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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 20, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the queen has tested positive for covid—19. buckingham palace says she is experiencing mild cold—like symptoms, but does expect to continue light duties at windsor this week. britain warns russia is planning the biggest conflict in europe since world war ii. it's as russia and belarus take part in huge military exercises near the border with ukraine. the legal requirement to self—isolate after catching covid in england is expected to be dropped from next week — the shadow health secretary says the move would be premature. the key thing is that people have access to free testing, they know their status, and they do the right thing by staying at home. which means they also need access to the right level of sick pay to do the right thing.
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and, frankly, it's negligent the government haven't acted already. borisjohnson refuses to say whether he will resign if police find he broke lockdown laws. any answer would be interpreted as a point of commentary about the process. i've got to leave it. it's a matter of principle, surely, it's not a point of commentary? i i've got to leave it. you must forgive me, i can't comment about a process that's currently under way and i won't. great britain have won the olympic title! team gb finally win gold with victory in the women's curling on the last day of the winter olympics, as the games officially come to an end with a spectacular closing ceremony in beijing.
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good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. buckingham palace have confirmed that the queen has today tested positive for covid. the monarch is experiencing mild cold—like symptoms but expects to continue light duties at windsor over the coming week. in will occupy a position with some medical attention because medical attention will follow as appropriate according to guidelines. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is with me now. what more do we know? here's what we know, which _ what more do we know? here's what we know. which isn't — what more do we know? here's what we know, which isn't a _ what more do we know? here's what we know, which isn't a lot, _ what more do we know? here's what we know, which isn't a lot, and _ what more do we know? here's what we know, which isn't a lot, and is _ know, which isn't a lot, and is almost buckingham palace is framing it. she tested positive for covid this morning at windsor castle. mild, cold like symptoms is how the
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palace are describing it. she expects to continue with light duties at windsor over the coming week. it expects to continue. the her age. the fact she is 95, she's nine weeks short her 96th birthday. she is frailer physically than she was six months ago. that much we no, we've seen the images, the people who met her at sandringham at the anniversary of her succession said she is frailer now and walking with a stick. we last saw her in winter and images on wednesday when she was meeting two officials from the mod. she said, i can't move, there is a mobility issue. we don't quite know what's causing that but she is as engaged and mentally as sharp as ever. clearly, she will now be receiving the full medical attention that would be appropriate for someone with mild, cold like covid
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symptoms. the medical household, that's the name given to the royal doctors led by professor sir hugh thomas, i'm sure they will have worked out over the months what they would do. fix, worked out over the months what they would do. ~ , ., ., ., worked out over the months what they would do. ~ , ., ., , would do. a protocol of procedure. the 've would do. a protocol of procedure. they've had _ would do. a protocol of procedure. they've had two — would do. a protocol of procedure. they've had two years _ would do. a protocol of procedure. they've had two years to _ would do. a protocol of procedure. they've had two years to think- would do. a protocol of procedure. i they've had two years to think about this, so they will be monitoring the situation carefully. it's interesting, really, but overthe two years of the pandemic, they have successfully managed to keep the virus out of windsor castle, this bubble was formed around the queen in the early months and that was successful. it was a writer of royal officials who were with her and everyone who comes near her would normally be tested to make sure they were covid free. by understanding recent days there have been cases within windsor castle, so the virus has got into the castle and has reached the queen. there had been speculation she might have caught it
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from the prince of wales, whom she met on the 8th of february, a couple of days later he learned he had contracted covid but he had contracted covid but he had contracted covid but he's now made a full recovery. the duchess of cornwall has also contracted covid. i think the virus has got into the castle and the queen has contracted it. , ., ., , . ., it. the big thing that has changed is the virus _ it. the big thing that has changed is the virus has _ it. the big thing that has changed is the virus has got _ it. the big thing that has changed is the virus has got in _ it. the big thing that has changed is the virus has got in but - is the virus has got in but presumably the queen is fully vaccinated.— presumably the queen is fully vaccinated. absolutely. again, that's not _ vaccinated. absolutely. again, that's not confirmed. - vaccinated. absolutely. again, i that's not confirmed. buckingham palace confirmed when she had the first vaccination but i think we can be 100% certain that she's had all the vaccines and booster doses, whether it's three or whatever. so, she will have the protection that one would assume would come from a full programme of vaccination but
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you come back to this fact that she is within that age bracket that is considered to be vulnerable, because she is 95. so, apart from who she is, because of her age, i think they will be paying close attention to the symptoms and monitoring whether these mild symptoms, as the palace describes them, get worse. it’s these mild symptoms, as the palace describes them, get worse.— describes them, get worse. it's the difficulty of — describes them, get worse. it's the difficulty of predicting _ describes them, get worse. it's the difficulty of predicting the - describes them, get worse. it's the difficulty of predicting the path - describes them, get worse. it's the difficulty of predicting the path of l difficulty of predicting the path of any individual who develops covid. and the added complication of age. if anyone is going to be monitored very carefully, it's the queen. indeed. generally, overthe years, there has been a change, certainly, in this mobility issue, since october the 20th when she had to cancel a trip to belfast and was brought into hospital and stayed overnight for preliminary tests. something happened that day, something changed. but i think we can take comfort from the fact that
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over the years, her health has been very good. she's been shown to be resilient and strong in terms of health. but it is the age that is the unknown factor in all of this. and in terms of the other members of the royalfamily, even talking and in terms of the other members of the royal family, even talking about the royal family, even talking about the arrangements for covid in place for two years, have those been pretty much maintained? has the palace been quite careful about how many members of herfamily palace been quite careful about how many members of her family are around her, how many people get to spend time with her? i’m around her, how many people get to spend time with her?— spend time with her? i'm sure they have. it touches _ spend time with her? i'm sure they have. it touches on _ spend time with her? i'm sure they have. it touches on the _ spend time with her? i'm sure they have. it touches on the privacy - spend time with her? i'm sure they have. it touches on the privacy of. have. it touches on the privacy of the family. they will not go into that. but i think it's common sense but when you're dealing with the help of a 95—year—old who happens to be the head of state, you will be very, careful. ifany be the head of state, you will be very, careful. if any of us were coming into contact with any royal event, you have to take a lateral flow test and show it's been negative. yes, they have deployed the sort of precautions you would deem to be sensible and prudent in a
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situation they find themselves. this statement came _ situation they find themselves. this statement came out, we weren't expecting it, we never do when we get statements of this kind but we shouldn't expect further statements, shouldn't expect further statements, should we? , ., ,._ ., should we? they would say that if we've not should we? they would say that if we've got something _ should we? they would say that if we've got something to _ should we? they would say that if we've got something to tell - should we? they would say that if we've got something to tell you, | should we? they would say that if l we've got something to tell you, we will tell you but if we haven't, we won't. they are in the business of not giving a running commentary. the endless habit that sometimes occurs on programmes such as this, what's the latest, which people like me get asked every hour, the answer is, well, there isn't any. that is the situation and if there's any further change or any further detail that they want to share, they will do so but they won't just bulletins for the sake of it. thank ou. let's go to our correspondent at windsor castle. what sort of atmosphere is they're
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down there? have you encountered any expressions of concern or are people unaware of it? i expressions of concern or are people unaware of it?— unaware of it? i think people have heard, unaware of it? i think people have heard. they've _ unaware of it? i think people have heard, they've come _ unaware of it? i think people have heard, they've come down - unaware of it? i think people have heard, they've come down here i unaware of it? i think people have heard, they've come down here to windsor castle. i've met people from manchester and birmingham who were coming here today for a visit and they heard about the news on the way down. they have expressed concern but i think there also very sensible about it. i had one lady say to me, we had covid too, we had mild symptoms, not the queen has contracted covid and we wish her all the best —— now the queen has contracted covid. they are wishing her a very speedy recovery. so many people around the country are impacted by covid and theyjust really want to see the queen have a good recovery. we've had a tweet from borisjohnson saying, i'm sure i speakfor everyone from borisjohnson saying, i'm sure i speak for everyone in wishing her majesty a swift recovery from covid and a rapid return to vibrant good
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health. so, ithink and a rapid return to vibrant good health. so, i think a lot of people are really wishing her well. she has are really wishing her well. she has a really expert team of doctors led by professor hugh thomas and mary's hospital. she's got really, really good care, a special team of physicians. its light duties from here on in. physicians. its light duties from here on in-_ borisjohnson has warned that evidence from russia and ukraine points to vladimir putin planning what could be the biggest conflict in europe since the second world war. in a bbc interview, the prime minister also repeatedly refused to comment on downing street parties currently being investigated by the police. our political correspondent peter saull reports. borisjohnson has spent the weekend with other world leaders in munich. his attention firmly focused on ukraine. and this morning, a stark prediction about what might unfold on this man's territory.
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the plan that we are seeing is for something that could be really the biggest war in europe since 1945 in terms of sheer scale. you are looking at notjust an invasion through the east, through the donbas, but, according to intelligence we are seeing, coming down from the north, down from belarus and encircling kyiv itself. russian forces are continuing to carry out exercises, but moscow describes talk of an invasion as western hysteria. if it does happen, an incursion would prompt what the prime minister calls the toughest possible sanctions. we will stop russian companies raising money on uk markets. and with our american friends, we are even going to stop them trading in pounds and dollars. that will hit very, very hard. while borisjohnson tackles matters of global importance, there is no escaping
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problems back home. a questionnaire about his attendance at parties on downing street has been returned to the metropolitan police. so, if he is fined, will he resign? you are just going to have to wait until the process is complete. there is literally not a bean i can tell you about that, as much as i would like to. time and again the prime minister refused to go there. do you think you are just burying your head in the sand? i am fortunate to live in a democracy. be the prime minister of a free, independent democratic country where people can take that sort of decision, where i do face that kind of pressure. that is a wonderful thing. the growing tensions in eastern europe have given borisjohnson a chance to show leadership. but the fight for his political future is far from over. peter saull, bbc news. let's cross live now to kyiv
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and speak to james waterhouse. how is all of this going down in the city today? how is all of this going down in the ci toda ? ~ �* ., ., , city today? well, i've got to be honest, city today? well, i've got to be honest. peeple _ city today? well, i've got to be honest, people are _ city today? well, i've got to be honest, people are expressing| city today? well, i've got to be - honest, people are expressing worry. ukrainians are used eight years of russian aggression but given the grim forecasts from the west, it's getting harder and harder has called for an immediate ceasefire to be fighting in eastern occupied territories of ukraine —— president zelensky has called for an immediate ceasefire. the west accuses moscow of creating a fake justification for a potential invasion. so, tensions are very much high. the reasons for russia prolonging this aggression on ukraine are numerous and sometimes complicated. i'm delighted to say
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i'm joined by the ukrainian journalist. thank you forjoining us. you covered ukraine's revolution of dignity eight years ago. can you explain briefly what it was, how it was significant and how you think we've got to this point? the eaceful we've got to this point? the peaceful protest, _ we've got to this point? the peaceful protest, we - we've got to this point? the peaceful protest, we are against kleptocracy, against authoritarian kle ptocracy, against authoritarian government kleptocracy, against authoritarian government and impunity of the police — government and impunity of the police. and the president supported by russia _ police. and the president supported by russia ordered to kill his own people. — by russia ordered to kill his own pecule. to — by russia ordered to kill his own people, to topple the demonstration and fled _ people, to topple the demonstration and fled to russia. in the end, russia — and fled to russia. in the end, russia attacked crimea and occupied it and _ russia attacked crimea and occupied it and started the war. that revolution was never against russia, it revolution was never against russia, ii was— revolution was never against russia, it wasiusi _ revolution was never against russia, it was just what a different type of life, democracy against authoritarianism. the putin and the kremlin, _ authoritarianism. the putin and the kremlin, that revolution was an example — kremlin, that revolution was an example that people can oust their own president was something wrong. he didn't _ own president was something wrong. he didn't want this example for his
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own people so it was like a revenge that we _ own people so it was like a revenge that we feel still today. as own people so it was like a revenge that we feel still today.— that we feel still today. as this crisis has worsened, _ that we feel still today. as this crisis has worsened, what - that we feel still today. as this i crisis has worsened, what struck that we feel still today. as this - crisis has worsened, what struck me is the difference in narratives. we've had the west predict looming invasion, the seriousness of the situation, we had moscow accused the west of creating hysteria and president zelensky has long said everybody stay calm, there's been no intelligence to suggest an invasion. what do you make of that whirlwind? the last years, despite the territories that were occupied, were rather— territories that were occupied, were rather cairn — territories that were occupied, were rather calm. we knew our troops, there _ rather calm. we knew our troops, there wasn't — rather calm. we knew our troops, there wasn't an immediate threat. however. — there wasn't an immediate threat. however, living with that for eight years. _ however, living with that for eight years, even with the revolution earlier, — years, even with the revolution earlier, it — years, even with the revolution earlier, it lasted four months. so we couldu'i— earlier, it lasted four months. so we couldn't afford herself to be in this sprint— we couldn't afford herself to be in this sprint mode to rush. if you think— this sprint mode to rush. if you think something starts, it could last tom} — think something starts, it could last long. so we need to conserve our strength and be ready. ukrainians are quite confident. the
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biggest _ ukrainians are quite confident. the biggest difference but if somebody says ukraine invaded or occupied. ukrainians— says ukraine invaded or occupied. ukrainians are confident they can make _ ukrainians are confident they can make and — ukrainians are confident they can make and show the kremlin that ukraine — make and show the kremlin that ukraine is— make and show the kremlin that ukraine is unconquerable, despite its formidable force, they won't be able ever_ its formidable force, they won't be able ever to control the whole country. — able ever to control the whole country, which is actually huge. two and a _ country, which is actually huge. two and a half— country, which is actually huge. two and a half times larger than britain _ and a half times larger than britain. ., ., �* ~' and a half times larger than britain. ., ., �* ,, ., and a half times larger than britain. ., ., �* ~ ., ., , ., britain. you don't think an invasion will be realised? _ britain. you don't think an invasion will be realised? i— britain. you don't think an invasion will be realised? i haven't - britain. you don't think an invasion will be realised? i haven't said - will be realised? i haven't said that. will be realised? i haven't said that- i'm _ will be realised? i haven't said that. i'm concerned, _ will be realised? i haven't said that. i'm concerned, i'm - will be realised? i haven't said i that. i'm concerned, i'm worried, but i'm _ that. i'm concerned, i'm worried, but i'm not— that. i'm concerned, i'm worried, but i'm not in_ that. i'm concerned, i'm worried, but i'm not in panic. it could happen— but i'm not in panic. it could happen but still, i mean, i covered the conflict — happen but still, i mean, i covered the conflict for eight years so i'm very disturbed with what's going on in the _ very disturbed with what's going on in the conflict zone because i think it might _ in the conflict zone because i think it might happen gradually. it's not like we're — it might happen gradually. it's not like we're staying here in front of the cameras and there is an attack. sometimes — the cameras and there is an attack. sometimes i feels like the media wait for— sometimes i feels like the media wait for something like that. other events— wait for something like that. other events can — wait for something like that. other events can take place, cyberattacks, something _ events can take place, cyberattacks, something unexpected.— events can take place, cyberattacks, something unexpected. ukrainians are
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very sensitive — something unexpected. ukrainians are very sensitive to _ something unexpected. ukrainians are very sensitive to russian _ something unexpected. ukrainians are very sensitive to russian influence - very sensitive to russian influence on the running of the country. do you ever see a day when ukraine can join nato or the eu? {lit you ever see a day when ukraine can join nato or the eu?— join nato or the eu? of course, a lot depends _ join nato or the eu? of course, a lot depends on — join nato or the eu? of course, a lot depends on ukraine _ join nato or the eu? of course, a lot depends on ukraine and - join nato or the eu? of course, a i lot depends on ukraine and reforms but a _ lot depends on ukraine and reforms but a lot— lot depends on ukraine and reforms but a lot has been achieved and in different— but a lot has been achieved and in different circumstances, other countries _ different circumstances, other countries in the end of 90s and 2000 patients— countries in the end of 90s and 2000 patients were accepted. eight years a-o patients were accepted. eight years ago it— patients were accepted. eight years ago it would be impossible. —— the end of— ago it would be impossible. —— the end of the — ago it would be impossible. —— the end of the 90s and the 2000s, they were accepted. the current situation shows _ were accepted. the current situation shows if_ were accepted. the current situation shows if you're not part of the alliance, — shows if you're not part of the alliance, there is no international structure — alliance, there is no international structure of security to support any country _ structure of security to support any country outside of nato._ country outside of nato. thank you so much for— country outside of nato. thank you so much forjoining _ country outside of nato. thank you so much forjoining us. _ country outside of nato. thank you so much forjoining us. so, - country outside of nato. thank you so much forjoining us. so, we - country outside of nato. thank you | so much forjoining us. so, we have a complicated path to this point, diplomacy has been continuing that the tension isn't going down on that border. . ~' , ., , the tension isn't going down on that
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border. ., ,, , ., , . the legal requirement for people in england who test positive for covid to isolate is due to end in the coming days. the government will outline its "living with covid" plan tomorrow, saying that a combination of vaccines, treatments and testing are now enough to keep people safe. our health correspondent jim reed reports. living with covid has meant living with some strict life—changing restrictions, but with vaccines keeping people out of hospital, the government says those is remaining laws will be lifted in england. that legal requirement to self—isolate if you have the virus will be replaced by guidance. i'm not saying you can totally throw caution to the winds. covid remains dangerous if you are vulnerable and if you are not vaccinated. but we need people to be much more confident and get back to work. the move is part of the government's living with covid plan published tomorrow. there is speculation that free
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access to pcr and rapid lateral flow tests could start to be scaled back — something that has worried labour. the key thing is people have access to free testing, they know their status and do the right thing by staying at home, which means they also need access to the right level of sick pay to do the right thing. the world health organisation and groups representing doctors have described the move as premature. and for people like piers rankin, a cancer patient, there is danger still in lifting the last remaining restrictions. taking a step into the unknown. i am a high—risk individual to covid and my family have to make sacrifices to keep me safe. how much risk can we bear without essentially shielding again for an indefinite period of time? the changes expected this week will apply to england only. other parts of the uk are moving at their own speed as the latest omicron wave passes. jim reed, bbc news.
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just to bring you some breaking news, this is coming from moscow, it is moscow's read out of the telephone call between president macron and president putin which took place in the last couple of hours. the two men discussed ukraine and putin told president macron the provocations by ukrainian security forces with the cause of the escalation in the donbas region. in other words, that region in the east of ukraine made up of the two self—declared breakaway republics of donetsk and luhansk, they are on the eastern side of the country bordering russia. there have been various incidents that have happened, both sides, both ukrainian government on the breaker over crab
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—— the breakaway republics have blamed. the secretary of state said that might be used as a justification for some kind of military intervention by russia. it's the case that president putin was telling emmanuel macron today, according to another newsagency, that ukrainian security forces caused the escalation in donbas region. however, putin and macron say they need to step up the search for diplomatic solutions. you may recall that antony blinken is due to meet sergey lavrov, his russian counterpart, on thursday and there are hopes that there will be any action on either side before thursday at least in the last chance for face—to—face diplomacy —— hopes that there won't be any action on either side.
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let's return now to politics, and the prime minister is facing a big week ahead, with accusations by labour that the government are dropping self isolation regulations in england too soon, and those partygate allegations still unresolved. our political correspondent, peter saull, is with us. which do you want to take first, covid or parties? they are linked, really. covid or parties? they are linked, reall . ~ , covid or parties? they are linked, reall. , , , ., really. absolutely. it stems from the covid regulations _ really. absolutely. it stems from the covid regulations and - really. absolutely. it stems from | the covid regulations and whether the covid regulations and whether the prime minister following those rules or whether he's going to be found to have broken the law that he himself set which is the fundamental question. i think a lot of conservative mps are asking that question. we are in a bit of a lull when it comes to partygate, parliament has been in recess and so a lot of the heat has been taken out of the saga. the question the prime minister was sent by the metropolitan police was returned on friday night and his lawyers were making various arguments are not including that the prime minister will have been working throughout, never stopped working, even though there were these gatherings
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potentially happening inside downing street but it could be weeks before we learn whether he is to receive a fixed penalty notice. in the meantime, the prime minister has been able to talk more about ukraine, a major crisis facing the world, he's been able to show global leadership on that and indeed the speech he gave to the munich security conference was well received, including by some of those people who have been critical of him within his own party, theresa may for example endorsed that particular speech he gave yesterday. tomorrow, he can again show a bit of lag to his backbenchers so to speak by announcing the end to all covid regulations, that i have no doubt will go down particularly well on his own side. the will go down particularly well on his own side.— will go down particularly well on his own side. , his own side. the interesting thing is the pace- _ his own side. the interesting thing is the pace. because _ his own side. the interesting thing is the pace. because the _ his own side. the interesting thing is the pace. because the four- is the pace. because the four governments of the uk all get the same medical advice, they'll talk to the same experts, but other parts of
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the same experts, but other parts of the uk are not going at the same as england. what is downing street saying about that?— england. what is downing street saying about that? boris johnson is makin: the saying about that? boris johnson is making the point _ saying about that? boris johnson is making the point that _ saying about that? boris johnson is making the point that they - saying about that? boris johnson is| making the point that they followed the data throughout and they aren't convinced —— they are convinced that now is the right time. of course, there are plenty of people who are sceptical about whether it is now too soon to end all of those restrictions. but if you look at the number of people being admitted to hospital and the number of deaths, it's not really out of the ordinary for a northern winter which suggests the booster programme has had a major impact. when we hear the living with covid plant tomorrow there will be a strong emphasis on vaccines and boosters as the last line of defence and also people taking personal responsibility rather than the state mandating how people should behave. we all learnt a lot as individuals over the last couple of years and the government would like us to continue to exercise what we've learned, as we hopefully tried to live with the coronavirus in the future. thank
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ou. let's return to the storms. two down, want to go with storm franklin on the way. two severe flood warnings have been issued this afternoon due to the rising level of the mersey. the risk of flooding has been exacerbated because of the heavy rain that's already been experienced in the area and is continuing to fall on ground which is already saturated from the heavy rain that has gone before. the risk of flooding, people will be approached by the authorities, by the police, council, environment agency, fire and rescue, and advised if they need to get out and offer assistance to get them out of their homes. that's objectively flood warnings that have been issued so people need to keep a local media and the websites so they know
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whether that particular part of north and west indies didsbury is going to be affected. thousands of people are still without power following storm eunice. today, there are weather warnings for wind covering much of the uk and heavy rain in northern england. and forecasters have just announced another storm on the way tonight — storm franklin — that's expected to bring more rain and gale force winds across the uk with an amber warning for northern ireland. sweeping away in the sussex, chopping through trees in the capital, and picking up the pieces in somerset. all part of the clean—up operation following one of the worst storms to hit the uk in decades. it was just absolutely brutal, nonstop. just devastation everywhere,
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as you can see, really. hopefully we'll never get it again, ever. many communities are still without power, including this holiday park in brean. we have made the decision to close the park until monday. _ having to turn families away during half—term. we've all had a rough couple of years and it's the first opportunity for people to come down and stay in their caravan or come on holiday for the year. so it couldn't have been a worse situation or a worse start off to the season. in newport, these houses were badly damaged by flying debris. start off to the season. in newport, these houses were badly damaged by flying debris. we've got probably, i'd say, just about a third of our roof missing. whereas the other two properties next door, they weren't so lucky, they have taken substantial damage and their properties are probably going to be condemned. and they've had to, sort of, everyone has had to relocate as a result of what's happening. in london, rapper dave's upcoming o2 arena concerts have been postponed, after part of the venue's roof was ripped off.
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but there's more bad weather on the way. met office warnings are in place for heavy rain and gusts of up to 70 miles an hour predicted in the next two days. on the trains, delays and cancellations are set to continue. passengers at preston shared their frustration. it was absolutely awful, carnage. we got on at the first stop, we got a seat and everything, but it was standing for a lot of people all the way down. people lost their lives in thesel winds and because we stood up on a train, we were just grateful to get home _ the worst of storm eunice might be over, but insurers say that clean—up costs could rise above £300 million, so its impact could be felt for a long time to come. alice key, bbc news. our weather presenter louise lear is here now. good to see you, although not
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particularly good news for people, at least starting in northern ireland where people need to be on their guard. ireland where people need to be on their guard-— their guard. that's where we've got this amber — their guard. that's where we've got this amber warning _ their guard. that's where we've got this amber warning issued - their guard. that's where we've got this amber warning issued for - their guard. that's where we've got. this amber warning issued for storm franklin and that's going to start at midnightand franklin and that's going to start at midnight and last until 7am. it's at midnight and last until 7am. it's a relatively short space of time but we could potentially see winds of 80 mph, and that could have a significant impact. certainly be prepared for some disruption on top of already the damage that we've had across the country. so, the amber warning is for northern ireland but it's worth stressing that. in scotland, northern england, wales, west facing coasts, we are likely to see 60—70. in cardigan bay and north wales we've got 70 mph at the moment. unfortunately, if you're trying to restore power, that's just going to exacerbate the issue. don’t going to exacerbate the issue. don't no shinnin: going to exacerbate the issue. don't go shinning up _ going to exacerbate the issue. don't go shinning up highlands. and - going to exacerbate the issue. don't go shinning up highlands. and there j go shinning up highlands. and there is a lot of heavy _ go shinning up highlands. and there is a lot of heavy rain _ go shinning up highlands. and there is a lot of heavy rain around - go shinning up highlands. and there is a lot of heavy rain around at - go shinning up highlands. and there is a lot of heavy rain around at the l is a lot of heavy rain around at the moment. ., ~ . ,
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is a lot of heavy rain around at the moment. ., ~ _ ., moment. the environment agency have issued a warning — moment. the environment agency have issued a warning about _ moment. the environment agency have issued a warning about a _ moment. the environment agency have issued a warning about a potential- issued a warning about a potential evacuation, they say that some homes are going to be evacuated because there is a risk to life near the river mersey. there is a risk to life near the river mersey-— there is a risk to life near the river merse . ~ �* ., ., , river mersey. we've got potentially, the search effect, _ river mersey. we've got potentially, the search effect, with _ river mersey. we've got potentially, the search effect, with those - river mersey. we've got potentially, the search effect, with those 60-70| the search effect, with those 60—70 mph winds —— surge. it's also incredibly mild out there and we've got snowmelt from recent snow that we've had so it's a tricky picture to communicate but basically it stays unsettled and looking ahead to the weather it stays unsettled through the week, with the heaviest of the rain in the strongest of the winds as we go through the next few days, the emphasis is going to shift toward scotland, northern ireland and northern england. it’s a and northern england. it's a question — and northern england. it's a question of— and northern england. it's a question of the _ and northern england. it's a question of the prepared. . and northern england. it's a i question of the prepared. and and northern england. it's a - question of the prepared. and its glad s question of the prepared. and its gladys after _ question of the prepared. and its gladys after franklin, _
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question of the prepared. and its gladys after franklin, so - question of the prepared. and its gladys after franklin, so we - question of the prepared. and itsj gladys after franklin, so we need question of the prepared. and its i gladys after franklin, so we need to have a word with

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