Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  February 21, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

10:00 pm
tonight at ten — all covid restrictions in england — will end in three days�* time — despite the concerns of some experts. the changes are part of the �*living with covid' plan — with an end to the legal requirement to self—isolate — after a positive test. let us learn to live with this virus and continue protecting ourselves and others without
10:01 pm
restricting our freedoms. this is a half—baked announcement from a government paralysed by chaos and incompetence. it is not a plan to live well with covid. we'll be asking if the latest figures justify the change — and we'll look at the different positions in scotland, wales and northern ireland. also tonight, president putin moves closer to a military invasion of ukraine, he tells the russian people that he's formally recognised two breakaway regions. despite weeks of diplomacy and a string of world leaders are urging vladimir putin to ease tension, the kremlin has triggered a major escalation of this crisis. the latest on storm franklin — bringing heavy rain and strong winds to many parts of the uk. and, tributes are paid to the music entrepreneur and promoterjamal edwards,
10:02 pm
who's died suddenly at the age of 31. and coming up in the sport, on the bbc news channel: cruise control for djokovic. victory in his first match back on tour since being deported from australia. good evening. all covid restrictions in england will end in three days�* time — the prime minister borisjohnson says it's a move away from government measures — towards a policy of personal responsibility — but some nhs leaders say it would be �*very premature' to see this as some kind of permanent victory over the virus. the changes are part of the �*living with covid�* plan — with an end to the legal requirement to self—isolate after a positive test. the universal testing programme will also end from 1st april — even
10:03 pm
for people with symptoms. and free testing will only be available to the most vulnerable. an additional booster dose will be offered to all those over 75 — and then from the spring to the most vulnerable people over 12 years old. in a moment — we�*ll examine the data behind the decision — and the likely economic impact — but first our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on mrjohnson�*s announcement. and a warning — the report contains some flashing images. now and then. the empty streets and silence of early lockdown. today millions of workers heading back to their desks, replacing the ghosts of empty offices before. the first vaccine, a modern miracle. applause jabs in almost every arm now. applause jabs in almost eve arm now. jabs in almost every arm now. good evenina. evening. a prime minister back then with an emergency instruction. you must stay at home. today, the
10:04 pm
laws which — you must stay at home. today, the laws which governed _ you must stay at home. today, the laws which governed our _ you must stay at home. today, the laws which governed our behaviour| laws which governed our behaviour swept away. we will remove all remaining domestic restrictions in law. so from this thursday, if you test positive in england it won�*t be law to stay at home. from april, only the most vulnerable will get free covid tests but there will be another booster vaccine for the elderly and those at risk. mr speaker. — elderly and those at risk. mr speaker. it _ elderly and those at risk. m speaker, it is time that we got our confidence back. we don�*t lead laws to compel people to be considerate to compel people to be considerate to others, so let us learn to live with this virus.— to others, so let us learn to live with this virus. minister, is it too soon to relax _ with this virus. minister, is it too soon to relax restrictions? - with this virus. minister, is it too soon to relax restrictions? but i soon to relax restrictions? but covid has _ soon to relax restrictions? but covid has never _ soon to relax restrictions? elf covid has never been straightforward. ministers turned up this morning to finalise the details. ~ . , this morning to finalise the details. ~ ., , , details. what is the cabinet minister cancelled, - details. what is the cabinet l minister cancelled, minister? details. what is the cabinet - minister cancelled, minister? but the were minister cancelled, minister? pm they were sent away within minutes, they were sent away within minutes, the meeting cancelled because the treasury and department of health were still haggling over how much to keep spending on covid tests.
10:05 pm
ammunition for the opposition. all ammunition for the opposition. all we've got to date is yet more chaos and disarray. not enough to prepare us for— and disarray. not enough to prepare us for the _ and disarray. not enough to prepare us for the new variants which may yet develop, an approach which seems to think_ yet develop, an approach which seems to think that_ yet develop, an approach which seems to think that living with covid means— to think that living with covid means simply ignoring it. this morning — means simply ignoring it. this morning he couldn't even persuade his own _ morning he couldn't even persuade his own health secretary to agree the plan — his own health secretary to agree the lan. ., ., .,, the plan. northern ireland has already scrapped _ the plan. northern ireland has already scrapped its _ the plan. northern ireland has already scrapped its legal - already scrapped its legal restrictions, but scotland and wales are sticking for now and there is concern about the prime minister�*s moves. concern about the prime minister's moves. , , . , concern about the prime minister's moves. , , ., , ., ., moves. this statement is not about rotectin: moves. this statement is not about protecting the _ moves. this statement is not about protecting the public, _ moves. this statement is not about protecting the public, it's _ moves. this statement is not about protecting the public, it's about - protecting the public, it's about the prime — protecting the public, it's about the prime minister— protecting the public, it's about the prime minister scrambling i protecting the public, it's about. the prime minister scrambling to save his — the prime minister scrambling to save his own— the prime minister scrambling to save his own skin. _ the prime minister scrambling to save his own skin.— save his own skin. first and foremost. _ save his own skin. first and foremost, removing - save his own skin. first and foremost, removing the - save his own skin. first and l foremost, removing the legal save his own skin. first and - foremost, removing the legal rules will make many practical differences, but it is also the end of a strange and stressful era in england at least, when politicians have passed laws that dictated so many aspects of our lives. for boris johnson it is, in a way, a welcome relief to satisfy those in his party who believe that the restrictions
10:06 pm
have been in place for too long and have been in place for too long and have been in place for too long and have been too tight. but the pandemic is not over and loosening up pandemic is not over and loosening up is not without risk. listen to the prime minister�*s sentiment tonight. i the prime minister's sentiment toniaht. ., , , , the prime minister's sentiment toniaht. ., , , tonight. i do believe this is a moment of— tonight. i do believe this is a moment of pride _ tonight. i do believe this is a moment of pride for- tonight. i do believe this is a moment of pride for our- tonight. i do believe this is a i moment of pride for our nation. tonight. i do believe this is a - moment of pride for our nation. then his top doctors' _ moment of pride for our nation. then his top doctors' caution. we - moment of pride for our nation. then his top doctors' caution. we still- his top doctors' caution. we still have hiuh his top doctors' caution. we still have high rates _ his top doctors' caution. we still have high rates of— his top doctors' caution. we still have high rates of omicron - his top doctors' caution. we still have high rates of omicron and| his top doctors' caution. we stillj have high rates of omicron and i would _ have high rates of omicron and i would urge people in terms of public heatth— would urge people in terms of public health advice, this is very much the government's position, that people should _ government's position, that people should still, if they have covid, try to _ should still, if they have covid, try to prevent other people getting it and _ try to prevent other people getting it and that means self—isolating. you are — it and that means self—isolating. you are scrapping free tests for all, you are scrapping free tests for all. but — you are scrapping free tests for all. but you _ you are scrapping free tests for all, but you are _ you are scrapping free tests for all, but you are telling - you are scrapping free tests for. all, but you are telling everybody they have — all, but you are telling everybody they have to _ all, but you are telling everybody they have to take _ all, but you are telling everybody they have to take personal- they have to take personal responsibility. _ they have to take personal responsibility. how - they have to take personal responsibility. how can - they have to take personal- responsibility. how can people take personal— responsibility. how can people take personal responsibility _ responsibility. how can people take personal responsibility if _ responsibility. how can people take personal responsibility if they- responsibility. how can people take personal responsibility if they mayl personal responsibility if they may not he _ personal responsibility if they may not be able — personal responsibility if they may not be able to _ personal responsibility if they may not be able to afford _ personal responsibility if they may not be able to afford to _ personal responsibility if they may not be able to afford to get - personal responsibility if they may not be able to afford to get a - personal responsibility if they may| not be able to afford to get a covid test? _ not be able to afford to get a covid test? . , not be able to afford to get a covid test? ., , , ., , test? vulnerable people will continue to _ test? vulnerable people will continue to have _ test? vulnerable people will continue to have access - test? vulnerable people will continue to have access to l test? vulnerable people will. continue to have access to free tests. we are going to make sure we invest in surveillance because we want to have the keenest pair of eyesin
10:07 pm
want to have the keenest pair of eyes in the crow�*s nest to watch for the iceberg in the form of any variant. , , , , , variant. the virus is still present, even in windsor _ variant. the virus is still present, even in windsor castle, - variant. the virus is still present, even in windsor castle, where i variant. the virus is still present, | even in windsor castle, where the 95—year—old queen herself has covid with mild symptoms. another stop on this agonising nationaljourney, that rarest of moments where every single one of us has been affected. and yet while the laws are loosening, the pandemic has not yet gone and is certainly not forgotten. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. the end to all remaining covid restrictions in england has prompted a mixed reaction from scientists and the public — and some concern from those who are clinically vulnerable. but what do the official figures say about the current state of the pandemic? do they justify the change at this time? our health editor hugh pym reports from eastbourne. taking a new tack and hoping for calmer water — the government�*s new approach on covid has been well signalled, and members of eastbourne & district model yacht club have
10:08 pm
thought what it means for them. roger is in his 80s, a potentially vulnerable age, but he�*s happy for the next step to be taken. we look as though we�*re on sort of the sunny side of the mountain now, aren�*t we? so, do you think it�*s rightjust to press on with without restrictions? without restrictions, yes. very definitely. those here aged 75 and over may be further reassured by news they�*ll be eligible for a fourth vaccine dose. there�*s little disagreement over the need to open up at some stage and end legal restrictions, but it�*s a question of timing. jonathan is an eastbourne gp and he�*s more cautious. there are high virus case rates in the area and he�*s anxious about what the ending of isolation rules might mean for patients. have a seat. thank you. if it were to carry on till easter, maybe that would be a bit better. yeah, we�*ve been trying very hard to keep people out of the building when they�*re carrying an infection. they say there�*s no
10:09 pm
rules about isolation, they�*ll want to come and see us, which is going to make life a little bit more difficult. his concerns are echoed by linda. there's still a lot of covid about. i've got three members of my family that have got it. would you feel more comfortable if this compulsory isolation stayed, then, for the time being? just till the spring. so, what does the science suggest? covid hospital admissions have been falling and new anti—viral drugs have come on stream. there�*s much higher immunity, thanks to previous infections and vaccination. covid case rates relative to the population have been falling in the uk. they�*re lower than, for example, germany and italy, but above countries like the united states and canada. very clear this- pandemic is not over... while noting omicron was much less severe than expected, the government�*s advisers warned future variants could be worse. the one thing that this virus has taught you is not to be cocky. .
10:10 pm
yeah. so i think we just need to go very carefully, i we need to monitor carefully and be prepared to react _ pcr testing sites will be wound down in england and free lateral flow tests cut back. that is proving more contentious. zoe is a secondary school teacher. she thinks the relaxation of isolation rules may be good for her children and other pupils without symptoms, but not necessarily everyone. for the sake of getting people back to work, etc, i think it�*s very good, but we do have vulnerable members of staff in our school, and i just think they may feel very differently about it to how i do. moving on from restrictions at this centre, my skate world, and in the wider community, they�*ll still have to learn to live with covid. hugh pym, bbc news, eastbourne. many business leaders — particularly in the hospitality sector — have been calling for a return to normality as soon as possible.
10:11 pm
but trades unions are warning that removing the legal requirement to self—isolate — puts workers in an impossible position. so what effect will today�*s announcement have on business and the economy? our business editor simonjack reports. the darkest days of lockdown seem a distant memory. the economy has bounced back. but changes to the way we live and work are still with us. for this salon in the manchester suburb of monton, people working from home, spending more time in the neighbourhood, means life is looking good. i�*d say that business has been better than ever. i think that people working from home, their schedule is more flexible. we have had a big influx of new clients, as well, because of that. people spending more time and money here means less of both for city centre businesses, like jen�*s distillery and bar. her friday night takings are still 25% lower than pre—pandemic. we, the whole sector, have had a really tough 2a months. it has been quite bruising. so i would like to think that over the coming years, we do start to see offices
10:12 pm
and businesses getting everyone back into their workplaces. is this a game changer? honestly, for us, i don�*t think so. i don�*t see this suddenly bringing an influx of people back to city centres. i do think it will be more organic and be more gradual. you can see the political and economic attraction of trying to choose a moment to draw a line under covid�*s influence on all our lives, dial down the billions spent on universal free testing, get back to normal. but normal has changed. those who can work from home want to keep doing it, even demand to keep doing it, and that could have big implications for the people who run our biggest cities. manchester train and tram use is down a quarter compared to pre—pandemic levels, threatening the viability of some services. the truth is the pandemic is going to leave a mark. it is going to leave a mark on public transport. it isn�*t going to be able to get straight back to what it was,
10:13 pm
and that is why the government will have to step in and support public transport as cities recover. or what? or what will happen? or we will see the loss of services and we are already hearing that operators are getting ready to reduce the frequency of services, cut some altogether. 30 services at risk in greater manchester. today�*s measures were described as a significant step towards normality by the business group cbi. but few think it will be business as usual anytime soon, if ever. simonjack, bbc news, manchester. just to underline, the plans announced today are just for england. and with the end of mass testing in england, there�*s now a question mark about the future of the testing schemes in scotland, and wales and northern ireland. in a moment, we�*ll hear from our correspondents hywel griffith in wales and emma vardy in northern ireland. but first, alexandra mackenzie explains how scotland is approaching the next phase of the pandemic. here in scotland, the first minister
10:14 pm
will outline her plan on living with covid, in the scottish parliament tomorrow. she said there will be some optimism as we move to a new phase in the pandemic but, ahead of that, she said that anyone who tests positive with covid should self—isolate. she also disagrees with any sudden change to testing arrangements. she would prefer a slower move to a more targeted approach. here in scotland, you must wear a face covering in indoor public places. and also, vaccine passports are required in places like nightclubs and other large gatherings. in wales, the rules on self—isolation remain. there is a review due next month but, for now, if you test positive for covid here, you have to self—isolate for at least five days. that may cause confusion for people who have to cross the border with england for work. masks remain mandatory in shops and on public transport
10:15 pm
and in health care until the end of this month. but the welsh government's biggest concern is that change on testing. they say bringing it to an end is premature and reckless. they had lobbied alongside scotland and northern ireland to keep a testing structure in place until at least the end ofjune. in northern ireland, _ the remaining covid restrictions like face masks and vaccine passports were dropped - from being legal requirements last week, _ while self—isolation rules remain. but ending restructures - here wasn't straightforward. because of the collapse in the power—sharing i executive at stormont, - there's no first and deputy first ministers here to sign off on big decisions. i instead, northern ireland's. health minister robin swann had to get the backing - of individual ministers instead. and robin swann has signed that |letter from the devolved nations| setting out their concerns, as england plans to - end isolation rules. it's calling urgently for more information on the scale i of services that will remain, l to ensure all four nations stay
10:16 pm
prepared for any potential future waves of the virus.| that was emma vardy at stormont. our medical editor fergus walsh is with me. first question is lots of people are asking today, are these changes announced by borisjohnson justified by the latest figures on the pandemic?— by the latest figures on the andemic? , ., , ., , pandemic? the number of people in hosital pandemic? the number of people in hospital with — pandemic? the number of people in hospital with covid _ pandemic? the number of people in hospital with covid has _ pandemic? the number of people in hospital with covid has been - pandemic? the number of people in hospital with covid has been falling | hospital with covid has been falling every month and overall deaths this winter are lower than normal so there has been no access from omicron. as a population level we have very strong protection from covid as a result of highly effective vaccines and millions of us have had our immunity topped up from getting omicron, plus we have these highly effective drugs. a totally different position from where we were a year ago. the dispute today is about the timing of this, especially the removal of free covid testing even if you have symptoms from all but a small limited number of groups and social
10:17 pm
care workers. the government have said it is ready to scale up testing again if a more dangerous variant comes along, but it is clear that the threat from covid has not gone away completely. the threat from covid has not gone away completely-— the threat from covid has not gone awa comletel . �* ., ., . away completely. another enforcement toda about away completely. another enforcement today about the — away completely. another enforcement today about the extension _ away completely. another enforcement today about the extension of— away completely. another enforcement today about the extension of the - today about the extension of the booster programme. in your view, how significant was that announcement? 3�* significant was that announcement? t�* million people over 75 and over half a million over 12 who are immunosuppressed will be offered this spring booster dose, the uk one of the first countries to offer theirs. germany is offering it to theirs. germany is offering it to the over 70s, israel already rolling out the second boosters to all adults. it is precautionary and meant to tide the most vulnerable over until the autumn when there will be another step to a much wider group of people and we may well then be in a situation where we will have annual covid boosters. maw; be in a situation where we will have annual covid boosters. many thanks once again. — annual covid boosters. many thanks once again, fergus _ annual covid boosters. many thanks once again, fergus walsh _ annual covid boosters. many thanks once again, fergus walsh our- annual covid boosters. many thanks l once again, fergus walsh our medical editor with the latest analysis. and you can read more
10:18 pm
about the changes announced today — and the coronavirus rules in place where you live — on our website. that�*s bbc.co.uk/news. the other main story tonight. the prospect of a russian military invasion of ukraine has become even more realistic tonight, following a televised address by president putin. he said he�*d signed a decree recognising two breakaway regions of ukraine, and insisted that history was on his side because ukraine, in his view, was not a true nation. the two regions in question are donetsk and luhansk, and diplomats warn that recognising these as independent states would give russia the justification it wants to send in troops, under the guise of protecting its own citizens. president biden has agreed "in principle" to hold a summit with president putin to discuss the crisis, but only if russia but only if russia gives up any
10:19 pm
plans to invade. several major european airlines are suspending, or reducing, the number of flights to ukraine because of security concerns. 0ur moscow correspondent steve rosenberg has the latest. it was an astonishing piece of political theatre, played out on russian tv. the protagonist, the president. vladimir putin alone, aloof, like a modern—day tsar. the supporting cast, members of russia�*s powerful security council. "i will let you all speak," he said, "then we must decide what to do." and one by one, they spoke, all urging president putin to defy kyiv and the west, and officially recognise the pro—russia rebel republics in eastern ukraine. "we must recognise these republics," the interior minister says, "but within their earlier, larger boundaries." the president listened, but looked like a man who�*d already made up his mind.
10:20 pm
later, he addressed the nation. translation: the essence i of the aggressive, nationalistic character of the regime that seized power in kyiv hasn�*t changed. i consider it necessary to immediately recognise the independence and sovereignty of the donetsk and luhansk people�*s republics. act two, the signing ceremony. the leaders of the rebel republics were already in moscow. they clearly knew what president putin�*s decision would be. earlier, this. russian tv claimed ukraine was shelling the rebel republics. fake news, kyiv says, and moscow inventing a pretext for military intervention. in recent days, thousands of civilians from the separatist
10:21 pm
republics have been evacuated to russia. moscow�*s been accused of using these people as political pawns. many here are confused and frightened by what�*s been happening. the geopolitical consequences of vladimir putin�*s decision are not their priority. fireworks tonight, in the rebel republics russia has recognised, celebrations. but elsewhere in ukraine and in the west, deep concern that moscow may now move its forces openly into eastern ukraine, and that the kremlin is set on a major escalation. well, it was moscow that basically created —— created these rebel republics eight years ago after russia first intervened militarily in eastern ukraine, but vladimir putin�*s official recognition of their independence is a watershed moment. it basically kills off the
10:22 pm
internationally recognised peace process that mr putin himself recommitted himself to just a few days ago. it also raises fears of a major military escalation in eastern ukraine. and from the decree he signed, it is clear that vladimir putin is already sending troops into those rebel republics as the decree says, to keep the peace. steve, many thanks again for the latest in moscow, steve rosenberg. let�*s get more reaction on this. in a moment, we�*ll get the latest from our north america editor sarah smith outside the white house, but first, our eastern europe correspondent sarah rainsford is in kyiv. given what president putin has announced in these past few hours, where does that leave the government in ukraine? ~ ., _ in ukraine? well, i would say sombre. _ in ukraine? well, i would say sombre, worried _ in ukraine? well, i would say sombre, worried and - in ukraine? well, i would say sombre, worried and angry . in ukraine? well, i would say sombre, worried and angry is in ukraine? well, i would say- sombre, worried and angry is the mood today, but things have moved so quickly that we haven�*t had a full official response just yet. president zelensky is holding an urgent meeting of his security
10:23 pm
council right now and we expect some kind of statement in the early hours of this morning. but we have heard from other politicians, they of course are extremely worried, calling on ukraine�*s allies in the west to unite now to stop what they see as an almost unstoppable russian advance. some of the morning of the possibility even of a world war. so very strong language coming from politicians here in ukraine. as you might expect, mr zelensky has also been holding calls this evening with political leaders across the west, with joe political leaders across the west, withjoe biden, borisjohnson, who called this a dark time in ukraine. the promise of sanctions from the uk to be announced tomorrow. but i think if this is russia testing the resolve of the west, this really is a key moment as far as ukraine is concerned for how its allies respond to that. w . concerned for how its allies respond to that. ,. ., ., , concerned for how its allies respond to that. ., ., , ., ., to that. sarah, many thanks, sarah rainsford from _ to that. sarah, many thanks, sarah rainsford from kyiv. _ to that. sarah, many thanks, sarah rainsford from kyiv. sarah - to that. sarah, many thanks, sarah rainsford from kyiv. sarah smith . to that. sarah, many thanks, sarah i rainsford from kyiv. sarah smith our north america editor is in washington. the biden administration
10:24 pm
has said several times it was expecting mr putin have made a decision, will tonight�*s events have changed a strategy in any for them? well, president biden himself said on friday that he was now convinced that president putin had made the decision to invade. what this move is being seen here as is confirmation that their worst fears may be about to come true and that invasion is going to go ahead. white house officials responded immediately by saying that they had anticipated a move like russia and had measures ready, they have announced economic sanctions on the parts of ukraine which vladimir putin has now declared independent and they are stressing that that is completely separate from a package of punishing sanctions that they have ready to go if russia does further invade ukraine, and those will be sanctions against russia itself. president biden has been working the phones tonight speaking not only to the ukrainian president, but the president of france, the chancellor of germany as well, as
10:25 pm
there is obvious deep concern here that this is a precursor for an invasion. that this is a precursor for an invasion-— that this is a precursor for an invasion. ., ., , ., that this is a precursor for an invasion, ., ., , ., ., invasion. sarah, many thanks, sarah smith in washington _ invasion. sarah, many thanks, sarah smith in washington and _ invasion. sarah, many thanks, sarah smith in washington and sarah i smith in washington and sarah rainsford in kyiv. storm franklin — the third named storm in the space of a week — has brought heavy rain and strong winds to many parts of the uk. severe flooding in northern ireland, in yorkshire and greater manchester have forced people to leave their homes. there are more than 300 flood warnings across england, scotland and wales. and a �*danger to life�* alert has been issued in shropshire in the past few hours. 0ur correspondent danny savage has the latest. it�*s been a very wet weekend. rivers across the uk have burst their banks and roads have been flooded. at ironbridge, in shropshire, a severe flood warning is now in place for the river severn. this is where the environment agency is most worried about. 0ur temporary barriers are in place and they will obviously do what they can to protect
10:26 pm
the community, but we are expecting potentially seeing those barriers becoming over—topped and hence why the severe flood warning has been issued. heavy rain across northern england meant these flood gates had to be opened in manchester. it meant the local golf course disappeared underwater, but it saved homes from flooding. we didn't get a great deal of sleep because we kept on checking the app, monitoring the water levels. a little bit concerning but, yeah, it feels like we are over the worst of it now. a few miles away, a lorry caught fire after strong winds blew it into a bridge on the m6, near wigan. the driver escaped unhurt, but there were long rush—hour delays. a trip along the river wharfe, in north yorkshire, revealed numerous floods. this is the high street in tadcaster. the water was pretty deep. properties in wharfe bank terrace that are lived in, they�*ve had to evacuate. a guy on the other side of the bridge climbed down a ladder to get out of his flat. it�*s very disappointing
10:27 pm
for the town. you know, nobody wants to run a business when this happens to it every few years, do they? tadcaster albion are nowjust one of the many football clubs who won�*t be playing at home for a while. in the next village along, the bridge across the river was closed, after showing signs that floodwater was making it move. this is the river wharfe, at boston spa, and the main bridge linking the two halves of the community has had to be closed because a crack has appeared in it. and that means for people living here, a seven—mile diversion to get from one side now to the other. in south yorkshire, rotherham railway station looked as though it was built for boats, rather than trains. storm franklin rattled through northern ireland first, with gusts of nearly 80 mph. wales was hit too. this was llandinam, in powys, where homes were flooded.
10:28 pm
but tonight, these anxious times for people living close to the dominic raab too. they are hoping the many millions of pounds spent on flood defences will save their homes and businesses. —— living close to the river seven. danny savage, bbc news. and one of those places is ironbridge. 0ur correspondent andrew plant is there. what is the latest on the state of the river? , , ., , what is the latest on the state of the river? , i. , the river? yes, you can see those temporary — the river? yes, you can see those temporary flood _ the river? yes, you can see those temporary flood barriers - the river? yes, you can see those temporary flood barriers that i the river? yes, you can see those | temporary flood barriers that have gone up behind us, they go up a couple of times a year, but this time does feel different because everyone living those —— behind those barriers has been advised to leave their homes and people either side had been told it might be a goodidea side had been told it might be a good idea to have a bag packed and ready to go in case they need to live in a hurry, and it is the swollen river levels that are the problem. we were up the river earlier today and river severn has already burst its banks and surrounding some homes and there is this delay, the extra river we are saying here fell over the welsh hills mall is way over the weekend and takes 48 hours or so to come down screen and that is really the
10:29 pm
problem. that means these levels are still rising and we are told they might not peak until this time tomorrow, so for everyone here and thousands more living alongside the river severn, that still very nervous night and day still ahead. andrew, many thanks for the latest in ironbridge, and replant. —— andrew plant. musicians, actors and members of the royal family have led tributes to the musician and entrepreneurjamal edwards, who�*s died suddenly, at the age of 31. jamal was credited with helping to launch a clutch of music careers, including those of ed sheeran and dave. he was also an ambassador for the prince�*s trust charity. our music correspondent mark savage considers jamal�*s remarkable legacy. smokeybarz tv! # smokeybarz tv...# big up, smokeybarz! this is howjamal edwards started a media empire. a grainy clip, filmed on a £20 mobile phone in the middle of a school trip. he created the sbtv channel
10:30 pm
on youtube in 2006, frustrated that he couldn�*t find the music that he loved online. everyone in my area was an mc, and i remember i wasjust sitting there thinking, why can�*t i find these online? and if they were online, it was bad quality versions. i thought, i�*m going to try and film the people in my area and upload it to youtube. before long, sbtv had become the go—to place for british rap, giving early exposure to artists like stormzy, dave and ed sheeran. the channel played a key role in making grime go mainstream and earned jamal edwards an mbe at the age of 24. he put his success to good use, funding youth groups for underprivileged children and raising awareness of mental health. musicians and djs have remembered him as an inspiration. if i had one word to describe jamal, it would be selfless.

68 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on