Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  February 22, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

11:30 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines. the head of nato says there's evidence that russian troops are moving into separatist—held areas of eastern ukraine. jens stoltenberg said this is the most dangerous moment for europe's security for a generation russian troops are reported to be nearing the ukrainian border. the russian parliament voted today to allow president putin to use the military abroad. president biden has imposed sanctions on russia far beyond those imposed after the annexation of crimea. they include blocking trade with two large russian banks and cutting off parts of the russian economy. he's also moving additional us forces to the baltic states. three white men who murdered ahmaud arbery, a black man who was outjogging in georgia in february 2020, have been convicted of federal hate crimes. the three defendants had already been sentenced to life in prison last year.
11:31 pm
hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me arejessica elgot, chief political correspondent at the guardian — and kieran andrews, scottish political editor at the times. tomorrow's front pages, starting with, the daily mail carries a warning from the us president that the world was on the brink of war as russia prepared for a full—scale assault on ukraine. while the daily telegraph has joe biden saying that vladimir putin had begun to invade ukraine and was preparing to advance deeper into the country. the times concerntrates onjoe biden saying the united states would immediately block the russian government from using using western financial
11:32 pm
markets to raise money. the metro has borisjohnson promising to turn russia into a pariah state as he revealed a first raft of financial sanctions. meanwhile, the �*i' says the prime minister has been accused of �*tepid' measures that fail to hit putin hard enough while germany halts a key gas pipeline, the us targets oligarchs �*families and the eu targets firms and individuals. the daily mirror notes one campaigner claiming borisjohnson could stop russia's invasion of ukraine by targeting assets of the 50 oligarchs said to control vladimir putin's billions in the uk. the financial times has vladimir putin saying "the best solution" to the crisis would be for ukraine to "demilitarise," abandon its goal ofjoining nato and pledge neutrality. the guardian reports that rhe russian president has said russia will support the territorial claims of its proxy states in east ukraine, increasing the likelihood of a larger conflict in the near future. while according to the sun — the uk will send more arms to ukraine — within days. so, let's begin.
11:33 pm
looking at the daily telegraph, it is interesting. vladimir putin invading and it says that biden but the picture borisjohnson, appears to be in the briefing room, briefed by the admiral. credit to the picture, it's credited number ten, picture, it's credited number ten, picture borisjohnson about biden and vladimir putin. it’s picture boris johnson about biden and vladimir putin.— and vladimir putin. it's a way of caettin and vladimir putin. it's a way of getting boris — and vladimir putin. it's a way of getting boris johnson _ and vladimir putin. it's a way of getting boris johnson front - and vladimir putin. it's a way of getting boris johnson front and | getting boris johnson front and centre and it's a uk paper into would expect that. but the news overnight and in some ways, more significant given the strength of the language being used and it did come from present biden at one turn, vladimir putin even when george w. bush and barack obama for reaching
11:34 pm
out and much more cautious figure about vladimir putin and pretty uncompromising in his language for the russian invasion. vladimir putin is setting up the rationale to go much further and the action so far and independence for the two states in eastern ukraine and what is been interesting. a change of tact from joe biden, but also in the way the us and the west in general has handled the run—up to this conflict and joe biden doing it again here, to get on the front foot with vladimir putin looking to be a lot of, if not all of the intelligence that has been received of him to the public domain, almost trying to either play russia at its own game in terms of having a full—scale
11:35 pm
propaganda war, but is exactly what is happening on the front lines or, trying to see who will blink first and pushed russia back and criticisms of that last week where the west in the us are going too far and saying things wouldn't happen in terms of the revision. i don't think anyone is saying that now, but it will be interesting to see if it is successful and averting a full—blown war and crisis which appears to be at the brink of. in the ukraine, it does not mention, it focuses onjoe biden. joe biden twisted putin is ready for bloodshed. not quite unsure i saw the word, that might be a paraphrase. but that picture of, i presume those russian tanks in the
11:36 pm
caption echoes, the daily mail after the first world war, the chilling site of tanks turning up on the way to battle. , ., .,, site of tanks turning up on the way to battle. , ., ., , to battle. yes, and those words and resent to battle. yes, and those words and present biden. _ to battle. yes, and those words and present biden, incredibly _ to battle. yes, and those words and present biden, incredibly strong - present biden, incredibly strong words and those _ present biden, incredibly strong words and those comments - present biden, incredibly strong i words and those comments raising with the _ words and those comments raising with the think gives them the right to declare — with the think gives them the right to declare these areas and going given— to declare these areas and going given further that he had previously but by— given further that he had previously but by saying that he would recognise as territories up until their_ recognise as territories up until their self—declared borders which goes _ their self—declared borders which goes a _ their self—declared borders which goes a lot — their self—declared borders which goes a lot further than where the front_ goes a lot further than where the front line — goes a lot further than where the front line is and ijust want to see, — front line is and ijust want to see, and _ front line is and ijust want to see, and i_ front line is and ijust want to see, and i think there is a sense although— see, and i think there is a sense although there is an incredibly strong — although there is an incredibly strong language of condemnation from washington from brussels and london,
11:37 pm
that there _ washington from brussels and london, that there is _ washington from brussels and london, that there is this sense of wanting to keep _ that there is this sense of wanting to keep talking and keeping that intelligence out there and keeping it as loudly as possible because there _ it as loudly as possible because there is— it as loudly as possible because there is the ability to come right up there is the ability to come right up to— there is the ability to come right up to this — there is the ability to come right up to this and completely cut off diplomatic contact with russia because — diplomatic contact with russia because you go then if it is a full frontal— because you go then if it is a full frontal assault on kyiv. and that is something that publicly and privately, senior leaders are warning _ privately, senior leaders are warning about.— privately, senior leaders are warning about. privately, senior leaders are warnin: about. . ., warning about. looking at the angle closer to home, _ warning about. looking at the angle closer to home, get _ warning about. looking at the angle closer to home, get dirty _ warning about. looking at the angle closer to home, get dirty russian i closer to home, get dirty russian money. out of uk now. the paper says too little too late to hurt vladimir putin is the ukraine begins. i do see the sanctions and the point that a lot of people are making and close to vladimir putin those who have
11:38 pm
money? to vladimir putin those who have mone ? ., ., ., ., , ., money? for a long time, the house of commons select _ money? for a long time, the house of commons select committee _ money? for a long time, the house of commons select committee reports i commons select committee reports into russian money and influence and money that is being wandered through the uk and went into the house of commons is afternoon, and all of the areas within the conservative party as well, what was announced by boris johnson in terms of sanctions against russia and begins vladimir putin, five banks, links to his cervical oligarchs was pretty underwhelming and particularly when you compared it to what came from the eu from germany and nordstrom two and the us. that appears to be only the beginning of the sanctions
11:39 pm
in the trust is coming out and saying that more will follow and i think more will have to follow. the uk government will want to, as you said, build up and build into where do we go? we don't want to get to devcon one straight but without more stronger sanctions, borisjohnson in the uk will seem quite weak on what they want so far.— in the uk will seem quite weak on what they want so far. you've been s-ueakin what they want so far. you've been speaking to — what they want so far. you've been speaking to a _ what they want so far. you've been speaking to a number— what they want so far. you've been speaking to a number of— what they want so far. you've been l speaking to a number of conservative mps who were of the view that the sanctions did not go far enough. you could ut sanctions did not go far enough. you could put the — sanctions did not go far enough. you could put the whole house and that statement pretty publicly, actually. how much it was to go much further and many— how much it was to go much further and many pointing out that three individuals who have been targeted on the _ individuals who have been targeted on the uk — individuals who have been targeted on the uk sanctions by the us in
11:40 pm
2018— on the uk sanctions by the us in 2018 and — on the uk sanctions by the us in 2018 and so, one described isjust playing _ 2018 and so, one described isjust playing catch up with the us and the banks— playing catch up with the us and the banks as _ playing catch up with the us and the banks as well. and there was sanctioned in the announcement. the foreign— sanctioned in the announcement. the foreign office internet, saying that they are _ foreign office internet, saying that they are expecting the sanctions to id they are expecting the sanctions to go much _ they are expecting the sanctions to go much further in that they could hit the _ go much further in that they could hit the oligarchs in the uk and interests _ hit the oligarchs in the uk and interests in the uk and had tech investments and it comes time were already. _ investments and it comes time were already, they're announcing that it will not _ already, they're announcing that it will not only target individuals and individuals families and the recognition sending children to school— recognition sending children to school in —
11:41 pm
recognition sending children to school in western countries and pushing — school in western countries and pushing the name of adult children and senior— pushing the name of adult children and senior people have used and they had to— and senior people have used and they had to go— and senior people have used and they had to go after and boris johnson said today— had to go after and boris johnson said today that they had to do that action— said today that they had to do that action and — said today that they had to do that action and i to get to the charges as of— action and i to get to the charges as of russian donors in the past and looking _ as of russian donors in the past and looking for— as of russian donors in the past and looking for something that labour may hang — looking for something that labour may hang out in. and mps certainly seem, _ may hang out in. and mps certainly seem. to _ may hang out in. and mps certainly seem. to be — may hang out in. and mps certainly seem, to be able to hold for very much _ seem, to be able to hold for very much longer. we are going to move to the times newspaper for a we are going to move to the times newspaperfor a run of we are going to move to the times newspaper for a run of stories. we are going to move to the times newspaperfor a run of stories. we had a run from the guardian at 1030 and to be fair, will ever run on the
11:42 pm
teams for the first edition. johnson first pm of the front pages the right hand side to be questioned under caution and i hope that they have obtained one of the questionnaires, take us through it. they have done stellar and breaking all sorts of stories about the goings on the downing street and got a hold of the questionnaires that have been sent out over slightly to each individual and this is something that's going be quite similar to what borisjohnson has received and making clear that the responses here are answered under caution which the headlines as the borisjohnson becomes, we are almost
11:43 pm
certain, the first prime minister to be questioned under caution, albeit not very bleak, but with a written responses. 12 questions in the form in terms of things like asking people participating in an event at a certain date, was the purpose of their participation in the gathering and this is where borisjohnson is going to try to argue and has had legal advice on this as well that he was justified legal advice on this as well that he wasjustified in legal advice on this as well that he was justified in attending the events that he did in the combination of downing street is also his home some of the events where he has put it, work events. it would be interesting to see how many find scheme at the end of this from the questioners that have been handed out and whether or not number ten can confirm the prime was one of
11:44 pm
them. ~ ., ., ,, ten can confirm the prime was one of them. ~ ., ., i. ., ., , them. what do you learn from these particular questionnaires _ them. what do you learn from these particular questionnaires obtained i particular questionnaires obtained by this? 1ng particular questionnaires obtained b this? a , ., by this? as they mention, the most im ortant by this? as they mention, the most important thing _ by this? as they mention, the most important thing seeing _ by this? as they mention, the most important thing seeing that - important thing seeing that description which it may, questioning something like this, something we've all heard in police traumas _ something we've all heard in police traumas. and i think that it's a particularly important point because of the _ particularly important point because of the history of attorney blair said about being questioned as a witness — said about being questioned as a witness in — said about being questioned as a witness in cash for honours and feeling — witness in cash for honours and feeling the need to resign in question— feeling the need to resign in question under caution, this the first time — question under caution, this the first time the prime minister appears _ first time the prime minister appears to have been question under caution _ appears to have been question under caution by— appears to have been question under caution by the police can people around — caution by the police can people around johnson, caution by the police can people aroundjohnson, cabinet caution by the police can people around johnson, cabinet ministers seem _ around johnson, cabinet ministers
11:45 pm
seem pretty confident so that boris johnson _ seem pretty confident so that boris johnson himself is very confident that she — johnson himself is very confident that she will be able to make the legal— that she will be able to make the legal argument and he has received similar— legal argument and he has received similar advice that these are work events— similar advice that these are work events that he attended. lots of mps feel sceptical about that optimism and many— feel sceptical about that optimism and many did the least a fortnight a-o and many did the least a fortnight ago feel— and many did the least a fortnight ago feel that it was imperative that they moved against borisjohnson ago feel that it was imperative that they moved against boris johnson who did receive _ they moved against boris johnson who did receive this fine. we will see significant — did receive this fine. we will see significant divisions among johnson's critics even if he doesn't -et johnson's critics even if he doesn't get a _ johnson's critics even if he doesn't get a fine. — johnson's critics even if he doesn't get a fine, lots of people think that especially those of gone public with a _ that especially those of gone public with a vote of no confidence that the goal— with a vote of no confidence that the goal has really shifted that he has broken the law that we can say that we _ has broken the law that we can say that we have no confidence in him. even _ that we have no confidence in him. even though she is apparently led parliament. others would say this
11:46 pm
global— parliament. others would say this global crisis, we need to continue and move on. going for the second round ofthe move on. going for the second round of the times- — move on. going for the second round of the times. scotland _ move on. going for the second round of the times. scotland has _ move on. going for the second round of the times. scotland has a - of the times. scotland has a familiar name in the front page and at the bottom, it's very good plates. —— place. scottish political editor kieran, talk us through your story. editor kieran, talk us through your sto . �* ., ,., editor kieran, talk us through your sto . �* ., ., story. and the front page, and the announced — story. and the front page, and the announced today _ story. and the front page, and the announced today to _ story. and the front page, and the announced today to the _ story. and the front page, and the announced today to the scottish . announced today to the scottish parliament that, almost of the remaining coronavirus laws that are in place, including the need to wear facemasks was to be dropped and all the people would be advised to wear face coverings in scotland and after that, and need for vaccine passports will be dropped on monday and this means that scotland is falling pretty similar trajectory to england
11:47 pm
and just about three weeks later. striking a more cautious tone and albeit on the same path as boris johnson and that more cautious tone leads into the thing that we picked up leads into the thing that we picked up from the scottish government road map to normality in strategic frameworks which even when the risk of covid—19 is identified, employers should encourage hybrid working because it is more beneficialfor workers and this would be happy to share that because it takes away the need for commute and better worklife balance that has come as a blow to a lot of businesses in particular towns and city businesses who have really struggled for the last two
11:48 pm
years underline that office call. i thought it had to be above the fold, some people in america say. any spaces good space. the guardian, you're going to take us through to the final story. to qualify. no student loan for them, those who fail these will be banned from taking up student loans under government plans. talk us through it. this student loans under government plans. talk us through it.- plans. talk us through it. this is something _ plans. talk us through it. this is something that _ plans. talk us through it. this is something that has _ plans. talk us through it. this is something that has been - plans. talk us through it. this is| something that has been pushed around _ something that has been pushed around by the government and the cities. _ around by the government and the cities, basically putting base level. — cities, basically putting base level. if— cities, basically putting base level, if you can take up a degree extensively without tracking down but they _ extensively without tracking down but they describe as low—quality degrees — but they describe as low—quality degrees. there's a of reason why this may— degrees. there's a of reason why this may cause some issues and
11:49 pm
regional— this may cause some issues and regional disparities, particularly on the — regional disparities, particularly on the past rates of gcs the. the proposals — on the past rates of gcs the. the proposals and consultations. and you will see _ proposals and consultations. and you will see how they will end up. and you could — will see how they will end up. and you could argue that if you do not achieve _ you could argue that if you do not achieve a — you could argue that if you do not achieve a levels and some degrees are not— achieve a levels and some degrees are not for— achieve a levels and some degrees are not for you. but achieve a levels and some degrees are not foryou. but i'm achieve a levels and some degrees are not for you. but i'm sure achieve a levels and some degrees are not foryou. but i'm sure it will— are not foryou. but i'm sure it will cause _ are not foryou. but i'm sure it will cause a _ are not foryou. but i'm sure it will cause a hefty debate. are not for you. but i'm sure it will cause a hefty debate. there is a uuote will cause a hefty debate. there is a quote here- _ will cause a hefty debate. there is a quote here. student _ will cause a hefty debate. there is a quote here. student controls - will cause a hefty debate. there is| a quote here. student controls are needed because low—quality costs are not to grow uncontrollably. given the headline, no student loans for maths and english fails. as in the writing of people to early? justices that's one of _ writing of people to early? justices that's one of the _ writing of people to early? justices that's one of the reasons _ writing of people to early? justices that's one of the reasons why - writing of people to early? justices that's one of the reasons why thisl that's one of the reasons why this would be incredibly controversial as it moves through the consultation
11:50 pm
stage. the idea here, according to the story, is that with the growth of student loans and taking away and capping of student places, it means the universities of found a way to charge fees to get more students and and make more money but, that has been done on the back of loans which may not be repaid if some of the students don't go on to getjobs which allow them to pay off their student debt in a way that is encouraging people to take on debt that they would never be able to get rid of. this is quite a crude measure and one that, if successful, will get past the sector. it is a big ask and there'll be some serious opposition to this down the i'm
11:51 pm
sure. that's it for the papers this hour. geeta guru murthy will be here tomorrow night for a first look at the papers — joining her will be the guardian's aubrey allegretti and sam listerfrom the daily express. dojoin us then if you can but for now, goodnight. i'm mark edwards with your sport. chelsea have take control of their champions league round of 16 tie with lille after a convincing 2—0 win over the french champions at stamford bridge. nesta mcgregor was watching the action for us. he gets paid to make the big decisions like promoting £97 million striker to the bench and instead
11:52 pm
starting top he had a great chance to justify his manager's selection but from point—blank range, he shot over. better luck next time. it wouldn't be long to wait. shortly after, the german thought he had scored but the keeper had other ideas. third time is said to be a charm and that proved to be the case. from the resulting corner... much to his managers delight. lille were second best for most of the game and early in the second half it was 2—0. the ball was carried a length of the field before this core finish. his dance moves? less cool. one eye on the quarterfinals. in tonight's other match, villarreal drew 1—1 at home to juventus. juventus took the lead
11:53 pm
almost from kick—off. dusan vlahovic scoring 32 seconds into his maiden outingin europe's premier competition, the quickest ever by a champions league debutant. villarreal equalised midway through the second half, dani parejo getting onto etienne capoue's fabulous pass. they pressed for a winner but 1—1 is how it finished. the bbc understands uefa are almost certain to move the venue for this year's champions league final away from the russian city of st petersburg. following overnight developments involving russia and ukraine, european football's governing body are thought to be looking into an alternative to host the showpiece match on may 28th. the chair of the dcms committee has urged uefa to move the match immediately. julian knight says allowing russia to host the final would send out all the wrong messages. middlesbrough moved into the championship play off places after coming from behind to beat west brom 2—1 at the riverside. elsewhere, reading made it back to back wins as they beat birmingham in paul ince's first game in charge.
11:54 pm
play off hopefuls preston and nottingham forest played out a goal less draw at deeepdale while coventry left it late to win at bristol city. switching to women's football, the republic of ireland have beaten wales 1—0 in the third place play—off at the pinatar cup in spain. the only goal of the game came from denise o'sullivan in the first half. it's the second defeat in a row for wales — after they lost on penalties to belgium on saturday. that's their last match before resuming world cup qualifying in april. a happy debut for scotland keeper eartha cummings. her save meant the scots won 3—1 on penalties after a nil—nil draw with hungary in normal time.. they finish fifth in the competition. members of the us women's soccer team have reached a landmark agreement with their governing body to end a six—year legal battle over equal pay. the $24 million settlement was announced today — years after a group, which includes megan rapinoe and alex morgan brought legal action over inequality and their treatment. us soccer also committed
11:55 pm
to providing an equal rate of pay for the women's and men's national teams including world cup bonuses. the world heavyweight title match up between dyllian whyte and tyson fury has finally been agreed in principle. just hours before this morning's deadline, whyte signed the contract to fight fury so it's now set to go ahead on the 23rd of april, with wembley and cardiff's principality stadium among the potential venues. whyte won his last fight — a rematch with russia's alexander povetkin last march, while fury is still unbeaten after defeating deontay wilder for a second time in october. preparations are underway again for the second season of the hundred — english cricket's newest one hundred ball competition. today clubs announced their retained list — most of the players they drafted ahead of that first season will stay on for a second year, including england test captain joe root at trent rockets and ben stokes at northern superchargers. australia's ellyse perry has been retained by birmingham phoenix, she'll be playing in the hundred for the first time, as travel restrictions
11:56 pm
stopped her last summer. and ireland have qualified for the men's t20 world cup in australia later this year — they beat oman by 56 runs in the semi—finals of the qualifying tournament. it'll be their seventh consecutive appearance in the t20 world cup. champion jockey oisin murphy has been banned for 1h months after admitting breaching coronavirus protocols, misleading the british horseracing authority and prejudicial conduct, plus two alcohol breaches. murphy admitted all charges at an independent judiciary panel on tuesday. the irishman had gone on holiday in september 2020 to the greek island of mykonos, which was on the covid red—list at the time, but told officials he had been in italy. murphy was previously banned for three months in november 2020 after testing positive for cocaine. while the winter olympics might be over, the paralympics are just around the corner and paralympics gb have announced one of their biggest teams yet. former silver and bronze medallist millie knight is among them —
11:57 pm
we caught up with her ahead of what will be her third games. sochi was for the experience, to kind of gain understanding of what competing at the paralympics was like. it was about performing and these games, i am looking forward to taking it back to sochi and enjoying it and going for the experience and for myself, really. i've got to learn to enjoy myself and relax a little more! and that's all the sport for now. from me, mark edwards and the rest of the team, goodbye.
11:58 pm
through the day. it is still very active on the satellite picture here. these weather fronts across the atlantic racing our way. all of this, this is wintry weather, linked to this low pressure. corridor atlantic air and ahead of it much drier and brighter and not a bad day at least across england and wales but increasingly through the day in the northwest, winter showers falling to lower levels and it's going to be a cold blustery day on thursday with a hint of better weather on friday.
11:59 pm
12:00 am
welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... nato warns that russian troops are heading for eastern ukraine. we report from the frontline — where ukrainians are preparing for an invasion. the troops here say they have been fighting a long war against russian backed separatist. they know president putin may now send more forces. the us and europe responds with industial and financial sanctions — and universal criticism of russia's aggression. who in the lords name does putin think gives him the right to declare new so—called countries on territory that
12:01 am
belong to his neighbours?

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on