prince harry due to be published later this year will contain criticism of his stepmother the duchess of cornwall. and the mail on sunday also leads with the royal family. the paper says prince charles and his wife camilla plan to be crowned in a small—scale, cut—price coronation. so, let's begin. we start with the sunday times. this has the width of munich is the headline at the top of the front
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page. bill wallace likens desperate western efforts to prevent russian invasion to appeasement. take us through this, jonathan. the invasion to appeasement. take us through this, jonathan. the sunday times is reporting _ through this, jonathan. the sunday times is reporting that _ through this, jonathan. the sunday times is reporting that the - through this, jonathan. the sunday times is reporting that the defence secretary is saying there is a whiff of munich in the air in terms of efforts by the west basically to prevent russia from invading ukraine. a lot of tomorrow's papers are writing of the situation in ukraine and the belief that russia may launch some sort of invasion quite shortly. we don't know if that's going to happen, we have to wait to see if that comes true, but ben wallace is comparing the dramatic response so far to the run—up to a ward would of course the allies allowed adolf hitler to invade and take control of part of slovakia. and the application is diplomacy is not working and he does
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not believe it is lucky to prevent conflict, that's not entirely certain from this report what he thinks should be happening instead. he's usually referring things that happen at some point in the past, for example in 2014 when russia invaded crimea and perhaps he is arguing that the response by the west at that point was not good enough. but in terms of what the west can actually do today to be tougher with russia than it is, i'm not sure that ben wallace makes that clear. we do know that us president and the french president and others had been speaking to vladimir putin today and issued some really tough warnings about the impact if russia does invade ukraine but the fact is the western powers, the uk, the us and the rest of europe are not willing to directly get involved in this conflict and are not willing to send troops to fight for ukraine and given that that's a fact, what this bill haas want people to do? let’s bill haas want people to do? let's ick u- on bill haas want people to do? let's pick up on the _ bill haas want people to do? let's pick up on the telegraph with the lead also ukraine and the red line
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russia plus false flag attack to provoke mortals of that was a phrase used byjake provoke mortals of that was a phrase used by jake sullivan, provoke mortals of that was a phrase used byjake sullivan, the national security visor for president biden in that white house news conference yesterday. it's also the understanding according to the telegraph of the uk government as well that there may be a false flag, a pretext, a pretence that ukraine has done something to start a war. tell us a little bit more about what the sunday telegraph is saying and does it address the issue of the sort of rhetoric that we are hearing from the west versus the diplomatic efforts that are happening? yes. efforts that are happening? yes, well this is _ efforts that are happening? yes, well this is a _ efforts that are happening? yes, well this is a story _ efforts that are happening? yes, well this is a story that _ efforts that are happening? yes, well this is a story that we - efforts that are happening? yes, well this is a story that we have heard _ well this is a story that we have heard it — well this is a story that we have heard it said before. the first talk about a _ heard it said before. the first talk about a potential false flag operation came last week or about ten days— operation came last week or about ten days ago, and it is extraordinary because as many others have pointed out, secret services don't _ have pointed out, secret services don't normally like to tell the world — don't normally like to tell the world how much they know about the other_ world how much they know about the other countries they are monitoring.
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because _ other countries they are monitoring. because it _ other countries they are monitoring. because it reveals where your sources — because it reveals where your sources are, but the fact that the us and _ sources are, but the fact that the us and uk— sources are, but the fact that the us and uk have chosen to publicise this suggests that they take it very seriously and that they are not sure what else _ seriously and that they are not sure what else other than calling food in poplar _ what else other than calling food in poplar bluff they can do about it. there _ poplar bluff they can do about it. there are — poplar bluff they can do about it. there are questions being raised about— there are questions being raised about whether those of us who don't have the _ about whether those of us who don't have the resources of the secret service — have the resources of the secret service can... there are about whether— service can... there are about whether or— service can... there are about whether or not we should believe this whether we should take the us ally seriously by the it's really important to point out here that false _ important to point out here that false flag — important to point out here that false flag operations are prudent's stock— false flag operations are prudent's stock in _ false flag operations are prudent's stock in trade particularly in his own— stock in trade particularly in his own country over the course of his lon- own country over the course of his long regime. there have been a number— long regime. there have been a number of— long regime. there have been a number of terrorist incidents frankly— number of terrorist incidents frankly leading to the deaths of marry— frankly leading to the deaths of marry of— frankly leading to the deaths of many of his own people were there have since — many of his own people were there have since been quite serious questions _ have since been quite serious questions raised about what the regime — questions raised about what the regime knew in advance with the primitive — regime knew in advance with the primitive and advanced and wishing to have _ primitive and advanced and wishing to have immediately allowed the
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kremlin— to have immediately allowed the kremlin to then impose new restrictions on the people and wrap up restrictions on the people and wrap up nationalist tall. and i think as far as _ up nationalist tall. and i think as far as the — up nationalist tall. and i think as far as the rhetoric goes, there is an awful— far as the rhetoric goes, there is an awful lot— far as the rhetoric goes, there is an awful lot of really inflammatory rhetoric _ an awful lot of really inflammatory rhetoric flying around, and i do think— rhetoric flying around, and i do think is— rhetoric flying around, and i do think is really important if someone says on— think is really important if someone says on this — think is really important if someone says on this programme right at the top of— says on this programme right at the top of the _ says on this programme right at the top of the amber you had a very good report on— top of the amber you had a very good report on this subject but there was comments — report on this subject but there was comments quite understandably from leading _ comments quite understandably from leading figure in the kremlin regime who was— leading figure in the kremlin regime who was spouting the most appalling propaganda about previous russian incursions — propaganda about previous russian incursions into ukraine being somehow a russian attempt to reimpose — somehow a russian attempt to reimpose democracy. he is talking about— reimpose democracy. he is talking about or— reimpose democracy. he is talking about or alluding to the overthrow of a russian appeasing government at the end _ of a russian appeasing government at the end of— of a russian appeasing government at the end of 2013 and 2014 because ukrainian — the end of 2013 and 2014 because ukrainian people took to the streets to reject _ ukrainian people took to the streets to reject the russian yoke. that's at the _ to reject the russian yoke. that's at the same thing as anyone or certainly— at the same thing as anyone or certainly not the west trying to
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overthrow the natural democratic yearnings— overthrow the natural democratic yearnings of the ukrainian people to have their— yearnings of the ukrainian people to have their lives run by russia. and i have their lives run by russia. and i find it— have their lives run by russia. and i find it really said that we are beginning to hear these kind of straightforward kremlin propaganda mouthpieces all over the news at the moment _ mouthpieces all over the news at the moment. ~ ., mouthpieces all over the news at the moment. ~ . ., , , ., ~ , , moment. ukraine inevitably takes up man of moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the — moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the front _ moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the front page, _ moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the front page, but - moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the front page, but not - moment. ukraine inevitably takes up many of the front page, but not in i many of the front page, but not in actually not the daily mailjust yet but we are going to go back to stick with the front page of the telegraph in fact on the story about the prime minister rolling back the state or will roll to stay and trust the people, says the headline on the front page of the sunday telegraph. jonathan, as we discussed earlier, i guess rolling back the state has the advantage for the treasury of saving money, which clearly they want to do in government having spent so much for dealing with a pandemic, but i just wonder how the idea of rolling back the state fits with that other state to date with the government of
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leveling up. state to date with the government of levelin: u -. , ., ., ., leveling up. yes, i mean we are not uuite leveling up. yes, i mean we are not quite clear— leveling up. yes, i mean we are not quite clear how _ leveling up. yes, i mean we are not quite clear how much _ leveling up. yes, i mean we are not. quite clear how much damage covenant has done to the finances of the government but it is pretty clear the chancellor and he is keen to find ways to save money. boris johnson by contrast is traditionally being a spender. he enjoys spending money and leveling up is part of this. leveling up is not all about splashing around cash but partly about devolution, devolving powers to local authorities, but i think part of it is big infrastructure projects, railroads, that sort of thing getting money up to the north and the midlands and here we hear from stephen barclay, the new chief of staff or borisjohnson, that there is going to be a return to a different sort of conservatism to restore a smaller state, and this does appear to be a bit of a change of direction from the government if he is right and what he is saying.
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and you have to ask yourself what is it happening? is it possibly because the prime minister is in deep trouble as we all know and he is trying to shore up his position in the conservative party and he needs to appeal to the side of the party, stephen barclay�*s side of the party, the sort of small state brexit side of the party even though boris himself is a brexit supporter, he is a different politician in other respects. he aims to a back support from tory mps and give him a bit more leverage and a bit of a small statist. ~ ., ., , ., more leverage and a bit of a small statist. ~ . ., , ., ., statist. what do you think the intent is with _ statist. what do you think the intent is with pushing - statist. what do you think the intent is with pushing this - statist. what do you think the | intent is with pushing this idea out? it intent is with pushing this idea out? , , , ., out? it is still 'ust loading an idea, as out? it is stilljust loading an idea, as onset, _ out? it is stilljust loading an idea, as onset, and - out? it is stilljust loading an idea, as onset, and i - out? it is stilljust loading an idea, as onset, and i agree l out? it is stilljust loading an i idea, as onset, and i agree with everything — idea, as onset, and i agree with everything we just heard. boris's problem — everything we just heard. boris's problem is — everything we just heard. boris's problem is actually ideologically he has very— problem is actually ideologically he has very little in common with the kind of— has very little in common with the kind of pro— has very little in common with the kind of pro brexit wing. they are all kinds of— kind of pro brexit wing. they are all kinds of evil in the tory party
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to support — all kinds of evil in the tory party to support brexit but the majority of those — to support brexit but the majority of those in the parliamentary party are also— of those in the parliamentary party are also from this very small state, libertarian — are also from this very small state, libertarian wing. and they expect boris _ libertarian wing. and they expect boris to— libertarian wing. and they expect boris to be their champion because they agree — boris to be their champion because they agree with him on breaks but they agree with him on breaks but the spending patterns all through his premiership have been basically those _ his premiership have been basically those of— his premiership have been basically those of gordon brown. so we shall see whether he can actually realign himself. _ see whether he can actually realign himself, which will be a shift. let's — himself, which will be a shift. let's move on then to the daily mail which i mentioned earlier. 0ne let's move on then to the daily mail which i mentioned earlier. one of the papers is not having any mention of ukraine on the front and its lead story is prince of wales's plans for a scaled—down coronation in the moment that will submit his wife's place in history, charles and camilla to be crowned side by side and then extensive coverage there inside the paper on what is called operation golden or. do you want to begin on this one, jonathan? for a lona time begin on this one, jonathan? for a long time we _ begin on this one, jonathan? for a long time we thought _ begin on this one, jonathan? for a long time we thought maybe - begin on this one, jonathan? fr?" —. long time we thought maybe camilla would never be queen, that she would
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just be known as a princess but this all goes back to the general line of affection people held for princess diana and people would ever except camilla is going. but it became very clear when the queen herself said she wished that camilla would be queen that the whole family belief in this has changed. and what we are seeing in today's daily mail is people talking, and is not clear exactly in the mail is inevitably somebody who knows what they are talking about, is involved in the process is speaking to them about the coronation and paving the way in a sense for the idea that camilla will be clean and we should be used to that. and it is quite interesting that the royal family is talking and preparing for the succession. her majesty is 95 years old, and she clearly wants to prepare for the
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future and that's what she is doing. and a word from you on this was of the male does point out my front page there is no suggestion that there is anything wrong with the queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started _ queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started seeing _ queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started seeing a _ queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started seeing a lot - queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started seeing a lot of- queen, that she is unwell. yes we have started seeing a lot of the i have started seeing a lot of the stories— have started seeing a lot of the stories about what the future might look like _ stories about what the future might look like for the royal family and 'ust look like for the royal family and just earlier this week there was also a — just earlier this week there was also a story about how prince charles — also a story about how prince charles i_ also a story about how prince charles i realise finally that it would — charles i realise finally that it would be right for him to live in buckingham palace if he became the monarch— buckingham palace if he became the monarch despite in the past he suggested he did not particularly like it _ suggested he did not particularly like it so — suggested he did not particularly like it. so there is a conversation happeninq — like it. so there is a conversation happening with the next rain and the next monarch and it is hard to ignore — next monarch and it is hard to ignore the _ next monarch and it is hard to ignore the fact that this is all beginning to happen as the queen has towards _ beginning to happen as the queen has towards the age of 95 and when i find interesting about this story in a minutes— find interesting about this story in a minutes clearly briefed as a positive — a minutes clearly briefed as a positive story about prince charles and there — positive story about prince charles and there is a lot if you read the full write — and there is a lot if you read the full write up about how aggressive his vision— full write up about how aggressive his vision of the coronation is an a lot about — his vision of the coronation is an a lot about how humble he is. whoever
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is breathing _ lot about how humble he is. whoever is breathing on his behalf is really trying to— is breathing on his behalf is really trying to stress he does not want to much _ trying to stress he does not want to much puppet ceremony and will not dress _ much puppet ceremony and will not dress a _ much puppet ceremony and will not dress a quite as much as others and that is— dress a quite as much as others and that is the _ dress a quite as much as others and that is the lines there are very clear but _ that is the lines there are very clear. but there is a problem with the coronation... just clear. but there is a problem with the coronation. . ._ clear. but there is a problem with the coronation... just finished that thou . ht the coronation... just finished that thought very _ the coronation... just finished that thought very briefly. _ the coronation... just finished that thought very briefly. the _ the coronation... just finished that thought very briefly. the house i the coronation... just finished that thought very briefly. the house of| thought very briefly. the house of lords is expanding _ thought very briefly. the house of lords is expanding so _ thought very briefly. the house of lords is expanding so much i thought very briefly. the house of lords is expanding so much and i thought very briefly. the house of. lords is expanding so much and the number— lords is expanding so much and the number of— lords is expanding so much and the number of life appears to be expended so much since the next coronation. — expended so much since the next coronation, that we don't know or see that _ coronation, that we don't know or see that being addressed yet and the new plans _ see that being addressed yet and the new lans. , ., , i. new plans. sorry to interrupt you but 'ust new plans. sorry to interrupt you but just as _ new plans. sorry to interrupt you but just as you — new plans. sorry to interrupt you but just as you refinishing - new plans. sorry to interrupt you butjust as you refinishing that i butjust as you refinishing that thought because we are out of time. kate from the i and jonathan from the birmingham mail, the you both very much for your thoughts and that is it for the papers this evening and goodbye for now.
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hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. i'mjane hill, and to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode, as ever. hi again, mark. what have you been watching? very mixed bag. we have death on the nile. hercule poirot and his moustache are back. we have an animated documentary, flee. and marry me — what happens when a pop star marries a fan? death on the nile. kenneth branagh's been busy. he has. this was shot in 2019, and it's been delayed because of covid. and then, of course, belfast has come out, done incredibly well with audiences and done incredibly well with awards voters, so it's a bit odd this is coming out now. it's directed by branagh, it stars branagh as hercule poirot. the story is, he's on the nile,
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there's a steamer. it is full of a variety show cast list of people,

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