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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 21, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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frustrated that he couldn't find the music that he loved online. everyone in my area was an mc, and i remember i wasjust sitting there thinking, why can't i find these online? and if they were online, it was bad quality versions. i thought, i'm going to try and film the people in my area and upload it to youtube. before long, sbtv had become the go—to place for british rap, giving early exposure to artists like stormzy, dave and ed sheeran. the channel played a key role in making grime go mainstream and earned jamal edwards an mbe at the age of 24. he put his success to good use, funding youth groups for underprivileged children and raising awareness of mental health. musicians and djs have remembered him as an inspiration. if i had one word to describe jamal,
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it would be selfless. withjamal, i never had to question what he was after, or his intentions, because i know he just wanted everyone to be great. i don't know anybody- who has a bad word to say about jamal, and i'm just really glad he got his- flowers when he was alive because one thing he can know, rest assured, he was a legend l and we all knew that, _ and his legacy will really live on. in acton, where he was raised, fans and friends have been leaving flowers and messages of tribute. he was the hero of acton, he was the guy who showed you could make it out without being a drug dealer, without getting involved in crime. jamal was the guy that showed kids from low—income households that you are not limited to what your grades might tell you. my abiding memory of him would be his vision, - how he looked ahead - and how he knew what to do.
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jamal�*s impact on music cannot be overestimated. and as mourners held a vigil in acton tonight, they will have remembered his words. the goal isn't to live forever, the goal is to create something that will. some of the many tributes paid today to jamal edwards — the pioneering musician and entrepreneur, who's died suddenly, at the age of 31. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benedicte paviot, uk correspondent with france 2a, and john stevens, the daily mail's deputy political editor. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the guardian says president putin has "put russia on a collision course with west over ukraine".
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the paper says the kremlin has declared talks are "at a dead end". the ft also leads on putin recognising those two breakaway republics, with a picture of a decree being signed. meanwhile, the metro says, "it's now over to you", as prime minister borisjohnson laid out plans to scrap all legal covid regulations. the daily mail say that the prime minister has thrown off the shackles of restrictions. the i reports on the new plans to live with covid and says "pay for your own test". the telegraph say that putin "warns of bloodshed" as he moves troops into ukraine. that's where we will start with how the guardian is reporting ukraine. vladimir putin puts russia on collision course with the west over ukraine and there was some quite peculiar theatre where the security council in russia was assembled it
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does not happen very often and they were all asked to give their sage advice to president putin as to what he should do. advice to president putin as to what he should dw— he should do. yes, political theatre. — he should do. yes, political theatre. it _ he should do. yes, political theatre, it has _ he should do. yes, political theatre, it has been - he should do. yes, political i theatre, it has been described he should do. yes, political - theatre, it has been described as such and indeed it was. that only a rare event by the theatrics of it, the implications of it, the implications of this with the escalation then tonight. apparently that was supposed to be live streamed but then some eagle eyes and saw that the russian defence minister's watch was five hours earlier but anyway that seems like an eight metre and now old detail. what is far more important is the rambling address to the nation that rush apartment president gave this which i wasjuggling rush apartment president gave this which i was juggling watching the prime minister in dentistry which will come onto about the plan for living with covid—i9 but this seems to be a plan by president putin for living with war, violating completely the integrity and the
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sovereignty of ukraine. since during the day he has decided that he will recognise the breakaway rebel regions of donetsk luhansk in ukraine's east as independent states of the guard he describes this as a pivotal decision that scuttles an existing peace agreement, which i think refers to the minsk agreements came it was clearly now is void and could clear tough new sanctions from the west. could trigger another pretext to invade ukraine and it seems that this is already happening since i think the very latest line out of moscow is that president putin is claiming to send russian, yes, i hope you're sitting down, peacekeepers to protect these republics. this is very scary stuff and as far as a reaction from europe, it's been quite quick, whether it's the eu council president, commission president,
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parliament president, this is a clear violation they say of international law, the sovereignty of ukraine and the president of france who is been so busy notjust going for tete—a—tete with president putin some time ago in that infamous table, but he has said this is clearly, this recognition by president putin of these breakaway rebel regions, president macron is not calling for an emergency meeting of the un security council and targeting european sanctions. speaking of sanctions, president biden has been very quick off the mark, saying that there will be new sanctions targeting russia over and above those that were already being planned if there were to be an invasion. ., ,, ., , ., ., . invasion. yeah, the us has announced sanctions tonight _ invasion. yeah, the us has announced sanctions tonight and _ invasion. yeah, the us has announced sanctions tonight and the _ invasion. yeah, the us has announced sanctions tonight and the foreign - sanctions tonight and the foreign secretary— sanctions tonight and the foreign secretary here has said the uk will be announcing its own sanctions on russia _ be announcing its own sanctions on russia tomorrow, which will then be ratcheted up again if there is an invasion— ratcheted up again if there is an invasion of— ratcheted up again if there is an invasion of ukraine. but there is some _ invasion of ukraine. but there is some interesting analysis tonight on
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the spectator website byjames the spectator website by james forsyth — the spectator website byjames forsyth and he is suggesting that president putin's decided to take this action with these two separatist regions because he knows that europe will be divided on how far to _ that europe will be divided on how far to go _ that europe will be divided on how far to go with this and the sanctions and there is concert in the uk _ sanctions and there is concert in the uk that if europe is divided on this and _ the uk that if europe is divided on this and if— the uk that if europe is divided on this and if there is not a united front in— this and if there is not a united front in response, then this will embolden — front in response, then this will embolden putin and he will go further and we will actually sleep a full on _ further and we will actually sleep a full on invasion of ukraine. for further and we will actually sleep a full on invasion of ukraine.- full on invasion of ukraine. for the moment, thank— full on invasion of ukraine. for the moment, thank you and _ full on invasion of ukraine. for the moment, thank you and let's - full on invasion of ukraine. for the | moment, thank you and let's move on and talk about the other big story of the day, which is the removal in england it has to be said of these restrictions that we have been living with. different parts of the uk, as we know, deal with health as a devolved matter and can make their own decisions. northern ireland ahead of england in some ways. on the metro, now it's over to you, no legal restrictions in place so we are being asked to individually do
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the right thing. this are being asked to individually do the right thing.— the right thing. this is from thursday. _ the right thing. this is from thursday, all— the right thing. this is from thursday, all legal- the right thing. this is from i thursday, all legal restrictions will go — thursday, all legal restrictions will go so _ thursday, all legal restrictions will go so if you test positive for covid, _ will go so if you test positive for covid, you — will go so if you test positive for covid, you will be compelled to oscillate — covid, you will be compelled to oscillate at home but not by the law and april— oscillate at home but not by the law and april to — oscillate at home but not by the law and april to the end of free covid tester— and april to the end of free covid tester most of the population, they willjust be targeted instead. there is some _ willjust be targeted instead. there is some criticism of this and some say the _ is some criticism of this and some say the government is going too fast with this _ say the government is going too fast with this but the argument that chris— with this but the argument that chris wood it used, the chief medicot— chris wood it used, the chief medical officer in england, made of the press _ medical officer in england, made of the press conference alongside boris johnson _ the press conference alongside boris johnson tonight was that with other things— johnson tonight was that with other things like nora virus, if you get them _ things like nora virus, if you get them people just do, senses of the best thing — them people just do, senses of the best thing for them to do is to stay at home _ best thing for them to do is to stay at home. you necessarily need a law in place _ at home. you necessarily need a law in place to— at home. you necessarily need a law in place to prevent people that that's— in place to prevent people that that's the right and sensible thing to do and — that's the right and sensible thing to do. and so what they are dealing with coronavirus now is bringing this into — with coronavirus now is bringing this into like most of the diseases we wiii— this into like most of the diseases we will know the right thing to do is stay— we will know the right thing to do is stay at home if you are not feeling — is stay at home if you are not feeling well, not to come into the
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workpiece — feeling well, not to come into the workplace and we don't need a lot of tetus to _ workplace and we don't need a lot of tetus to do _ workplace and we don't need a lot of telus to do that. but workplace and we don't need a lot of telus to do that.— telus to do that. but the argument has been made _ telus to do that. but the argument has been made that _ telus to do that. but the argument has been made that at _ telus to do that. but the argument has been made that at a _ telus to do that. but the argument has been made that at a time - has been made that at a time when there is a cost—of—living crisis, if you've got to buy your own tests, some will have to make some very difficult choices and potentially putting themselves at risk and other people that they come into contact with who are vulnerable. and it is again a division of the haves and the have—nots, that is the argument. yes, it is a gap that has existed during the pandemic, very difficult choices for people now to make and as you say whether it's the rise of fuel, of energy prices, of food very noticeable for everybody, so bills going up, wages not, the end of self isolation payments and then you have to pay for tests, there are no longer there be this is all one month earlier. the labour party thinks that this should have continued for at least another month and my sense from sir chris woody
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and my sense from sir chris woody and sir patrick vallance was also some can particularly ask her patrick, urging some caution. how quickly is that wrapping up of testing and of course the uk is world leading and on that world beating, oramongst world leading and on that world beating, or amongst the leaders on economic sequencing, but how quickly could that be wrapped up and would free test actually be available? we have seen weather here in central london or across the uk real difficulties while tests were frequent so we were told there was no problem with the stock, but there were problems with the stock insert language distribution. so i think this is worrying, and it's all very well relying on personal responsibility but i think many people would argue that the people who receive questionnaires including the prime minister himself and headed for the men by last friday evening and we will see, we must not prejudge what the outcome of the ongoing police investigation or indeed the full unredacted report will say whatever either or both of
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those come out, this is just yet another choice and i have not even included people who cannot bear to pay for their heating and are having to make difficult choices already. so i think that that is a lot to ask. ., , ., ,., , ask. the delete mail, your paper, john, ask. the delete mail, your paper, john. boris _ ask. the delete mail, your paper, john, boris throws _ ask. the delete mail, your paper, john, boris throws off _ ask. the delete mail, your paper, john, boris throws off the - ask. the delete mail, your paper, l john, boris throws off the shackles. that figure, 840 million lost a's in school, school is very concerned but there are different sorts of environments as a lot of children have not been vaccinated and had not even been eligible to be vaccinated, so again without these restrictions, teachers are feeling somewhat at peril. teachers are feeling somewhat at eril. �* . ., peril. and the tricky thing for the government _ peril. and the tricky thing for the government has _ peril. and the tricky thing for the government has been _ peril. and the tricky thing for the government has been that - peril. and the tricky thing for the government has been that there| peril. and the tricky thing for the i government has been that there is peril. and the tricky thing for the - government has been that there is a cost either— government has been that there is a cost either way. you know, if you have these — cost either way. you know, if you have these lockdown restrictions in piece. _ have these lockdown restrictions in place. you — have these lockdown restrictions in place, you see the impact that has on the _ place, you see the impact that has on the economy, on businesses, on our high _ on the economy, on businesses, on our high streets, on places like hospitals — our high streets, on places like hospitals which have got record waiting — hospitals which have got record waiting lists and on schools where you have — waiting lists and on schools where you have seen a lot of children
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missing — you have seen a lot of children missing days particularly hurts those from disadvantaged backgrounds. and on the other— disadvantaged backgrounds. and on the other hand, if you get rid of restrictions too quickly, there is concern — restrictions too quickly, there is concern that you're going to start seeing _ concern that you're going to start seeing coronavirus spreading more and new— seeing coronavirus spreading more and new variants returning. and at the press — and new variants returning. and at the press conference tonight, boris johnson _ the press conference tonight, boris johnson was trying to claim that there _ johnson was trying to claim that there is— johnson was trying to claim that there is not a big divide between gung _ there is not a big divide between gung ho — there is not a big divide between gung ho politicians and cautious and anxious— gung ho politicians and cautious and anxious scientist, but i think you actually— anxious scientist, but i think you actually did see there was slightly different— actually did see there was slightly different attitudes from the podium tonight _ different attitudes from the podium tonight. we heard a lot from the scientists— tonight. we heard a lot from the scientists about the possibility of new variants, about concerns about but i _ new variants, about concerns about hut i think— new variants, about concerns about but i think at one point to make is that we _ but i think at one point to make is that we are — but i think at one point to make is that we are getting rid of everything but the restrictions are going _ everything but the restrictions are going but— everything but the restrictions are going but we will still have some testing. — going but we will still have some testing, there is a big survey where they keep _ testing, there is a big survey where they keep track of how to run a country. that is going to stay and people _ country. that is going to stay and people who are most vulnerable are still going _ people who are most vulnerable are still going to be able to get access to free _ still going to be able to get access to free tests and anti—viral drugs.
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and as _ to free tests and anti—viral drugs. and as she — to free tests and anti—viral drugs. and as she says, one of the concerns is that— and as she says, one of the concerns is that if— and as she says, one of the concerns is that if there is some concern will test — is that if there is some concern will test to— is that if there is some concern will test to be able to come back guite _ will test to be able to come back quite quickly and scientists say that it — quite quickly and scientists say that it will be in place so if we do suddenly— that it will be in place so if we do suddenly see a new variants or loads more _ suddenly see a new variants or loads more infections that within a couple of weeks _ more infections that within a couple of weeks you will be able to get back— of weeks you will be able to get back to — of weeks you will be able to get back to a — of weeks you will be able to get back to a point we are never people can get— back to a point we are never people can get tests very easily. let�*s can get tests very easily. let's look at the _ can get tests very easily. let's look at the financial _ can get tests very easily. let's look at the financial times. i can get tests very easily. let�*s look at the financial times. johnson calls into covid legal curves as cabinet handles over the bill for testing whichjohnjust cabinet handles over the bill for testing whichjohn just mentioned. testing which john just mentioned. this testing whichjohn just mentioned. this has been expensive and it has been for every country in the world, but the issue is we need to be, according to sir patrick vallance and we were hearing at the press conference today, the chief scientific adviser, that we have got to be fleet of foot and we must be able to get back into some of these restrictions at pace, he said. yes. but of course _ restrictions at pace, he said. yes. but of course everything - restrictions at pace, he said. yes. but of course everything has - restrictions at pace, he said. jazz but of course everything has a cost but rather than have to have
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antivirus, i think it will be so much simpler if we did forjust a little while longer have these free test. i think that gap you referred to before is very important but what is actually eminently edifying and possibly mortify and possibly not for borisjohnson is the hadley continued all the way into when the cabinet meeting was supposed to take place. so we had the chancellor arguing with the health secretary and it seems that the chancellor is the one who won the date because the catheter had to agree that he would absorb £1 billion of costs according to the ft from within the nhs budget tjy to the ft from within the nhs budget by reprioritizing spending possible we know that the budget and all the plans about social care, the backlog of operations, the cancer, heart attack detection, all these things are way behind. i think that's quite worrying to hear that and clearly
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the labour leader has called on government to publish data supporting, sentiment data supporting, sentiment data supporting this end of the legal restrictions and requirement to self—isolate and i think that's quite a fair thing to ask. and i think the day of freedom that businesses, many businesses and asked for and longed for because they have been hurting very badly during the last two years is a day of huge, huge considerable anxiety for anybody who is immunosuppressed and just relying on personal responsibility, we have seen that some all the way up to government have not, it would seem, taken that personal responsibility, so there will be very anxious time for people and i think we all have to hope that people will behave very responsibly and that is indeed the great majority of people during the pandemic did but with the bat is simple we have seen, whether it's a minister having to resign, or
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others, i

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