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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 17, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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the us secretary of state has ramped up warnings of an imminent russian attack on ukraine — as the un security council met in new york. he said russia should announce with no qualification, that it will not invade ukraine. satellite images show an increase in russian troops on the ukraine border. russia continues to insist it has no plans to invade and says its withdrawn some military equipment. more than 100 people have now died, in landslides and flooding in brazil. nearly a month's worth of rain fell in a matter of hours. the search for survivors in the mud and debris — is continuing. a new york state judge has ruled that former us president donald trump, his son donald jr. and his daughter ivanka must comply with subpoenas to testify in a probe by state attorney general letitia james into trump's business practices.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are sienna rodgers of labourlist and sebastian payne, whitehall editor of the financial times. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the daily express headline — storm of the century as the uk is put on red alert, as storm eunice approaches. the daily mail fears winds of up to 100mph could bring flying debris and endanger lives. many schools are closing as a precaution. the i paper says millions of people are urged to stay at home, with the army being placed on emergency standby. the financial times covers the ongoing crisis in ukraine. president biden warns russia may invade the country within several days. the times says moscow is building up its forces along the border before an attack on ukraine.
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boris johnson describes the situation as �*very grim'. the daily telegraph writes putin could attempt a false flag operation — which could give the kremlin an excuse to invade. a mirror investigation claims thousands of elderly residents were forced out of private care homes, in social care collapse. and the guardian features team gb sliding onto the podium at the winter olympics. the men's curling team have guaranteed themselves at least silver after winning their semi—final win. gold their semi—final win. is possible. gold theirsemi—finalwin. is possible. let's gold their semi—final win. is possible. let's start with the gold is possible. let's start with the papers and most of them developed through them focused on the arrival of storm eunice. i was big to be received by the presenter who suggested that in the west coast it could come towards dawn or certainly the middle of the night. uk braces for stinging jet storm. sebastian from the financial time, i want to ask about the weather but i
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will ask you as the whitehall editor how essential government deals with nonpolitical crises like theirs. in the last half—hour you ask me about this thing and now i can. i'm going to do that for one moment before we go on to disaster planning within the british state. this is why the storm is going to be particularly problematic, due to a very intense gust of wind that happens very rarely come it's about 30 miles in its length and only last for a couple of hours. the last time this was seen was from the great storm of 1987. that is of course why this is being described as many of the big just tomorrow as they were storm within 30 years. all the hatches are being battened down at the moment. red alert for wales in the southwest of england and amber alerts for the rest of the country. you asked me about disaster planning in whitehall and the prime minister called a meeting of cobra which is nothing to do with snakes but is the cabinet office briefing room. and it's a
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0ffice briefing room. and it's a briefing room where all the kind of top figures within the british skate did not state gather at any time a crisis with the head of the military who are on standby, transport secretary because all trains in wales have been cancelled and the fact that all the civilians and armed forces are ready to help with this potential consequence of the storm put up as you say, expected to lend about dawn. tomorrow morning is can be very blustery indeed for the whole of the country. in those parts with red warning schools are closed, everyone�*s been urges a home, i think it's the daily star that says tomorrow if those people have to pay to pay on they should not venture out tomorrow given the likely storm that's going to happen. it's going to be a very worrying time. all aspects of the state are ready for this but i think the last time we start storm like this was about 30 to 40 start storm like this was about 30 to a0 deaths. you can understand why so many elements of the state are concerned by it. we
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so many elements of the state are concerned by it.— concerned by it. we miss the daily star. concerned by it. we miss the daily star- thank _ concerned by it. we miss the daily star. thank you _ concerned by it. we miss the daily star. thank you for _ concerned by it. we miss the daily star. thank you for your _ concerned by it. we miss the daily l star. thank you for your explanation of stinging jet for the time very well spent. as we look at these papers it's interesting, they having to predict something which by the time the people read those papers in the morning will be hitting them perhaps see the storm in the front doors. how good are we in the uk act dealing with storms? i doors. how good are we in the uk act dealing with storms?— dealing with storms? i hope we are excellent at — dealing with storms? i hope we are excellent at covering _ dealing with storms? i hope we are excellent at covering them. - dealing with storms? i hope we are excellent at covering them. this i dealing with storms? i hope we are excellent at covering them. this is | excellent at covering them. this is why it's _ excellent at covering them. this is why it's so — excellent at covering them. this is why it's so important so that people can get— why it's so important so that people can get their newspapers before tomorrow when the storm is actually going _ tomorrow when the storm is actually going to _ tomorrow when the storm is actually going to be — tomorrow when the storm is actually going to be happening. in terms of the country— going to be happening. in terms of the country and how it deals with these _ the country and how it deals with these things, it is a bit of a running _ these things, it is a bit of a running joke in british life that as soon _ running joke in british life that as soon as_ running joke in british life that as soon as it — running joke in british life that as soon as it is _ running joke in british life that as soon as it is a bit of rain or cloud passes— soon as it is a bit of rain or cloud passes over_ soon as it is a bit of rain or cloud passes over us and there is massive disruption _ passes over us and there is massive disruption to— passes over us and there is massive disruption to travel. difficult to deal_ disruption to travel. difficult to deal with— disruption to travel. difficult to deal with and may say something about— deal with and may say something about our— deal with and may say something about our infrastructure. yes, we've seen _ about our infrastructure. yes, we've seen this— about our infrastructure. yes, we've
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seen this storms week dudley fallen trees, _ seen this storms week dudley fallen trees, people left without power, tens of— trees, people left without power, tens of thousands of people without power _ tens of thousands of people without power and _ tens of thousands of people without power and this storm eunice coming tomorrow— power and this storm eunice coming tomorrow is — power and this storm eunice coming tomorrow is going to be worse. this rare red _ tomorrow is going to be worse. this rare red alert — tomorrow is going to be worse. this rare red alert and people are being told they— rare red alert and people are being told they are doors and windows should _ told they are doors and windows should be — told they are doors and windows should be close properly, they should — should be close properly, they should secure loose objects and absolutely do not conduct any repairs — absolutely do not conduct any repairs of _ absolutely do not conduct any repairs of the storm is happening, work— repairs of the storm is happening, work from — repairs of the storm is happening, work from home, avoid travel if you can. work from home, avoid travel if you can don't _ work from home, avoid travel if you can. don't pose for any selfies along — can. don't pose for any selfies along coastlines, don't pose for a drarnatic— along coastlines, don't pose for a dramatic picture because it looks like it— dramatic picture because it looks like it could be comparable to the kind of— like it could be comparable to the kind of storm scene in 1990. as we were _ kind of storm scene in 1990. as we were discussing earlier in 1997 when peopie _ were discussing earlier in 1997 when people died and billions of pounds worth— people died and billions of pounds worth of— people died and billions of pounds worth of damage was caused. | worth of damage was caused. i remember the 1987 storm weather was no warning not to pose for selfies, a different era they are. the times,
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the international story we've been covering for days and days now, there is a picture of the prime minister in a tightjet, raf in lincolnshire not wearing a flights suit as tom cruise or george w. bush. but the headline made for whitehall convinced putin is about to invade. sebastian payne, how do you see a? i to invade. sebastian payne, how do ou see a? ~ to invade. sebastian payne, how do you see a?— you see a? i think i'm very glad to see that boris _ you see a? i think i'm very glad to see that boris johnson _ you see a? i think i'm very glad to see that boris johnson did - you see a? i think i'm very glad to see that boris johnson did not - you see a? i think i'm very glad to see that boris johnson did not try | see that borisjohnson did not try to do a tom cruise and present when he was visiting an raf base today. what you see in this front story today does suggest the real concern of the misinformation campaign going on by russia at the moment. they put out these images and videos of the past couple of days that seem to show tanks and troops being withdrawn from the ukrainian border adding a bit of hope that they may not invade. but the intelligent sources and the fact that this is being briefed from senior whitehall officials suggest that britain does
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see the situation is incredibly serious. you don't want that headline if it's not backed up by reality. the fact is, we've heard from borisjohnson and reality. the fact is, we've heard from boris johnson and joe reality. the fact is, we've heard from borisjohnson and joe biden as well as their deputies that they think vladimir putin is still very likely to invade even though it was building up to a crescendo, it seemed to subside a little bit with that slight window for diplomacy. that seems to have now closed. we've seen the disastrous pictures of schilling's data being described as false flag operations by the prime minister where a school in the eastern region of ukraine was sheued eastern region of ukraine was shelled and children had to be moved out of the way i think you're going to see lots more of the skirmishes in the coming days, whether this leads to a full on invasion or not. this is all part of russia's idea do not have clarity because they want to give some pretence to potentially invade. that's what all the whitehall sources are saying on the front page of the ft. there's things are never clear, there's always a
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question, not necessarily russian troops. so i think a couple of more of these could point to an invasion but i think the uk, the us and nato are still desperately hoping there is a diplomatic solution here. i do feel that window is closing for the briefings like this does suggest unfortunately, it could be a pretty bad outcome to the situation which could have disastrous consequences for the people of ukraine, thousands, tens of thousands of deaths but also much wider questions for european security and how there was reacts to us and how interred russia response.— was reacts to us and how interred russia response. there is an article talkin: russia response. there is an article talking about _ russia response. there is an article talking about ukraine _ russia response. there is an article talking about ukraine on _ russia response. there is an article talking about ukraine on this - russia response. there is an article talking about ukraine on this from | talking about ukraine on this from the new york times talking about younger people who might be under 30 not knowing war in europe, not remembering the cold war, perhaps the war in bosnia. 0ff remembering the cold war, perhaps the war in bosnia. off the top of the war in bosnia. off the top of the papers we don't declare each other�*s ages but yet we found out he just there's age is a little earlier on with that story and the telegraph of the wonder would you speak to people of your generation whether
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there is that sense of hasn't been at war and the first time a younger generation is a sink that prospect albeit in these? it’s generation is a sink that prospect albeit in these?— albeit in these? it's certainly true for --eole albeit in these? it's certainly true for people my — albeit in these? it's certainly true for people my age. _ albeit in these? it's certainly true for people my age, people - albeit in these? it's certainly true for people my age, people under| albeit in these? it's certainly true i for people my age, people under 30 it seemed _ for people my age, people under 30 it seemed as if war has been, in terms _ it seemed as if war has been, in terms of— it seemed as if war has been, in terms of actual warfare quite distant~ _ terms of actual warfare quite distant~ i_ terms of actual warfare quite distant. i suppose the caveat is that obviously everything that happened around 911, the war on terror, _ happened around 911, the war on terror, iraq— happened around 911, the war on terror, iraq and afghanistan, that was intensely political and a lot of the people that i know were marching, even if you were very young, — marching, even if you were very young, against those wars. there was so much _ young, against those wars. there was so much debate around that. there were _ so much debate around that. there were restrictions on travel and things— were restrictions on travel and things like that. so did change our lives _ things like that. so did change our lives yes. — things like that. so did change our lives yes. i— things like that. so did change our lives. yes, ithink things like that. so did change our lives. yes, i think this will be very different because we know that we are _ very different because we know that we are incredibly reliant in terms of our— we are incredibly reliant in terms of our energy, we are ready have an energy— of our energy, we are ready have an energy crisis —
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of our energy, we are ready have an energy crisis. that kind of thing —— god forbid — energy crisis. that kind of thing -- god forbid ---_ energy crisis. that kind of thing -- god forbid --. , , , god forbid --. under “umping because ou're l in: god forbid --. under “umping because we lying cut _ god forbid --. under “umping because you're lying cut out. _ god forbid --. underjumping because you're lying cut out. without - you're lying cut out. without one—word in three of the will go back to sebastian's paper, the financial times was up a story i thought was written by him and he assures me it wasn't. he did mention the red wall and i assume you write everything about the redwall but it turns out others do as well. take us throu . h turns out others do as well. take us through it- — turns out others do as well. take us through it. this _ turns out others do as well. take us through it. this is _ turns out others do as well. take us through it. this is a _ turns out others do as well. take us through it. this is a fascinating - through it. this is a fascinating tale that does involve the redwall of course which makes a great interest in what's can happen in the next election in 202a. the idea of a pact has been talked about for quite a long time for those who are frustrated by the fact that labour has not won an election over the last five general elections. the story that we run our enough paper tomorrow suggest that in informal, below the radar pack might be taking
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place this is not a formal coalition it all and this is not standing down candidates. but if you look at some of the by elections we had last year, this is already been tried out in north shop schreier with a lib dems took that see from the tories without an agent 20 points for that that's because labour pulled back a bit, it may didn't put all the resources it all the money you would normally expect the party and adviser verse or in spinning west yorkshire, liberal democrats didn't go full throttle there either. both parties seem to have knowledge behind the scenes, this is quite a good thing. and it is as you carve a part of england say the lib dems and some of those more prosperous tory seats in the south, you go for those ones. everyone's running candidates everywhere but that you go all the way. for labelled we will pull back and some of the other. that gives a progressive alliance with up which is not allowing the left wing vote to be split and make it easier to beat the tories. and keir starmer
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is, allies of keir starmer should say, quoted that the labour leader is fully focused on trying to win. if that requires doing some kind of deal with the lib dems and so be it. we don't have voted will feel about this because they don't like being pushed into a corner of being told about a particular way. also legal questions. if you look at this very carefully but i was the conservative party look at the story i would certainly be quite worried because one of the stories in the last election is the right wing boat was not split, right to party weren't a big deal but on the left it was split between labour, lib dems and also the green party and the smp and applied camry as well. it's a bit more united, a much bigger challenge for borisjohnson. more united, a much bigger challenge for boris johnson.— for boris johnson. because you covered that _ for boris johnson. because you covered that in _ for boris johnson. because you covered that in such _ for boris johnson. because you covered that in such depth - for boris johnson. because you covered that in such depth i. for boris johnson. because you l covered that in such depth i want for boris johnson. because you - covered that in such depth i want to move to the next story in the mirror. a mirror investigation, inhumane says the front page of the mirror. thousands of elderly
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residents kicked out in tsunami of private care home closures. these stories across page four and five of the paper. stories across page four and five of the -a er. , stories across page four and five of the --aer. , , ., ,., stories across page four and five of the “aen , , ., ,., ., the paper. this stories about how 56% of the paper. this stories about how 5696 of hospital _ the paper. this stories about how 5696 of hospital patients - the paper. this stories about how 5696 of hospital patients have - the paper. this stories about how. 5696 of hospital patients have been 56% of hospital patients have been fit for _ 56% of hospital patients have been fit for discharge have not been able to leave _ fit for discharge have not been able to leave because there's no social care in place for them. really, this is a story— care in place for them. really, this is a story going back to something that we _ is a story going back to something that we are — is a story going back to something that we are already talking about last year— that we are already talking about last year an awful lot because the government did announce some social care policies— government did announce some social care policies finally after saying that it — care policies finally after saying that it had a ready—made plan for social— that it had a ready—made plan for social care — that it had a ready—made plan for social care when boris johnson was on the _ social care when boris johnson was on the steps of downing street. what they've _ on the steps of downing street. what they've announced so far, it will address— they've announced so far, it will address this crisis officially, i think— address this crisis officially, i think it's _ address this crisis officially, i think it's fair to say. nhs and social— think it's fair to say. nhs and social care _ think it's fair to say. nhs and social care levy will be coming in soon _ social care levy will be coming in soon it _ social care levy will be coming in soon it will— social care levy will be coming in soon it will be seeing on our pace labs is _ soon it will be seeing on our pace labs is ruk— soon it will be seeing on our pace labs is ruk largely going towards the nhs — labs is ruk largely going towards the nhs rather than do social care. certainly— the nhs rather than do social care. certainly for the first few years that's — certainly for the first few years that's guaranteed that it doesn't seem _ that's guaranteed that it doesn't seem as — that's guaranteed that it doesn't seem as if the nhs is never to be
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saying _ seem as if the nhs is never to be saying we — seem as if the nhs is never to be saying we are fine in terms of cash, we don't _ saying we are fine in terms of cash, we don't need so much we don't see that happening. is it one particular quote _ that happening. is it one particular quote i_ that happening. is it one particular quote i found encapsulated some of the problems is that he like carol said i_ the problems is that he like carol said i get— the problems is that he like carol said i get local supermarket by someone — said i get local supermarket by someone who used to be my care the next senior— someone who used to be my care the next senior care. she was doing more money— next senior care. she was doing more money pushing someone's shopping on a conveyor— money pushing someone's shopping on a conveyor belt. this story in the trade _ a conveyor belt. this story in the trade union. _ a conveyor belt. this story in the trade union, talking about how this is a question of workers being treated — is a question of workers being treated well, the pain conditions are just — treated well, the pain conditions are just not good enough and social care _ are just not good enough and social care that's— are just not good enough and social care. that's part of the reason there's— care. that's part of the reason there's so— care. that's part of the reason there's so many vacancies leading to these _ there's so many vacancies leading to these problems. we there's so many vacancies leading to these problems.— these problems. we look at a different story _ these problems. we look at a different story now. - these problems. we look at a different story now. in - these problems. we look at a different story now. in the - these problems. we look at a l different story now. in the daily telegraph we've been talking about age and different generations and now we have some way of calibrating it all because of the front page is a story which certainly great did my
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attention. brains work until we turned 60 is the headline in the daily telegraph. sebastian, is as good or bad news? very good news, i think. the idea that peoples brains fall off a cliff when their 20 is not something anyone would be particularly happy about. this new research which is much more comprehensive than previous studies in cognitive ability as people age suggest that people hit their peak mental power at the age of 30 two that you! i am at the age of 30 two that you! i am a couple years on the other side of 30. good to know him in the peak mental capacity for the papers. essentially you're at that level and that remains constant until you're 60. when you get 60 according to this, you don't drop off a cliff but your response times do start to lesson a little bit. this goes against past studies that suggest that you hit your peak at 20 and it was a gradual slope from there. this covers about 1.5 million people. it's a very comprehensive study and isaac it's good to know that people are working longer and working more
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intensejobs towards are working longer and working more intense jobs towards the end of their careers, their cognitive ability remain sharp at that point. says there's no drop offjust about response time, overwhelmingly a good thing. to response time, overwhelmingly a good thin. .,, , ., ., ~::, thing. to stick up for the over 60s, david attenborough, _ thing. to stick up for the over 60s, david attenborough, the _ thing. to stick up for the over 60s, david attenborough, the queen, i thing. to stick up for the over 60s, | david attenborough, the queen, the pope, there are plenty, notjust over 60, over80 pope, there are plenty, notjust over 60, over 80 who seem to be doing pretty good work and doing pretty good cognitive abilities how would they do with the story? i think it would deal with it okay. 60—year—olds were found to be as mentally— 60—year—olds were found to be as mentally sharp as 30—year—olds. but their response times were found to fall and _ their response times were found to fall and the researchers said that this is— fall and the researchers said that this is because adults become more cautious— this is because adults become more cautious in— this is because adults become more cautious in their decision—making with age. — cautious in their decision—making with age, which is interesting. there — with age, which is interesting. there is— with age, which is interesting. there is also extra hope added because — there is also extra hope added because it says a separate study shows _ because it says a separate study shows that 50 minute bouts of exercise. _ shows that 50 minute bouts of exercise, just walking, doesn't have to be _ exercise, just walking, doesn't have to be a _ exercise, just walking, doesn't have to be a spin— exercise, just walking, doesn't have to be a spin class or something, can improve _ to be a spin class or something, can improve retention and memory. not
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all hope _ improve retention and memory. not all hope is _ improve retention and memory. not all hope is lost with up it's really quite _ all hope is lost with up it's really quite positive story.— quite positive story. lastly, back to the times. _ quite positive story. lastly, back to the times. while _ quite positive story. lastly, back to the times. while the - quite positive story. lastly, back to the times. while the bites - quite positive story. lastly, back. to the times. while the bites back after ta ke—off to the times. while the bites back after take—off roasting. i have not seen the great british big for some extraordinary reason for the tickets to the story briefly. you extraordinary reason for the tickets to the story briefly.— to the story briefly. you must be the last person _ to the story briefly. you must be the last person who _ to the story briefly. you must be the last person who hasn't - to the story briefly. you must be the last person who hasn't seen| the last person who hasn't seen great british break tonight decor. made some comments about one of the nations most favourite tv programmes and he doesn't want it either. and his wife and kids do and said he thought it was comparable to gladiatorial combat. that was not his sort of thing that didn't like when the contestants were lost and pushed out. this prompted a backlash with a writer in the times criticising justin welby for attacking such a great british institution. in return is written to the times with the letter of the front page today and take a break, and have a sense of humour, i was not being serious about it was up
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it's takes not gladiatorial contests was that i think the good thing is that hoping that hopefullyjustin welby will get on board with the great british bake—off and he can joyful what it is. great british bake-off and he can joyful what it is.— joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant _ joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant on _ joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant on the _ joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant on the show- joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant on the show to - joyfulwhat it is. should he be a contestant on the show to get l joyfulwhat it is. should he be a i contestant on the show to get the full experience? bud contestant on the show to get the full experience?— contestant on the show to get the full experience? and woody when? well eah, full experience? and woody when? well yeah. why _ full experience? and woody when? well yeah, why not. _ full experience? and woody when? well yeah, why not. i'll— full experience? and woody when? well yeah, why not. i'll be - full experience? and woody when? well yeah, why not. i'll be honest, | well yeah, why not. i'll be honest, i've stopped watching bake—off. changing — i've stopped watching bake—off. changing channels now, they change everyone _ changing channels now, they change everyone and i don't like it anymore _ everyone and i don't like it anymore. i do much prefer that he said is— anymore. i do much prefer that he said is more — anymore. i do much prefer that he said is more inclined to praise crime — said is more inclined to praise crime drama and i totally agree with him. crime drama and i totally agree with him he's _ crime drama and i totally agree with him. he's recommended line of duty, brilliant _ him. he's recommended line of duty, brilliant actually. it won't say who ages _ brilliant actually. it won't say who ages or— brilliant actually. it won't say who ages or anything. it says people are starting _ ages or anything. it says people are starting to— ages or anything. it says people are starting to watch responder which i really. _ starting to watch responder which i really, really recommend. that's an absolute _ really, really recommend. that's an absolute really complex, well—written i recommend that one. the archbishop of canterbury likes crime dramas. that's what we learn. thank you to you both so much.
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that's it for the papers. the papers will return tomorrow where we will have some guests including tv and radio commentators and junk crickets, education minister of the sunday times. good night. good evening. this is your update from the bbc sport centre. news of team gb's first guaranteed medal at the winter olympics to come but we'll start with football and a brilliant result for rangers tonight, in their europe league knockout round — first leg — away to borussia dortmund. they won a—2 to give themseves a great chance of making the last 16. rangers were 2—nil up by halftime, john lundstrum added a fine third, an own goal made it four—one before raphael guerrero scored another late
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consolation for dortmund, to make the second leg at ibrox next week really interesting. not such good news for celtic though. they lost their europa conference league match 3—1 to the norwegian side bodo glimt. leciester gave the randers the run around this evening — they scored a past the danish side, three of the goals coming in the second half — their last, this from kiernan dewsbury hall, in a a—1win. leicester with the advantage, ahead of the second leg, as they look to qualify for the quarter finals. in middlesbrough, england's women drew theirfirst match, in the inaugural arnold clark cup, which features four of the worlds top ten teams. they were up against canada tonight and took the lead through a really well taken strike from millie bright. canada though got themselves back into it in the second half, an equally well taken goal from janine beckie. 1—1 it finished at the riverside. earlier, it was the same score between the other two teams in the tournament, germany and spain. well, away from that story — today
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has seen a breakthrough for team gb. it took until day 13 but a first medal of these games is now guaranteed. the men's curling team are into the final after beating the united states, and will go for gold on saturday — with silver the least they can win. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss reports. it's taken 13 long days but finally britons has its first medal of the game. a superb performance to beat the defending champions the usa in the semifinals of the curling. it was a really tight, tense affair it ebbed and flowed but it was britain eventually that took control. they led by two going into the final and when usa had theirfinal shot at glory itjust wasn't good enough so britain took the victory. they will now play sweden in the match for the gold medal on saturday. but afterwards you could just see the relief, you could see the delight
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and bruce explain exactly what they're victory meant. the last two weeks or so specially for myself it's been a bit of a roller coaster. so this is very special. i'm just so excited to share the moment with the guys. and that celebration at the end there was just pure elation, i don't think it could happen any other way. yes, what a win. earlier on britain's women made it onto the semifinals and the most dramatic fashion. they knew they had to beat the russian 0lympic committee in theirfinal group match and hope of the results went their way, which is exactly what happened. they are through to the semifinals where they will face sweden. it was a good day for britain in the skiing. 19—year—old zoe is through to the final of the half pipe. she did it in very impressive style qualifying in fourth place her big sister is he won a medal at the last games. can zoe get a medal for herself tomorrow?
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and gus kenworthy is through to the final of the men's event albeit a pretty nail—biting fashion. 12 men went through to the final and he qualified in 12th place but he is through to the final as well. it's obviously been a pretty tough games for britain over the last 12 days or so. but they do have some real medal chances over the last few days. a tearful kamila valieva, the russian figure skater, finished outside the medal places in herfinal event — having been cleared to continue following herfailed drugs test. she produced an uncharecteristic, error—strewn display with multiple falls, finishing in fourth. the event was won by anna scherbakova, also of the russian olympic committee. it means there will be a medal ceremony, with valieva finishing outside the podium places. she tested positive for a banned substance at an event back in december, the result of which was only announced last week, shortly after she won team gold. i mean, the warm—up was solid,
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she was there but she had her team—mates on the ice with her and i thought, "0k, you have learned how to have that solid russian veneer." and of course, you come out and you suddenly see it dissipate. and things were just slightly off. and then, itjust fell apart. 0ne game in superleague tonight, with new warrington coach daryl powell taking on his former club, castleford. it took a few minutes to get going when there was a slight mishap — when the boy bringing on the ball in an electric car twice failed to stop. this was his second go, eventually brought to a halt by the warrington mascot. when the game eventually got under way, it was a fairly comfortable win for the wolves. josh charnley with two tries, 3a—10 the final score. and that's all the sport for now.
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storm eunice is bearing down on the uk. and all indications are this will be a dangerous, disruptive, and damaging storm. in fact, a met office red warning is in force — that means there's a danger to life. the storm system has been developing — you can see it here on the earlier satellite picture, this hook of cloud indicative of a storm that's been deepening and strengthening rapidly. this area of low pressure passing across the uk — and on its southern flank with all the isobars, the white line squeezing together — that is where we have the potential for damaging winds. especially across coastal parts of southwest england and south wales — met office red warning here, gusts of up to 90mph, very rough seas and coastal flooding are likely. and then, we also have this much bigger amber warning area. and still the potential for some really disruptive and dangerous weather here, as well — gusts of wind up to 80mph. rain and wind quickly spreading northwards through the early part of friday,
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snow for western counties of northern ireland, high ground of northern england, and up into scotland, as well. but the winds peaking through the morning across some coasts of wales in the southwest, with gusts up as high as 90mph. some very rough seas, also very rough seas through the english channel. and those strong winds will be working eastwards through the day — even inland spots of eastern and southeastern england seeing gusts of 70—80mph — that is very unusual. further north, it won't be as windy, but snow is likely to cause issues. some hill snow for parts of northern ireland and northern england, significant snow in scotland, could see up to 30 centimetres, settling over high ground — that snow coming down very quickly is likely to cause transport impacts and some power cuts, as well. temperatures the least of our worries, but really cold in the north where that snow is falling. now, things will only very slowly calm down during friday evening, we'll see some wintry showers pushing in from the northwest. and then, for saturday, a band of rain pushing in from the west potentially
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with some snow, especially over high ground in the north. it will be a windy day — not as extremely windy as friday, but still potentially windy enough to hamper any clean—up efforts. temperatures between 3—10 celsius. and we stick with a fairly blustery theme as we head into sunday. some brisk winds across the uk, outbreaks of heavy rain, but mild, 9—13 celsius.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm mariko 0i. the headlines: the us urges russia formally to announce that it will not invade ukraine, as fears mount that it's preparing to create a pretext for war. but let me be clear — i am here today not to start a war, but to prevent one. a judge in new york rules that donald trump and two of his children must answer questions under oath as part of an investigation into fraud. more than a hundred people are now known to have died in floods and mudslides in brazil as the search goes on for those missing.

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