Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 22, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

10:30 pm
we have no clarity on how much of the covid testing infrastructure the uk government intends to retain, no clarity on how much investment will support it in future, and no clarity on whether the treasury will provide additional resources or demand instead that funding is taken from elsewhere in the health budget. the challenge is that covid testing is administered by the uk government and while the scottish government says they want free pcr and lateral flow tests to continue, free mass testing will end in england in april. the scottish government seems to want to retain lateral flow tests at the point of care. it is possible that this will go in line with the free prescription scheme of the scottish government, and that then the costs would have to come out of the scottish government's health budget. testing, the latest area where four—nation policy diverges, as we find our way out of this pandemic.
10:31 pm
lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. before we go, a final word on the escalating crisis in ukraine with our chief international correspondent lyse doucet, who's in the capital kyiv. can you give us a sense of what people in the capital are experiencing right now and what their real look at the possibilities is, how would you sum it up? well. their real look at the possibilities is, how would you sum it up? well, i think the news _ is, how would you sum it up? well, i think the news at _ is, how would you sum it up? well, i think the news at ten _ is, how would you sum it up? well, i think the news at ten tonight - is, how would you sum it up? well, i think the news at ten tonight has - think the news at ten tonight has reminded our viewers that this crisis in ukraine has whipped up a storm that has gone right around the world. but here in kyiv, look at the stunning skyline behind me, the mood is calm, strangely calm. but last night, around this time when president putin had just given his speech in which he basically said that ukraine was a fake country and shouldn't exist, i heard a
10:32 pm
politicians using the word "terrified" for the first time, terrified of what could lie ahead. and to day began, as it often does, with president volodymyr zelenskyy what are you waiting for to take action? russian aggression is already here and now tonight ukrainian politicians are looking at the fine detail of those sanctions that are being imposed in one country after the other. president volodymyr zelenskyy has called up reservist saying it's not a general mobilisation, just for a special period, he says, holding out the hope that diplomacy can prevail. ukrainians, well for many weeks now, many have been packing a bag just in case, learning how to shoot a gun just in case. some have moved houses but for the most part, ukrainians are staying put and saying that if it comes to it, and they hope it doesn't, they will fight, because
10:33 pm
perhaps their neighbour, president putin, describing their country as a fake country, has reminded ukrainiansjust fake country, has reminded ukrainians just tell ukrainian they are. ukrainians 'ust tell ukrainian they are. , , ukrainians 'ust tell ukrainian they are. ,, . ukrainians 'ust tell ukrainian they are. i, . , ukrainians 'ust tell ukrainian they are. ,, . , ., are. lyse doucet, interesting to talk to you _ are. lyse doucet, interesting to talk to you once _ are. lyse doucet, interesting to talk to you once again. - are. lyse doucet, interesting to talk to you once again. our- are. lyse doucet, interesting to| talk to you once again. our chief international correspondent in kyiv. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the guardian's chief political correspondence and scottish times political correspondence. the daily telegraph
10:34 pm
has president biden saying that president putin has begun to invade ukraine and is preparing to advance deeper into the country. the metro has borisjohnson promising that russia will turn into a pariah state as he announced the first raft of sanctions. the prime minister has been accused of tepid measures whereas germany holds a key gas pipeline. financial times has vladimir putin sang the best solution to the crisis would be for ukraine to demilitarise, abandon its goal tojoin nato. the russian president says... according to the sun, the uk will send further arms to ukraine within days. it's pretty
10:35 pm
much all ukraine and that's where we will begin. by looking at the guardian. in yourfront page will begin. by looking at the guardian. in your front page which we will see in the second, there is a quieter bottom about the effect of uk sanctions, "like taking a shooter to a gun fight." it's made it onto that your front to a gun fight." it's made it onto that yourfront page to a gun fight." it's made it onto that your front page sojessica, taken to the story, please? 50 that your front page so jessica, taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately _ taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately a _ taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately a reaction _ taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately a reaction to - taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately a reaction to the - taken to the story, please? so this is ultimately a reaction to the uk l is ultimately a reaction to the uk sanctions that it has announced. i think being seen as some what weaker than some of the other measures countries are taking, including germany's pausing of nord stream
10:36 pm
two. uk based tech exports, sovereign debt, because it became incredibly clear during that house of commons debate from borisjohnson that conservative mps had a huge appetite for hitting vladimir putin much harder than the five banks and three high net worth individuals who are being targeted in the current measures. the foreign office will say that they are intending to ratchet up those sanctions if putin goes further which everyone seems to expect him to do and he did as much this afternoon, but, with things
10:37 pm
being announced as they are, people are clearly feeling it does not go far enough. are clearly feeling it does not go far enough-— are clearly feeling it does not go far enou:h. . ~ , ,., are clearly feeling it does not go far enou:h. . �* , ,., ., far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers _ far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers are _ far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers are doing _ far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers are doing a - far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers are doing a lot - far enough. kieran andries, some of the later papers are doing a lot of i the later papers are doing a lot of angles on that, but with this guardian story, the secretary general of nato has said this is the biggest security threat to a generation or so. how is the uk dealing with this?— dealing with this? well, stark warninus dealing with this? well, stark warnings from _ dealing with this? well, stark warnings from the _ dealing with this? well, stark warnings from the secretary i dealing with this? well, stark - warnings from the secretary general of nato and from president biden when he gave his address from the white house as well. the rhetoric of the language being used has really sharpened and increased its gravity in recent days. you can see this from boris johnson's in recent days. you can see this from borisjohnson�*s address in the of house commons. he didn't go as far as other world leaders in terms of perhaps the gloom but it was the same idea, the same message, talking
10:38 pm
about putting more defensive forces into ukraine and, again, talking about to touch on sanctions the possibility of more coming. you know, it looks like there's been a very coordinated effort across the west in the last i2—24—hour is. something that vladimir putin was counting against, to be honest. there were moves to try and divide and conquer, pick of france, possibly even germany because of nord stream two. this was a real show of unity and strength amongst the people of the west but it does feel like they're are darker clouds hanging over europe now than there were even just a couple of days ago when it looked like they would still be diplomatic resolution. let’s
10:39 pm
when it looked like they would still be diplomatic resolution.— be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro. _ be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro, we _ be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro, we have _ be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro, we have an - be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro, we have an ad - be diplomatic resolution. let's talk to the metro, we have an ad hoc. to the metro, we have an ad hoc towards the headlines and tonight it goes to the metro. the picture at the prime minister and vladimir putin but clearly chosen for a specific reason and expression. i asked about sanctions earlier on bbc news if mr putin's allies, the billionaires, if they go to the cash point will they be able to get their money? and he said, yes, they will. so is the prime minister's first raft of sanctions you mention in your first answer is that going to go anywhere near the effect that perhaps the americans would want? i think so far, not. we saw putin shrugging off that threat of isolation. he dramatically enlarge the scope of what he said his
10:40 pm
intentions were in the current intervention in the ukraine. he talked about recognising the borders going beyond those claimed by people's republics. towns and cities are still very much under ukrainian government control. so, so far those sanctions don't seem to have had the deterrent effect and if you look at the three individuals who have been sanctioned by the british government, they were sanctioned by the us from 2018 so that doesn't seem to have necessarily deterred vladimir putin all that much. so i think... people say there are things you can do such as the announcements made by the us government, russian
10:41 pm
debt and so forth. putin seems to be prepared to risk this kind of economic isolation.- prepared to risk this kind of economic isolation. now the times and the independent. _ economic isolation. now the times and the independent. criticism - economic isolation. now the times and the independent. criticism of. economic isolation. now the times l and the independent. criticism of uk measures as page and paves the way for further invasion. measures as page and paves the way forfurther invasion. as political editor, do you get a sense that the pressure is coming from people who would normally be allies within the conservative party or critics? it conservative party or critics? it appears to be coming from across the party _ appears to be coming from across the party you _ appears to be coming from across the party. you saw iain duncan smith who has been _ party. you saw iain duncan smith who has been in _ party. you saw iain duncan smith who has been in and out as a supporter of boris _ has been in and out as a supporter of borisjohnson but has been in and out as a supporter of boris johnson but this has been in and out as a supporter of borisjohnson but this isn't one wing _ of borisjohnson but this isn't one wing this — of borisjohnson but this isn't one wing. this isn't the usual suspects. this is— wing. this isn't the usual suspects. this is a _ wing. this isn't the usual suspects. this is a genuine and quite deep feeling — this is a genuine and quite deep feeling of— this is a genuine and quite deep feeling of unease, notjust this is a genuine and quite deep feeling of unease, not just within the conservative party but most of
10:42 pm
the conservative party but most of the other— the conservative party but most of the other main parties in the uk, including — the other main parties in the uk, including labour and the snp, about the sanctions that go far enough and the sanctions that go far enough and the word _ the sanctions that go far enough and the word tepid that is used on the front— the word tepid that is used on the front page — the word tepid that is used on the front page of the independent was from an— front page of the independent was from an american financier calling for harder— from an american financier calling for harder sanctions. it was such a widespread — for harder sanctions. it was such a widespread feeling that things don't io widespread feeling that things don't go far— widespread feeling that things don't go far enough in the house of commons _ go far enough in the house of commons today. borisjohnson built this up— commons today. borisjohnson built this up himself. he spent a lot of time _ this up himself. he spent a lot of time in _ this up himself. he spent a lot of time in the — this up himself. he spent a lot of time in the last week or so really making _ time in the last week or so really making a — time in the last week or so really making a lot of noise about how tough _ making a lot of noise about how tough britain will be if there is even — tough britain will be if there is even... the first toecap that leaves into ukrainian territory but that's more _ into ukrainian territory but that's more than — into ukrainian territory but that's more than happen now and franklin roosevelt— more than happen now and franklin roosevelt said to be good at diplomacy you could speak softly and
10:43 pm
carry a big _ diplomacy you could speak softly and carry a big stick so borisjohnson is going — carry a big stick so borisjohnson is going to — carry a big stick so borisjohnson is going to have to do something quite _ is going to have to do something quite significant. it was likely was carrying _ quite significant. it was likely was carrying a — quite significant. it was likely was carrying a megaphone to hide a balloon — carrying a megaphone to hide a balloon his back! his carrying a megaphone to hide a balloon his back!— carrying a megaphone to hide a balloon his back! his another one in the headline — balloon his back! his another one in the headline awards _ balloon his back! his another one in the headline awards category. -- i the headline awards category. —— here is another one. i was getting a sense of boris johnson who deals with fire —— international crisis... i johnson who deals with fire -- international crisis. . ._ international crisis... i think that's certainly _ international crisis... i think that's certainly right - international crisis... i think that's certainly right that. international crisis... i think - that's certainly right that although borisjohnson is very much raised and repeating the idea of sending more support to the ukraine in what form that might take, it's selling up form that might take, it's selling up and take the form of any troops
10:44 pm
and britain has top it's always a bit of a sweeping generalisation but to characterise britain's role in this, it's taken one of the more hardline approach is to this. as you are describing it. borisjohnson has been talking up the gravity of the threat, the severity of the sanctions and i know what has felt strange to him is the uk taking such a heart line position —— hardline position. germany had taken criticism for being more likely to appease and possibly france, with president macron positioning himself as a broker and then see the uk come out with a weaker package, i think
10:45 pm
that has led to a bit of disquiet and a bit of surprise about how that has been received within downing street. n has been received within downing street. ., ., , , ., ., street. i want to pick up on what jessica was _ street. i want to pick up on what jessica was saying _ street. i want to pick up on what jessica was saying about - street. i want to pick up on what jessica was saying about boris i jessica was saying about boris johnson and his international affairs. how much does his own political future, affairs. how much does his own politicalfuture, we affairs. how much does his own political future, we can discuss that with a neck story as well, depend on his stewardship of international crises and affairs? borisjohnson has a great many potential— borisjohnson has a great many potential traps he could fall into in terms — potential traps he could fall into in terms of his prime ministership and i_ in terms of his prime ministership and i know— in terms of his prime ministership and i know we are about to come onto party— and i know we are about to come onto party gate _ and i know we are about to come onto party gate as — and i know we are about to come onto party gate as well, which is one of them _ party gate as well, which is one of them but — party gate as well, which is one of them but obviously, the most important thing facing the uk but the world — important thing facing the uk but the world at the moment, you know, is the _ the world at the moment, you know, is the crisis _ the world at the moment, you know, is the crisis in — the world at the moment, you know, is the crisis in ukraine and russia's_ is the crisis in ukraine and russia's invasion. how he handles that, _ russia's invasion. how he handles that, how— russia's invasion. how he handles that, how he works with other leaders — that, how he works with other leaders across the west, it will go a long _ leaders across the west, it will go a long way—
10:46 pm
leaders across the west, it will go a long way certainly shoring himself up

60 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on