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tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 21, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines — president putin has signed a decree recognising the independence of two breakaway areas of ukraine controlled by russian—backed separatists. in a televised address, he said the donetsk and luhansk areas were ancient russian territories and called the ukrainian government a puppet regime. the announcement is likely to raise tensions with the west significantly. the european union has condemned the move as a blatent violation of international law. it said it would react firmly in solidarity with ukraine. the british government says england's remaining covid laws will be abandoned. the prime minister, borisjohnson, said people would no longer be legally required to isolate after a positive test. four days of hearings have opened at the international court ofjustice into allegations that the government of myanmar committed genocide against the muslim rohingya minority. human rights groups have been protesting outside the court in the hague.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benedicte paviot of france 2a and john stevens of the daily mail. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the times says president putin is "sending tanks into ukraine" after he recognised the independence of the two separatist regions tonight. the guardian says president putin has "put russia on collision course with west over ukraine". the paper says the kremlin has declared talks are "at a dead end". the ft also leads on putin recognising those two breakaway republics with a picture of the decree beng signed. the telegraph say that putin "warns of bloodshed" as he moves troops into ukraine. meanwhile, the metro says, "it's now over to you", as prime minister borisjohnson lays
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out plans to scrap all legal covid regulations. the daily mirror has the headline "lateral blow" in response to scrapping free covid testing as part of the prime minister's decision to drop all legal covid restrictions. the daily mail today say that the prime minister has thrown off the shackles in response to his decision to scrap all legal covid restrictions. the i reports on the new plans to live with covid and says "pay for your own test". let's start with what is happening in eastern ukraine in these two breakaway republics. the times says that putin sends tanks into ukraine, and there is a picture of him there surrounded by phones which look sort of terribly analogue really. president deploys peacekeeping forces, we are told, not how the ukrainians will see them. ha. forces, we are told, not how the ukrainians will see them. no. this is an outright _ ukrainians will see them. no. this is an outright lie. _ ukrainians will see them. no. this is an outright lie. what _ ukrainians will see them. no. this
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is an outright lie. what president. is an outright lie. what president putin is tonight calling a peacekeeping force is a military force entering a democratic, sovereign state, an independent state that clearly what we learned from the very, very long rambling russian president's nation address tonight was that really what mr pruden is deploring is the fact that there is no longer the ussr. it's clearly not just about there is no longer the ussr. it's clearly notjust about nato or future membership of ukraine, it's about the collapse of the ussr, its loss of power and the independence of ukraine. so, what president putin in a very typical putin playbook is doing, having heightened the threat, having a shared amongst others, whether it's president biden or
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president macron, that he was not intent on war but was very much just doing military exercises around ukraine, he is sending in military forces under the guise, which nobody is going to believe, of peacekeeping missions into donetsk and luhansk to protect the people there. and this military drumbeat is extremely worrying. we have seen it condemned very quickly by the us president biden, the white house is again going to be announcing sanctions and we have seen president macron who is been so active in the last few weeks going to meet for six or seven hours face—to—face if one can say at the end of that very long table, the russian president. borisjohnson russian president. boris johnson tonight russian president. borisjohnson tonight calling president zelinski and we have got a condemnation from the eu commission president, parliament president, council president and talk of sanctions. the thing is that clearly the russian president has decided this does not
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worry him, and we have got boris apparently it was going to chair a cobra meeting tomorrow morning at 6:30am to discuss the latest developments in ukraine and to co—ordinate the uk response, including interestingly agreeing a certificate package of sessions to be introduced immediately, and he is going to be looking at sending more defensive support to ukraine at the request of the ukrainian government. so things are moving very quickly. very quickly indeed and the guardian's headline is putin puts russia on a collision course with the west over ukraine and despite all of these protestations by president putin and the foreign minister over many weeks and months that there is no intention at all of invading western leaders, nato allies all not believing that apparent reassurance at all, but i wonder how many of them foresaw this particular turn of events? we wonder how many of them foresaw this particular turn of events?— particular turn of events? we have seen a massive _ particular turn of events? we have
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seen a massive turnaround - particular turn of events? we have seen a massive turnaround in - particular turn of events? we have seen a massive turnaround in the. seen a massive turnaround in the last 24— seen a massive turnaround in the last 24 hours. the last couple of weeks, putin has been mocking the west, _ weeks, putin has been mocking the west, saying the us is saying we are going _ west, saying the us is saying we are going to invade ukraine but we are going to _ going to invade ukraine but we are going to do nothing of the sort, and even this_ going to do nothing of the sort, and even this morning we were still hearing — even this morning we were still hearing the possibility that we might— hearing the possibility that we might have putin holding a meeting withjoe _ might have putin holding a meeting withjoe biden to might have putin holding a meeting with joe biden to try and find some way forward and finding it a mimetic solution, but it's quite difficult to see — solution, but it's quite difficult to see where those talks go now. this is_ to see where those talks go now. this is the — to see where those talks go now. this is the first big test of the west— this is the first big test of the west and interesting to see tomorrow what the _ west and interesting to see tomorrow what the different countries do agree — what the different countries do agree to — what the different countries do agree to do when it comes to sanctions _ agree to do when it comes to sanctions and i think part of the reason — sanctions and i think part of the reason that boris johnson sanctions and i think part of the reason that borisjohnson is holding that meeting at 6:30am tomorrow is so that— that meeting at 6:30am tomorrow is so that they can quickly decide also think the _ so that they can quickly decide also think the uk is going to do to show that there — think the uk is going to do to show that there is going to be swift and firm response from the uk. but i think— firm response from the uk. but i think there — firm response from the uk. but i think there is concern that there might— think there is concern that there might be — think there is concern that there might be a — think there is concern that there might be a slight reluctance from other— might be a slight reluctance from other countries. this is not a full-hiown_ other countries. this is not a full—blown invasion, as you say, this is—
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full—blown invasion, as you say, this is russia recognising these two countries, — this is russia recognising these two countries, to separatist regions and then sending in troops under the guise _ then sending in troops under the guise of— then sending in troops under the guise of peacekeeping. but there are concerns— guise of peacekeeping. but there are concerns other countries in europe might— concerns other countries in europe might not— concerns other countries in europe might not go the full way with sanctions and there might be decision— sanctions and there might be decision and there is concern that if countries — decision and there is concern that if countries in the west are divided on what _ if countries in the west are divided on what to— if countries in the west are divided on what to do when it comes to sanctions. _ on what to do when it comes to sanctions, then putin will be emboldened and might have been put off going _ emboldened and might have been put off going further with a full— blown invasion— off going further with a full— blown invasion but he will think that fine, — invasion but he will think that fine, it— invasion but he will think that fine, it is— invasion but he will think that fine, it is divided and does not know— fine, it is divided and does not know what— fine, it is divided and does not know what to do and i will go ahead and start— know what to do and i will go ahead and start putting my troops and ukraine — and start putting my troops and ukraine. he and start putting my troops and ukraine. , , . and start putting my troops and ukraine. , ., , ., ., _ , ukraine. he says that diplomacy is finished, talks _ ukraine. he says that diplomacy is finished, talks are _ ukraine. he says that diplomacy is finished, talks are over, _ ukraine. he says that diplomacy is finished, talks are over, so - ukraine. he says that diplomacy is l finished, talks are over, so whether that can be salvaged does not look very likely tonight, does it? lesson want to about the removal of the legal covid requirements, restrictions, protections depending on your view they have been announced today by borisjohnson and here they are on the daily mail.
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boris throws off the shackles but at the top there, there is a sort of recap of the costs in human terms, the costs in financial terms of this pandemic. the costs in financial terms of this andemic. . ~ . the costs in financial terms of this andemic. ., ~ ., ::' , pandemic. yakima 701 days as we were first told to stay _ pandemic. yakima 701 days as we were first told to stay at _ pandemic. yakima 701 days as we were first told to stay at home _ pandemic. yakima 701 days as we were first told to stay at home by _ pandemic. yakima 701 days as we were first told to stay at home by eight - first told to stay at home by eight borisjohnson. three lockdowns, for £10 billion spent, forces you 9 million covid tests, 1.5 million cancelled operations. that is staggering. 840 million lost days in school, that's extraordinary, how do you catch that up? more doom laden press conference as anyone can bear, says the daily mail. i don't think it is the problem with a press conferences but i think it's a problem that if people make laws, tell you what you need to do to help not spread the pandemic and then
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allegedly not follow those rules, i think that's when that is more than one can bear, when one has lost loved ones, not be able to say goodbye to them and all the rest of the grief that the great majority of the grief that the great majority of the population has endured one way or another. we all know or have been hit directly by this. of course with the daily mail is underlining very much is these two years of off on lock down, there's the human cost in the financial cost but whatjohn was saying in the first review should have been a really important victory day and that is fully what boris johnson wanted, did not turn out to be a victory day that he had thought. because of the haggling between the health secretary and the chancellor, tightening the purse strings after, yes, of course it has cost the nation, a human cost in a
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financial cost, in a very big way and there are many businesses that have gone to the wall and more that may do so. and many, many that are struggling and need to see that lie at the end of the tunnel, but how this will play out in offices up and down the land for those of us who did not have to go into work and could, unlike those people like bus drivers or supermarket workers who did have to go in, and how you have personal responsibility is not necessarily staying at home if you do have covid and maybe you don't know if you have covid because they were supposed to go and buy a no longer free to were supposed to go and buy a no longerfree to ask were supposed to go and buy a no longer free to ask for £5, all of this in the middle of a cost—of—living crisis, these are real dilemmas for people. everything is going up except wages. so real dilemmas for people. everything is going up except wages.— is going up except wages. so people will not have — is going up except wages. so people will not have much _ is going up except wages. so people will not have much of a _ is going up except wages. so people will not have much of a choice - is going up except wages. so people will not have much of a choice in - will not have much of a choice in whether they buy a test or not. i will be slightly inconsiderate, john, and not let you comment on your own paper. i'm going to move your own paper. i'm going to move you on think about the daily mirror
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and i hope that that's acceptable to break with convention but lateral below is the test headline there with free test asked but experts say cutting curves with the lowest paid. also people who are clinically vulnerable, still some of whom have been locked down never ending for some if they are immune system is compromised. they particularly tonight will be worrying. this compromised. they particularly tonight will be worrying.- tonight will be worrying. this is the decision _ tonight will be worrying. this is the decision of— tonight will be worrying. this is the decision of free _ tonight will be worrying. this is the decision of free testing - tonight will be worrying. this is i the decision of free testing which will end — the decision of free testing which will end in— the decision of free testing which will end in april for most people, although— will end in april for most people, although it sounds like the vulnerable will still be able to get hold of— vulnerable will still be able to get hold of them and you can see by the government— hold of them and you can see by the government is doing this. testing has been — government is doing this. testing has been costing £2 billion a month. that's_ has been costing £2 billion a month. that's obviously an awful lot of money, — that's obviously an awful lot of money, and the government thinks that at— money, and the government thinks that at some point you have to bring that at some point you have to bring that to _ that at some point you have to bring that to an— that at some point you have to bring that to an end. and i think a lot of people _ that to an end. and i think a lot of people will— that to an end. and i think a lot of people will accept that. i think the timing will be slightly awkward for the government, though, coming at the government, though, coming at the start— the government, though, coming at the start of— the government, though, coming at the start of april and as she mentioned it, we know that the
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energy— mentioned it, we know that the energy price caps with how much money— energy price caps with how much money will pay for their gas and electricity, that's going to change the start— electricity, that's going to change the start of april. you've got the planned — the start of april. you've got the planned heights in national insurance which means it may people's— insurance which means it may people's tax bill will go up and that's— people's tax bill will go up and that's coming in at the beginning of april and _ that's coming in at the beginning of april and now you have also seen testing _ april and now you have also seen testing going to come in. i think you're _ testing going to come in. i think you're probably going to leave stockpiling the free tests before then and — stockpiling the free tests before then and i know that personally last week but— then and i know that personally last week but i_ then and i know that personally last week but i know that these efforts were coming, i ordered a couple of boxes _ were coming, i ordered a couple of boxes of— were coming, i ordered a couple of boxes of rapid tests in the post and you have _ boxes of rapid tests in the post and you have seen the government today already— you have seen the government today already start to limit how many boxes — already start to limit how many boxes you _ already start to limit how many boxes you can order. limiting it to one box— boxes you can order. limiting it to one box of lateral flows every 24 hours _ one box of lateral flows every 24 hours and they have already changed it to only— hours and they have already changed it to only ordering one box every 72 hours _ it to only ordering one box every 72 hours i _ it to only ordering one box every 72 hours i think— it to only ordering one box every 72 hours i think you might see many people _ hours i think you might see many people stockpiling on tests before they start charging for them. i�*m they start charging for them. i'm sure, they start charging for them. i'm sure. you _ they start charging for them. i“n sure, you were right and you have a few weeks to do it and that is a system probably crashing a few times if you are trying to get them
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tonight. let's get the financial times withjohnson calls into covid legal curves as cabinet hackles of rebel for testing. legal curves as cabinet hackles of rebel fortesting. i'm legal curves as cabinet hackles of rebel for testing. i'm sure the cost involved and how money was spent is going to be a fairly important plank of the public inquiry into the pandemic that we are told is going to happen. pandemic that we are told is going to ha en. ~ , , pandemic that we are told is going tohauen.~ , , . pandemic that we are told is going tohauen. ,, to happen. well, this is eric cost and then the _ to happen. well, this is eric cost and then the unnecessary - to happen. well, this is eric cost and then the unnecessary costs. | to happen. well, this is eric cost - and then the unnecessary costs. but we will let the inquiry deal with that whenever that actually starts and whenever we actually get the result. that could be quite a long time. so what should have been, as i was saying earlier, a really important day, the haggling continued all the way into downing street as a cabinet meeting was due to start, ministers walked in and were told to leave because it was not actually going to happen because of this important haggling that was
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going on still at the hour between the health secretary and the chancellor. and it turns out that the chancellor one out, so the health department has agreed to absorb £1 billion of cost from within the nhs budget by reprioritizing spending and interestingly under this plan, the office of national statistics surveillance operation will continue. that's absolutely crucial, as we heard sir patrick vallance and from sir chris whitty because there will be other sessions. they are likely to be more dangerous and will be significantly crucial will be for the wrapping up of testing that will have been let go to actually start up have been let go to actually start up again quickly and what will be very important also is the economic sequencing to spot mutations. now thatis sequencing to spot mutations. now that is an area that the united kingdom is an absolute world leader
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on, and that is absolutely also one of the big tools in the armoury of the uk, along with a vaccination programme fulsome and very briefly i want to the labour leader calling in parliament in response to the prime minister's statement on the government to publish data supporting the ending of that illegal —— legal requirements of isa life is that there will be very important to see if that is indeed forthcoming. important to see if that is indeed forthcoming-— important to see if that is indeed forthcoming. thank you. the final covid story. _ forthcoming. thank you. the final covid story, the _ forthcoming. thank you. the final covid story, the daily _ forthcoming. thank you. the final covid story, the daily telegraph, | covid story, the daily telegraph, jean, fresh butcherjabs likely for all over 50s from the autumn and a reminder that immunity needs to be replenished from time to time. this is free boosters _ replenished from time to time. this is free boosters that are going to id is free boosters that are going to go and _ is free boosters that are going to go and are — is free boosters that are going to go and are going to start off i think with over 75 and those who are the most _ think with over 75 and those who are the most vulnerable from next month and that— the most vulnerable from next month and that it seems quite likely in the autumn they are going to extend
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that to _ the autumn they are going to extend that to all— the autumn they are going to extend that to all over 50s. but as she said, _ that to all over 50s. but as she said. this — that to all over 50s. but as she said, this should have been a great day for— said, this should have been a great day for borisjohnson. said, this should have been a great day for boris johnson. he said, this should have been a great day for borisjohnson. he has not had that— day for borisjohnson. he has not had that many good days in the last couple of _ had that many good days in the last couple of months and now announcing all these _ couple of months and now announcing all these great freedoms of people and the _ all these great freedoms of people and the end of the pandemic as it were, _ and the end of the pandemic as it were, that — and the end of the pandemic as it were, that should have been great but instead is been overshadowed by these _ but instead is been overshadowed by these rows— but instead is been overshadowed by these rows in the cabinet and i think— these rows in the cabinet and i think a — these rows in the cabinet and i think a lot _ these rows in the cabinet and i think a lot of people in the tory party— think a lot of people in the tory party will— think a lot of people in the tory party will be thinking that boris johnson — party will be thinking that boris johnson hasjust handed ammunition to labour— johnson hasjust handed ammunition to labour party today by having these _ to labour party today by having these cabinet rows and the scene of ministers turning up to number ten and then— ministers turning up to number ten and then immediately being turned away _ and then immediately being turned away but— and then immediately being turned away. but there was some good news for hint _ away. but there was some good news for hint you — away. but there was some good news for him. you saw some of the backbenchers who have been particularly critical of boris johnson _ particularly critical of boris johnson over the last couple of months. — johnson over the last couple of months, people like mark harper and people _ months, people like mark harper and people like david davis who had been saying _ people like david davis who had been saying that boris johnson's time people like david davis who had been saying that borisjohnson's time is ”p saying that borisjohnson's time is up and _ saying that borisjohnson's time is up and he — saying that borisjohnson's time is up and he needs to go as prime minister~ — up and he needs to go as prime minister. they are some of the tory backbenchers and even parliament yesterday — backbenchers and even parliament yesterday and praising him for taking — yesterday and praising him for taking the steps out of lockdown.
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yes, _ taking the steps out of lockdown. yes. a _ taking the steps out of lockdown. yes, a peculiar old game, politics. fascinating to watch, but, gosh, you have to have a strong stomach. let's finish with the daily telegraph, shall we chris met betamax police left behind by criminals. last hour, just explaining in case you were too young, you at home, to remember it betamax, a betamax and sub a video tape that did not really take off. vhs won the day. but now there are all sorts of defunct and the argument here is that police are being left behind by technology. i think that's a sufficient explanation. but there is a serious point here that there is a review of policing being undertaken by sir michael barber, a former government adviser, and he is is it about a crisis of confidence in the police. well, there is a crisis alas of confidence in the police. it needs to prepare for the future, and it
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will seen that sir michael barber in a speech that he is going to give tomorrow, tuesday, is going to say that a fundamental reform is needed to meet those future challenges, so he is going to give several warnings, i think, he is going to give several warnings, ithink, and he says he is going to give several warnings, i think, and he says it's really important that they will have more recruiting any knowledges that there is but he is really saying that there needs to be fundamental turning point in the modernisation of this vital public service. he says and he will say i think it matters deeply to us all and he talks, he says there is a huge societal technological and environmental changes happening, extremely quickly, yet too often policing seems stuck in the past, hardly fit for the president, let alone for the future. now he will acknowledge as i think that people would that there is a lot of hard work that is done by police officers
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across the land and i have gotten the report is about england and so we should point that out, but he says that despite that, it is absolutely vital to the future operation of the police if you are going to police by consent the police be seen to really reform fundamentally. so that will be of course worry for certain police officers, but it is important that somebody does review like this and if they can him i think two years and he says the police are stretched far too thin... and he says the police are stretched far too thin. . ._ far too thin... yes, absolutely they act like social— far too thin... yes, absolutely they act like social workers _ far too thin... yes, absolutely they act like social workers and - far too thin... yes, absolutely they act like social workers and a - far too thin... yes, absolutely they act like social workers and a quickl act like social workers and a quick comment from you, john. it does seem if there is a lot of cycle in this review, just briefly.— if there is a lot of cycle in this review, just briefly. one of the hrases review, just briefly. one of the phrases is _ review, just briefly. one of the phrases is how _ review, just briefly. one of the phrases is how the _ review, just briefly. one of the phrases is how the thin - review, just briefly. one of the phrases is how the thin blue i review, just briefly. one of the i phrases is how the thin blue line has been — phrases is how the thin blue line has been spread too thinly and there is concern _ has been spread too thinly and there is concern that police are spending too much — is concern that police are spending too much time dealing with things like mental health, family breakdowns rather than their court
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role which — breakdowns rather than their court role which is obviously tackling crime — role which is obviously tackling crime. , ., . ~' role which is obviously tackling crime. , ., ., ,, i. , role which is obviously tackling crime. , ., . ~' ,, , . that's it for the papers this hour. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening with the guardian's deputy political editor jessica elgot and kieran andrews, who's the scottish political editor at the times. dojoin us then if you can, but for now, goodnight. hello, i'm marc edwards with your sport. novak djokovic has won his first match of the year. it comes after missing last month's australian open due to his deportation from the country as a result of not being vaccinated against covid—i9. the world number one made light work of wild card lorenzo musetti at the dubai tennis championships, beating the italian in straight
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sets injust 73 minutes. the serb will play either russia's karen khachanov or australia's alex de minaur next. andy murray came from a set down to beat australian qualifier christopher o'connell in three sets. he was really turning on the style and showing his athleticism as he set up match point. very happy with that. the victory comes a week after murray suffered one of the heaviest defeats of his career, 6—0, 6—1 against roberto bautista agut in doha. he'll now face either alejandro davidovich fokina or world number ten jannik sinner. chelsea are in chapmions league action on tuesday as they welcome lille to stamford bridge, but all the pre—match talk has centred around their misfiring star striker romelu lukaku, and in particular his recent premier league outing at the weekend. chelsea's most expensive player, who was signed at the start of the season for $115 million, only touched the ball seven times in saturday's win at crystal palace, the lowest number any player has managed in a 90—minute premier league appearance since at least 2003, when that data was first recorded.
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it can be like this, and this is of course not what we want and of course not what romelu wants, but it's also not like... it's not a time to laugh about him and makejokes about him. he is in the spotlight, and of course we will protect him because he is our player. now, at the peak of his career, jack wilshere was seen as one of the best midfielders in england. but his career has been heavily affected by injuries, and he had been without a club for eight months. now the former arsenal player has found a new home in denmark. wilshere has joined aarhus, who play in the danish super league. the midfielder has signed a deal until the summer with an option to extend and will wear the number ten shirt. if you'd asked me ten years ago would i be in denmark, probably no. but the way that things have happened and the way that my career has gone, i'm here and that's football. some of these things always happen in football, you know, with previous players.
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but one thing i can say is i've been training for a long period of time now, and i feel really good. let's bring you up to date with all the squad news for this weekend's six nations, and a boost for wales ahead of their crunch tie with england at twickenham. taulupe faletau is back in the squad after recovering from injury. the british and irish lions back rower played 80 minutes on saturday in his second match back for bath after seven months out injured. faletau comes into the squad following wales' victory over scotland in round two, having lost their opener to ireland. scotland head coach gregor townsend has added six players to the squad to face france at murrayfield on saturday. jonny gray was among the big names to drop out due to injury. uncapped glasgow warriors duo ollie smith and kiran mcdonald are draughted in, along with simon berghan, oli kebble, marshall sykes and james lang. and james lowe is back in the ireland squad for their upcoming match against italy on sunday. the leinster wing missed the first two matches of this year's six nations with injury. his club team—matejimmy o'brien has
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been given a call—up, too. next to golf, and the proposed saudi—backed super league is "dead in the water" according to rory mcilroy after two more big—name golfers ruled themselves out ofjoining the breakaway league. bryson dechambeau and dustinjohnson have reaffirmed their commitment to the pga tour. let's hear from our golf correspondent ian carter on the latest developments. johnson, he actually used the pga tour's social media outlets to outline he is actually still very much behind the established american circuit. and shortly after that, bryson dechambeau took to his own social media channels to say that as long as the best players in the world were continuing to play on the pga tour, that's exactly where he would continue to play his golf. there are, we think, some players who are still interested, but, significantly, all of the big names, all of the younger stars have aligned themselves with the pga tour. without the big names, without the likes of dechambeau and johnson, who were the big names that i think greg norman and his colleagues in terms
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of trying to launch this super league were hoping that they would be able to hang this whole project around... without them, it does look dead in the water. disability golf has received a boost with a revamped and renamed golf for the disabled tour announced today, with more tournaments and investment for the european disabled golf association. the dp world tour, formally known as the european tour, will increase its support to take the tour semi—professional. it'll also feature events at the porsche open in germany and bmw championship at wentworth for the first time. mark cavendish has claimed his second win of the year with victory on stage two of the uae tour. cavendish bounced back after missing out on the green jersey at last week's tour of oman. the 36—year—old edged out yasper philipsen in abu dhabi. he's now up to third overall, just six seconds behind the belgian who leads the race. and that's all the sport for now.
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hello. the weather is looking a little calmer and quieter for the rest of this week. no new named storms, but still some wet and windy weather at times. and of course we've got the legacy of all those storms, still some flooding. this is the picture in shrewsbury in shropshire. and it's really through the rest of the day, we're going to be continuing to see flood warnings in force, particularly across england and wales. there's also been a few for scotland as well. now, all down to the fact that we have got another band of rain approaching from the north—west, so some of that rain's going to be falling on areas that really could do without it. still quite a lot of isobars on the map, so it's going to be another breezy day on tuesday, but certainly not those disruptive winds that we've seen recently. to start the day, it'll be coldest towards the east. that's where we will have had the clearest skies for longest overnight, but rain already across northern ireland and scotland. could be quite heavy through tuesday morning with some blustery winds. that sweeps across northern england into wales, too, and then it will tend to become
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quite light and patchy as it reaches the south east later in the day. it'll be followed by sunshine and showers. some of those showers wintry over the higher ground of scotland, and gusts of wind around about 40 mph for some of us. so, anotherfairly cool—feeling day across scotland and northern ireland where you're exposed to the windier conditions, too. but reasonably mild still further south and east. temperatures about 13 degrees, but turning colder behind that cold front as it sweeps eastwards. now, overnight, then, we're in that colder air mass and lighter winds and clearer spells, too, so that's the recipe for quite a chilly night as we head into the early hours of wednesday. could be a touch of frost, particularly across england and wales. it will cloud over a bit from the north, bringing some rain across northern parts of scotland as we start the day. so, after that fairly cool, but mostly dry start towards the south at least, what we will see is this weather frontjust making inroads into scotland and northern ireland, so trying to push in. bumping into higher pressure further south. so, that will bring outbreaks of rain, perhaps a bit of mountain snow to scotland, later in the day into northern ireland, perhaps a few showers in the far north west of england later on. but for much of england and wales, thankfully we're looking
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at a drier day on wednesday. some sunshine around, temperatures around about 10—11 degrees in the south, but to the north of that cold front, only around about seven degrees there for stornoway for instance. and then we're looking at a colder day more widely on thursday with some blustery showers, another fairly windy—feeling day, but thankfully things looking a little bit warmer, drier and brighter by the time we get to friday. bye for now.
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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. russian president vladimir putin says he will recognise two breakaway regions of east ukraine and he's sending troops there. translation: announcing the decisions taken today, i'm sure with the support of the russian citizens, all the patriotic forces of the country. we'll have the latest reaction to president putin's move from washington and around the world.also in the programme. the international court begins hearings into alleged genocide of the rohinga people in myanmar. all covid restrictions in england will end in three days' time —
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despite the concerns of some experts.

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