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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 23, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today... calls for tougher sanctions as russia's parliament backs plans to send troops into parts of eastern ukraine. foreign secretary liz truss says "nothing is off the table" as western allies take action against russian financial interests. in sport, this season's champions league final is likely to be moved from russia. st petersburg is due to host the showpiece at the end of may, but escalating tensions means an alternative host city is set to be chosen. it's a virtual world, which some say is the future of the internet. but how do we keep children safe in the metaverse? good morning. tighter regulations for the funeral sector.
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new rules are being introduced to stamp out rogue operators and protect people from cold callers. good morning. another windy day ahead. for england and wales, largely dry with a view showers. for scotland, northern ireland and later northern england some rain followed by snow showers. all the details later in the programme. it's wednesday, the 23rd of february, our main story. the foreign secretary has said britain will use "every lever at its disposal" to stop president putin in his tracks, after he ordered troops into two rebel—held parts of eastern ukraine. it's not yet clear whether this has taken place. liz truss also maintained that "nothing was off the table", amid calls for the government to impose tougher sanctions on russia. mark lobel reports. kremlin firepower spotted near the russian city of rostov—on—don, close
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to the ukrainian border. translation: i'm really concerned a huge war may break out. - worried to tears. satellite images also capture military vehicles, and a troop hospital across the borderfrom ukraine's capital in southern belarus. this map explains how a russian invasion could stretch beyond the two separatist areas in grey here, which are already recognised by russia as independent. the us president thinks putin also includes the ukrainian—controlled yellow areas as part of his responsibility to protect. he asserted that these regions actually extend deeper than the two areas he recognised, claiming large areas currently under thejurisdiction of the ukraine government. this is the beginning of a russian invasion of ukraine. it's likely us influence was behind a significant german decision to punish russia by stopping a major pipeline meant to export gas
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from russia to europe. further sanctions were announced by the uk on five russian banks and three russian individuals. foreign secretary liz truss says britain will use every lever at its disposal to stop president putin in his tracks, if russia refuses to pull troops back. but for some, that's not quick enough. putin is only likely to be deterred, if at all, by countermeasures and sanctions that are more stronger than he has expected. so i think we do... we do need to go further. i hope the government is right in itsjudgement that it's worth just trying one more time to see if this conflict can be contained. despite the sanctions, president putin used a brief press conference to reiterate his unlikely demands ukraine renounces future nato membership, and rids itself of weapons — leaving everyone guessing what his next move will be. explosion.
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the sound of bombing on ukraine's current front line could soon get louder. it also appears the diplomatic window is closing — as nato's chief warns, this is the most dangerous moment in european security for a generation. mark lobel, bbc news. in a moment, we'll speak to james waterhouse in kyiv and get the view from westminster with adam fleming. but first, let's go to the russia—ukraine border, where caroline davies is this morning. caroline, how has the kremlin responded to sanctions imposed by the west? good morning. as you can imagine they have been fairly robust in their response, even before this announcement was made to recognise the separatist held areas in ukraine as independent. officials who met with president putin said the west
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may well decide to put in these sanctions. we imagine the west has will come to us and say russia has survived this before. they are saying these sanctions are in their words illegitimate. the russian ambassador has said this will have no effect on russia has survived this previously and it will rebound onto the us and western economies instead. others have already pointed out there is already an impact of president putin's decision to recognise these areas. we have seen a dramatic decline in the value of the ruble against the dollar as well. many people are wondering what will happen next. today is a public holiday in russia, dedicated to the armed forces. we are still waiting to see what president putin intends to see what president putin intends to do with those forces.— to do with those forces. thank you for that.
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james waterhouse is in kyiv for us this morning. james, what's the feeling in ukraine after the latest developments? there was another address last night — there was another address last night he — there was another address last night. he described a patriot as someone — night. he described a patriot as someone who would fight the enemy for their_ someone who would fight the enemy for their own country. that is a change — for their own country. that is a change from the don't panic messages before _ change from the don't panic messages before he _ change from the don't panic messages before. he has signed an order for all the _ before. he has signed an order for all the reservists for all the armed forces _ all the reservists for all the armed forces his — all the reservists for all the armed forces. his government will be concerned _ forces. his government will be concerned about a number of things vladimir— concerned about a number of things vladimir putin said yesterday, firstly— vladimir putin said yesterday, firstly he _ vladimir putin said yesterday, firstly he would give military sopporl _ firstly he would give military support to the separatist rebels if needed~ — support to the separatist rebels if needed. we are not yet clear if troops — needed. we are not yet clear if troops have crossed the border into the occupied territories. there are unconfirmed sightings, if you like. the other— unconfirmed sightings, if you like. the other thing he said, i recognise all of— the other thing he said, i recognise all of these — the other thing he said, i recognise all of these regions. the occupied territories — all of these regions. the occupied territories only make a third, that
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is another— territories only make a third, that is another two thirds of territory. he said _ is another two thirds of territory. he said this could be resolved through— he said this could be resolved through talks. if he tries to cross any line. — through talks. if he tries to cross any line, ukraine said it would defend — any line, ukraine said it would defend itself and that would effectively be an act of war. that would _ effectively be an act of war. that would be — effectively be an act of war. that would be getting ukrainian attention this morning. alongside more countries _ this morning. alongside more countries announcing sanctions against — countries announcing sanctions against russia would be seen to be helpful _ against russia would be seen to be helpful. president zelensky has asked _ helpful. president zelensky has asked the uk for more equipment, more _ asked the uk for more equipment, more weapons. that is as far as it goes _ more weapons. that is as far as it goes for— more weapons. that is as far as it goes for ukraine. the secretary of state _ goes for ukraine. the secretary of state for _ goes for ukraine. the secretary of state for the us has said he will not meet — state for the us has said he will not meet with his russian counterpart as things stand, so we do not _ counterpart as things stand, so we do not know where we go from here. thank— do not know where we go from here. thank you _ our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in westminster for us this morning. adam, the government is facing calls for even tougher sanctions? as we predicted on the programme yesterday. — as we predicted on the programme yesterday, quite a lot of
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conservative mps and opposition parties _ conservative mps and opposition parties at — conservative mps and opposition parties at westminster think the government should have gone further and they— government should have gone further and they should have prevented more people. _ and they should have prevented more people, more companies from doing more _ people, more companies from doing more things in the global economy as a result— more things in the global economy as a result of— more things in the global economy as a result of this. and so the government this morning is feeling the need _ government this morning is feeling the need to defend what it is doing. liz truss. _ the need to defend what it is doing. liz truss, the foreign secretary, has written _ liz truss, the foreign secretary, has written an article for the times and she _ has written an article for the times and she will be on the sofa, in this seat, _ and she will be on the sofa, in this seat, shortly. she is talking about how there — seat, shortly. she is talking about how there are still lots of things on the _ how there are still lots of things on the table the government could do and there _ on the table the government could do and there is— on the table the government could do and there is a long list of people they could target in the future of president — they could target in the future of president putin does not pull back or he _ president putin does not pull back or he escalates the situation even further _ or he escalates the situation even further i— or he escalates the situation even further. i think they are trying to reassure — further. i think they are trying to reassure people it is not the puny response — reassure people it is not the puny response it — reassure people it is not the puny response it was labelled as by some of their— response it was labelled as by some of their critics. there is a protest as well — of their critics. there is a protest as well the _ of their critics. there is a protest as well. the government wants to sanction— as well. the government wants to sanction some of the members of the russian _ sanction some of the members of the russian parliament that have voted for these _ russian parliament that have voted for these breakaway areas in ukraine to be _ for these breakaway areas in ukraine to be recognised by russia. that
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will require a little change in british— will require a little change in british law to be able to do that, so that— british law to be able to do that, so that is— british law to be able to do that, so that is a — british law to be able to do that, so that is a bit further down the line, _ so that is a bit further down the line, although that is another problem _ line, although that is another problem for the government. they say they have _ problem for the government. they say they have already changed the laws in advance — they have already changed the laws in advance of everything will be ready— in advance of everything will be ready to — in advance of everything will be ready to go when it turns out that is not _ ready to go when it turns out that is not the — ready to go when it turns out that is not the case. what is interesting is not the case. what is interesting is sanctions — is not the case. what is interesting is sanctions used to be a thing the european — is sanctions used to be a thing the european union did collectively. when _ european union did collectively. when the — european union did collectively. when the uk within the eu all the debates— when the uk within the eu all the debates happened in brussels with ambassadors and ministers going to meetings _ ambassadors and ministers going to meetings elsewhere. it is really interesting to see this happening in a bi- interesting to see this happening in a big way— interesting to see this happening in a big way and —— in westminster and a big way and —— in westminsterand ithink— a big way and —— in westminster and i think that _ a big way and —— in westminster and i think that is — a big way and —— in westminster and i think that is a big change from brexit~ — i think that is a big change from brexit. ., ~' , ., more than 60 flood warnings remain in place across england, following high rainfall from storm franklin. two severe warnings, meaning there's a danger to life, have been issued for the river severn in ironbridge and in bewdley in worcestershire. dozens of homes near the river have been evacuated. gary brooker, the frontman
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of psychedelic rock band procul harum, has died at the age of 76. # a whiter shade of pale... the group's debut hit, "a whiter shade of pale," topped the charts for six weeks in 1967, selling more than 10 million copies. he'd been receiving treatment for cancer and a statement confirmed he died peacefully at home on saturday. the duchess of cambridge is on a two—day visit to denmark, taking the work of her childhood foundation abroad for the first time. kate has travelled to copenhagen to learn how the country has become a world leader in its approach to early childhood development. our reporter adrienne murray is in copenhagen this morning. adrienne, what's on the agenda today? 0h, oh, my goodness, looked like there was quite a lot of fun yesterday. that's right. you have obviously seen _ that's right. you have obviously
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seen the — that's right. you have obviously seen the pictures of the duchess going _ seen the pictures of the duchess going down the slide and lego play lab. going down the slide and lego play lab she _ going down the slide and lego play lab. she was obviously having a good time _ lab. she was obviously having a good time this _ lab. she was obviously having a good time this is — lab. she was obviously having a good time. this is primarily a working visit _ time. this is primarily a working visit for— time. this is primarily a working visit for the _ time. this is primarily a working visit for the duchess. as you mentioned, she is here with the royal— mentioned, she is here with the royal foundation centre for early childhood. it is a fact—finding mission~ _ childhood. it is a fact—finding mission. denmark is seen as a leader in the _ mission. denmark is seen as a leader in the field _ mission. denmark is seen as a leader in the field of— mission. denmark is seen as a leader in the field of child development and a _ in the field of child development and a subject close to cape's park. after— and a subject close to cape's park. after yesterday she went to several projects _ after yesterday she went to several projects here in copenhagen, where she met _ projects here in copenhagen, where she met with experts, parents, children— she met with experts, parents, children and health visitors to find out more — children and health visitors to find out more about some of the initiatives and how they have been working _ initiatives and how they have been working here in denmark. great to talk to yom _ working here in denmark. great to talk to you. thank _ working here in denmark. great to talk to you. thank you _ working here in denmark. great to talk to you. thank you very - working here in denmark. great to talk to you. thank you very much i talk to you. thank you very much indeed. mount etna, europe's most active volcano has roared back to life, sending volcanic ash ten kilometres into the air, over eastern sicily. a crater on the south east side of the volcano spewed lava and sent large clouds of smoke and ash over surrounding villages on monday. mount etna is more than 3,000 metres high and erupts several times a year,
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but rarely causes any damage. still looks quite scaly. carol is with us this morning. what is happening? it is carol is with us this morning. what is happening?— is happening? it is a frosty known in central and _ is happening? it is a frosty known in central and eastern _ is happening? it is a frosty known in central and eastern areas. - is happening? it is a frosty known | in central and eastern areas. over the next _ in central and eastern areas. over the next couple of days at will turn colder~ _ the next couple of days at will turn colder. rain showers and some of them _ colder. rain showers and some of them will— colder. rain showers and some of them will be wintry and it is wintry~ _ them will be wintry and it is wintry. another windy day today. for most _ wintry. another windy day today. for most of _ wintry. another windy day today. for most of england and wales, bar the odd shower in the west, it will be dry. odd shower in the west, it will be dry in _ odd shower in the west, it will be dry. in scotland and northern ireland — dry. in scotland and northern ireland a _ dry. in scotland and northern ireland a weather front is sinking slowly— ireland a weather front is sinking slowly southwards. that will get into northern ireland and northern england _ into northern ireland and northern england and behind that we will see a return— england and behind that we will see a return to — england and behind that we will see a return to wintry showers. sales in the north and west. particularly
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windy at times this morning across south-east— windy at times this morning across south—east scotland and south—east england _ south—east scotland and south—east england. that will ease this afternoon. overnight you can see how the weather _ afternoon. overnight you can see how the weather front will sink south. patchy _ the weather front will sink south. patchy but it could rejuvenate by the end — patchy but it could rejuvenate by the end of the night. wintry showers to low— the end of the night. wintry showers to low levels across scotland and northern — to low levels across scotland and northern ireland. it would be a cold night _ northern ireland. it would be a cold night with— northern ireland. it would be a cold night with the risk of frost and ice and still— night with the risk of frost and ice and still windy. tomorrow quite smartly — and still windy. tomorrow quite smartly we lose the rain from the south—east. it will still be snowing at levels _ south—east. it will still be snowing at levels across scotland and northern ireland. low levels we could _ northern ireland. low levels we could see — northern ireland. low levels we could see as much as two to seven centimetres. again windy and that winds— centimetres. again windy and that winds will— centimetres. again windy and that winds will make it feel colder and these _ winds will make it feel colder and these temperatures are suggesting. a bbc investigation has found children could be exposed to grooming and sexually explicit material, in some parts of the so—called metaverse. that's the name given to a range
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of games and experiences, which can be accessed using virtual reality headsets — a world which facebook founder mark zuckerberg, has called "the future." angus crawford reports. meetjess, she's 25, a bbcjournalist, but in virtual reality, she's pretending to be a child. going in. into vr chat — one of the most popular apps. the age limit�*s 13. some rooms look innocent enough. but there's pole dancing and strip clubs, too. 0h, hello, miss, we can hang out, watch a movie or something. isn't it school time right now? there are two people to the side of me now, who are trying to get on top of each other. ok, so there's like a group of people that are, like, simulating sex. i want to say there's like five of them and they're definitely children, i'm pretty sure because of how they sound.
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the avatars can't go naked. and thenjess is assaulted. oh, my god! what was that like? horrible. it was strange. it felt like it was happening to me. stop it. leave me alone. it's like the wild west, and i wouldn't feel safe as a sibling of younger children, having my siblings play on this. and if i was a parent, i wouldn't let my children in that kind of area. it's too adult. we showed whatjess had found to andy burrows at the nspcc, and he's horrified. it'sjust the most shocking breach of any responsibility. i am angry because facebook promised us disney levels of safety. this isn't a theme park. this is a set of virtual worlds, where children are at risk of grooming, of sexual abuse, of really harmful experiences. it speaks to a corporate neglect. these are sites that are dangerous by design.
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today, we're going to talk about the metaverse. mark zuckerberg thinks the metaverse is the future of the internet, even rebranding facebook as meta, spending billions of dollars on the quest headset, which dominates the market. you need a facebook account tojoin in. there are games and apps made by meta and by other companies, too. ok, here we go. the so—called metaverse doesn't actually exist yet. that's just the name given to a series of games and virtual reality experiences you get to using a headset like this one. choose what you want to look like, your avatar, and you can start exploring. the question is, how safe is this world for children? katherine allen studies vr. i met her in her virtual office while sitting beside her in the real world. not everything's perfect in this space, is it? no, it's a bit of a wild west, to be honest.
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simulated sex is something that you see quite commonly. if we don't get on top of it, if it's not regulated and legislated, if the public aren't aware of what's really happening, children going to these spaces unsupervised, then we could see really a hotbed for potential grooming, predators and also experiences that children are having that may well be too early for them in their development. predators are just having a free—for—all with these kids. this man has been investigating vr chat rooms for months. he's worried for his safety and wants to remain anonymous. he's made a youtube film and even met and interviewed a ia—year—old, who says he was groomed and raped in virtual reality. did they try to do things to you? yes. you'll see 40—year—old men hanging out with 12—year—old boys and girls. it's like a nightclub. but if you are running a nightclub and you can't afford a bouncer, so you just leave the doors open, well, you're going to get shut down
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because, yeah, i get it. it may be expensive to hire a bouncer, but you got to do it. you have to do it because the alternative is to let kids just wander in and get destroyed. vr chat says it is working hard to make itself a safe and welcoming place for everyone. predatory and toxic behaviour has no place on the platform. meta stresses it's not responsible for other companies' apps and says... for children, the metaverse can be an exciting adventure, but it also poses a real risk of harm. angus crawford, bbc news. do let us know what you think about that. we'll be talking about it later on the programme. let's take a
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look at the papers. every one features the conflict in ukraine as its lead story. the guardian's headline warns that the "war threat grows." the image shows russian tanks lined up near the border. the daily telegraph focuses on the us president's warnings, quoting him as saying that russia is preparing to advance deeper into ukraine. sanctions imposed by the western allies are the focus of the times. the paper says dozens of russian oligarchs and their business interests are being targeted. and, we'll be bringing you the latest on this story all morning, but for some more background reading into the conflict, head to the dedicated page on the bbc news website. lots to talk about. oti mabuse in the papers, she is leaving strictly. she won it with kelvin fletcher and bill bailey. she has so much work elsewhere. bill bailey. she has so much work elsewhere-—
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elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too _ elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too big — elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too big a _ elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too big a star. _ elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too big a star. she - elsewhere. too busy for strictly! she is too big a star. she was i she is too big a star. she was brilliant with anybody she ever did it with. we brilliant with anybody she ever did it with. ~ ., ., ., , . ~ it with. we love a dog picture. are ou it with. we love a dog picture. are you ready? _ it with. we love a dog picture. are you ready? this— it with. we love a dog picture. are you ready? this is— it with. we love a dog picture. are you ready? this is minor- it with. we love a dog picture. are you ready? this is minor before i you ready? this is minor before going to the agreements. look what happened! —— milo. he came out with hair so short he was unrecognisable. his owner took the ten—month—old dog to daycare and he came home like this. he no longerfits the kennel club event description of what he should look like. what would you say about that? would you be a bit crass? he about that? would you be a bit crass? ., ., a about that? would you be a bit crass? _, , ., , crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross. it crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross- it is — crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross- it is a _ crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross. it is a bit _ crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross. it is a bit cold _ crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross. it is a bit cold at _ crass? he looks confused. -- a bit cross. it is a bit cold at the - cross. it is a bit cold at the moment _ cross. it is a bit cold at the moment. it _ cross. it is a bit cold at the moment. it is _ cross. it is a bit cold at the moment. it is hard - cross. it is a bit cold at the moment. it is hard work. l
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cross. it is a bit cold at the | moment. it is hard work. if cross. it is a bit cold at the - moment. it is hard work. if you do not have the _ moment. it is hard work. if you do not have the right _ moment. it is hard work. if you do not have the right clippers. - moment. it is hard work. if you do not have the right clippers. we - moment. it is hard work. if you doj not have the right clippers. we did the legs. she looked horrendous. little cocktail sticks for legs. i felt like it was dog abuse in some ways. here is a weird survey. i blame my holiday alter ego. brits say they get up to all sorts of things they were not do at home. the teachings that brits do when they are on their holidays they would not do at home. —— 30 rings. making holiday friends with strangers... nine. taking hotel things. eating cheese and cold meats for breakfast. always on holiday. not at home, ever. . ., , ., . , ever. having to search every day. sta in: ever. having to search every day. staying op _ ever. having to search every day. staying op later _ ever. having to search every day. staying up later than _ ever. having to search every day. staying up later than usual. - staying up later than usual. drinking alcohol before midday. not
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worrying about money. boozing at the airport stop dining out every day. isn't that part of the fun?- isn't that part of the fun? people who live in _ isn't that part of the fun? people who live in aberystwyth - isn't that part of the fun? people who live in aberystwyth are - isn't that part of the fun? people who live in aberystwyth are the l isn't that part of the fun? people - who live in aberystwyth are the most likely to behave differently. is likely to behave differently. is that because they did the survey mainly in aberystwyth. followed by brighton, liverpool, belfastand bristol. brighton, liverpool, belfast and bristol. , , , ., brighton, liverpool, belfast and bristol. , , ., bristol. does it depend where you go on our bristol. does it depend where you go on your holiday? _ bristol. does it depend where you go on your holiday? is _ bristol. does it depend where you go on your holiday? is it _ bristol. does it depend where you go on your holiday? is it too _ bristol. does it depend where you go on your holiday? is it too much - on your holiday? is it too much detail. a ridiculous _ on your holiday? is it too much detail. a ridiculous thing - on your holiday? is it too much detail. a ridiculous thing to - on your holiday? is it too much j detail. a ridiculous thing to ask --eole detail. a ridiculous thing to ask people about- _ detail. a ridiculous thing to ask people about. do _ detail. a ridiculous thing to ask people about. do you - detail. a ridiculous thing to ask people about. do you do - detail. a ridiculous thing to ask people about. do you do that i detail. a ridiculous thing to ask - people about. do you do that dining out every day _ people about. do you do that dining out every day on — people about. do you do that dining out every day on holiday? _ people about. do you do that dining out every day on holiday? alcohol. out every day on holiday? alcohol before midday? _ out every day on holiday? alcohol before midday? how— out every day on holiday? alcohol before midday? how dare - out every day on holiday? alcohol before midday? how dare you! i out every day on holiday? alcohol. before midday? how dare you! you out every day on holiday? alcohol- before midday? how dare you! you are watching breakfast from the bbc. conservative mpjames brokenshire was 53 when he died from lung cancer in october. before he passed away, he formed a close friendship online with mandee lucas, who was also undergoing treatment for lung cancer. mandee has recently been given the all—clear and has been
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to meet james' widow, cathy. our reporter zoe conway was there. are we allowed to hug? i think so. lovely to see you. sorry, i'm wet, aren't i? so lovely see you, cathy. don't worry. not at all. thanks so much for having me today. well, you're more than welcome. cathy brokenshire and mandee lucas, meeting for the very first time. go through there. cathy's husband, james, died of lung cancerfour months ago. mandee has been free of the disease for the last five years. how are you feeling? i miss him all the time. but no, we are coping and getting involved in the charity is good. in april 2018, james brokenshire was interviewed on bbc breakfast. he'd had surgery to remove part of one lung just a few months before. yet there he was back as a cabinet minister. it's been hard, you know, - it's been really, really difficult. and i rememberjust those early days where, you know, - that sort of sinking feeling in your stomach, the pit . of your stomach of what is this? you know, what does this mean? and i think also recognising huge pressures on your family. -
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my wife, cathy, and the kids have been absolutely- extraordinary at times where, - yeah, you do go to dark moments, you do really think _ about what does the future hold? watching at home was mandee, who was recovering from her own lung cancer treatment. and i don't know why, but i connected with him, which sounds ridiculous, but i just felt for him. i'd been through the same thing. he's the same age as me. i was a couple of years down the line, but i felt like i wanted to reach out and say, "if you want to talk, i'm here. and have you heard of roy castle lung cancer foundation?" which i did. and he responded, saying, "thank you for reaching out. it's nice to know that other people have been in the same boat as me, and i'm hoping for a full recovery." and there wasn't an awful lot of chat. and then the announcement in october came that he'd passed away and i literally sat with my cornflakes on my lap, crying my eyes out. i couldn't believe my ears — that this man who was so vibrant and full of life and full of goods can just not be here at that age. 53. same age as me.
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cathy says she knew she wanted to marry james the first time she met him in a pub in essex. she says it was his charisma, his presence that so attracted her. and when he went into politics, she became what she calls a pa to his personal life. we were soulmates, and i kind of did everything in his personal life that he couldn't do because he was running around — dealing with politics. and we've oftenjoked in the past, the pair of us, that we've done so well and lasted so long because we're still in our honeymoon period 31 years later, but life is very different. it has... it was very quiet. i mean, unfortunately, i lost my best mate and my husband overnight. the reason why cathy and mandee decided to meet is that they want to campaign together for a national lung cancer screening programme. too often, people have no symptoms until it's too late.
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james only coughed up twice with his two bouts of cancer and that led to him having parts, or his whole lung removed, within weeks. there were no other symptoms. unbelievable! nothing. just coughed up a small piece of blood. it wasn't continuous, it was just one episode. for me, i had no symptoms. it shows how important lung screening is. so that's one of his first conferences he went to. cathy has been stunned by the support that's come flooding in from people she's never met. and the messages, just the message. the messages are absolutely incredible — from strangers that didn't know him to people that worked with him. i don't know, a sign of getting old. i have put my glasses on. me too. "onjames's birthday, it's good to rememberjust the happy celebrations over the years. we will miss him so much and he's always in our thoughts."
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that's lovely. the trouble is there's hundreds and hundreds and hundreds. there are thousands. yeah. you've been together now for about an hour. first impressions? lovely lady. i'm excited. i'm really excited. i think we've got a lot in common. yeah. i think we all get on really well and it's so nice to have someone who understands it to work with. yeah, and i'm passionate to get involved because that's what james wanted to do, and sadly he can't do that. but it gives me a focus and something to do for him and in memory of him. it's the power ofjames that's going to motivate us. power ofjames, i do love that as a hashtag. since james brokenshire died, a train has been named after him. his old school is naming a building after him. but that's just the start. he'll also live on through the indominitable force of these two women. power ofjames! zoe conway, bbc news.
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they will bejoining they will be joining us live on the south just after eight o'clock this morning. i look forward to having a chat with them. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. a very good morning to you from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. scientists at imperial college london have devised a cheaper test that could save the lives of thousands of heart attack patients. the british heart foundation which funded the works at the quick test can help doctors to spot people at high risk of death following a suspected attack so they can be closely monitored and given more intensive treatment. a london hospital wants to raise awareness of a rare condition that affects children, and is thought to be triggered by covid—19. evelina london children's hospital was one of the first organisations in the world to identify pims — or paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome. the symptoms include a fever, swelling of the toes and fingers, and red rash.
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the hospital says that if it's caught early it's easily treatable. i think it's important to stress that this is a rare disease that we see in response to an acute covid infection. so for the vast majority of children that will go on to get a covid infection, they're going to be generally quite well with the acute covid infection, and they will carry on living their normal lives afterwards. but a very tiny minority can become unwell. a kennel belonging to a german shepherd dog could fetch more than £200,000 when it's auctioned this afternoon — purely because it was hit by a space rock that fell to earth in costa rica in 2019. the wooden dog house is part of a sale dedicated to rare and unusual meteorites at christie's of london. you will be pleased to know that rocky the dog came to no harm.
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this is how tfl services are looking right now. just ongoing part on the northern line. onto the weather now. hello, good morning. low pressure continues to dominate the weather over the next couple of days. it is looking rather blustery at times — various weather fronts coming through — but not as windy as it has been, and certainly not stormy. there'll be some sunshine, also some outbreaks of rain, and then it's looking drier, more settled on friday and saturday. today, this morning — well, it's a cold, frosty start to the day, some of our temperatures have dipped below freezing. we'll see lots of sunshine around through the morning, we'll keep the sunny skies and then, while it's still looking dry for much of the afternoon, there will be more cloud building in from the west and possibly some scattered showers, as well. quite a brisk, south—westerly wind blowing. temperatures are lower than they were yesterday, but still getting into double figures — i think in central london, certainly 10, 11 degrees celsius. and it's a milder night to follow on wednesday night. there'll always be quite a bit of cloud around. we've got a cold front sweeping
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in from the northwest as we head through into thursday morning, so it's quite a wet start to the day on thursday. some colder air tucking in behind — watch out for a little bit of wintriness to some of the showers through the afternoon. a brisk westerly wind, also some sunshine. it's looking drier with lighter winds on friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... after calls for tougher sanctions on russia, we'll bring you the very latest developments on the ukraine crisis throughout the morning, we'll speak to the foreign secretary liz truss at 7.30. ten years after the death of their daughter cici from meningococcal septicaemia, former footballer dean holden and tv presenter danielle nicholls willjoin us, to discuss the importance of raising
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awareness of the condition. and with less than a week to go until our favourite birmingham gangsters return to our screens, we'll look ahead to the final, long—awaited series of tv drama peaky blinders. let's get more on this morning's main story now. following days of fast—paced developments in the ukraine crisis, the bbc�*s ros atkins has been taking a look at some of the key moments of russia's military build—up. on monday evening, president putin gave a televised address. he also signed russia's recognition of the independence of donetsk and luhansk in eastern ukraine, and ordered troops into the territories. within hours, unidentified military vehicles were filmed near them. and vladimir putin says any russian troops will be peacekeeping — to which the us says this. he calls them peacekeepers. this is nonsense. we know what they really are. all this has come after months of a russian military
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build—up near to ukraine. back in mid—november, this was the warning from nato. in recent weeks, we have seen large and unusual concentrations of russian forces close to ukraine's borders. moscow said this was alarmist, but neither the troops nor the concerns went away. on the 8th of december, the washington post published this recent satellite image showing russian deployment. it reported a us estimate of 70,000 troops close to the border. russia didn't deny this, but in an address in late december, president putin said this. translation: the strengthening of us and nato military groupings _ on russia's borders, and the organisation of large—scale military manoeuvres are a serious cause for concern. to this, we can add putin's long—standing frustration that nato has expanded further east. and byjanuary, russian troops were arriving in belarus. it neighbours both russia and ukraine, and moscow said its actions were about repelling external aggression.
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it talked of compromises, too. but by february, this was the american assessment. we're in a window when an invasion could begin at any time. on the same day, russia claimed our "country is not going to attack anyone". but russia's military activity continued. there were naval manoeuvres in the black sea. this satellite image showed helicopter deployments close to the border. another showed a new pontoon bridge in belarus, less than six kilometres from ukraine. at this time, russia was also claiming it was pulling some troops out. it released these images to prove it, but nato was unconvinced. so far, we have not seen any sign of de—escalation on the ground. by this point, the americans were claiming there were 150,000 russian troops in place. which brings us to this week — with vladimir putin talking of ukraine as ancient russian soil and ordering his troops into ukraine. and while the west imposes new sanctions, he now considers his next move.
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the government is facing calls to impose further sanctions on russia from across the political divide. we're joined now by the shadow foreign secretary, david lammy. good morning to you. are you happy with the sanctions that have been introduced so far, what do you make them? if introduced so far, what do you make them? , ., introduced so far, what do you make them? i., introduced so far, what do you make them? i. ., ., them? if you look at what the european _ them? if you look at what the european union _ them? if you look at what the european union has _ them? if you look at what the i european union has announced, them? if you look at what the - european union has announced, 371 members of the russian parliamentarians subject to a travel ban. 27 oligarchs targeted. and you compare that with us, just three. three oligarchs and five banks and they are not the biggest banks in russia. if we are serious we have got to go hard. a threshold has been breached. sending in peacekeepers?
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we know what these soldiers will be doing when they go into ukraine, and so on that basis i think the mood of the entire house of commons yesterday was that the government were not being strong enough. so what exactly would you be suggesting if it were your decision at this point? i if it were your decision at this oint? , , .,, if it were your decision at this oint? , , ., point? i said yesterday that we should now _ point? i said yesterday that we should now cut _ point? i said yesterday that we should now cut russia - point? i said yesterday that we should now cut russia out - point? i said yesterday that we should now cut russia out of l point? i said yesterday that we i should now cut russia out of the swift financial system. i said in the past that we should stop the export of semiconductors so they cannot use that in their military systems. we have got to damage the russian currency, the ruble, and that means dealing with sovereign debt, and taking them out of the currency markets. there is much, much more that we can do and it is worrying that both the eu and the americans have announced tougher sanctions than we have. the americans have announced tougher sanctions than we have.— sanctions than we have. the uk government _ sanctions than we have. the uk government have _ sanctions than we have. the uk government have already - sanctions than we have. the uk government have already said l sanctions than we have. the uk i government have already said that they will not be putting troops on they will not be putting troops on the ground in ukraine. do you agree
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with that statement? yes. the ground in ukraine. do you agree with that statement?— the ground in ukraine. do you agree with that statement? yes. ukraine is not art of with that statement? yes. ukraine is not part of nato. _ with that statement? yes. ukraine is not part of nato, so _ with that statement? yes. ukraine is not part of nato, so we _ with that statement? yes. ukraine is not part of nato, so we have - with that statement? yes. ukraine is not part of nato, so we have alwaysl not part of nato, so we have always said that, whilst this is not about hard power on the ground, it is about financial power and the might of sanctions, and that is why i think, in the end, the labour party, of course, but also other parties and backbenchers in the conservative party hugely concerned that we were not strong and hard enough, sending a message to vladimir putin that might, at this 11th hour, make him step back. we might, at this 11th hour, make him ste back. ~ ., ~' ., might, at this 11th hour, make him ste back. ~ ., ,, ., ., step back. we do know that some sanctions might _ step back. we do know that some sanctions might well _ step back. we do know that some sanctions might well have - step back. we do know that some sanctions might well have a i step back. we do know that some i sanctions might well have a knock-on sanctions might well have a knock—on effect here in the uk, for example gas prices going up all the time when many people are facing huge rises in the cost of living. does that they're remembering when thinking about sanctions? sanctions
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are alwa s thinking about sanctions? sanctions are always -- _ thinking about sanctions? sanctions are always -- always _ thinking about sanctions? sanctions are always -- always impose i thinking about sanctions? sanctions are always -- always impose a i thinking about sanctions? sanctions i are always -- always impose a burden are always —— always impose a burden on those giving the sanctions, as well as those who are receiving the sanctions. that is the nature of sanctions. that is the nature of sanctions because you impose them because you are defending your values, your democracy, your understanding of the rule of law. obviously it is good that we are not as reliant on russian gas as our colleagues in central europe. but it is the case, of course, that if russia invades ukraine, it will have a knock—on effect on gas prices, on oil price and of coarse supply across europe. we oil price and of coarse supply across europe.— oil price and of coarse supply across euro e. ~ ,, ., , ., across europe. we know this morning that there is — across europe. we know this morning that there is a — across europe. we know this morning that there is a lack _ across europe. we know this morning that there is a lack of _ across europe. we know this morning that there is a lack of clarity - that there is a lack of clarity about the situation on the ground in ukraine. there are varying reports and non—have been completely confirmed at the moment and yesterday keir starmer said the campaign of misinformation should be tackled and suggested the russian
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broadcaster rt should be banned from broadcasting here. what do you say about that? we broadcasting here. what do you say about that? ~ ., ., broadcasting here. what do you say about that?— about that? we wrote to the government _ about that? we wrote to the government and _ about that? we wrote to the government and ofcom i about that? we wrote to the l government and ofcom about about that? we wrote to the - government and ofcom about russia today. —— about russia today 2.5 years ago. this is a station that has time and time again breached ofcom rules. it is clearly engaged in disinformation and misinformation. it was raised in the russia report. why, when you scroll through the channels available on satellite tv, is it still up? talking about things that might affect people here in the uk, the champions league final is due to take place in russia. there could be at least one english side in the final. should that be going ahead? no. i don't believe it should. it it no. i don't believe it should. if it does look _ no. i don't believe it should. if it does look like _ no. i don't believe it should. if it does look like it might go ahead, should any british team that gets their boycott it?— their boycott it? well, look, that would be a _ their boycott it? well, look, that would be a matter— their boycott it? well, look, that would be a matter for— their boycott it? well, look, that would be a matter for the i their boycott it? well, look, that i would be a matter for the governing
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bodies of football. but let's be clear. given the situation that has emerged, i would clear. given the situation that has emerged, iwould not clear. given the situation that has emerged, i would not expect it to go ahead in st petersburg. daeid emerged, i would not expect it to go ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank ou ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank you very — ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank you very much _ ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank you very much for _ ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank you very much for your - ahead in st petersburg. david lammy, thank you very much for your time i thank you very much for your time this morning. thank you very much for your time this morning-— thank you very much for your time this morning._ we i thank you very much for your time this morning._ we will. thank you very much for your time i this morning._ we will be this morning. thank you. we will be discussin: this morning. thank you. we will be discussing some _ this morning. thank you. we will be discussing some of _ this morning. thank you. we will be discussing some of those _ this morning. thank you. we will be discussing some of those issues i this morning. thank you. we will be | discussing some of those issues with the foreign secretary liz truss at 7:30am. and that is whatjohn is talking about. growing political pressure to make the champions league final at the end of may and the very real prospect that will happen. when you also consider that a lot of the fans i am sure will not be able to travel to that game. it is when that decision will come and i think probably what uefa are likely to do is perhaps weight until the semifinal stage, is perhaps weight until the semifinalstage, perhaps is perhaps weight until the semifinal stage, perhaps when they know which teams will contest the final, and then perhaps try to pick a venue that is suitable for both of those teams. increasingly likely that that match will be moved. the bbc understands uefa is almost certain to switch to a different host city amid the escalating crisis. several countries, including the uk, have introduced sanctions against russia. the 68,000 seater gazprom stdaium
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had been selected as the venue. uefa said it was "closely monitoring the situation" and "any decision would be made in due course if necessary". mr speaker, on his point about sporting events, as i said earlier on, i think it inconceivable that major international football tournaments can take place in russia after, as i say, the invasion of a sovereign country. the game, its expected, will still be played on may 28th. london mayor sadiq khan said the english cpaital london mayor sadiq khan said the english capital was ready to step in, with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley is also under consideration but would appear to be out as it's due to host the league 2 and championship play—off finals on may 28 and 29. there are four english teams still in the hunt for a place in the final. chelsea, owned by the russian billionaire roman abramovich, have one foot in the quarter finals after beating lille. no place in the side last night for their star striker as nesta mcgregor reports.
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thomas tuchel gets paid to make the big decisions — like demoting £97 million striker romelu lukaku to the bench, and instead starting kai havertz. mind you, at £72 million, he's not a bad backup to have. havertz had a great chance to justify his manager's selection — but from point blank range, he shot over. better luck next time. there wouldn't be long to wait. shortly after, the german thought he'd scored — the lille keeper had other ideas. they say third time's the charm, and that proved to be the case. from the resulting corner, havertz nodded in hakim ziyech's cross, much to his relief and his manager's delight. lille were second—best for most of the game, and early in the second half it was 2—0. n'golo kante — as he often does — carried the ball the length of the field. christian pulisic applied the cool finish. his dance moves perhaps less cool. chelsea comfortable winners at home and surely one eye already on the quarterfinals.
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nesta mcgregor, bbc news. he certainly enjoyed it. i am not sure romelu lukaku did. here was thomas tuchel�*s reasoning for not including their £97 million striker. not only mentally tired, but also physically tired, which i can understand — he played, i think, since the liverpool game and he started every match for us and then there were some extra times in it, as well. and for sunday, we have four days to decide and to recover and, of course, he has every chance to play. england women play germany tonight in theirfinal match of their international tournament, which has served as a warm—up to this summer's euros. the republic of ireland beat wales in their invitational tournament in spain. the only goal came from denise o'sullivan in the first half in what is the second defeat in a row for wales — after they lost on penalties to belgium on saturday. a happy debut for scotland keeper eartha cumings. her save meant the scots won 3—1 on penalties
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after a 0—0 draw with hungary. they finish fifth in the competition. champion jockey oisin murphy has been banned for 1h months after admitting breaching coronavirus protocols, misleading the british horseracing authority, and acting in a way that prejudiced the reputation of horseracing. he'd previously been banned for three months in november 2020, after testing positive for cocaine. emma raducanu was forced to retire in a real marathon match overnight — her first competitive outing since bowing out at the australian open. the reigning us open champion was top seed at the guadalajara open mexico, but she was clearly struggling after spending three hours and 36 minutes on court against australia's daria saville — that's the longest match of the wta season so far. it was a set all, with raducanu down a break in he third. it was a set all, with raducanu down a break in the third. that was when she opted to call it a day and head off court. we have seen
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some real marathon match is out there at the moment, haven't we? you could see she — there at the moment, haven't we? gm. could see she was struggling. there at the moment, haven't we? you could see she was struggling. she i could see she was struggling. she was shattered and i guess with that kind of length of match and the heat and dealing with those conditions, it takes its toll. alex's match did not finish until 4:55am. that it takes its toll. alex's match did not finish until 4:55am.- not finish until 4:55am. that is mad. not finish until 4:55am. that is mad- that _ not finish until 4:55am. that is mad. that is _ not finish until 4:55am. that is mad. that is crazy, _ not finish until 4:55am. that is mad. that is crazy, how- not finish until 4:55am. that is mad. that is crazy, how can i not finish until 4:55am. that is l mad. that is crazy, how can you not finish until 4:55am. that is i mad. that is crazy, how can you be -la in: mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis _ mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis at — mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis at that _ mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis at that time - mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis at that time of i mad. that is crazy, how can you be playing tennis at that time of the i playing tennis at that time of the day? playing tennis at that time of the da ? ., , ., , playing tennis at that time of the da ? , , ., playing tennis at that time of the da? , , ., , ., playing tennis at that time of the da? ,., day? nobody should be doing anything at that time of— day? nobody should be doing anything at that time of day! _ at that time of day! laughter we will see you a bit later on. let's go to carol, up bright and early with the rest of us and has the weather. a cold start the day across central and eastern areas, some frost in the countryside and some and fog across southern counties of england. generally speaking today and tomorrow will turn colder, showers, some of which will be wintry and it will be windy as we go through the
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rest of the week. we have this cold front sinking slowly southwards today. you can see from the isobars that it will be windy, and behind this cold front it turns colder so we will see an increase in wintry showers. this morning the showers that i wintry mostly on the hills, but you can see the rain coming in and the winteriness waiting in the winds. a few rain showers in northern ireland, wales and the south—west but generally speaking for england and wales it will be mostly dry day with sunny spells. for scotland and northern ireland, i'm starting dry but then the rain slowly sinks southwards. later that will get into northern england and behind it we see some wintry showers, even starting to get down to lower levels. gales across the north and west and it will be pretty windy for a time this morning across south east of scotland and north—east england before it starts to ease through the course of the afternoon. through this evening and overnight, a weather front continue to sink south as a weakening feature but could well pack up first thing in the morning across the five
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south—east. meanwhile we will still have some showers which will be wintry to lower levels across scotland and also northern ireland. and it will still be windy, especially in the north and west. behind our weather front you especially in the north and west. behind our weatherfront you can especially in the north and west. behind our weather front you can see how the air turns colder, you can also see how tomorrow, once again, it is another windy day. weather front bearing the rain clears early on on thursday and then we still have those wintry showers. if we zoom into scotland initially we can have at the lower levels between two and five centimetres, for some seven to ten, that is four inches, and on higher ground we could have up to 20, possibly 30 centimetres. with the wind that will drift and blow. blizzards in the hills and snow at lower levels in northern ireland but was no across the pennines, wales, the meuse, the midlands, is likely on higher ground but wherever you are it will be a windy day —— on the moors. a lot of wind between showers
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but also sunshine. it will be cold, temperatures of four in the north to aid in the south, but when you add on the strength of the wind and the wind chill it will feel colder than that. forsome wind chill it will feel colder than that. for some parts of the noise it will feel sub zero. into friday, our weather front is sinking southwards. i want to draw your attention to what is happening in the west because we have a ridge of high pressure building across us. on friday morning itself it will start off pretty windy, especially along the north sea coastline, where there will be showers. as this ridge builds in, many of the showers will fade and the wind will also ease. we are looking at a drier and brighter day with temperatures for it to 12 degrees, and as we head into the weekend, for england and wales it will be windy but mostly dry. for scotland and northern ireland, also windy, but overnight saturday into sunday you will windy, but overnight saturday into sunday you will see windy, but overnight saturday into sunday you will see some windy, but overnight saturday into sunday you will see some rain. thank you, we will see you just have 7am. more than 1.5 million people have paid upfront
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for their own funeral, or a relative's. but new rules being introduced by the financial regulator could mean some people may not get the funeral plan they were promised. sarah is taking a look. good morning. that's right, funerals can be expensive, thousands of pounds, which is why people plan ahead but this sector is seeing some really big changes. good morning, everyone — we're talking about funeral plans today. you pay a lump sum or instalments. the plan covers everything from undertaker�*s fees to the cost of a coffin. around 1.6 million people have a funeral plan. but until now, the industry hasn't been officially regulated. that's left some people unprotected when providers fail. that's what happened to roy and linda smith from hull. linda was diagnosed with terminal cancer last year. when it had sunk in, i did everything from literally finances to picking up the phone and making an appointment to go and sort out
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about— an appointment to go and sort out about the — an appointment to go and sort out about the funeral because i know how stressful _ about the funeral because i know how stressful they are. i think the first— stressful they are. i think the first i— stressful they are. i think the first i heard about it was when i -ot first i heard about it was when i got a _ first i heard about it was when i got a letter from the auditors and i thought — got a letter from the auditors and i thought... oh, well, goodbye £1700. not going— thought... oh, well, goodbye £1700. not going to get that back. nobody wants— not going to get that back. nobody wants a _ not going to get that back. nobody wants a poker's funeral. that must be the _ wants a poker's funeral. that must be the worst, most upsetting thing. -- pauper's— be the worst, most upsetting thing. —— pauper's funeral. a really difficult experience there. now from the end ofjuly things will change. the financial conduct authority will regulate the industry. firms will have to sell products which offer "fair value". they must be well—run companies, with sufficient resources. there will be no more high—pressure selling. from the summer, only authorised firms will be able to offer funeral plans. in total, there are 72 providers. but so far 30 firms still haven't applied to get regulated. two have been withdrawn altogether. one of those was safe hands plans limited in wakefield. from the end ofjuly, it will no longer offer funerals. it's told existing customers it hopes it can honour their plans.
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but what should people do if they're worried about these changes? here's some advice. don't panic. everything may be ok. just because your funeral plan provider— just because your funeral plan provider has not applied for regulation doesn't mean they don't have the _ regulation doesn't mean they don't have the money they're against your plan _ have the money they're against your plan they _ have the money they're against your plan. they may be about to sell your plan. they may be about to sell your plan to _ plan. they may be about to sell your plan to another provider and your funeral— plan to another provider and your funeral will be delivered just as you hoped. secondly, if you go and try and _ you hoped. secondly, if you go and try and cancel your plan now, you will almost — try and cancel your plan now, you will almost certainly pay a hefty cancellation fee and there is just no need — cancellation fee and there is just no need to— cancellation fee and there is just no need to do that. sit tight for now _ regulating the market is being welcomed by many people as the right thing to do, but the concern is some customers may lose out in the transition. especially if people are left with underfunded plans, or policies that can't be met. worrying times for some people and we will speak to the regulator after atm and put some of those points to them. . ~
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atm and put some of those points to them. ., ,, i. you are into peaky blinders. i love it, so you are into peaky blinders. i love it. so stylish- _ you are into peaky blinders. i love it, so stylish. remember- you are into peaky blinders. i love it, so stylish. remember we i you are into peaky blinders. i love it, so stylish. remember we have| you are into peaky blinders. i love i it, so stylish. remember we have the writer on a few weeks ago? he it, so stylish. remember we have the writer on a few weeks ago?— writer on a few weeks ago? he said it wouldn't be _ writer on a few weeks ago? he said it wouldn't be long, _ writer on a few weeks ago? he said it wouldn't be long, he _ writer on a few weeks ago? he said it wouldn't be long, he said - writer on a few weeks ago? he said it wouldn't be long, he said it i it wouldn't be long, he said it would be weeks. bafta award—winning drama peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. with millions of fans worldwide hooked on the story of the notorious shelby family — there are now only days to wait before the gang return to our screens. set on the streets of birmingham between the first and second world wars, the city has taken the programme to its heart. as our midlands correspondent phil mackie has been finding out. it's nine years since tommy shelby first rode into town. since then, peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. now it's time to say farewell to tommy and the shelby clan — at least for a while. season six will be the last on the small screen.
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but the man whose creation this is has plans to start making a big—screen sequel in his home city — where fellow brummies have taken the show to their hearts. birmingham is a hard place to please. brummies are hard people to satisfy, and ijust feared that people said, "well, this isn't us," but it seems to have really, you know, struck a chord in birmingham, as well, and that's... i think if it hadn't been for that, it wouldn't have struck a chord elsewhere. it needed to be, you know, appreciated in its home town. most of what you see in the show never happened — it's completely made up. of course, it's a drama, it's a fiction. but there are some elements of truth in there, too. and there were real criminals called the peaky blinders who operated in this part of birmingham. and this was one of them — edward derrick. it was here in this birmingham back street that the first attack took place in march 1890 by men
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who were called peaky blinders. and this is his great—grandson, professor carl chinn — whose books have debunked some of the show�*s myths. it's really important to bear in mind that the real peaky blinders were not glamorous, well—dressed, charismatic anti—heroes. they were vicious and vile, back—street thugs who attacked each other, the police and who preyed upon the decent, respectable poor amongst whom they lived. and, no, they didn't conceal razor blades in their peaked caps. brummies know it's not historically accurate, but it hasn't stopped it becoming part of their culture. superfans love dressing up to show their devotion — there's even a peaky blinders festival in birmingham later this year. it's lovely to see places, you know, as a brummie, cos you're like, "i've been there, i've been in that pub, i know that road, i know that." and then i think other people want to come to birmingham to see it, as well. it's the history about birmingham, as well. my great—granddad grew up in small heath —
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he used to say to me, "oh, the peaky blinders..." something, he was like, "wow!" now the waiting's nearly over, and it doesn't look like tommy shelby�*s going to go quietly. this will be the end of it. phil mackie, bbc news birmingham. they have said it now, final series, definitely. i they have said it now, final series, definitel . �* ., ., , ., definitely. i can't wait to see how it all unravels. _ definitely. i can't wait to see how it all unravels. sunday _ definitely. i can't wait to see how it all unravels. sunday night. i it all unravels. sunday night. starts this — it all unravels. sunday night. starts this weekend, - it all unravels. sunday night. starts this weekend, i i it all unravels. sunday night. starts this weekend, i am i it all unravels. sunday night. i starts this weekend, i am sure you can catch up with it on the iplayer, i think they have all the previous series, as well. if you need to catch up before sunday, get cracking. i catch up before sunday, get crackina. ., ., ., catch up before sunday, get cracking-— catch up before sunday, get crackina. ., . ., ., cracking. i do! i have a few to watch. cracking. i do! i have a few to watch- you — cracking. i do! i have a few to watch. you are _ cracking. i do! i have a few to watch. you are not _ cracking. i do! i have a few to watch. you are not up - cracking. i do! i have a few to watch. you are not up to i cracking. i do! i have a few to i watch. you are not up to speed? not like ou watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are- — watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are- l _ watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are. i need _ watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are. i need to _ watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are. i need to talk _ watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are. i need to talk to - watch. you are not up to speed? not like you are. i need to talk to you i like you are. i need to talk to you about it. like you are. i need to talk to you about it- i — like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have _ like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a _ like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a lot _ like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a lot to _ like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a lot to do i like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a lot to do in i like you are. i need to talk to you about it. i have a lot to do in the | about it. i have a lot to do in the next few days. _ about it. i have a lot to do in the next few days. excellence, i about it. i have a lot to do in the next few days. excellence, that l about it. i have a lot to do in the | next few days. excellence, that is our next next few days. excellence, that is your next few _ next few days. excellence, that is your next few days _ next few days. excellence, that is your next few days plan. - next few days. excellence, that is your next few days plan. nothing | your next few days plan. nothing else to do at _ your next few days plan. nothing else to do at all! _ time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning to you from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. scientists at imperial college london have devised a cheap blood test that could save the lives of thousands of heart attack patients. the british heart foundation, which funded the work, said the quick test can help doctors to spot people at high risk of death following a suspected attack, so they can be closely monitored and given more intensive treatment. a tourist attraction that opened incomplete, over budget and led to resignations is being dismantled. the marble arch mound charged visitors up to £8 when it opened injuly. however, the £6 million artificial hill was forced to shut temporarily when plants and grass began to die. new pictures show almost all of the trees have now been torn off. a new shared workspace — exclusively for start—up climate tech entrepreneurs —
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has been set—up in london. based in the old county hall building, its already host to 50 small businesses sharing ideas from eco toilets to energy saving air bricks. it's a fantastic experience to work with like—minded entrepreneurs — you just bump into each other in the corridor, you help each other with advice, you're sharing resources. climate change is a much bigger deal than it was ten years ago when we first started. and we're seeing huge growth in our businesses and the political drivers to kind of actually take some action, and we're right at the heart of that. a kennel belonging to a german shepherd dog could fetch more than £200,000 when it's auctioned in london this afternoon. it's purely because it was hit by a space rock that fell to earth in costa rica in 2019. it's part of a sale dedicated to rare and unusual meteorites at christie's. if you are using the tube this morning this is how things are looking at the moment...
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all good just the ongoing part closure on the northern line there. here's your weather with elizabth rizzini. hello, good morning. low pressure continues to dominate the weather over the next couple of days. it is looking rather blustery at times — various weather fronts coming through — but not as windy as it has been, and certainly not stormy. there'll be some sunshine, also some outbreaks of rain, and then it's looking drier, more settled on friday and saturday. today, this morning — well, it's a cold, frosty start to the day, some of our temperatures have dipped below freezing. we'll see lots of sunshine around through the morning, we'll keep the sunny skies and then, while it's still looking dry for much of the afternoon, there will be more cloud building in from the west and possibly some scattered showers, as well. quite a brisk south—westerly wind blowing. temperatures are lower than they were yesterday, but still getting into double figures — i think in central london, certainly 10, 11 degrees celsius. and it's a milder night to follow on wednesday night. there'll always be quite a bit of cloud around. we've got a cold front sweeping in from the northwest as we head through into thursday morning,
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so it's quite a wet start to the day on thursday. some colder air tucking in behind — watch out for a little bit of wintriness to some of the showers through the afternoon. a brisk westerly wind, also some sunshine. it's looking drier with lighter winds on friday. i'll be back in half an hour. see you soon.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today... calls for tougher sanctions as russia's parliament backs president putin's plans to send troops into parts of eastern ukraine. he is setting up a rationale to go much further. this is the beginning of a russian invasion of ukraine. foreign secretary liz truss says "nothing is off the table" as western allies take action against russian financial interests. in sport, this season's champions league final is likely to be moved from russia. st petersburg is due to host the showpiece at the end of may, but escalating tensions means an alternative host city is set to be chosen. footballer troy deeney claims schools are failing children from ethnic minority backgrounds and is calling for teachers
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to be given more help to cover issues on race. good morning. today will be windy wherever _ good morning. today will be windy wherever you are. england and wales mostly— wherever you are. england and wales mostly dry— wherever you are. england and wales mostly dry with a view showers. in scotland _ mostly dry with a view showers. in scotland and northern ireland rain slowly— scotland and northern ireland rain slowly going southwards. all the details _ slowly going southwards. all the details throughout the rest of this morning's— details throughout the rest of this morning's programme. it's wednesday, the 23rd of february, our main story. the foreign secretary has said britain will use "every lever at its disposal" to stop president putin in his tracks, after he ordered troops into two rebel—held parts of eastern ukraine. it's not yet clear whether this has taken place. liz truss also maintained that "nothing was off the table," amid calls for the government to impose tougher sanctions on russia. mark lobel reports. kremlin firepower spotted near the russian city of rostov—on—don, close to the ukrainian border. translation: i'm really concerned a huge war may break out. - worried to tears.
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satellite images also capture military vehicles, and a troop hospital across the borderfrom ukraine's capital in southern belarus. this map explains how a russian invasion could stretch beyond the two separatist areas in grey here, which are already recognised by russia as independent. the us president thinks putin also includes the ukrainian—controlled yellow areas as part of his responsibility to protect. he asserted that these regions actually extend deeper than the two areas he recognised, claiming large areas currently under thejurisdiction of the ukraine government. this is the beginning of a russian invasion of ukraine. it's likely us influence was behind a significant german decision to punish russia by stopping a major pipeline meant to export gas from russia to europe. further sanctions were announced by the uk on five russian banks and three russian individuals.
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foreign secretary liz truss says britain will use every lever at its disposal to stop president putin in his tracks, if russia refuses to pull troops back. but for some, that's not quick enough. putin is only likely to be deterred, if at all, by countermeasures and sanctions that are more stronger than he has expected. so i think we do... we do need to go further. i hope the government is right in itsjudgement that it's worth just trying one more time to see if this conflict can be contained. despite the sanctions, president putin used a brief press conference to reiterate his unlikely demands ukraine renounces future nato membership, and rids itself of weapons — leaving everyone guessing what his next move will be. explosion. the sound of bombing on ukraine's current front line could soon get louder. it also appears the diplomatic window is closing —
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as nato's chief warns, this is the most dangerous moment in european security for a generation. mark lobel, bbc news. in a moment, we'll speak to james waterhouse in kyiv and get the view from westminster with adam fleming. but first, let's go to the russia—ukraine border, where caroline davies is this morning. caroline, how has the kremlin responded to sanctions imposed by the west? they have been fairly robust about all of this even before the decisions announced by president putin is recognising these separatist areas as independent. there was a security council meeting where they talked about sanctions saying they would probably be enforced and russia could survive and it could end up strengthening russia and the west would end up
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coming back to russia because it needed russia, in that year. since the sanctions had been put into place we have heard more on this language. we had the russian ambassador to america talking about the fact that this will rebound on the fact that this will rebound on the us economy and will not have an effect on russia. the foreign ministry has talked about the fact they talk about the illegitimate measures. on social media, it is not about how everyday russians might feel on this particular sanctions even before this was considered to be a reality that this might happen, many were already concerned about the economic impact any form of military intervention by russia might have on their everyday lives. now we have seen on social media people making jokes about the decline in the ruble, people are very concerned about how this might affect the everyday lives. james waterhouse is in kyiv
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for us this morning. good to have you on the programme, as ever. james, what's the feeling in ukraine after the latest developments? imean, i mean, traditionally when russia behaves — i mean, traditionally when russia behaves in — i mean, traditionally when russia behaves in this way, when it increases _ behaves in this way, when it increases its level of aggression on ukraine. _ increases its level of aggression on ukraine, there is a galvanised sense of national— ukraine, there is a galvanised sense of national identity. this period has been — of national identity. this period has been no different. online, russian — has been no different. online, russian speaking ukrainians have very delivery started sharing posts in ukrainian. many are expressing their— in ukrainian. many are expressing their worry~ — in ukrainian. many are expressing their worry. as far as ministers here _ their worry. as far as ministers here are — their worry. as far as ministers here are concerned, there will be a couple _ here are concerned, there will be a couple of— here are concerned, there will be a couple of things president putin of russia _ couple of things president putin of russia said that will increase their worries— russia said that will increase their worries further. firstly the question— worries further. firstly the question of him being prepared to offer military support to the separatist rebels in eastern ukraine _ separatist rebels in eastern ukraine. we are not sure whether russian _ ukraine. we are not sure whether russian troops have indeed crossed the border — russian troops have indeed crossed the border. he has also said he will recognise _ the border. he has also said he will recognise the whole of these regions. _ recognise the whole of these
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regions, la france and donetsk. given— regions, la france and donetsk. given only— regions, la france and donetsk. given only a third are occupied by these _ given only a third are occupied by these militants that would represent a massive _ these militants that would represent a massive land grab is that they also said — a massive land grab is that they also said ukraine should have a stance — also said ukraine should have a stance of— also said ukraine should have a stance of neutrality in joining the nato _ stance of neutrality in joining the nato alliance. presidents are lenski stead _ nato alliance. presidents are lenski stead once — nato alliance. presidents are lenski stead once again in front of a full map of— stead once again in front of a full map of ukraine, including the occupied _ map of ukraine, including the occupied territories, and said patriots — occupied territories, and said patriots will defend their country against — patriots will defend their country against enemies. —— president zelensky _ against enemies. —— president zelensky. that is after a statement saying _ zelensky. that is after a statement saying big — zelensky. that is after a statement saying big losses are ahead that victory _ saying big losses are ahead that victory will come in the end. he has signed _ victory will come in the end. he has signed an— victory will come in the end. he has signed an order for reservists to be called _ signed an order for reservists to be called up _ signed an order for reservists to be called up to— signed an order for reservists to be called up to the armed forces and asked _ called up to the armed forces and asked the — called up to the armed forces and asked the uk particularly formal military— asked the uk particularly formal military support on top of what the uk has _ military support on top of what the uk has already given. this is a change — uk has already given. this is a change of— uk has already given. this is a change of tone for this is ukraine shifting _ change of tone for this is ukraine shifting from saying keep calm,
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everyone. — shifting from saying keep calm, everyone, thanking western allies. will and _ everyone, thanking western allies. will and are looking at how it can potentially defend itself in escalation of a war that has a ready been _ escalation of a war that has a ready been happening for eight years. thank— been happening for eight years. thank you — been happening for eight years. thank you for that. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in westminster for us this morning. adam, the government is facing calls for even tougher sanctions? liz truss, the foreign secretary, has written an article for the times newspaper, saying nothing is off the table when it comes to further sanctions against russia and there is a long list of further individuals the uk government is preparing to target. the reason she is having to do that is the government is having to defend itself from claims by many of its own conservative mps and opposition parties these sanctions do not go far enough. accusations and claims and criticisms that were made this morning by the shadow foreign secretary. if morning by the shadow foreign secreta . . , ., , secretary. if we are serious, we have not secretary. if we are serious, we have got to _ secretary. if we are serious, we have got to go _ secretary. if we are serious, we have got to go hard. _ secretary. if we are serious, we
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have got to go hard. a - secretary. if we are serious, we| have got to go hard. a threshold secretary. if we are serious, we i have got to go hard. a threshold has been breached, sending in peacekeepers. we know what these soldiers _ peacekeepers. we know what these soldiers will be doing when they go into ukraine. on that basis, i think the mood — into ukraine. on that basis, i think the mood of— into ukraine. on that basis, i think the mood of the entire house of commons — the mood of the entire house of commons yesterday was that the government were not being strong enough _ government were not being strong enou:h. . ., government were not being strong enou:h. . . ,, , ., enough. there are a few issues for the government. _ enough. there are a few issues for the government. first _ enough. there are a few issues for the government. first of _ enough. there are a few issues for the government. first of all i the government. first of all expectation management. boris johnson's rhetoric on ukraine has been very, very strong. some people looked at what the sanctions ended up looked at what the sanctions ended up being and said the actions do not quite match the rhetoric. then the process. the government wants to sanction some members of the russian parliament who had been very supportive of what the russian government is doing. the uk government will have to change the law and tweak the law to be able to do that and that could take a couple of weeks. they are not quite as ready to go as they might have sounded. then a philosophical question of, what are sanctions for? the government has said it will escalate and as a russian actions
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escalate. lots in parliament where saying, you deter people more by putting in big sanctions now to stop the escalation happening in the first place. that is why this is a tricky balancing act for the uk government.— tricky balancing act for the uk government. ., ,, , ., , . as we've just heard, the calls for tougher sactions on russia come after vladimir putin ordered troops into two rebel—held regions of eastern ukraine: donetsk and luhansk. let's take a look at how the west has responded. the uk has imposed sanctions on five russian banks and three wealthy russian businessmen. president biden announced sanctions on two major banks and has cut off part of the russian economy from international financial systems. germany has shelved the nord stream 2 pipeline, which would have doubled the flow of russian gas. the eu is cutting off russia's access to their banks and financial markets — as well as banning trade from the two rebel—held regions. we'rejoined now
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by lord kim darroch, former uk ambassador to the us. thank you very much for being with us this morning. good to talk to you and get your thoughts. let's start with what you have seen in the last 24 with what you have seen in the last 2a hours. how concerned should we be? the most dangerous thing that has happened, i think that is president putin saying that russia has recognised the full area of both the next and luhansk, the two breakaway separatist regions in eastern ukraine. what that means is, the moment russia troops had come into the area or are coming into the area held by the separatist, if they actually want to capture the whole of those regions, it means getting into the line of separation between separatist and ukrainian forces and engaging with ukrainian forces, in other words it means realfighting, shells, rockets, bullets and casualties. if that is what he has intended, that is a huge escalation
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of where we are now and profoundly serious. taste of where we are now and profoundly serious. ~ , , ., ~ of where we are now and profoundly serious. ~ , , ., ,, ., serious. we were speaking to the ukrainian ambassador _ serious. we were speaking to the ukrainian ambassador to - serious. we were speaking to the ukrainian ambassador to the i serious. we were speaking to the ukrainian ambassador to the uk | serious. we were speaking to the i ukrainian ambassador to the uk on the programme yesterday. obviously things have changed little since then. he feels there is still a chance of a diplomatic solution. [30 chance of a diplomatic solution. do ou chance of a diplomatic solution. dr? you share that positivity? i think it looks pretty bleak in terms of diplomacy. president biden has ruled out for the time being a summit with putin. you say never. obviously you hope there will be a moment when diplomacy plan b reactivated again that it does not look promising at the moment. that it does not look promising at the moment-— the moment. what about the government's _ the moment. what about the government's actions - the moment. what about the government's actions here i the moment. what about the government's actions here in the moment. what about the i government's actions here in the the moment. what about the - government's actions here in the uk? there is criticism from outside the conservative party and within it as well. we will be speaking to liz truss in about 20 minutes' time. do you think the uk government has gone far enough? fiee you think the uk government has gone far enou~h? ,. ~', ., far enough? five banks and three oliuarchs
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far enough? five banks and three oligarchs looks _ far enough? five banks and three oligarchs looks pretty _ far enough? five banks and three oligarchs looks pretty modest i oligarchs looks pretty modest compared with what the european union has done, and certainly compared with germany's suspension of nordstream two. both sides seem to be asking for more. all that said, i can understand why the government would want to hold somethings back. if there is the kind of escalation they had talked about, then we will need to hit russia much, much harder with sanctions. russia much, much harder with sanctions-— russia much, much harder with sanctions.- what - russia much, much harder with sanctions.- what we i russia much, much harder with sanctions.- what we have sanctions. sorry. what we have siunalled sanctions. sorry. what we have signalled is. — sanctions. sorry. what we have signalled is, the _ sanctions. sorry. what we have signalled is, the most - sanctions. sorry. what we have signalled is, the most effective| signalled is, the most effective sanctions we can impose on the financial sector, because that is where london is extremely strong. that is where i would look to in the future. .,, that is where i would look to in the future. ., . ., , future. those financial sanctions are thin . s future. those financial sanctions are things like _ future. those financial sanctions are things like the _ future. those financial sanctions are things like the sweat - future. those financial sanctions. are things like the sweat financial system and in the currency markets as well. —— nordstream two —— swift.
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i think there is property in this country held by russians. somewhere down the line there is potential action on swift, there is potential action on swift, the international payment system. i am not sure that is entirely in our handsif am not sure that is entirely in our hands if it has to be internationally coordinated and that will be the biggest epaulette area. it will effectively cut russia out of the international financial system. —— the biggest effect in this area. d0 system. -- the biggest effect in this area. ,, system. -- the biggest effect in this area. i. ,, system. -- the biggest effect in this area. ,, ., ., this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you — this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you have _ this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you have to _ this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you have to think _ this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you have to think there i this area. do you think we can avoid a war? you have to think there is i a war? you have to think there is that it does _ a war? you have to think there is that it does not _ a war? you have to think there is that it does not look _ a war? you have to think there is that it does not look good - a war? you have to think there is that it does not look good at - a war? you have to think there is that it does not look good at the | that it does not look good at the moment. forthat that it does not look good at the moment. for that to happen, the russians will have to stay with the separatist and not engage with the ukrainians. if they do that, that is
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where the real war starts. what where the real war starts. what think about _ where the real war starts. what think about how _ where the real war starts. what think about how america - where the real war starts. what think about how america has i where the real war starts. what think about how america has reacted to this? do you think they will have to this? do you think they will have to be military action? i do to this? do you think they will have to be military action?— to be military action? i do not see it. if to be military action? i do not see it- if america _ to be military action? i do not see it. if america is _ to be military action? i do not see it. if america is not _ to be military action? i do not see it. if america is not going - to be military action? i do not see it. if america is not going to - it. if america is not going to contemplate sending in troops to the ukraine, i don't think any europeans are either. i think that is the right place to be. it does come down to the toughest possible package of economic sanctions, plus, in the future there has been a lot of speculation about providing equipment, military equipment, armed weapons to ukraine if we get into a full—scale war. let's hope that doesn't happen. it full-scale war. let's hope that doesn't happen.— full-scale war. let's hope that doesn't happen. it seems, if you listen to the _ doesn't happen. it seems, if you listen to the foreign _ doesn't happen. it seems, if you listen to the foreign minister - doesn't happen. it seems, if you l listen to the foreign minister from moscow saying the russians expected these sanctions, they are not surprised by them, wondering whether
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any of this. vladimir putin from flexing his muscles.— any of this. vladimir putin from flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- _ flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- lavrov _ flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- lavrov is _ flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- lavrov is paid - flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- lavrov is paid to - flexing his muscles. that is what lover of -- lavrov is paid to do. | lover of —— lavrov is paid to do. they would have anticipated the sanctions packages that are appearing. it does mean we would thenif appearing. it does mean we would then if we get a second or third round of stages. the fact they said they expected it and can cope with it does not mean there will be deeply damaged by them. russia gets most of its money from exporting oil and gas and stuff like suspending the nordstream two pipeline would really hurt them. i would not minimise the impact of western sanctions. ., ~ , ., , . minimise the impact of western sanctions. ., ~ , . ., sanctions. thank you very much for bein: with sanctions. thank you very much for being with us _ sanctions. thank you very much for being with us this _ sanctions. thank you very much for being with us this morning. - sanctions. thank you very much for being with us this morning. thankl being with us this morning. thank you for your time.
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so what impact is the conflict having on people living in ukraine and around the world? we're joined now byjournalist and researcher olga tokariuk, who's based in ukraine, and natalia ravlyuk, who runs the british—ukrainian aid group from london. morning to both of you. vulgar, if i can come to you first. i am interested to know how you felt, listening to president putin speak. —— olga. what did you think about ukrainian people? -- olga. what did you think about ukrainian people?— -- olga. what did you think about ukrainian people? yes, well the main feelin: that ukrainian people? yes, well the main feeling that i — ukrainian people? yes, well the main feeling that i and _ ukrainian people? yes, well the main feeling that i and a _ ukrainian people? yes, well the main feeling that i and a lot _ ukrainian people? yes, well the main feeling that i and a lot of _ feeling that i and a lot of ukrainians had when listening to the speech— ukrainians had when listening to the speech was anger that he basically said ukraine doesn't have a right to exist— said ukraine doesn't have a right to exist as _ said ukraine doesn't have a right to exist as an— said ukraine doesn't have a right to exist as an independent state, it is an artificially created country. there — an artificially created country. there were a lot of grievances about the current —
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there were a lot of grievances about the current course and the reforms that have _ the current course and the reforms that have been going on stop he made a lot of— that have been going on stop he made a lot of threats that were not even reat~ _ a lot of threats that were not even reat~ he _ a lot of threats that were not even reat~ he is— a lot of threats that were not even real. he is ready to punish ukraine if the _ real. he is ready to punish ukraine if the ukrainian government does not do what _ if the ukrainian government does not do what russia wants. there could be another _ do what russia wants. there could be another escalation. it filled people with anger because basically our very existence is under threat. it also _ very existence is under threat. it also filled — very existence is under threat. it also filled people with determination and courage and resolve — determination and courage and resolve to resist and to fight. olga, — resolve to resist and to fight. olga, tell— resolve to resist and to fight. olga, tell me, what is the atmosphere likely you are? well, the atmosrahere — atmosphere likely you are? well, the atmosrahere is _ atmosphere likely you are? well, the atmosphere is tense. _ atmosphere likely you are? well, the atmosphere is tense. everyone - atmosphere likely you are? well, the atmosphere is tense. everyone is - atmosphere is tense. everyone is talking _ atmosphere is tense. everyone is talking about recent developments. everyday _ talking about recent developments. everyday development see more worrying — everyday development see more worrying. several ukrainian soldiers have been—
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worrying. several ukrainian soldiers have been killed on the front line in recent— have been killed on the front line in recent days, another one was killed _ in recent days, another one was killed yesterday. civilians were killed — killed yesterday. civilians were killed in — killed yesterday. civilians were killed in the later shelling by russian _ killed in the later shelling by russian forces, artillery shelling. some _ russian forces, artillery shelling. some people from eastern ukraine from the _ some people from eastern ukraine from the territories that are now under— from the territories that are now under shelling that had been living in cities _ under shelling that had been living in cities and villages and heading west towards other regions of ukraine, _ west towards other regions of ukraine, where the situation is more calnr _ ukraine, where the situation is more calnr the _ ukraine, where the situation is more calm. the problem is we do not know what could _ calm. the problem is we do not know what could be putin's next target. yesterday— what could be putin's next target. yesterday in the donetsk region there _ yesterday in the donetsk region there was— yesterday in the donetsk region there was a pro—ukrainian rally where _ there was a pro—ukrainian rally where people took to the streets with ukrainian flags. he had could become _ with ukrainian flags. he had could become the next russian target. people _ become the next russian target. people are preparing in the ways they can — people are preparing in the ways they can -- _ people are preparing in the ways they can. —— key s. parents are giving — they can. —— key s. parents are giving to— they can. —— key s. parents are giving to children badges and stickers — giving to children badges and stickers with their contacts and
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medical— stickers with their contacts and medical information, like blood type in case _ medical information, like blood type in case there is a strike. it is a very— in case there is a strike. it is a very precarious and i would say horrific— very precarious and i would say horrific reality. a lot of ukrainians are feeling this in the coming — ukrainians are feeling this in the coming days. ukrainians are feeling this in the coming days— ukrainians are feeling this in the cominu da s. . ., , ~ ., coming days. what is it like for you to be a ukrainian _ coming days. what is it like for you to be a ukrainian living _ coming days. what is it like for you to be a ukrainian living in - coming days. what is it like for you to be a ukrainian living in the - coming days. what is it like for you to be a ukrainian living in the uk i to be a ukrainian living in the uk and what is it like for other ukrainians watching what is going on at the moment?— ukrainians watching what is going on at the moment? good morning. we are ve sort at the moment? good morning. we are very sort of- -- — at the moment? good morning. we are very sort of- -- we _ at the moment? good morning. we are very sort of... we don't _ at the moment? good morning. we are very sort of... we don't feel— very sort of... we don't feel scared, we are feeling angry, as olga said. everyone is worried what will happen next. it is very uncertain. we are angry because we had been gifted to putin eight more years. he started the ball into thousand and ia. he was doing the same things the russians are doing now. —— in 2014. the ukrainians are
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defending their land. the russians are destroying other countries, different countries. ukrainians feel angry. they are ready to support ukrainians all the way in this war. they are worried about family, obviously, about friends, about our country as a whole. tell obviously, about friends, about our country as a whole.— country as a whole. tell us about some of the _ country as a whole. tell us about some of the work _ country as a whole. tell us about some of the work you _ country as a whole. tell us about some of the work you have - country as a whole. tell us about some of the work you have been| country as a whole. tell us about - some of the work you have been able to do to try to help people in ukraine at the moment. what can you do to help? we ukraine at the moment. what can you do to hel? ~ ., , ukraine at the moment. what can you do to hel? ~ . , ., ukraine at the moment. what can you doto hel? ~ . , ., ., . do to help? we are trying to launch an a- eal do to help? we are trying to launch an appeal and _ do to help? we are trying to launch an appeal and fundraiser— do to help? we are trying to launch an appeal and fundraiser money - do to help? we are trying to launch an appeal and fundraiser money for medical kits, everything a soldier will probably need for the people who possibly will need to evacuate and leave their houses. we are every single week on the streets of london, trying to say maybe this is the time to open up putin's pockets
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and impose the strongest sanctions everin and impose the strongest sanctions ever in the uk, property, newspapers. they have a lot of money in uk banks. newspapers. they have a lot of money in uk banks-— in uk banks. listening to what was bein: in uk banks. listening to what was being said. — in uk banks. listening to what was being said. are _ in uk banks. listening to what was being said, are there _ in uk banks. listening to what was being said, are there things - in uk banks. listening to what was being said, are there things you i being said, are there things you need help with at the moment? what do you need?— do you need? yes, we're in ukraine are very grateful — do you need? yes, we're in ukraine are very grateful and _ do you need? yes, we're in ukraine are very grateful and appreciate - are very grateful and appreciate their— are very grateful and appreciate their support at the uk and providing defensive assistance to uk, also — providing defensive assistance to uk, also financial assistance. the uk, also financial assistance. the uk economy has been hit really hard by this— uk economy has been hit really hard by this latest escalation. the ukrainian _ by this latest escalation. the ukrainian economy has been losing $2.3 billion monthly. more needs to be done, _ $2.3 billion monthly. more needs to be done, nor sanctions on russia, more _ be done, nor sanctions on russia, more support for ukraine. support can come — more support for ukraine. support can come from ordinary citizens donating — can come from ordinary citizens donating to ukrainian charities. chitdren— donating to ukrainian charities. children who are affected by war and have psychological problems. also
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charity— have psychological problems. also charity supporting internally displaced people. there are displaced people. there are displaced people. there are displaced people he had to leave their houses in crimea in occupied donetsk— their houses in crimea in occupied donetsk because of russian aggression. there are a range of options. — aggression. there are a range of options, how you can support ukraine and how— options, how you can support ukraine and how the _ options, how you can support ukraine and how the citizens can support ukraine — and how the citizens can support ukraine. also demonstrations. rallies, — ukraine. also demonstrations. rallies, taking to the streets and protesting against russia's aggressive actions. that is a very strong _ aggressive actions. that is a very strong sign — aggressive actions. that is a very strong sign of support.— aggressive actions. that is a very strong sign of support. thank you both very much — strong sign of support. thank you both very much indeed. _ strong sign of support. thank you both very much indeed. let's - strong sign of support. thank you both very much indeed. let's findi both very much indeed. let's find out what is happening with the weather. carol is with us this morning. it beautiful photograph behind you. morning. it beautiful photograph behind you-— behind you. yes, it is. taken in kent this _ behind you. yes, it is. taken in kent this morning. _ behind you. yes, it is. taken in kent this morning. today, - behind you. yes, it is. taken in - kent this morning. today, wherever you are, it is going to be a windy day. in england and wales it will be mostly dry. if he showers in
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the west. most will miss them. this line of rain moving across northern ireland and scotland, eventually getting into northern england. behind it turns colder. through the latter part of the day it will full as snow in the lower levels. for a time it will be windy across south—east scotland and north—east england. that will ease during the day. tonight a weather front continues to sink southwards as a weak feature. as a wave developed a long neck and a chance it will pep up long neck and a chance it will pep up in the south—east overnight. still windy. tomorrow we lose the rain from the south—east quite smartly. snow showers continue across scotland and northern ireland for a time before we start to see the snow level rise back into the hills. on higher ground we could see as much as 30 centimetres of snow at low levels between two and ten
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centimetres. it will feel cold tomorrow. centimetres. it will feel cold tomorrow-— centimetres. it will feel cold tomorrow. . ., , ., tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick ho -e tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick hope back — tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick hope back out _ tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick hope back out again. _ tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick hope back out again. i _ tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick hope back out again. i already - tomorrow. we are ready for it. vick| hope back out again. i already have it. —— big coat. footballer and anti—racism campaigner troy deeney says he believes the current education system is failing children from ethnic minority backgrounds, by inadequately teaching them about their history. he's calling on the government to make changes to the curriculum, after a yougov survey he commissioned found only 12% of british teachers felt empowered to cover diverse topics with their pupils. he's been speaking to our sports editor, dan roan. he's been a driving force at whatever club he's played for. commentator: and who else | but the talismanic troy deeney! and now he's laying down a challenge to the government. former watford striker troy deeney telling me he wants more diversity to be mandatory
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in the school curriculum. no—one's saying that every single history lesson has to be about black, asian and mixed ethnicities. we are saying that over the course of a 12—month period, where kids are at school, that we can learn a little bit about everybody and keep doing that from a younger age. i think a lot of what's going on in the school curriculum right across the board is very much a horse racing mentality — that the blinkers are on and we're looking here. deeney was a key figure behind premier league players' decision to take the knee before matches in support of racial equality, and he's now written an open letter to the education secretary claiming the current system is failing children from ethnic minorities. i always find it quite disheartening, really, that the only representation we have from a black perspective is always one of what i consider negative. we always learn about slave trade and how things were like that. and it'sjust like, well, there's a lot more. ijust realised that everyone's got a different lens on the world. as well as launching a petition, deeney�*s commissioned a yougov survey of 1,000 teachers, which he says showed 54% of those who took part believe the school system has a racial bias, while only 12% feel empowered
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to teach diverse topics. i feel that's very dangerous because the people we're putting in charge, or empowering to teach our kids, don't feel confident enough of in their role to talk about subjects that's happening in the world. in response, the department for education said the curriculum offers pupils the opportunity to study significant figures from black and ethnic minority backgrounds and the contributions they've made to the nation. we continue to be informed by the work of committed individuals and groups when it comes to supporting the teaching of black and minority ethnic history. is there a danger, do you think, that even if the motive is very commendable and positive, that it ends up in some cases being divisive? everything is divisive at this moment in time. literally anything. when you talk about history, the biggest message i have to say is i've never asked for anything to be removed. maybe just add a bit more. do you expect resistance to your suggestion? a hundred percent. you'll get stick and abuse for it all? i expect resistance.
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i expect online abuse. i expect... but i'm already living that anyway. so what have i got to fear in that regard? in wales, the teaching of black and other ethnic minority histories will soon become mandatory. now at birmingham city, deeney hopes his efforts will build the pressure for english schools to follow suit. dan roan, bbc news. we do have a little better than update. the education secretary has tweeted him saying thank you for raising this important issue. it would be good to discuss this with you, i will ask my team to reach out. already having an impact. coming up at ten past eight this morning we'll be speaking to the widow of conservative mp james brokenshire, who died from lung cancer in october. she's been meeting a lady called mandee, who formed a close online friendship with james before he passed away. they bonded over their shared experience of living with lung cancer.
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now, they're campaigning for better screening for the disease. we will be speaking to liz truss in the next b minutes about the developments in ukraine and what the uk government is doing about that. —— few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm alice salfield. scientists at imperial college london have devised a cheap blood test that could save the lives of thousands of heart attack patients. the british heart foundation, which funded the work, said the quick test can help doctors to spot people at high risk of death following a suspected attack — so they can be closely monitored and given more intensive treatment. a tourist attraction that opened incomplete, over budget, and led to resignations is being dismantled. the marble arch mound charged visitors up to £8 when it opened injuly. however, the £6 million artificial hill was forced to shut temporarily
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when plants and grass began to die. new pictures show almost all of the trees have now been torn off. a london hospital wants to raise awareness of a rare condition that affects children — and is thought to be triggered by covid—19. evelina london children's hospital was one of the first organisations in the world to identify pims, or paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome. the symptoms include a fever, swelling of the toes and fingers, and red rash. i think it's important to stress that this is a rare disease that we see in response to an acute covid infection. so for the vast majority of children that will go on to get a covid infection, they're going to be generally quite well with the acute covid infection, and they will carry on living their normal lives afterwards. but a very tiny minority can become unwell. a kennel belonging to a german shepherd dog could fetch more than £200,000 when it's auctioned in london this afternoon.
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it's purely because it was hit by a space rock that fell to earth in costa rica in 2019. it's part of a sale dedicated to rare and unusual meteorites at christie's. if you are using the tube this morning... it's all looking good except for the ongoing part closure on the northern line there. here's your weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. low pressure continues to dominate the weather over the next couple of days. it is looking rather blustery at times — various weather fronts coming through — but not as windy as it has been, and certainly not stormy. there'll be some sunshine, also some outbreaks of rain, and then it's looking drier, more settled on friday and saturday. today, this morning — well, it's a cold, frosty start to the day, some of our temperatures have dipped below freezing. we'll see lots of sunshine around through the morning, we'll keep the sunny skies and then, while it's still looking dry for much of the afternoon, there will be more cloud building in from the west and possibly some scattered showers, as well. quite a brisk south—westerly
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wind blowing. temperatures are lower than they were yesterday, but still getting into double figures — i think in central london, certainly 10, 11 degrees celsius. and it's a milder night to follow on wednesday night. there'll always be quite a bit of cloud around. we've got a cold front sweeping in from the northwest as we head through into thursday morning, so it's quite a wet start to the day on thursday. some colder air tucking in behind — watch out for a little bit of wintriness to some of the showers through the afternoon. a brisk westerly wind, also some sunshine. it's looking drier with lighter winds on friday. i'll be back in an hour. for now, though, it's back to sally and dan. see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. let's return to our top story now. the foreign secretary says "nothing is off the table" in the uk's response to the crisis in ukraine, amid growing calls for the government to impose further sanctions on russia.
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it comes amid growing calls for the government to impose further sanctions on moscow. last night, the usjoined the growing number of nato allies to announce measures targeting russian individuals, banks and businesses. we can speak to liz truss now. good morning, thank you for being with us this morning. i know it is a busy one for you but lots of our viewers will be interested to know what the latest developments are. many of them will have seen the australian prime minister scott morrison says he expects a full—scale invasion in the next 24 hours. what are your thoughts on where we are with russia and ukraine at the moment? we where we are with russia and ukraine at the moment?— where we are with russia and ukraine at the moment? we do expect to see a full-scale invasion. _ at the moment? we do expect to see a full-scale invasion. we _ at the moment? we do expect to see a full-scale invasion. we think _ at the moment? we do expect to see a full-scale invasion. we think it - at the moment? we do expect to see a full-scale invasion. we think it is - full—scale invasion. we think it is highly likely. we don't know exactly when that will take place that we have seen the russian troops are massing at the border, we have seen vladimir putin's recognition of the so—called republics in the donbas region, and we are seeing all the precursors to a serious invasion.
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claims of ukrainian troops doing sort of operations, so—called false flags. we have seen attempts to undermine the ukrainian government. we have seen this action by vladimir putin and the security council, so we are very, very concerned about an imminent invasion of ukraine. what imminent invasion of ukraine. what does a full-scale _ imminent invasion of ukraine. what does a full-scale invasion _ imminent invasion of ukraine. what does a full—scale invasion look like? and move on the capital kyiv? that is one possibility, although there are other possibilities, as well. the reality is that russian forces have encircled ukraine so we could see an attack from a variety of directions. what we are very, very clear about is that we have already announced a package of severe sanctions to punish vladimir putin for the recognition of those two parts of ukraine. he has effectively denied ukrainian sovereignty. there would be an escalation in those sanctions, nothing would be off the table in the event of a full invasion, and we
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are working very closely with our allies, the americans, europeans and indeed the g7 to make sure we inflict pain on the putin regime. talk about those sanctions. you called them severe. lots of people and many in your own party saying they do not go far enough. let me remind you of some comments. a former conservative leader so iain duncan smith said if we are going to hit them with sanctions we need to hit them with sanctions we need to hit them with sanctions we need to hit them hard at sit now. the foreign affairs select committee chairman said it is giving them a free pass at this early stage stop theresa may, former cabinet minister, david lymington said putin is not likely to be deterred by this, he is only like to be deterred by stronger sanctions. tobias ellwood act now rather than wait for russia to advance further. can you explain now why there are many in your own party and right across the house who are saying that uk have not gone far enough with sanctions against russia byjust looking at five banks and three individuals? these are the toughest sanctions we
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have ever put on russia. they are targeting people very close to the kremlin. absolute key oligarchs. they are targeting banks that one of the russian military and key banks that keep the russian regime going. we are also making sure that russia will not be able to raise sovereign debt on international markets. we are making sure that territorial sanctions will be in place in those regions, as well. we are targeting politicians in the russian parliament, who voted for that recognition to take place. what is important is we are working in concert with international allies. the sanctions we are putting in place are coordinated with the us, europe. to make sure that vladimir putin cannot play divide and rule amongst the allies, we have shown we are united and we will escalate those sanctions in the event of a full invasion into ukraine. it is important we keep some sanctions in the locker. i have been very clear
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that nothing is off the table. vladimir putin and his cronies will be fearing that they will be hit next, and that is important. the sanctions are there, yes, as a punishment for what has happened in terms of recognition of those so—called republics, but it is also about deterring future action by russia and making it clear that they will be consequences for a full—scale invasion. i think it is incredibly important that we are aligned with our allies and that vladimir putin gets a strong message of unity in response to his appalling actions to essentially deny the sovereignty of ukraine. there is a senior government source being quoted this morning saying that what sanctions are inevitable. you seem to be talking about that. a longer list of oligarchs being looked at, more banks, export controls, issues over sovereign debt. can you explain, if there was to be further moves by russia, what
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those further sanctions from the government would look like? just to be clear, government would look like? just to be clear. we — government would look like? just to be clear, we will— government would look like? just to be clear, we will be _ government would look like? just to be clear, we will be restricting - government would look like? just to be clear, we will be restricting and l be clear, we will be restricting and stopping russian access to sovereign debt anyway. that is part of the package that we announced yesterday. but there will be more action on financial markets, there will be more action on individuals. we have a list of individuals ready to go. there will be more action on companies that support the russian state. we introduced legislation last week that enables us to target a much wider range of companies. we have drawn up the list. in response to putin's action is to recognise those so—called republics, we reacted within 24 hours, putting down our new package of sanctions which have been completely coordinated with our allies, the united states and the europeans. and if we see, which i feel we are likely to, a full—scale invasion of ukraine, we will similarly act rapidly and we will act in concert
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with our international allies to send a very clear message to vladimir putin that we are not going to allow him to win. we will work together to degrade the russian economy and to resist vladimir putin's attempts to turn the clock back to the 1990s, to turn back the map of eastern europe and to violate the sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine. you the sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine.— the sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine. you met with his foreign _ integrity of ukraine. you met with his foreign minister _ integrity of ukraine. you met with his foreign minister earlier- integrity of ukraine. you met with his foreign minister earlier this i his foreign minister earlier this month. can you give us an idea into the personality of vladimir putin? is he flexing his muscles, is he an international bully? i is he flexing his muscles, is he an international bully?— international bully? i didn't meet vladimir putin, _ international bully? i didn't meet vladimir putin, i— international bully? i didn't meet vladimir putin, i met _ international bully? i didn't meet vladimir putin, i met the - international bully? i didn't meet vladimir putin, i met the foreign minister and what i heard was a denial of reality. there were claims they would be no invasion of ukraine, whilst at the same time we have seen the troops and tanks are massed on the border. there were claims that ukraine have no right to
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sovereignty and the government is illegitimate. what we have seen is constant attempts by the russian government to spread this information, to spread discoid. what has become very clear over the last weeks and months is they are simply not interested in diplomacy. they are not interested in finding any kind of revolution doing up a resolution to the conflict. putin has stated clearly he will not stop at ukraine, that he wants to see countries like latvia, lithuania, other countries in eastern europe brought back into the russian sphere of influence, which is why it is so important that the international community is united in condemning what he is doing, inflicting pain through sanctions and supporting the ukrainians in terms of their battle to retain sovereignty of their nation, and self—determination of their nation. flan nation, and self-determination of their nation-— their nation. can i ask you a little bit about russian _ their nation. can i ask you a little bit about russian money - their nation. can i ask you a little bit about russian money in - their nation. can i ask you a little bit about russian money in the l their nation. can i ask you a little i bit about russian money in the uk? particularly about russian donations to the conservative party. your
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party has received nearly £2 million from donors with russian links since borisjohnson became prime minister. mr sue have benefited and that included dominic raab, deputy premier lister, the chancellor rishi sunak, and five other mps who are attending cabinet, as well, that current cabinet table. how damaging is that for the government at the moment? , ., ., ., ., ., , moment? every donation to any olitical moment? every donation to any political party — moment? every donation to any political party has _ moment? every donation to any political party has to _ moment? every donation to any political party has to be - moment? every donation to any political party has to be fully - political party has to be fully declared. the person donating has to be on the electoral register in britain and of course there are people who have moved out of russia and become british citizens, who are part of our country. what is important is the people we are targeting with sanctions, those are oligarchs close to vladimir putin. that is not a general comment about russian citizens or people from russian citizens or people from russia who may have become british citizens. we have to be very careful to distinguish between those who are supporters of the regime, those who
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are cropping up vladimir putin, and those people who may have moved from russia years ago and who are part of the british political system. i understand you are making that differentiation but let me show you a picture from may of 2019, when theresa may was prime minister. this is from your instagram. i think the thing you posted was a ladies night. there you are, next to theresa may. on the other side of theresa may is the wife of a former russian minister who has given the conservative party more than £1.8 million, making herthe conservative party more than £1.8 million, making her the biggest female donor in recent political history. their wealth comes from her husband, vladimir who has strong links to the kremlin. at the time there were six female cabinet members. that shows us, doesn't it, that the closeness of the british government to russian money. what that the closeness of the british government to russian money. what i can sa to government to russian money. what i can say to you — government to russian money. what i can say to you today — government to russian money. what i can say to you today is _ government to russian money. what i can say to you today is that _ government to russian money. what i can say to you today is that we - government to russian money. what i can say to you today is that we will -
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can say to you today is that we will target anybody who we believe has links to the putin regime, who is helping support and prop up the putin government, and nothing is off the table in terms of who we target. are you embarrassed by seeing photographs like that? hie. are you embarrassed by seeing photographs like that?- are you embarrassed by seeing photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the _ photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the dinner _ photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the dinner at _ photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the dinner at the - photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the dinner at the time, . photographs like that? no, i am not. i attended the dinner at the time, i l i attended the dinner at the time, i make my decisions as foreign secretary on the basis of what is right and, as i have said, without prejudice, we will target anybody who is of interest in terms of the russian regime, who is helping prop up russian regime, who is helping prop up me a putin's appalling regime, and there are no other considerations as far as i am concerned. d0 considerations as far as i am concerned-— considerations as far as i am concerned. , ., ~ ., , concerned. do you think the money has been -- _ concerned. do you think the money has been -- that _ concerned. do you think the money has been -- that has _ concerned. do you think the money has been -- that has been - concerned. do you think the money has been -- that has been donated j concerned. do you think the money i has been -- that has been donated to has been —— that has been donated to the conservative party should be given back? this the conservative party should be given back?— the conservative party should be riven back? �* , , ., , given back? as i said there is money donated to the _
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given back? as i said there is money donated to the conservative - given back? as i said there is money donated to the conservative party. l donated to the conservative party. everybody who donates is on the british electoral register. they are fully vetted before making those donations. i think it is very important that we don't conflate people with russian heritage and background with people who are close to the putin regime. what i'm clear about is that we will target people who are close to the putin regime, we will target companies who are supportive of the putin regime and who are helping prop up the economy. we will do that without prejudice. i understand that and point you are making is about russian influence more broadly but on that particular point sir keir starmer last week said that for a decade the tories have notjust said that for a decade the tories have not just failed said that for a decade the tories have notjust failed to challenge russian influence, but you have enabled it. how do you answer that? we are putting in place unexplained wealth or it is, we have targeted illicit finance, we are bringing forward the economic crime built to
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make finance much more transparent. but we have to be clear about who is responsible for what is happening in ukraine at the moment. it is not people in britain, it is not being caused by cash in britain, it is caused by cash in britain, it is caused by cash in britain, it is caused by vladimir putin, who is an autocrat who is seeking to support an eight ukraine and, more broadly, eastern europe, under his rule. and of course we need to make sure we have finances here in london, we make sure we target these oligarchs. but fundamentally this is about the actions of a dictatorial leader who is subordinating democracy across ukraine, and that is who we should be focusing our target on and that is what i am working on with our allies across the world to make sure
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that we inflict pain on the putin regime. and that we stop putin in his ambitions in the uk. in regime. and that we stop putin in his ambitions in the uk.— regime. and that we stop putin in his ambitions in the uk. in terms of other international _ his ambitions in the uk. in terms of other international pressure, - his ambitions in the uk. in terms of other international pressure, what l other international pressure, what about the champions league final scheduled to go ahead in may in saint petersburg at the moment? i don't believe that should go ahead in st petersburg. at this stage, with what russia is doing internationally, it is wrong to have a football tournament there. ii a football tournament there. if there was to be a british team in there was to be a british team in the final, it has happened a lot, chelsea are the holders, they have russian links at the moment. do you think the british team should boycott a potential final in st petersburg?— boycott a potential final in st petersburg? boycott a potential final in st petersburu? . , ., ., ., petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i — petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i was _ petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i was a _ petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i was a player, _ petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i was a player, which - petersburg? that is a matter for the team but if i was a player, which is i team but if i was a player, which is very unlikely eventuality, i certainly would not want to be part of that certainly would not want to be part ofthan certainly would not want to be part of than , , certainly would not want to be part ofthan , , . of that ok. this trust, foreign secretary. _ of that ok. this trust, foreign secretary, appreciate - of that ok. this trust, foreign secretary, appreciate your - of that ok. this trust, foreign i secretary, appreciate your time, thank you. john is here talking about that very subject, the champions league final.
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increasing pressure, looking increasingly likely that the final will be moved and you have to factor fans into this. will they be able to travel? probably not. it is when that decision will come and perhaps uefa will probably make that decision closer towards that final when they know the teams who will be contesting it and trying to pick a suitable venue as an alternative. good morning. the bbc understands european football's governing body is almost certain to switch to a different host city amid the escalating crisis after several countries, including the uk, introduced sanctions against russia. the 68,000 seater gazprom stadium in st petersburg had been selected as this season's venue. uefa said it was "closely monitoring the situation" and "any decision would be made in due course if necessary". mr speaker, on his point about sporting events, as i said earlier on, i think it inconceivable that major international football tournaments can take place in russia after, as i say, the invasion of a sovereign country.
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the game is still expected to be played on the 28th may. london mayor sadiq khan said the english capital was ready to step in with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley is also under consideration but is due to host the league two and championship play—off finals that weekend on may 28th and 29th. manchester united one of four english clubs hoping to reach the final — they're away at atletico madrid in their last—16 tie this evening. their manager says there is a huge amount to work through and cosider. this is something for uefa and maybe even for some politicians to decide upon. i think we all hope — not only here in england, but in the whole of europe, if not in the rest of the world — that things will de—escalate. nobody could really be interested in a sort of war within europe. so this is more important, actually, than a champions league game, if we're honest. chelsea, owned by russian billionaire roman abrahomvich, are a step closer to the quarter finals after beating
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lille in the first leg of their last—16 tie. no place in the side for romelu lukaku last night. his replacment kai havertz got chelsea's first. american christian pulisic with their second, leaving chelsea in control of the tie ahead of the second leg in three weeks' time. chelsea are making progress. we wait to see where it might go, whether final will be staged. intern; final will be staged. very interesting, _ final will be staged. very interesting, i'm - final will be staged. very interesting, i'm sure - final will be staged. very i interesting, i'm sure there final will be staged. very - interesting, i'm sure there is a decision coming shortly. let's go to carol with the weather and it is getting cold again. it is indeed. good _ and it is getting cold again. it 3 indeed. good morning, everybody. a cold start to the day today for some. these are the temperatures in towns and cities. in rural areas they are lower so there is some frost in central and eastern parts of the uk. this is what is going to bring the cold air, this cold front sinking southwards with this rain, you can see snow showers coming in behind and wherever you are today
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will be windy. no showers in the hills, the highlands, here is the rain coming in already and there are the snow showers across scotland. england, wales, a few showers around but for most it will be a dry day with some sunshine but windy across the north—east of england and the north—east of scotland before that eases through the course of the afternoon. weather front taking eases through the course of the afternoon. weatherfront taking its main south was commit wintry showers following on and gates across the north and west and a real difference in temperatures and to south. previous evening and overnight, our weather front previous evening and overnight, our weatherfront sinking previous evening and overnight, our weather front sinking south, fragmenting as it does, but likely to pep up as it goes into the south east corner. snow showers to sea level across scotland and also in northern ireland and it will be a cold night with the risk of ice and also frost. you can see why. as i cold front sinks south, all this cold front sinks south, all this cold air filters in cold front sinks south, all this cold airfilters in behind and you can see from the wind arrows it will
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be widely windy tomorrow. there goes the rain as we go through the course of the morning. behind it we are in the cold air. again increasingly snow lower levels across scotland and high levels could have as much as 30 centimetres, getting on for 12 inches. blowing in the wind, bliss is on high ground and the same across northern ireland. heaviest snow on the hills but like in scotland we can see some at lower levels, as well. across the pennines, the lakes come in through the welsh mountains, the moors and the welsh mountains, the moors and the midlands, snow showers with height. through the rest of the day, most showers will retreat back to rain or indeed sleet and there will be a lot of dry weather but don't forget it will be windy! with lower temperatures, 4—80 , and on the wind chill and it will feel quite bitter tomorrow —— for it to eight degrees. from thursday into friday, is where the front sinking south but i want to draw your attention to the
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atlantic, because we have high pressure building in as we head towards the weekend. we start off with gusty winds, especially down the north sea coastline, still a few showers but as high pressure builds in from the west things will settle. a lot of dry weather, some sunshine, as well, and temperatures up to about 10 degrees at best. then it remains very settled into the weekend for most. thank you very much. ten years ago, former footballer dean holden and tv presenter danielle nicholls were on a family holiday, when their 17—month old daughter cici died. she'd contracted meningococcal septicaemia — a bacterial infection, which causes blood poisining and sepsis, requiring urgent treatment. now, dean and danielle are ambassadors for the charity meningitis now and want to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of the condition. they're here with us now. good morning. good morning. lovely to have you — good morning. good morning. lovely to have you with _ good morning. good morning. lovely to have you with us _ good morning. good morning. lovely to have you with us stop _
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you have been for the most awful time is a family and actually it was ten years ago and it has taken you this long to be able to talk about it in the way that you can talk about it today. tell me how you are now, ten years on.— now, ten years on. every day is a new day and _ now, ten years on. every day is a new day and you _ now, ten years on. every day is a new day and you have _ now, ten years on. every day is a new day and you have to - now, ten years on. every day is a new day and you have to do - now, ten years on. every day is a new day and you have to do the i now, ten years on. every day is a - new day and you have to do the work every _ new day and you have to do the work every day _ new day and you have to do the work every day. mental _ new day and you have to do the work every day. mental health _ new day and you have to do the work every day. mental health wise. - new day and you have to do the work every day. mental health wise. it - new day and you have to do the work every day. mental health wise. it is i every day. mental health wise. it is recall— every day. mental health wise. it is recall its— every day. mental health wise. it is recall its mental— every day. mental health wise. it is recall its mental health, _ every day. mental health wise. it is recall its mental health, it - every day. mental health wise. it is recall its mental health, it should l recall its mental health, it should 'ust recall its mental health, it should just be _ recall its mental health, it should just be healthy— recall its mental health, it should just be healthy as _ recall its mental health, it should just be healthy as you _ recall its mental health, it should just be healthy as you go - recall its mental health, it should just be healthy as you go to - recall its mental health, it should just be healthy as you go to the i recall its mental health, it should i just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff— just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like — just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like that _ just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like that —— _ just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like that —— it _ just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like that —— it is _ just be healthy as you go to the gym and stuff like that —— it is weird - and stuff like that —— it is weird to call— and stuff like that —— it is weird to call it — and stuff like that —— it is weird to call it mental— and stuff like that —— it is weird to call it mental health. - and stuff like that —— it is weird to call it mental health. it - and stuff like that —— it is weird to call it mental health. it is i to call it mental health. it is about— to call it mental health. it is about doing _ to call it mental health. it is about doing the _ to call it mental health. it is about doing the work - to call it mental health. it is about doing the work everyl to call it mental health. it is i about doing the work every day to call it mental health. it is - about doing the work every day and talking _ about doing the work every day and talking about — about doing the work every day and talking about mental— about doing the work every day and talking about mental health - about doing the work every day and talking about mental health issuesl talking about mental health issues and normalising _ talking about mental health issues and normalising death _ talking about mental health issues and normalising death we - talking about mental health issues and normalising death we are - talking about mental health issues and normalising death we are all. and normalising death we are all going _ and normalising death we are all going to — and normalising death we are all going to die, _ and normalising death we are all going to die, that _ and normalising death we are all going to die, that is _ and normalising death we are all going to die, that is for- and normalising death we are all going to die, that is for sure. - going to die, that is for sure. dean, — going to die, that is for sure. dean, what— going to die, that is for sure. dean, what is— going to die, that is for sure. dean, what is it _ going to die, that is for sure. dean, what is it like - going to die, that is for sure. dean, what is it like to- going to die, that is for sure. dean, what is it like to be - going to die, that is for sure. i dean, what is it like to be able going to die, that is for sure. - dean, what is it like to be able to talk about cici now? it is dean, what is it like to be able to talk about cici now?— talk about cici now? it is still difficult now. _ talk about cici now? it is still difficult now. the _ talk about cici now? it is still difficult now. the treatment| talk about cici now? it is still i difficult now. the treatment we talk about cici now? it is still - difficult now. the treatment we have done, _ difficult now. the treatment we have done, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, i -ot done, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, i got into— done, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, i got into that very early because literally —
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literally overnight it changes a person — literally overnight it changes a person and you can't understand. this stiff— person and you can't understand. this stiff upper lip, being told to man up— this stiff upper lip, being told to man up and get on with it, particularly in the sport of football, that was not the way for me. football, that was not the way for nae i_ football, that was not the way for nae i had — football, that was not the way for me. i had to grieve, look after myself— me. i had to grieve, look after myself so _ me. i had to grieve, look after myself so i _ me. i had to grieve, look after myself so i could look after danielle and keep our marriage together— danielle and keep our marriage together and we have four other kids _ together and we have four other kids. talking, meditation, allthe things— kids. talking, meditation, allthe things classed as a bit weird has kept _ things classed as a bit weird has kept us — things classed as a bit weird has kept us going and it is a daily thing — kept us going and it is a daily thing if_ kept us going and it is a daily thing. if you go a day without doing it it can— thing. if you go a day without doing it it can set— thing. if you go a day without doing it it can set you back so it is a daily— it it can set you back so it is a daily routine. in it it can set you back so it is a daily routine.— daily routine. in terms of the circumstances, _ daily routine. in terms of the circumstances, some - daily routine. in terms of the circumstances, some of- daily routine. in terms of the circumstances, some of our. daily routine. in terms of the - circumstances, some of our viewers will not be aware. it was a family holiday that turned into a bit of a nightmare. ads, holiday that turned into a bit of a nightmare-— holiday that turned into a bit of a - nightmare._ what nightmare. a living nightmare. what ha--ened? nightmare. a living nightmare. what happened? obviously _ nightmare. a living nightmare. what happened? obviously we _ nightmare. a living nightmare. what happened? obviously we had - nightmare. a living nightmare. what l happened? obviously we had travelled and been delayed _ happened? obviously we had travelled and been delayed so _ happened? obviously we had travelled and been delayed so we _ happened? obviously we had travelled and been delayed so we travelled - happened? obviously we had travelled and been delayed so we travelled for. and been delayed so we travelled for ages. _ and been delayed so we travelled for ages. she _ and been delayed so we travelled for ages. she was — and been delayed so we travelled for ages. she was only— and been delayed so we travelled for ages, she was only 18 _ and been delayed so we travelled for ages, she was only 18 months - and been delayed so we travelled for ages, she was only 18 months old i and been delayed so we travelled for ages, she was only 18 months old soj ages, she was only 18 months old so she was— ages, she was only 18 months old so she was tired. — ages, she was only 18 months old so she was tired, she _ ages, she was only 18 months old so she was tired, she had _ ages, she was only 18 months old so she was tired, she had missed - ages, she was only 18 months old so she was tired, she had missed her. she was tired, she had missed her nap. _ she was tired, she had missed her nap, the _ she was tired, she had missed her nap, the usual— she was tired, she had missed her nap, the usual scenario _ she was tired, she had missed her nap, the usual scenario and - she was tired, she had missed her nap, the usual scenario and wheni she was tired, she had missed her. nap, the usual scenario and when we -ot nap, the usual scenario and when we got tom _ nap, the usual scenario and when we got tom we — nap, the usual scenario and when we got tom we were— nap, the usual scenario and when we got tom we were in— nap, the usual scenario and when we got tom we were in a— nap, the usual scenario and when we got to... we were in a bill— nap, the usual scenario and when we got to... we were in a bill because i got to... we were in a bill because we had _ got to... we were in a bill because we had a _ got to... we were in a bill because we had a lot— got to... we were in a bill because we had a lot of— got to... we were in a bill because we had a lot of kits _ got to... we were in a bill because we had a lot of kits and _ got to... we were in a bill because we had a lot of kits and financiaiiyi we had a lot of kits and financially that was _ we had a lot of kits and financially that was the — we had a lot of kits and financially that was the better _ we had a lot of kits and financially that was the better option. - we had a lot of kits and financially that was the better option. we i we had a lot of kits and financially. that was the better option. we went into this _ that was the better option. we went into this villa — that was the better option. we went into this villa and _ that was the better option. we went into this villa and she _ that was the better option. we went into this villa and she wandered - into this villa and she wandered around — into this villa and she wandered around the _ into this villa and she wandered around the pool, _
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into this villa and she wandered around the pool, she _ into this villa and she wandered around the pool, she was - into this villa and she wandered around the pool, she was tired, into this villa and she wandered - around the pool, she was tired, she had been _ around the pool, she was tired, she had been on — around the pool, she was tired, she had been on a — around the pool, she was tired, she had been on a flight _ around the pool, she was tired, she had been on a flight four— around the pool, she was tired, she had been on a flight four hours. - around the pool, she was tired, she had been on a flight four hours. it i had been on a flight four hours. it was a _ had been on a flight four hours. it was a bit — had been on a flight four hours. it was a bit of— had been on a flight four hours. it was a bit of a _ had been on a flight four hours. it was a bit of a perfect _ had been on a flight four hours. it was a bit of a perfect storm - had been on a flight four hours. it i was a bit of a perfect storm because these _ was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs— was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs now— was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs now that _ was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs now that we _ was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs now that we look- was a bit of a perfect storm because these signs now that we look back i these signs now that we look back and say. _ these signs now that we look back and say. maybe _ these signs now that we look back and say, maybe we _ these signs now that we look back and say, maybe we would - these signs now that we look back and say, maybe we would have i these signs now that we look back i and say, maybe we would have seen that more _ and say, maybe we would have seen that more if— and say, maybe we would have seen that more if we _ and say, maybe we would have seen that more if we haven't _ and say, maybe we would have seen that more if we haven'tjust- and say, maybe we would have seen that more if we haven'tjust got- and say, maybe we would have seen that more if we haven't just got off i that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight — that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight i— that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight. i changed _ that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight. i changed her— that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight. i changed her nap - that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight. i changed her nap in - that more if we haven'tjust got off the flight. i changed her nap in the night, _ the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she — the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she was— the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she was warm, _ the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she was warm, i— the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she was warm, i gave - the flight. i changed her nap in the night, she was warm, i gave her. the flight. i changed her nap in the - night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol— night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and _ night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by— night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by sam _ night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by 8am we _ night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by 8am we went _ night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by 8am we went into - night, she was warm, i gave her some calpol and by 8am we went into her. calpol and by 8am we went into her room _ calpol and by 8am we went into her room and _ calpol and by 8am we went into her room and she — calpol and by 8am we went into her room and she was— calpol and by 8am we went into her room and she was making - calpol and by 8am we went into her room and she was making this- calpol and by 8am we went into herl room and she was making this weird noise _ room and she was making this weird noise and _ room and she was making this weird noise and it — room and she was making this weird noise and it is — room and she was making this weird noise and it is like _ room and she was making this weird noise and it is like a _ room and she was making this weird noise and it is like a really— room and she was making this weird noise and it is like a really weak- noise and it is like a really weak whimper— noise and it is like a really weak whimper and _ noise and it is like a really weak whimperand so— noise and it is like a really weak whimper and so we _ noise and it is like a really weak whimper and so we knew- noise and it is like a really weak whimper and so we knew and i noise and it is like a really weaki whimper and so we knew and we panicked — whimper and so we knew and we panicked and _ whimper and so we knew and we panicked and you _ whimper and so we knew and we panicked and you know- whimper and so we knew and we panicked and you know you - whimper and so we knew and we panicked and you know you get i whimper and so we knew and we i panicked and you know you get the little brochure _ panicked and you know you get the little brochure in— panicked and you know you get the little brochure in the _ panicked and you know you get the little brochure in the villa - panicked and you know you get the little brochure in the villa that - little brochure in the villa that tells _ little brochure in the villa that tells you — little brochure in the villa that tells you what _ little brochure in the villa that tells you what to _ little brochure in the villa that tells you what to do _ little brochure in the villa that tells you what to do an - little brochure in the villa that - tells you what to do an emergency? you hate _ tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having _ tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having to _ tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having to be _ tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having to be the _ tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having to be the one - tells you what to do an emergency? you hate having to be the one use i you hate having to be the one use that _ you hate having to be the one use that it _ you hate having to be the one use that it said — you hate having to be the one use that it said do— you hate having to be the one use that. it said do not— you hate having to be the one use that. it said do not call— you hate having to be the one use that. it said do not call an - that. it said do not call an ambulance _ that. it said do not call an ambulance on _ that. it said do not call an ambulance on the - that. it said do not call an ambulance on the island i that. it said do not call an - ambulance on the island because there _ ambulance on the island because there is— ambulance on the island because there is only— ambulance on the island because there is only one _ ambulance on the island because there is only one ambulance - ambulance on the island because there is only one ambulance on. ambulance on the island because i there is only one ambulance on the island! _ there is only one ambulance on the island! go— there is only one ambulance on the island! go to— there is only one ambulance on the island! go to this _ there is only one ambulance on the island! go to this clinic _ there is only one ambulance on the island! go to this clinic in _ there is only one ambulance on the island! go to this clinic in a - there is only one ambulance on the island! go to this clinic in a taxi - island! go to this clinic in a taxi and _ island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this— island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this is— island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this is the _ island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this is the number. - island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this is the number. we - island! go to this clinic in a taxi and this is the number. we gol island! go to this clinic in a taxi i and this is the number. we go to island! go to this clinic in a taxi - and this is the number. we go to the clinic— and this is the number. we go to the clinic and _ and this is the number. we go to the clinic and they — and this is the number. we go to the clinic and they were _ and this is the number. we go to the clinic and they were amazing - and this is the number. we go to the clinic and they were amazing and - clinic and they were amazing and they all— clinic and they were amazing and they alliumped _ clinic and they were amazing and they alljumped on _ clinic and they were amazing and they alljumped on her, - clinic and they were amazing and they alljumped on her, but - clinic and they were amazing and i they alljumped on her, but because of the _ they alljumped on her, but because of the panic. — they alljumped on her, but because of the panic. we _ they alljumped on her, but because of the panic, we watched _ they alljumped on her, but because of the panic, we watched her- they alljumped on her, but because of the panic, we watched her die. i they alljumped on her, but becausel of the panic, we watched her die. we saw things— of the panic, we watched her die. we saw things that — of the panic, we watched her die. we saw things that possibly— of the panic, we watched her die. we saw things that possibly other - saw things that possibly other parents — saw things that possibly other parents might— saw things that possibly other parents might not— saw things that possibly other parents might not have - saw things that possibly other parents might not have seen. saw things that possibly other - parents might not have seen because everybody _ parents might not have seen because everybodyiust — parents might not have seen because everybodyjust panicked. _
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parents might not have seen because everybodyjust panicked. they- parents might not have seen because everybodyjust panicked. they put i everybodyjust panicked. they put these _ everybodyjust panicked. they put these enormous _ everybodyjust panicked. they put these enormous needles - everybodyjust panicked. they put these enormous needles into- everybodyjust panicked. they put| these enormous needles into their bones— these enormous needles into their bones and — these enormous needles into their bones and at— these enormous needles into their bones and at that _ these enormous needles into their bones and at that point _ these enormous needles into their bones and at that point she - these enormous needles into their bones and at that point she is i bones and at that point she is dying — bones and at that point she is dying then— bones and at that point she is dying then they _ bones and at that point she is dying. then they wanted i bones and at that point she is dying. then they wanted to i bones and at that point she is. dying. then they wanted to get bones and at that point she is i dying. then they wanted to get her to the _ dying. then they wanted to get her to the icu — dying. then they wanted to get her to the icu on— dying. then they wanted to get her to the m on the _ dying. then they wanted to get her to the icu on the other— dying. then they wanted to get her to the icu on the other island, i dying. then they wanted to get her to the icu on the other island, that is not _ to the icu on the other island, that is not on _ to the icu on the other island, that is not on lanzarote, _ to the icu on the other island, that is not on lanzarote, it— to the icu on the other island, that is not on lanzarote, it is— to the icu on the other island, that is not on lanzarote, it is on- to the icu on the other island, that is not on lanzarote, it is on gran. is not on lanzarote, it is on gran canaria — is not on lanzarote, it is on gran canaria they— is not on lanzarote, it is on gran canaria. they have _ is not on lanzarote, it is on gran canaria. they have the _ is not on lanzarote, it is on gran| canaria. they have the helicopter is not on lanzarote, it is on gran- canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof— canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof of— canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof of the — canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof of the hospital _ canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof of the hospital to _ canaria. they have the helicopter on the roof of the hospital to be - the roof of the hospital to be airlifted _ the roof of the hospital to be airlifted to _ the roof of the hospital to be airlifted to the _ the roof of the hospital to be airlifted to the child - the roof of the hospital to be airlifted to the child icu i the roof of the hospital to be airlifted to the child icu buti the roof of the hospital to be i airlifted to the child icu but she never— airlifted to the child icu but she never got — airlifted to the child icu but she never got into _ airlifted to the child icu but she never got into it. _ airlifted to the child icu but she never got into it. she _ airlifted to the child icu but she never got into it.— airlifted to the child icu but she never got into it. she died inside two hours- _ never got into it. she died inside two hours. hearing _ never got into it. she died inside two hours. hearing you - never got into it. she died inside two hours. hearing you talk i never got into it. she died inside i two hours. hearing you talk about it in such detail, _ two hours. hearing you talk about it in such detail, it _ two hours. hearing you talk about it in such detail, it is _ two hours. hearing you talk about it in such detail, it is shocking - two hours. hearing you talk about it in such detail, it is shocking to i in such detail, it is shocking to hear but i know for you it is just something you have had to learn to process and deal with everyday and i imagine it is your head every day. you learn to live with a hole that is inside — you learn to live with a hole that is inside your— you learn to live with a hole that is inside your height _ you learn to live with a hole that is inside your height so - you learn to live with a hole that is inside your height so you i you learn to live with a hole that| is inside your height so you learn to live _ is inside your height so you learn to live with— is inside your height so you learn to live with this _ is inside your height so you learn to live with this empty— is inside your height so you learn to live with this empty feeling i is inside your height so you learn. to live with this empty feeling that i felt to live with this empty feeling that ! felt this— to live with this empty feeling that i felt this hole _ to live with this empty feeling that i felt this hole in _ to live with this empty feeling that i felt this hole in your— to live with this empty feeling that i felt this hole in your heart. - to live with this empty feeling that i felt this hole in your heart. part i i felt this hole in your heart. part of that— i felt this hole in your heart. part of that is— i felt this hole in your heart. part of that is celebrating _ i felt this hole in your heart. part of that is celebrating is _ i felt this hole in your heart. part of that is celebrating is that i i felt this hole in your heart. part of that is celebrating is that we l of that is celebrating is that we have _ of that is celebrating is that we have always _ of that is celebrating is that we have always been _ of that is celebrating is that we have always been able - of that is celebrating is that we have always been able to - of that is celebrating is that we have always been able to talk. of that is celebrating is that we - have always been able to talk about cici, it _ have always been able to talk about cici, it is _ have always been able to talk about cici, it isjust—
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have always been able to talk about cici, it is just the _ have always been able to talk about cici, it isjust the day— have always been able to talk about cici, it is just the day that _ have always been able to talk about cici, it is just the day that we - cici, it is just the day that we couldwt— cici, it is just the day that we couldn't talk— cici, it is just the day that we couldn't talk about _ cici, it is just the day that we couldn't talk about because i cici, it is just the day that wel couldn't talk about because of cici, it is just the day that we - couldn't talk about because of the trauma _ couldn't talk about because of the trauma. , t, , couldn't talk about because of the trauma. , ., , ., , trauma. terrifying as it was we wanted to _ trauma. terrifying as it was we wanted to function _ trauma. terrifying as it was we wanted to function as - trauma. terrifying as it was we wanted to function as a - trauma. terrifying as it was we j wanted to function as a family. trauma. terrifying as it was we - wanted to function as a family. the stats _ wanted to function as a family. the stats are _ wanted to function as a family. the stats are against you, your marital break-up. — stats are against you, your marital break—up, we have been together since _ break—up, we have been together since school and we have four other kids and _ since school and we have four other kids and it — since school and we have four other kids and it is — since school and we have four other kids and it is about them as much as cici so _ kids and it is about them as much as cici so for— kids and it is about them as much as cici so for me — kids and it is about them as much as cici so for me to function as a footballer_ cici so for me to function as a footballer and for danielle to do what _ footballer and for danielle to do what she — footballer and for danielle to do what she does on tv, hopefully there will be _ what she does on tv, hopefully there will be a _ what she does on tv, hopefully there will be a documentary. we had to find ways — will be a documentary. we had to find ways to deal with that and the way we _ find ways to deal with that and the way we did — find ways to deal with that and the way we did that was to do all the work_ way we did that was to do all the work that— way we did that was to do all the work that allows you to cry and then five minutes— work that allows you to cry and then five minutes later go into a football _ five minutes later go into a football stadium and work and be functional. �* . ., . , functional. and also to raise awareness _ functional. and also to raise awareness because - functional. and also to raise awareness because you - functional. and also to raise l awareness because you didn't functional. and also to raise - awareness because you didn't know much about meningococcal septicemia, i am sure many people watching this money would not know those things. having been through what you have been through, you don't want any otherfamily to go been through, you don't want any other family to go through that. it other family to go through that. it is the speed at which it takes you. anything _ is the speed at which it takes you. anything that _ is the speed at which it takes you. anything that can _ is the speed at which it takes you. anything that can get _ is the speed at which it takes you. anything that can get you - is the speed at which it takes you. anything that can get you that - is the speed at which it takes you. | anything that can get you that help quicker, _ anything that can get you that help quicker, as— anything that can get you that help quicker, as far— anything that can get you that help quicker, as far as _ anything that can get you that help quicker, as far as unfortunately- anything that can get you that help quicker, as far as unfortunately it l quicker, as far as unfortunately it she presented _ quicker, as far as unfortunately it she presented with _ quicker, as far as unfortunately it she presented with the _ quicker, as far as unfortunately it she presented with the rash - quicker, as far as unfortunately it she presented with the rash very| she presented with the rash very late on — she presented with the rash very iate on that— she presented with the rash very late on. that does— she presented with the rash very late on. that does happen. - she presented with the rash very late on. that does happen. loads to look for.
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late on. that does happen. loads to look for- it — late on. that does happen. loads to look for. it wasn't _ late on. that does happen. loads to look for. it wasn't there _ late on. that does happen. loads to look for. it wasn't there until - late on. that does happen. loads to look for. it wasn't there until she i look for. it wasn't there until she was d in: look for. it wasn't there until she was dying at _ look for. it wasn't there until she was dying at the _ look for. it wasn't there until she was dying at the end. _ look for. it wasn't there until she was dying at the end. we - look for. it wasn't there until she was dying at the end. we met. look for. it wasn't there until she i was dying at the end. we met steve and gloria _ was dying at the end. we met steve and gloria who set up when their caium _ and gloria who set up when their caium kerr— and gloria who set up when their calum kerr died. —— when their son died at zion people — —— when their son died at zion peorrie say— —— when their son died at zion people say that you didn't love your child like _ people say that you didn't love your child like isle love your child like isle child like isle love your child like isle of _ child like isle love your child like isle of man, i can't get through tomorrow _ isle of man, i can't get through tomorrow. ten years on, we are still together _ tomorrow. ten years on, we are still together it — tomorrow. ten years on, we are still together. it has been tough and we laugh— together. it has been tough and we laugh about things and we celebrate but we _ laugh about things and we celebrate but we have a four of kids we have to be _ but we have a four of kids we have to be therefore as parents and i want _ to be therefore as parents and i want to— to be therefore as parents and i want to keep doing what we were born to do. _ want to keep doing what we were born to do. which— want to keep doing what we were born to do, which is football and daniel with -- _ to do, which is football and daniel with —— danielle with tv. you to do, which is football and daniel with -- danielle with tv. you know ou have with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to — with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to be _ with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to be in _ with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to be in a _ with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to be in a certain - with -- danielle with tv. you know you have to be in a certain mood i with -- danielle with tv. you knowj you have to be in a certain mood to be a _ you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv— you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv presenter— you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv presenter so— you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv presenter so i— you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv presenter so i was- you have to be in a certain mood to be a tv presenter so i was looking i be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting — be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting back— be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting back into _ be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting back into work- be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting back into work as - be a tv presenter so i was looking at getting back into work as she i at getting back into work as she died and — at getting back into work as she died and it— at getting back into work as she died and it was— at getting back into work as she died and it was just _ at getting back into work as she died and it wasjust like, - at getting back into work as she died and it wasjust like, i- at getting back into work as she. died and it wasjust like, i cannot pretend — died and it wasjust like, i cannot pretend everything _ died and it wasjust like, i cannot pretend everything is— died and it wasjust like, i cannot pretend everything is happy- died and it wasjust like, i cannot| pretend everything is happy when died and it wasjust like, i cannot-
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pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling _ pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling this _ pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling this physical— pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling this physical pain, _ pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling this physical pain, the - pretend everything is happy when i'm feeling this physical pain, the pain i feeling this physical pain, the pain is physical — feeling this physical pain, the pain is physical l— feeling this physical pain, the pain is -h sical. ,, . . is physical. i guess you are an example _ is physical. i guess you are an example of— is physical. i guess you are an example of learning _ is physical. i guess you are an example of learning how- is physical. i guess you are an example of learning how to i is physical. i guess you are an l example of learning how to not is physical. i guess you are an - example of learning how to notjust survive something as traumatic and awful as this, but cope and adapt and thrive again.— and thrive again. exactly. our sister and _ and thrive again. exactly. our sister and brother-in-law - and thrive again. exactly. our sister and brother-in-law are | sister and brother—in—law are amazing, _ sister and brother—in—law are amazing, the _ sister and brother—in—law are amazing, the support - sister and brother—in—law are amazing, the support from i sister and brother—in—law are . amazing, the support from them sister and brother—in—law are - amazing, the support from them at the time _ amazing, the support from them at the time was — amazing, the support from them at the time was amazing. _ amazing, the support from them at the time was amazing. cici's - the time was amazing. cici's godparent. _ the time was amazing. cici's godparent, stephen, - the time was amazing. cici's godparent, stephen, he - the time was amazing. cici'sj godparent, stephen, he was the time was amazing. cici's - godparent, stephen, he was there for me. godparent, stephen, he was there for me "im— godparent, stephen, he was there for me "i'm here, — godparent, stephen, he was there for me "i'm here, we— godparent, stephen, he was there for me. "i'm here, we are— godparent, stephen, he was there for me. "i'm here, we are going - godparent, stephen, he was there for me. "i'm here, we are going to- godparent, stephen, he was there for me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! i me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you— me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you need _ me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you need people _ me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you need people like _ me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you need people like that- me. "i'm here, we are going to talk! " you need people like that because| " you need people like that because often _ " you need people like that because often people — " you need people like that because often people it _ " you need people like that because often people it so _ " you need people like that because often people it so difficult _ " you need people like that because often people it so difficult to - " you need people like that because often people it so difficult to talk. often people it so difficult to talk about _ often people it so difficult to talk about the — often people it so difficult to talk about the death _ often people it so difficult to talk about the death of _ often people it so difficult to talk about the death of a _ often people it so difficult to talk about the death of a child. - often people it so difficult to talk about the death of a child. it - often people it so difficult to talk about the death of a child. it is l about the death of a child. it is ok, _ about the death of a child. it is 0k. since — about the death of a child. it is ok, since there _ about the death of a child. it is ok, since there and _ about the death of a child. it is ok, since there and you - about the death of a child. it is ok, since there and you might| about the death of a child. it is . 0k, since there and you might be sad _ ok, since there and you might be sad it— 0k, since there and you might be sad. . ., , 0k, since there and you might be sad. , . , . 0k, since there and you might be sad. . ., , ., and 0k, since there and you might be sad-_ and iti sad. it is really important. and it is important _ sad. it is really important. and it is important those _ sad. it is really important. and it is important those people - sad. it is really important. and it is important those people are . sad. it is really important. and it| is important those people are still spoken— is important those people are still spoken about _ is important those people are still spoken about a _ is important those people are still spoken about. a friend _ is important those people are still spoken about. a friend of- is important those people are still spoken about. a friend of mine i is important those people are still. spoken about. a friend of mine lost her mum _ spoken about. a friend of mine lost her mum recently, _ spoken about. a friend of mine lost her mum recently, that _ spoken about. a friend of mine lost her mum recently, that was - spoken about. a friend of mine lost her mum recently, that was her- her mum recently, that was her favourite — her mum recently, that was her favourite meal— her mum recently, that was her favourite meal and _ her mum recently, that was her favourite meal and one - her mum recently, that was her favourite meal and one of- her mum recently, that was her favourite meal and one of her. favourite meal and one of her friends — favourite meal and one of her friends were _ favourite meal and one of her friends were not _ favourite meal and one of her friends were not mention - favourite meal and one of her friends were not mention it. favourite meal and one of her. friends were not mention it and favourite meal and one of her- friends were not mention it and she said, _ friends were not mention it and she said. that _ friends were not mention it and she said. that was — friends were not mention it and she said, that was her— friends were not mention it and she said, that was her favourite - friends were not mention it and she said, that was her favourite meal! i said, that was her favourite meal! let's _ said, that was her favourite meal! let's talk— said, that was her favourite meal! let's talk about _ said, that was her favourite meal! let's talk about my _ said, that was her favourite meal!
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let's talk about my month! - said, that was her favourite meal! let's talk about my month! do - said, that was her favourite meal! | let's talk about my month! do you know— let's talk about my month! do you know what — let's talk about my month! do you know what i— let's talk about my month! do you know what i mean? _ let's talk about my month! do you know what i mean?— know what i mean? dean com you mentioned — know what i mean? dean com you mentioned the _ know what i mean? dean com you mentioned the other _ know what i mean? dean com you mentioned the other children, - know what i mean? dean com you | mentioned the other children, how hyde. —— how hard is it? anniversaries are difficult. we hyde. -- how hard is it? anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2-5 hour long _ anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour long dvd _ anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour long dvd and _ anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour long dvd and i _ anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour long dvd and i have - anniversaries are difficult. we have a 2.5 hour long dvd and i have all i a 2.5 hour long dvd and i have all this footage of her, she was only 17 months _ this footage of her, she was only 17 months old — this footage of her, she was only 17 months old. the two of them never met and _ months old. the two of them never met and we — months old. the two of them never met and we talk about her every day because _ met and we talk about her every day because we — met and we talk about her every day because we have normalised it. there is a auide because we have normalised it. there is a guide and — because we have normalised it. there is a guide and in _ because we have normalised it. there is a guide and in her— because we have normalised it. there is a guide and in her name _ because we have normalised it. there is a guide and in her name at - is a guide and in her name at the school— is a guide and in her name at the school and — is a guide and in her name at the school and it _ is a guide and in her name at the school and it is— is a guide and in her name at the school and it isjust _ is a guide and in her name at the school and it is just about - is a guide and in her name at the i school and it is just about teaching children— school and it is just about teaching children these _ school and it is just about teaching children these really— school and it is just about teaching children these really good - school and it is just about teaching children these really good mentali children these really good mental health— children these really good mental health habits. — children these really good mental health habits. that— children these really good mental health habits.— health habits. that it is now meditating. _ health habits. that it is now meditating. a _ health habits. that it is now meditating. a cold - health habits. that it is now meditating. a cold shower. health habits. that it is now. meditating. a cold shower like health habits. that it is now- meditating. a cold shower like we do, plunging in the ice and all of the things— do, plunging in the ice and all of the things that are good for you. it is all— the things that are good for you. it is all free, — the things that are good for you. it is all free, get you through the day, _ is all free, get you through the day, get — is all free, get you through the day, get you to a good place, physically stronger, go to the gym and we _ physically stronger, go to the gym and we try— physically stronger, go to the gym and we try to normalise it and talk and we try to normalise it and talk and talk— and we try to normalise it and talk and talk and we did a podcast and my own dad _ and talk and we did a podcast and my own dad came up to me a couple of
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years— own dad came up to me a couple of years ago. — own dad came up to me a couple of years ago, he has really struggled and not _ years ago, he has really struggled and not dealt with it. he said he has led — and not dealt with it. he said he has led some things listening to us that helps— has led some things listening to us that helps him now, nearly 70 years old. hopefully, people say, it is a cliche _ old. hopefully, people say, it is a cliche but— old. hopefully, people say, it is a cliche but if— old. hopefully, people say, it is a cliche but if we can help one person hopefully— cliche but if we can help one person hopefully there are people out there not just _ hopefully there are people out there not just with child death anyone who can look— not just with child death anyone who can look at— not just with child death anyone who can look at us and think, they are doing _ can look at us and think, they are doing 0k. — can look at us and think, they are doing 0k, there is some hope. we are muddlin: doing 0k, there is some hope. we are muddling through, _ doing 0k, there is some hope. we are muddling through, like _ doing 0k, there is some hope. we are muddling through, like everybody - muddling through, like everybody else _ muddling through, like everybody else. , �* ., ., muddling through, like everybody else. ,�* ., muddling through, like everybody else. ., ,. muddling through, like everybody else. ., , .., else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we seak else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we speak to — else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we speak to so _ else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we speak to so many _ else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we speak to so many people - else. doesn't have to be perfect to. we speak to so many people on - else. doesn't have to be perfect to. | we speak to so many people on this sofa who have been through all things in their lives and helping other people and that feeling that you are supporting others going through something you are going through something you are going through is such a positive thing for people who have met tragedy in any shape orform. it people who have met tragedy in any shape or form-— shape or form. it is, you want to sa it is shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok _ shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok not _ shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok not to _ shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok not to be _ shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok not to be ok - shape or form. it is, you want to say it is ok not to be ok but - shape or form. it is, you want to | say it is ok not to be ok but that is showing — say it is ok not to be ok but that is showing it _ say it is ok not to be ok but that is showing it by— say it is ok not to be ok but that is showing it by saying _ say it is ok not to be ok but thati is showing it by saying sometimes say it is ok not to be ok but that. is showing it by saying sometimes i am a _ is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit _ is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit of— is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit of a — is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit of a mess, _ is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit of a mess, sometimes- is showing it by saying sometimes i am a bit of a mess, sometimes i. am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really— am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really struggle _ am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really struggle to _ am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really struggle to get _ am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really struggle to get out - am a bit of a mess, sometimes i really struggle to get out of - am a bit of a mess, sometimes i| really struggle to get out of bed. we turned — really struggle to get out of bed. we turned that _ really struggle to get out of bed. we turned that around _ really struggle to get out of bed. we turned that around because i really struggle to get out of bed. | we turned that around because of really struggle to get out of bed. - we turned that around because of the work we _ we turned that around because of the work we have done, we have spoken to people _ work we have done, we have spoken to people who _ work we have done, we have spoken to people who have gone through traumatic experiences in the military— traumatic experiences in the military and they refocus. you can do the work- _ military and they refocus. you can do the work. it _ military and they refocus. you can do the work. it is _ military and they refocus. you can do the work. it is there _ military and they refocus. you can do the work. it is there for - military and they refocus. you can do the work. it is there for all - military and they refocus. you can do the work. it is there for all to l do the work. it is there for all to see. do the work. it is there for all to see- thank _ do the work. it is there for all to see. thank you _
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do the work. it is there for all to see. thank you for _ do the work. it is there for all to see. thank you for coming - do the work. it is there for all to see. thank you for coming in. i do the work. it is there for all to - see. thank you for coming in. thank ou for see. thank you for coming in. thank you for having _ see. thank you for coming in. thank you for having us. _ see. thank you for coming in. thank you for having us. we _ see. thank you for coming in. thank you for having us. we look- see. thank you for coming in. thank you for having us. we look forward l you for having us. we look forward to the documentary _ you for having us. we look forward to the documentary if— you for having us. we look forward to the documentary if it _ you for having us. we look forward to the documentary if it comes - to the documentary if it comes around. ., .. to the documentary if it comes around. ., ,, i. stay with us, headlines coming up. you are. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today...
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calls for tougher sanctions as russia's parliament backs president putin's plans to send troops into parts of eastern ukraine. we do expect to see a full—scale invasion. we think it is highly likely. foreign secretary liz truss says "nothing is off the table" as western allies take action against russian financial interests. the champions league final is likely to be moved from russia. st petersburg is due to host the showpiece at the end of may, but escalating tensions means an alternative host city is set to be chosen. it's a virtual world, which some say is the future of the internet. but how do we keep children safe in the metaverse? good morning. tighter regulations for the funeral sector. new rules are being introduced to stamp out rogue operators and protect people from cold callers. good morning. a windy day wherever you are. england and wales mostly
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dry. in scotland and northern ireland met rain sinking south, led by wintry showers, increasingly to lower levels. all the details later in the programme. it's wednesday, the 23rd of february. the foreign secretary has said britain will use "every lever at its disposal" to stop president putin in his tracks, after he ordered troops into two rebel—held parts of eastern ukraine. it's not yet clear whether this has taken place. liz truss also told this programme that "nothing was off the table", amid calls for the government to impose tougher sanctions on russia. mark lobel reports. kremlin firepower spotted near the russian city of rostov—on—don, close to the ukrainian border. translation: i'm really concerned a huge war may break out. - worried to tears. satellite images also capture military vehicles, and a troop hospital
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across the borderfrom ukraine's capital in southern belarus. this map explains how a russian invasion could stretch beyond the two separatist areas in grey here, which are already recognised by russia as independent. the us president thinks putin also includes the ukrainian—controlled yellow areas as part of his responsibility to protect. he asserted that these regions actually extend deeper than the two areas he recognised, claiming large areas currently under thejurisdiction of the ukraine government. this is the beginning of a russian invasion of ukraine. it's likely us influence was behind a significant german decision to punish russia by stopping a major pipeline meant to export gas from russia to europe. further sanctions were announced by the uk on five russian banks and three russian individuals. foreign secretary liz truss says britain will use every lever
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at its disposal to stop president putin in his tracks, if russia refuses to pull troops back. what we are very, very clear about is we have already announced a package of severe sanctions to punish vladimir putin for the recognition of those two parts of ukraine. he has effectively denied ukrainian sovereignty. there will be an escalation in those sanctions, nothing will be off the table in the event of a full invasion and we are working very closely with our allies, the americans, the europeans and indeed the g7 to make sure we inflict pain on the putin regime. despite the sanctions, president putin used a brief press conference to reiterate his unlikely demands ukraine renounces future nato membership, and rids itself of weapons — leaving everyone guessing what his next move will be. explosion. the sound of bombing on ukraine's current front line could soon get louder.
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it also appears the diplomatic window is closing — as nato's chief warns, this is the most dangerous moment in mark lobel, bbc news. we are about to get the latest for you from various parts of the world. in a moment, we'll speak to james waterhouse in kyiv and get the view from westminster with adam fleming. but first, let's go to the russia—ukraine border, where caroline davies is this morning. we have just spoken to liz truss on the last half—an—hour on the programme talking about some of the sanctions imposed by the west. given a response from the kremlin to that. the kremlin has been consistently fairly robust in its response, which is not surprising. even before we knew president putin announced that he was recognising these separatist held areas. there was talk about the
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fact russia would be able to be resilient against the sanctions. some said it would increase the strength of russia because they had previously had sanctions and survived and made them more independent. there were suggestions that the west would come back to russia because it needed russia. reports on state media about the facts the foreign ministry says these are illegitimate sanctions. a robust response on that side. on the other side, robust response on that side. on the otherside, people robust response on that side. on the other side, people are concerned about the economic impact this might have. people were concerned about that even before the announcement about any form of intervention by russia. they were worried about economic sanctions and how it might affect their lives. today is a public holiday here in russia. it is dedicated to the armed forces. that feels particularly resilient and important here in an area which is very close to the ukrainian border, where they had seen this conflict
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going on since 2014. i think many people are still wondering what exactly president putin is planning to do with his russian troops. james waterhouse is in kyiv for us this morning. james, what's the feeling in ukraine after the latest developments? i think the weight of worry is real. you go _ i think the weight of worry is real. you go for— i think the weight of worry is real. you go for a — i think the weight of worry is real. you go for a coffee with ukrainians here and _ you go for a coffee with ukrainians here and they are —— there are long size _ here and they are —— there are long size the _ here and they are —— there are long size. the focus is on the east of the country— size. the focus is on the east of the country with movements there. the focus _ the country with movements there. the focus also comes from the estimated 150,000 russian troops stretched elsewhere on the border. we have _ stretched elsewhere on the border. we have seen more deployments, according — we have seen more deployments, according to satellite images. there are vehicles to the north in an air base _ are vehicles to the north in an air base there — are vehicles to the north in an air base there. president zelensky has
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given— base there. president zelensky has given a _ base there. president zelensky has given a second address in front of a bil given a second address in front of a big map _ given a second address in front of a big map of— given a second address in front of a big map of ukraine talking about patriotism are people defending their land against the enemy. he signed _ their land against the enemy. he signed an— their land against the enemy. he signed an order for a service being called _ signed an order for a service being called up _ signed an order for a service being called up into the army. this is on the back— called up into the army. this is on the back of— called up into the army. this is on the back of saying, big losses are ahead _ the back of saying, big losses are ahead tougher deals are ahead. victory— ahead tougher deals are ahead. victory will eventually emerge but hold your — victory will eventually emerge but hold your nerve and hold your line. that is _ hold your nerve and hold your line. that is very — hold your nerve and hold your line. that is very removed from the previous— that is very removed from the previous messaging of stay calm and do not _ previous messaging of stay calm and do not panic. it is about ukraine almost — do not panic. it is about ukraine almost taking a self assessment. how equipped _ almost taking a self assessment. how equipped we going to be with an escalation? he has asked the uk for more _ escalation? he has asked the uk for more help — escalation? he has asked the uk for more help. what president putin has said about _ more help. what president putin has said about the regions of donetsk and luhansk being recognised by russia, _ and luhansk being recognised by russia, that will add to that worry. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is in
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westminster for us this morning. adam, the government is facing calls for even tougher sanctions? that is what the foreign secretary was talking about this morning. the uk was talking about this morning. tia: uk government announced was talking about this morning. ti2 uk government announced yesterday it would place restrictions on three wealthy individuals in russia who were close to vladimir putin and five banks. liz truss has been telling us they are prepared to go further and nothing is off the table. if the situation escalates, the restrictions the uk is willing to place on rations will escalate further as well. the government has faced quite strong criticism from opposition parties but also from the conservative party as well, from lots of backbench mps, including former leaders, chairs of select committees, saying actually the government should be going a lot further. liz truss is having to come out and defend herself this morning. the government has a few problems,
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the first is expectation management. boris johnson's the first is expectation management. borisjohnson's rhetoric the first is expectation management. boris johnson's rhetoric against latimer putin has been very strong and some feel the sanctions that have resulted are not as strong as the rhetoric. —— vladimir putin. the uk will have to change the law and tweak its legislation to allow action against those supporting the russian action in uk parliament. button is not ready to be pushed yet. then a philosophical debate about what the sanctions are for. do you ratchet them up as the situation ratchets up with russia? that is the government position. dd has some of the critics of the government are calling for, but strong sanctions in now to deter any further ratcheting up? that is why the government is finding it tricky to strike the right balance.—
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finding it tricky to strike the riaht balance. ., , ., , right balance. some other stories makin: right balance. some other stories making the _ right balance. some other stories making the news. _ more than 60 flood warnings remain in place across england, following high rainfall from storm franklin. two severe warnings, meaning there's a danger to life, have been issued for the river severn in ironbridge and in bewdley in worcestershire. dozens of homes near the river have been evacuated. gary brooker, the frontman of psychedelic rock band procul harum has died at the age of 76. the group's debut hit "a whiter shade of pale" topped the charts for six weeks in 1967, selling more than 10 million copies. he'd been receiving treatment for cancer and a statement confirmed he died peacefully at home on saturday. the duchess of cambridge is on a two—day visit to denmark, taking the work of her childhood foundation abroad for the first time. kate has travelled to copenhagen to learn how the country has become a world leader in its approach to early childhood development.
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and to check out the slide! today, she will receive an official welcome from denmark's queen margrethe, before visiting a forest kindergarten and a domestic abuse shelter. really impressive in heels, i can tell you. 50 really impressive in heels, i can tell ou. . ., ., tell you. so much could have gone wront. tell you. so much could have gone wrong- face _ tell you. so much could have gone wrong. face first! _ tell you. so much could have gone wrong. face first! she _ tell you. so much could have gone wrong. face first! she came - tell you. so much could have gone wrong. face first! she came out i wrong. face first! she came out well. mount etna, europe's most active volcano has roared back to life, sending volcanic ash ten kilometres into the air, over eastern sicily. a crater on the south east side of the volcano spewed lava and sent large clouds of smoke and ash over surrounding villages on monday. mount etna is more than 3,000 metres high and erupts several times a year, but rarely causes any damage. normally it doesn't cause too many problems. normally it doesn't cause too many roblems. ., ., normally it doesn't cause too many roblems. , , ,
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normally it doesn't cause too many roblems. , , problems. looks pretty scary. look at that! my — problems. looks pretty scary. look at that! my goodness! _ problems. looks pretty scary. look at that! my goodness! you - problems. looks pretty scary. look at that! my goodness! you would i at that! my goodness! you would worry, wouldn't you? everyone is fine. that is the most important thing. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. a frosty start for some central and eastern areas. it will turn colder in the next couple of days. there will be showers, some of them wintry. windy once again today. gusty winds across the south—east of scotland and eastern england. gales in the north and west. a weather front sinking south, taking the rain across scotland and ireland. for the rest of england and wales, after the cold start, there will be some sunshine with a view showers mainly in the west and highs at 210 degrees. this evening and overnight in a band of rain sinks south. it continues to weaken but it will pep
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up continues to weaken but it will pep up as it pushes into the south—east. snow showers at sea level across scotland and northern ireland. there will be the risk of ice and frost around as well. they showers continuing at sea level for a time tomorrow across scotland and northern ireland. on high ground as much as 30 centimetres. on though levels may be two centimetres to ten centimetres stop with the wind there will be listed on the hills. snow showers across the pennines, the lakes commit wales, the moors, a few on the hills across the midlands. temperatures are going down. in the wind chill, it will make it feel even colder.— wind chill, it will make it feel even colder. ., ,, , ., , . even colder. thank you very much. see ou even colder. thank you very much. see you in — even colder. thank you very much. see you in the _ even colder. thank you very much. see you in the next _ even colder. thank you very much. see you in the next half-an-hour. | conservative mp james brokenshire was just 53 when he died from lung cancer in october. before he passed away, he formed a close friendship online with mandee lucas,
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who was also undergoing treatment for lung cancer. mandee has recently been given the all—clear and has been to meetjames' widow, cathy. our reporter zoe conway was there. are we allowed to hug? i think so. lovely to see you. sorry, i'm wet, aren't i? so lovely see you, cathy. don't worry. not at all. thanks so much for having me today. well, you're more than welcome. cathy brokenshire and mandee lucas, meeting for the very first time. go through there. cathy's husband, james, died of lung cancerfour months ago. mandee has been free of the disease for the last five years. how are you feeling? i miss him all the time. but no, we are coping and getting involved in the charity is good. in april 2018, james brokenshire was interviewed on bbc breakfast. he'd had surgery to remove part of one lung just a few months before. yet there he was back as a cabinet minister. it's been hard, you know, - it's been really, really difficult. and i rememberjust those early days where, you know, that sort— of sinking feeling in your stomach, the pit of your stomach _
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of what is this? you know, what does this mean? and i think also recognising huge pressures on your family. - my wife, cathy, and the kids have been absolutely extraordinary - at times where, yeah, - you do go to dark moments, you do really think about, i what does the future hold? watching at home was mandee, who was recovering from her own lung cancer treatment. and i don't know why, but i connected with him, which sounds ridiculous, but i just felt for him. i'd been through the same thing. he's the same age as me. i was a couple of years down the line, but i felt like i wanted to reach out and say, "if you want to talk, i'm here. and have you heard of roy castle lung cancer foundation?" which i did. and he responded, saying, "thank you for reaching out. it's nice to know that other people have been in the same boat as me, and i'm hoping for a full recovery." and there wasn't an awful lot of chat. and then the announcement in october came that he'd passed away and i literally sat with my cornflakes on my lap, crying my eyes out. i couldn't believe my ears — that this man who was so vibrant
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and full of life and full of goods can just not be here at that age. 53. same age as me. cathy says she knew she wanted to marry james the first time she met him in a pub in essex. she says it was his charisma, his presence that so attracted her. and when he went into politics, she became what she calls a pa to his personal life. we were soulmates, and i kind of did everything in his personal life that he couldn't do because he was running around — dealing with politics. and we've oftenjoked in the past, the pair of us, that we've done so well and lasted so long because we're still in our honeymoon period 31 years later, but life is very different. it has... it was very quiet. i mean, unfortunately, i lost my best mate and my husband overnight. we're nowjoined
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by mandee and cathy. morning to you both. really interesting. that peace was found, you met for the first time a week ago. it seems like you feel like you had known each other forever, is that right? we had known each other forever, is that right?— that right? we do, absolutely. definitely friends. _ that right? we do, absolutely. definitely friends. the - that right? we do, absolutely. definitely friends. the bond i that right? we do, absolutely. l definitely friends. the bond you haveis definitely friends. the bond you have is terrifically sad but that typically want to maybe do something positive from something that has been so difficult. ftill" positive from something that has been so difficult.— been so difficult. our stories are so difficult- _ been so difficult. our stories are so difficult. i— been so difficult. our stories are so difficult. i have _ been so difficult. our stories are so difficult. i have my _ been so difficult. our stories are so difficult. i have my husband. | been so difficult. our stories are - so difficult. i have my husband. you are a five year cancer survivor. hopefully we can team up and create something. we are calling for national screening. something. we are calling for nationalscreening. it something. we are calling for national screening. it is raising awareness along the way. absolutely. i know ou awareness along the way. absolutely. i know you explained _ awareness along the way. absolutely. i know you explained it _ awareness along the way. absolutely. i know you explained it in _ awareness along the way. absolutely. i know you explained it in the - awareness along the way. absolutely. i know you explained it in the film. i i know you explained it in the film. you saw something injames and felt you needed to reach out. it you saw something in james and felt you needed to reach out.—
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you needed to reach out. it was so weird. you needed to reach out. it was so weird- he — you needed to reach out. it was so weird- he was _ you needed to reach out. it was so weird. he was the _ you needed to reach out. it was so weird. he was the same _ you needed to reach out. it was so weird. he was the same age - you needed to reach out. it was so weird. he was the same age as i you needed to reach out. it was so. weird. he was the same age as me, you needed to reach out. it was so i weird. he was the same age as me, i wasa— weird. he was the same age as me, i was a few— weird. he was the same age as me, i was a few years ahead of him. i had already— was a few years ahead of him. i had already had — was a few years ahead of him. i had already had my all clear for two years — already had my all clear for two years he — already had my all clear for two years. he looked so young and healthy— years. he looked so young and healthy and vibrant. it just touched me, healthy and vibrant. it just touched me. i_ healthy and vibrant. it just touched me. i don't— healthy and vibrant. it just touched me, i don't know why. obviously he is a me, idon't know why. obviously he is a lovely— me, i don't know why. obviously he is a lovely guy, had a magnetic smile — is a lovely guy, had a magnetic smile i— is a lovely guy, had a magnetic smile. i reached out to him, had a chat— smile. i reached out to him, had a chat with — smile. i reached out to him, had a chat with him. i wanted to make sure he knew— chat with him. i wanted to make sure he knew i_ chat with him. i wanted to make sure he knew i was here and he knew about the roy— he knew i was here and he knew about the roy castle lung cancer foundation because that is where everything starts. in foundation because that is where everything starts.— everything starts. in those conversations, _ everything starts. in those conversations, do - everything starts. in those conversations, do you - everything starts. in those | conversations, do you think everything starts. in those - conversations, do you think you everything starts. in those _ conversations, do you think you both helped each other and how did you helped each other and how did you help each other? i helped each other and how did you help each other?— helped each other and how did you help each other? i think so. i don't know if he — help each other? i think so. i don't know if he knew _ help each other? i think so. i don't know if he knew about _ help each other? i think so. i don't know if he knew about roy - help each other? i think so. i don't know if he knew about roy castle i know if he knew about roy castle before _ know if he knew about roy castle before. it know if he knew about roy castle before.- it is _ know if he knew about roy castle before.- it is the - know if he knew about roy castle before.- it is the only - know if he knew about roy castle l before.- it is the only lung before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity _ before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity in _ before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity in the _ before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity in the uk _ before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity in the uk and - before. heeded. it is the only lung cancer charity in the uk and it - before. heeded. it is the only lung| cancer charity in the uk and it does amazing _ cancer charity in the uk and it does amazing work. i felt like i wanted to say— amazing work. i felt like i wanted to say it — amazing work. i felt like i wanted to say it is — amazing work. i felt like i wanted to say it is going to be ok. unfortunately it wasn't and it breaks — unfortunately it wasn't and it breaks my heart. later when he died,
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it broke _ breaks my heart. later when he died, it broke me — breaks my heart. later when he died, it broke me i— breaks my heart. later when he died, it broke me. iam not a particularly emotional— it broke me. iam not a particularly emotional crying person but it really — emotional crying person but it really break me.— emotional crying person but it really break me. what about the campaign? _ really break me. what about the campaign? why _ really break me. what about the campaign? why were _ really break me. what about the campaign? why were you - really break me. what about the i campaign? why were you inspired really break me. what about the - campaign? why were you inspired to try and do something? the campaign? why were you inspired to try and do something?— try and do something? the minute james was diagnosed, _ try and do something? the minute james was diagnosed, he - try and do something? the minute james was diagnosed, he knew... | try and do something? the minute i james was diagnosed, he knew... he always wanted to do good and help people. that is why he went into politics in the first place. it was another campaign he could get involved with and hence why he knew about the roy castle lung cancer foundation. he chaired the first debate on the floor of the house of commons talking about lung cancer. he was trying to ways awareness. —— raise awareness. get people talking about him breaking down stigmas attached to lung cancer. sadly he cannot continue that fight and i am here, ready and willing to do that. how would it work about raising
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awareness? for how would it work about raising awareness?— awareness? forjames, he had literally two — awareness? forjames, he had literally two bouts _ awareness? forjames, he had literally two bouts of _ awareness? forjames, he had literally two bouts of coughing | awareness? forjames, he had i literally two bouts of coughing up blood. two smal episodes with no other symptoms. blood. two smal episodes with no othersymptoms. i blood. two smal episodes with no other symptoms. i know the same as for you, even less. other symptoms. i know the same as foryou, even less. i other symptoms. i know the same as for you, even less.— for you, even less. i had no symptoms- _ for you, even less. i had no symptoms. the _ for you, even less. i had no symptoms. the checks - for you, even less. i had no symptoms. the checks are | for you, even less. i had no - symptoms. the checks are around in uk. symptoms. the checks are around in uk roy— symptoms. the checks are around in uk. roy castle is very much involved in getting _ uk. roy castle is very much involved in getting people backing those. if you get— in getting people backing those. if you get a — in getting people backing those. if you get a call—up 31, please go. go to that _ you get a call—up 31, please go. go to that appointment. they had an amazing — to that appointment. they had an amazing way of patching one at stage one lung _ amazing way of patching one at stage one lung cancer, which is completely curable _ one lung cancer, which is completely curable -- _ one lung cancer, which is completely curable. —— catching someone. it is curable. -- catching someone. it is not 'ust curable. -- catching someone. it is notjust smokers. _ curable. -- catching someone. it is notjust smokers. i _ curable. -- catching someone. it is notjust smokers. i was _ curable. -- catching someone. it is notjust smokers. i was not - curable. -- catching someone. it is notjust smokers. i was not a - curable. -- catching someone. it is. notjust smokers. i was not a smoker and neither— notjust smokers. i was not a smoker and neither was _ notjust smokers. i was not a smoker and neither was james. _ notjust smokers. i was not a smoker and neither was james. i _
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notjust smokers. i was not a smoker and neither was james. i have - and neitherwasjames. i have friends — and neitherwasjames. i have friends through the roy castle lung cancer— friends through the roy castle lung cancer foundation, a stage four, who are 30, _ cancer foundation, a stage four, who are 30, 36~ — cancer foundation, a stage four, who are 30, 36. they went to the doctor over and _ are 30, 36. they went to the doctor overand over— are 30, 36. they went to the doctor overand overand got are 30, 36. they went to the doctor over and over and got antibiotics. the doctor— over and over and got antibiotics. the doctor did not think they had lun- the doctor did not think they had lung cancer. a medical emergency proved _ lung cancer. a medical emergency proved they had stage four. it is vital— proved they had stage four. it is vital people go to the targeted health— vital people go to the targeted health checks. it is a postcode lottery— health checks. it is a postcode lottery at _ health checks. it is a postcode lottery at the moment. we want to -et lottery at the moment. we want to get off— lottery at the moment. we want to get off the — lottery at the moment. we want to get off the ground nationally. how are ou get off the ground nationally. how are you now? _ get off the ground nationally. how are you now? really _ get off the ground nationally. how are you now? really well. - get off the ground nationally. how are you now? really well. i- get off the ground nationally. how are you now? really well. i had i get off the ground nationally. howl are you now? really well. i had my five ear are you now? really well. i had my five year all — are you now? really well. i had my five year all clear _ are you now? really well. i had my five year all clear in _ are you now? really well. i had my five year all clear in january. i i five year all clear in january. i was _ five year all clear in january. i was terrified but had my five year all clear~ — was terrified but had my five year all clear~ i— was terrified but had my five year all clear. i feel like was terrified but had my five year all clear. ifeel like it was terrified but had my five year all clear. i feel like it is my reason _ all clear. i feel like it is my reason for— all clear. i feel like it is my reason for living, to make sure that people _ reason for living, to make sure that people do— reason for living, to make sure that people do not go through this and they get— people do not go through this and they get checked out. if you do not qualify— they get checked out. if you do not qualify for— they get checked out. if you do not qualify for a targeted lung health check, _ qualify for a targeted lung health check, hopefully nationally at some point in _ check, hopefully nationally at some point in the future, please if you
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have _ point in the future, please if you have any— point in the future, please if you have any symptoms till, even a backache — have any symptoms till, even a backache or a tickly cough, go and see your— backache or a tickly cough, go and see your doctor. find backache or a tickly cough, go and see your doctor. and restlessness. take a course _ see your doctor. and restlessness. take a course of— see your doctor. and restlessness. take a course of antibiotics i see your doctor. and restlessness. take a course of antibiotics but i see your doctor. and restlessness. take a course of antibiotics but if i take a course of antibiotics but if that does— take a course of antibiotics but if that does not work, go back and ask for an— that does not work, go back and ask for an x-ray — that does not work, go back and ask for an x—ray. we that does not work, go back and ask for an x-ray-— for an x-ray. we have 'ust come throu~h for an x-ray. we have 'ust come through the h for an x-ray. we have just come through the pandemic. - for an x-ray. we have just come through the pandemic. some i for an x-ray. we have just come - through the pandemic. some symptoms of coronavirus coughing, breathlessness, lethargy. if you have got anything, if in doubt, go and seek it out. still have got anything, if in doubt, go and seek it out.— and seek it out. still very early da s for and seek it out. still very early days for you- _ and seek it out. still very early days for you. four _ and seek it out. still very early days for you. four months. i l and seek it out. still very early. days for you. four months. i am fine, i days for you. four months. i am fine. i am _ days for you. four months. i am fine, i am coping. _ days for you. four months. i am fine, i am coping. i— days for you. four months. i am fine, i am coping. i miss- days for you. four months. i am fine, i am coping. i miss him i days for you. four months. i am i fine, i am coping. i miss him every day. silly things like someone asking, how was your day to putting the kettle on, catching up with each other. i havejust got the kettle on, catching up with each other. i have just got to get on. getting involved, it is helping me get through things with the power of james. if i can help others, that is
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good motivation for me. james. ifi can help others, that is good motivation for me.— good motivation for me. meeting someone like _ good motivation for me. meeting someone like mandee, _ good motivation for me. meeting someone like mandee, that i good motivation for me. meeting j someone like mandee, that must good motivation for me. meeting i someone like mandee, that must make a difference as well. we someone like mandee, that must make a difference as well.— a difference as well. we have both been through _ a difference as well. we have both been through this _ a difference as well. we have both been through this journey. - a difference as well. we have both been through this journey. my i been through this journey. my outcome was completely different to mandee. we want a lot more mandees and a lot less like james. she mandee. we want a lot more mandees and a lot less like james.— and a lot less like james. she is amazin: and a lot less like james. she is amazing by _ and a lot less like james. she is amazing by the _ and a lot less like james. she is amazing by the way. _ and a lot less like james. she is amazing by the way. lovely i and a lot less like james. she is amazing by the way. lovely to l and a lot less like james. she is i amazing by the way. lovely to meet ou both. amazing by the way. lovely to meet you both. thank _ amazing by the way. lovely to meet you both. thank you _ amazing by the way. lovely to meet you both. thank you for _ amazing by the way. lovely to meet you both. thank you for having i amazing by the way. lovely to meet you both. thank you for having us. i you both. thank you for having us. you have raised _ you both. thank you for having us. you have raised quite _ you both. thank you for having us. you have raised quite a _ you both. thank you for having us. you have raised quite a bit - you both. thank you for having us. you have raised quite a bit of- you both. thank you for having us. i you have raised quite a bit of money already. the you have raised quite a bit of money alread . . ., , you have raised quite a bit of money alread . . . , ., , already. the charity page has reach 70,000. it — already. the charity page has reach 70,000. it is— already. the charity page has reach 70,000. it is about _ already. the charity page has reach 70,000. it is about raising - already. the charity page has reach 70,000. it is about raising moneyl 70,000. it is about raising money but also about raising awareness. the comments that have been attached to the donations and the stories that have gone on. people who have never metjames and that have gone on. people who have never met james and worked with that have gone on. people who have never metjames and worked with him, it is lovely. many and friends to to read. i would
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it is lovely. many and friends to to read. iwould recommend it is lovely. many and friends to to read. i would recommend to everyone, if they could look at a charity page for that would be incredible. that links into the roy castle lung foundation.— foundation. any worries and concerns. — foundation. any worries and concerns, please _ foundation. any worries and concerns, please look- foundation. any worries and concerns, please look at i foundation. any worries and concerns, please look at the j foundation. any worries and i concerns, please look at the roy castle _ concerns, please look at the roy castle lung foundation page. there is so much — castle lung foundation page. there is so much information about different— is so much information about different lung cancers, different mutations. if you get called up for a targeted — mutations. if you get called up for a targeted health check and you are worried, _ a targeted health check and you are worried, go— a targeted health check and you are worried, go on there, there is lots of information on there. they worried, go on there, there is lots of information on there.— of information on there. they are doint of information on there. they are doing amazing — of information on there. they are doing amazing things. _ of information on there. they are doing amazing things. good i of information on there. they are doing amazing things. good to i of information on there. they are i doing amazing things. good to know. i am sure that will help somebody out there. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm alice salfield. scientists at imperial college london have devised a cheap blood test that could save the lives of thousands of heart attack patients.
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the british heart foundation, which funded the work, said the quick test can help doctors to spot people at high risk of death following a suspected attack — so they can be closely monitored and given more intensive treatment. a tourist attraction that opened incomplete, over budget, and led to resignations is being dismantled. the marble arch mound charged visitors up to £8 when it opened in july last year. however, the £6 million artificial hill was forced to shut temporarily when plants and grass began to die. new pictures show almost all of the trees have now been torn off. a new shared workspace exclusively for start—up climate tech entrepreneurs has been set—up in london. tech entrepreneurs has been set up in london. based in the old county hall building, its already host to 50 small businesses sharing ideas from eco—toilets to energy—saving air bricks. it's a fantastic experience to work with like—minded entrepreneurs — you just bump into each other in the corridor, you help each other with advice,
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you're sharing resources. climate change is a much bigger deal than it was ten years ago when we first started. and we're seeing huge growth in our businesses and the political drivers to kind of actually take some action, and we're right at the heart of that. a kennel belonging to a german shepherd dog could fetch more than £200,000 when it's auctioned in london today — purely because it was hit by a space rock that fell to earth in costa rica in 2019. it's part of a sale of rare and unusual meteorites at christie's. and if you're wondering about roky the dog — apart from being without his shed, he's doing just fine. if you're using the tube this morning... it's all looking good except for the ongoing part closure on the northern line there. and now your weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. low pressure continues to dominate the weather over the next couple of days. it is looking rather blustery at times — various weather fronts coming through — but not as windy as it has
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been, and certainly not stormy. there'll be some sunshine, also some outbreaks of rain, and then it's looking drier, more settled on friday and saturday. today, this morning — well, it's a cold, frosty start to the day, some of our temperatures have dipped below freezing. we'll see lots of sunshine around through the morning, we'll keep the sunny skies and then, while it's still looking dry for much of the afternoon, there will be more cloud building in from the west and possibly some scattered showers, as well. quite a brisk, south—westerly wind blowing. temperatures are lower than they were yesterday, but still getting into double figures — i think in central london, certainly 10, 11 degrees celsius. and it's a milder night to follow on wednesday night. there'll always be quite a bit of cloud around. we've got a cold front sweeping in from the northwest as we head through into thursday morning, so it's quite a wet start to the day on thursday. some colder air tucking in behind — watch out for a little bit of wintriness to some of the showers through the afternoon. a brisk westerly wind, also some sunshine. it's looking drier with lighter winds on friday. i'll be back atjust after 9am.
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for now, though, here's sally and dan. see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. morning live follows us on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's in store with gethin and kimberley. you with gethin and kimberley. normally tell us what is on you normally tell us what is going on but can you show me graziano? i miss him already!— miss him already! beautifully sun-kissed. _ miss him already! beautifully sun-kissed, the _ miss him already! beautifully sun-kissed, the manchesterl miss him already! beautifully i sun-kissed, the manchester sunrise sun—kissed, the manchester sunrise is gorgeous— sun—kissed, the manchester sunrise is gorgeous and graziano is looking ten out _ is gorgeous and graziano is looking ten out of— is gorgeous and graziano is looking ten out of ten. coming up on morning live... we're spending more on energy than any other generation as the price cap pushes millions of households into fuel poverty. but if you're struggling _ to pay your bills, matt allwright is here with all the support out there for you. - this is a worrying time for millions of us, but you're not on your own. from loans and grants to a new ruling which
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—— to money off your council tax we can take the financial sting out of the next few months. and from the energy crisis to a potential health one. i measles was eliminated from the uk five years ago, but is _ now making a worrying comeback. dr punam is here to explain why health professionals— are so concerned. yes, one in ten kids in the uk could now be at risk of catching the disease and parents are choosing not to give their kids the mmr jab. it's a trend i'm seeing first hand at my baby clinics and i'll explain why in some cases it's down to vaccine fatigue and covid anxiety. there is a lot of about. plus we're talking to actor mark benton who says, despite a career spanning 20 years, from doctor who to waterloo road, it's his role in shakespeare and hathaway that has been his most fun job to date. and from 20 years in telly to 70 on the throne. i dominic littlewood has been given exclusive behind the _ scenes access to the royal mint. he's been to see how the queen's jubilee coins are made. _
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and just to keep dan and sally and everybody— and just to keep dan and sally and everybody else happy we will sign up with graziano, king of the ballroom. it is with graziano, king of the ballroom. it is amid _ with graziano, king of the ballroom. it is amid weak core work—out. get it is amid weak core work-out. get read it is amid weak core work—out. ready because it is amid weak core work—out. (132t ready because we are it is amid weak core work—out. (112t ready because we are going it is amid weak core work—out. (i12t ready because we are going to be smiling, it will be perfect, i cannot wait to see you doing that. we will work on our core. i am alwa s we will work on our core. i am always ready _ we will work on our core. i am always ready for _ we will work on our core. i am always ready for you, - we will work on our core. i am | always ready for you, graziano. we will work on our core. i am i always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups — always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups on _ always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups on him. _ always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups on him. i _ always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups on him. i look - always ready for you, graziano. lots of close-ups on him. i look forward | of close-ups on him. i look forward to that. beautiful. _ a bbc investigation has found children could be exposed to grooming and sexually explicit material, in some parts of the so—called metaverse. that's the name given to a range of games and experiences which can be accessed using virtual reality headsets — a world which facebook founder mark zuckerberg, has called "the future". angus crawford reports. meetjess, she's 25, a bbcjournalist, but in virtual reality, she's pretending to be a child. going in. into vr chat — one of the most popular apps.
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the age limit�*s 13. some rooms look innocent enough. but there's pole dancing and strip clubs, too. oh, hello, miss, we can hang out, watch a movie or something. isn't it school time right now? there are two people to the side of me now, who are trying to get on top of each other. ok, so there's like a group of people that are, like, simulating sex. i want to say there's like five of them and they're definitely children, i'm pretty sure because of how they sound. and thenjess is assaulted. oh, my god! what was that like? horrible. it was strange. it felt like it was happening to me. stop it. leave me alone. it's like the wild west, and i wouldn't feel safe as a sibling of younger children, having my siblings play on this. and if i was a parent, i wouldn't let my children
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in that kind of area. it's too adult. we showed whatjess had found to andy burrows at the nspcc, and he's horrified. it'sjust the most shocking breach of any responsibility. i am angry because facebook promised us disney levels of safety. this isn't a theme park. this is a set of virtual worlds, where children are at risk of grooming, of sexual abuse, of really harmful experiences. it speaks to a corporate neglect. these are sites that are dangerous by design. today, we're going to talk about the metaverse. mark zuckerberg thinks the metaverse is the future of the internet, even rebranding facebook as meta, spending billions of dollars on the quest headset, which dominates the market. you need a facebook account tojoin in. there are games and apps made by meta and by other companies, too. ok, here we go.
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the so—called metaverse doesn't actually exist yet. that's just the name given to a series of games and virtual reality experiences you get to using a headset like this one. choose what you want to look like, your avatar, and you can start exploring. the question is, how safe is this world for children? katherine allen studies vr. i met her in her virtual office while sitting beside her in the real world. not everything's perfect in this space, is it? no, it's a bit of a wild west, to be honest. simulated sex is something that you see quite commonly. if we don't get on top of it, if it's not regulated and legislated, if the public aren't aware of what's really happening, children going to these spaces unsupervised, then we could see really a hotbed for potential grooming, predators and also experiences that children are having that may well be too early for them in their development.
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predators are just having a free—for—all with these kids. this man has been investigating vr chat rooms for months. he's worried for his safety and wants to remain anonymous. he's made a youtube film and even met and interviewed a 11t—year—old, who says he was groomed and raped in virtual reality. did they try to do things to you? yes. you'll see 40—year—old men hanging out with 12—year—old boys and girls. it's like a nightclub. but if you are running a nightclub and you can't afford a bouncer, so you just leave the doors open, well, you're going to get shut down because, yeah, i get it. it may be expensive to hire a bouncer, but you got to do it. you have to do it because the alternative is to let kids just wander in and get destroyed. vr chat says it is working hard to make itself a safe and welcoming place for everyone.
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predatory and toxic behaviour has no place on the platform. meta stresses it's not responsible for other companies' apps and says... for children, the metaverse can be an exciting adventure, but it also poses a real risk of harm. angus crawford, bbc news. we're joined now byjessica sherwood, who you saw in that report, and dame rachel de souza — the children's commissioner for england. jessica, you grew up playing games as a teenager, i know. how surprised or shocked where you buy what you discovered? i or shocked where you buy what you discovered?— discovered? i was incredibly surprised- _ discovered? i was incredibly surprised. i _ discovered? i was incredibly surprised. i grew— discovered? i was incredibly surprised. i grew up - discovered? i was incredibly surprised. i grew up in i discovered? i was incredibly surprised. i grew up in the i discovered? i was incredibly i surprised. i grew up in the 2000 discovered? i was incredibly - surprised. i grew up in the 2000 and had the consoles that were very popular at the time, but my parents could regulate what i was playing on
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because of the fact they had to go out and buy the games and my tv was in the living room. so my parents could see what i was doing. with these headsets, there is very little way you can see what people are doing, so it is a lot harder to see and monitor what is going on so i was incredibly shocked at what i was seeing, basically, because! was incredibly shocked at what i was seeing, basically, because i have not seen it before.— seeing, basically, because i have not seen it before. rachel de souza, i imatine not seen it before. rachel de souza, i imagine there _ not seen it before. rachel de souza, i imagine there are _ not seen it before. rachel de souza, i imagine there are parents - not seen it before. rachel de souza, j i imagine there are parents watching the report and going, "what?!" it is concerning. the report and going, "what?!" it is concerning-— concerning. absolutely. i am not sur . rised concerning. absolutely. i am not surprised but _ concerning. absolutely. i am not surprised but i _ concerning. absolutely. i am not surprised but i am _ concerning. absolutely. i am not surprised but i am really - concerning. absolutely. i am not i surprised but i am really horrified. i surprised but i am really horrified. i have _ surprised but i am really horrified. i have been— surprised but i am really horrified. i have been bringing the tech companies in to meet with me to get them _ companies in to meet with me to get them to— companies in to meet with me to get them to act— companies in to meet with me to get them to act more quickly and ensure that children can be safe online. they— that children can be safe online. they need — that children can be safe online. they need to be as safe online as they are — they need to be as safe online as they are off—line and if i was a parent— they are off—line and if i was a parent watching this i would be really _ parent watching this i would be really worried, but why i am not surprised — really worried, but why i am not surprised it _ really worried, but why i am not surprised it is because hundreds of
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children— surprised it is because hundreds of children tell me all the time about these _ children tell me all the time about these experiences, it is not only metat _ these experiences, it is not only meta. but — these experiences, it is not only meta, but right across social media. that is— meta, but right across social media. that is why — meta, but right across social media. that is why i — meta, but right across social media. that is why i am pleased the online safety _ that is why i am pleased the online safety bill _ that is why i am pleased the online safety bill is going through and why i'm arguing forage safety bill is going through and why i'm arguing for age verification so that children are only really getting _ that children are only really getting age—appropriate experiences. that has— getting age—appropriate experiences. that has got to be embedded in this but i that has got to be embedded in this but i am _ that has got to be embedded in this but i am really concerned that meta have not— but i am really concerned that meta have not made their metaverse safe by design _ have not made their metaverse safe by design. we haven't age—appropriate design code and i expected — age—appropriate design code and i expected better of them. are you telling _ expected better of them. are you telling me at mark zuckerberg, with all fantastic engineers and ability to create — all fantastic engineers and ability to create this, cannot keep children safe? _ to create this, cannot keep children safe? that — to create this, cannot keep children safe? that is my challenge to social media _ safe? that is my challenge to social media companies and they should be stepping _ media companies and they should be stepping up now, even though legislation will make them step up, but they— legislation will make them step up, but they should be stepping up now. let's talk— but they should be stepping up now. let's talk about now, jessica. parents watching this, it might be the first time they have even thought about this sort of thing.
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what could you do today to make these headsets safer? i what could you do today to make these headsets safer?— what could you do today to make these headsets safer? i think age verification _ these headsets safer? i think age verification is _ these headsets safer? i think age verification is a _ these headsets safer? i think age verification is a really _ these headsets safer? i think age verification is a really big - these headsets safer? i think age verification is a really big deal. i verification is a really big deal. to get on these headsets you just need a facebook account, the minimum age is 13 but obviously any child can log on and pretend they are 13. otherwise when you are in these spaces they are very adult spaces. it is seemingly for children, for everybody, but the things that go on in there ijust everybody, but the things that go on in there i just very... everybody, but the things that go on in there ijust very... there is lots of adult conversation, lots of graphic content so i think having some kind of barrier rooms you can go into on the art chap would do a lot so that if these things i going on, my nose —— temple macro would not be exposed. on, my nose -- temple macro would not be “posed-— on, my nose -- temple macro would not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles — not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on — not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on the _ not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on the tv _ not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on the tv in _ not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on the tv in the _ not be exposed. when you are playing on consoles on the tv in the living i on consoles on the tv in the living room... a parent cannot see what their child is seeing. is like a set of ski goggles with a visor in front of ski goggles with a visor in front
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of it so of ski goggles with a visor in front ofitst ., _ ., of ski goggles with a visor in front ofitst ., ., ., of ski goggles with a visor in front ofitstfl ., ., ., , of it so obviously you have to trust our child of it so obviously you have to trust your child that _ of it so obviously you have to trust your child that they _ of it so obviously you have to trust your child that they are _ of it so obviously you have to trust your child that they are telling i of it so obviously you have to trust your child that they are telling you i your child that they are telling you what is going on. there is a feature you can beam it to your tv, so you can actually see what is happening so i would say that if you are thinking about buying this clear children that might be a good idea. how easy was it for you to gain access to those adult only areas and how realistic did it feel you are in there? it how realistic did it feel you are in there? . , . , , how realistic did it feel you are in there? . , , ., _ , there? it was incredibly easy, it is a case of wandering _ there? it was incredibly easy, it is a case of wandering around, - there? it was incredibly easy, it is a case of wandering around, see l a case of wandering around, see where you end up. every room i went into, something very strange happened. i had adults explaining sex to me. it was a lot. it was too much for even me, and i obviously have quite a difficultjob at the bbc so i wouldn't even begin to understand how an actual is—year—old would deal with what i have actually seen. w . would deal with what i have actually seen. ., , ,, seen. rachel, what pressure can you ut an seen. rachel, what pressure can you put an organisation _ seen. rachel, what pressure can you put an organisation to _ seen. rachel, what pressure can you put an organisation to make - seen. rachel, what pressure can you put an organisation to make changes quickly? i put an organisation to make changes cuickl ? . , ., ., quickly? i literally have made the eiuht bi
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quickly? i literally have made the eight big tech _ quickly? i literally have made the eight big tech companies, - quickly? i literally have made the l eight big tech companies, including meta, _ eight big tech companies, including meta, agreed to meet with me every six months _ meta, agreed to meet with me every six months to give us information that we _ six months to give us information that we know they have, and useful information— that we know they have, and useful information about how many children they have _ information about how many children they have online. i have taken that ”p they have online. i have taken that up to— they have online. i have taken that up to ministers, they are having to meet _ up to ministers, they are having to meet with— up to ministers, they are having to meet with ministers. we need the legislation but i think... we need to keep _ legislation but i think... we need to keep the pressure on. they are a great _ to keep the pressure on. they are a great big _ to keep the pressure on. they are a great big global companies, they can do hetter~ _ great big global companies, they can do better. so i think government will he _ do better. so i think government will be holding them to account. the is the _ will be holding them to account. the is the age—appropriate design code. but i think— is the age—appropriate design code. but i think what jess was saying about— but i think what jess was saying about what we can do while the legislation on those things are going — legislation on those things are going through, it was really important. i think parents should notjust— important. i think parents should notjust turn away important. i think parents should not just turn away from this, it is difficult — not just turn away from this, it is difficult i— not just turn away from this, it is difficult. i am a parent but i didn't— difficult. i am a parent but i didn't grow up with this. what 16 to 21—year—olds told me, i had a number of them _ 21—year—olds told me, i had a number of them into— 21—year—olds told me, i had a number of them into say, what do they wish their parents have known about the online _ their parents have known about the online world? they said parents, find out — online world? they said parents, find out about it. we have done a
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guide. _ find out about it. we have done a guide. you — find out about it. we have done a guide, you can find it on the children_ guide, you can find it on the children commissioned a site, find out attout— children commissioned a site, find out about things that go on but also keep talking to your children. don't let it he _ keep talking to your children. don't let it be another separate world you are not— let it be another separate world you are not part — let it be another separate world you are not part of. the 16 to 21—year—old said, even when their mum _ 21—year—old said, even when their mum keeps— 21—year—old said, even when their mum keeps asking, is everything 0k? and mum keeps asking, is everything 0k? ami you _ mum keeps asking, is everything 0k? ami you are _ mum keeps asking, is everything 0k? and you are fed up and tell her to id and you are fed up and tell her to go away, — and you are fed up and tell her to go away, the 16 to 21—year—olds said they like _ go away, the 16 to 21—year—olds said they like it _ go away, the 16 to 21—year—olds said they like it that she asks, tell them — they like it that she asks, tell them to— they like it that she asks, tell them to keep asking. we need adults to be part _ them to keep asking. we need adults to be part of this world so they can really— to be part of this world so they can really help— to be part of this world so they can really help their children take decisions and work with them about where _ decisions and work with them about where they— decisions and work with them about where they should be, where they are, what — where they should be, where they are, what they are seeing. we cannot 'ust are, what they are seeing. we cannot just leave _ are, what they are seeing. we cannot just leave youngsters alone, especially while it is this dangerous. in terms of the companies, they need to do more, they need — companies, they need to do more, they need to step up. we are constantly pushing them on this and the legislation hopefully will make a real— the legislation hopefully will make a real difference, we will have proper — a real difference, we will have proper age gates on and force them, forces _ proper age gates on and force them, forces companies to only give
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appropriate material, age—appropriate to children. they are so— age—appropriate to children. they are so advanced, they know how old children _ are so advanced, they know how old children are — are so advanced, they know how old children are and they need to get some _ children are and they need to get some moral compass here. dame rachel de souza as jessica _ some moral compass here. dame rachel de souza as jessica sherwood, _ some moral compass here. dame rachel de souza as jessica sherwood, thank- de souza asjessica sherwood, thank you. i'm sure that has been fascinating for lots of parents watching this morning. bit fascinating for lots of parents watching this morning.- fascinating for lots of parents watching this morning. bit of an eye-onener- — watching this morning. bit of an eye-opener. let's _ watching this morning. bit of an eye-opener. let's find - watching this morning. bit of an eye-opener. let's find out - for the final time on this wednesday morning what is happening with the weather. , ., ., morning what is happening with the weather. ,., ., ., , ., weather. good morning, everyone. if ou are weather. good morning, everyone. if you are thinking _ weather. good morning, everyone. if you are thinking of _ weather. good morning, everyone. if you are thinking of stepping - weather. good morning, everyone. if you are thinking of stepping out - weather. good morning, everyone. if you are thinking of stepping out it. you are thinking of stepping out it is quite _ you are thinking of stepping out it is quite a — you are thinking of stepping out it is quite a chilly start stop as you can see — is quite a chilly start stop as you can see from these temperatures. in some _ can see from these temperatures. in some rural— can see from these temperatures. in some rural parts we have had frost, in central— some rural parts we have had frost, in central and eastern areas, and gusty— in central and eastern areas, and gusty winds across north—east england — gusty winds across north—east england and the south east of scotland. they will slowly ease through — scotland. they will slowly ease through the day. for england and wales. _ through the day. for england and wales, some showers around, but for many— wales, some showers around, but for many it— wales, some showers around, but for many it will— wales, some showers around, but for many it will be a dry day. scotland and northern ireland, this band of rain sinking — and northern ireland, this band of rain sinking southwards and also looking — rain sinking southwards and also looking at— rain sinking southwards and also looking at some snow showers following behind with gales across the north— following behind with gales across the north and west. as i mentioned, it will— the north and west. as i mentioned, it will he _ the north and west. as i mentioned, it will be windy wherever you are.
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tonight— it will be windy wherever you are. tonight i— it will be windy wherever you are. tonight i will weather front seats south _ tonight i will weather front seats south with its rain, pepe got as it moves _ south with its rain, pepe got as it moves into— south with its rain, pepe got as it moves into the south—east. increasingly we will have snow showers — increasingly we will have snow showers at sea level across scotland and northern ireland with the risk of ice _ and northern ireland with the risk of ice on — and northern ireland with the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and some _ of ice on untreated surfaces and some frost. tomorrow we lose this rain slowly. — some frost. tomorrow we lose this rain slowly, but there will be further — rain slowly, but there will be further snow showers at low levels of scotland and northern ireland. in fact, of scotland and northern ireland. in fact. we _ of scotland and northern ireland. in fact, we could have as have as much as two— fact, we could have as have as much as two to _ fact, we could have as have as much as two to ten — fact, we could have as have as much as two to ten centimetres of snow at lower— as two to ten centimetres of snow at lower levels, getting on for four inches — lower levels, getting on for four inches 0n _ lower levels, getting on for four inches. on higher ground up to 30 centimetres, almost a foot. you can see with _ centimetres, almost a foot. you can see with the — centimetres, almost a foot. you can see with the winds we are looking at hlizzards _ see with the winds we are looking at blizzards on the hills. safe and northern— blizzards on the hills. safe and northern ireland. snow on the hills of the _ northern ireland. snow on the hills of the pennines, for example, the lake district, the moors and into snowdonia — lake district, the moors and into snowdonia as well as the midlands. here it— snowdonia as well as the midlands. here it is— snowdonia as well as the midlands. here it is likely to be on high levels — here it is likely to be on high levels and through the day you will find they— levels and through the day you will find they will turn back to sleet or rain and _ find they will turn back to sleet or rain and through the day for many although— rain and through the day for many although it — rain and through the day for many although it will be windy it will be dry and _ although it will be windy it will be dry and we will see some sunshine but it— dry and we will see some sunshine but it will— dry and we will see some sunshine but it will feel cold. temperatures four in— but it will feel cold. temperatures four in the — but it will feel cold. temperatures four in the north to eight in the
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south _ four in the north to eight in the south and _ four in the north to eight in the south and we had on the wind—chill. for some _ south and we had on the wind—chill. for some it will feel some zero. chilly _ have a lovely wednesday. see you later. . ~ have a lovely wednesday. see you later. ., ,, , ., have a lovely wednesday. see you later. . ~' have a lovely wednesday. see you later. ., ,, we are speaking a lot about russia and ukraine, even in the sport. amid escalating tensions, senior political figures speaking on the programme suggesting the champions league final which is due to be staged on 28 in saint petersburg should be moved and bbc understands... it should be moved and bbc understands. . ._ should be moved and bbc understands... �* ., ., ., understands... it can't go ahead, kate? it is _ understands... it can't go ahead, kate? it is a _ understands... it can't go ahead, kate? it is a matter _ understands... it can't go ahead, kate? it is a matter went - understands... it can't go ahead, kate? it is a matter went that - kate? it is a matter went that decision will _ kate? it is a matter went that decision will be _ kate? it is a matter went that decision will be made. - good morning. the bbc understands the final will be moved from russia on 28th may. foreign secretary liz truss told breakfast this morning she didn't believe the game in st petersburg should go ahead, a view echoed by the shadow foreign secretary david lammy on this programme. with political pressure growing an alternative venue to the 68,000 seater gazprom stadium is expected to be found.
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european football's governing body uefa have said it's "closely monitoring the situation" and "any decision would be made in due course if necessary". four english sides remain in contention to reach the final. london mayor sadiq khan said the english capital was ready to step in with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley is also under consideration but is due to host the league two and championship play—off finals on may 28 and 29. one of those sides, manchester united, have a commercial with the russian airline aeroflot, but didn't fly with the carrier for their last—16 tie in spain against atletico madid tonight. manager ralf ragnick says there is a huge amount to work through and consider ahead of switching venues. this is something for uefa and maybe even for some politicians to decide upon. i think we all hope — not only here in england, but in the whole of europe, if not in the rest of the world — that things will de—escalate. nobody could really be interested in a sort of war within europe. so this is more important, actually, than a champions league game, if we're honest.
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chelsea — owned by russian billionaire roman abrahomvich — are a step closer to the quarter finals after beating lille in the first leg of their last—16 tie. no place in the side for romelu lukaku last night. his replacment kai havertz got chelsea's first. american christian pulisic with their second, leaving chelsea in control of the tie ahead of the second leg in three weeks' time. emma raducanu was forced to retire in a real marathon match overnight — her first competitive outing since defeat at the australian open. the reigning us open champion was top seed at the guadalajara open, but she was clearly struggling she had some strapping on her leg. three hours and 36 minutes she was out on court against australia's daria saville — that's the longest match of the wta season so far. it was a set all with raducanu down a break in the third when she called it a day.
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it ofa it of a marathon for her. i guess with the heat, so many late matches going on into the early hours, perhaps inevitable. it is going on into the early hours, perhaps inevitable.— perhaps inevitable. it is a gruelling _ perhaps inevitable. it is a gruelling schedule. - perhaps inevitable. it is a gruelling schedule. it - perhaps inevitable. it is a gruelling schedule. it has perhaps inevitable. it is a - gruelling schedule. it has been a while since _ gruelling schedule. it has been a while since she _ gruelling schedule. it has been a while since she has _ gruelling schedule. it has been a while since she has played - gruelling schedule. it has been a while since she has played so - while since she has played so perhaps... while since she has played so perhaps- - -— while since she has played so --erhas... �* ., ., ., perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? — perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? lt _ perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? it is _ perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? it is terrible, _ perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? it is terrible, of - perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? it is terrible, of all - perhaps... are you a fan of peaky blinders? it is terrible, of all the | blinders? it is terrible, of all the thins it blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is _ blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is on — blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is on the _ blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is on the list, _ blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is on the list, higher- blinders? it is terrible, of all the things it is on the list, higher on | things it is on the list, higher on the list of. ie. things it is on the list, higher on the list ofi— things it is on the list, higher on the list of._ it. the list of. is it a long list? it is not you — the list of. is it a long list? it is not you need _ the list of. is it a long list? it is not you need to _ the list of. is it a long list? it is not you need to catch - the list of. is it a long list? it is not you need to catch up . the list of. is it a long list? it - is not you need to catch up because the final series starts this weekend. i the final series starts this weekend-— the final series starts this weekend. ., ., . , weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen — weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite _ weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite a _ weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite a bit _ weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite a bit but _ weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite a bit but i - weekend. i also need to catch up. i have seen quite a bit but i am - have seen quite a bit but i am nowhere _ have seen quite a bit but i am nowhere near as up—to—date as you are. nowhere near as up—to—date as you are it _ nowhere near as up—to—date as you are it is _ nowhere near as up—to—date as you are. it is getting aged. bafta award—winning drama peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. with millions of fans worldwide hooked on the story of the shelby family — there are now only days to wait before the gang return to our screens. set on the streets of birmingham between the first as our midlands correspondent
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phil mackie has been finding out. it's nine years since tommy shelby first rode into town. since then, peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. now it's time to say farewell to tommy and the shelby clan — at least for a while. season six will be the last on the small screen. but the man whose creation this is has plans to start making a big—screen sequel in his home city — where fellow brummies have taken the show to their hearts. birmingham is a hard place to please. brummies are hard people to satisfy, and ijust feared that people said, "well, this isn't us," but it seems to have really, you know, struck a chord in birmingham, as well, and that's... i think if it hadn't been for that, it wouldn't have struck a chord elsewhere. it needed to be, you know, appreciated in its home town.
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most of what you see in the show never happened — it's completely made up. of course, it's a drama, it's a fiction. but there are some elements of truth in there, too. and there were real criminals called the peaky blinders who operated in this part of birmingham. and this was one of them — edward derrick. it was here in this birmingham back street that the first attack took place in march 1890 by men who were called peaky blinders. and this is his great—grandson, professor carl chinn — whose books have debunked some of the show�*s myths. it's really important to bear in mind that the real peaky blinders were not glamorous, well—dressed, charismatic anti—heroes. they were vicious and vile, back—street thugs who attacked each other, the police and who preyed upon the decent, respectable poor amongst whom they lived. and, no, they didn't conceal razor blades in their peaked caps. brummies know it's not historically accurate, but it hasn't stopped it becoming
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part of their culture. superfans love dressing up to show their devotion — there's even a peaky blinders festival in birmingham later this year. it's lovely to see places, you know, as a brummie, cos you're like, "i've been there, i've been in that pub, i know that road, i know that." and then i think other people want to come to birmingham to see it, as well. it's the history about birmingham, as well. my great—granddad grew up in small heath — he used to say to me, "oh, the peaky blinders..." something, he was like, "wow!" now the waiting's nearly over, and it doesn't look like tommy shelby�*s going to go quietly. this will be the end of it. phil mackie, bbc news birmingham. sunday night? it has got me going. i have to catch — sunday night? it has got me going. i have to catch it _ sunday night? it has got me going. i have to catch it because _ sunday night? it has got me going. i have to catch it because we - sunday night? it has got me going. i have to catch it because we will - have to catch it because we will talk about it on monday. you are not on the programme tomorrow. i talk about it on monday. you are not on the programme tomorrow.- on the programme tomorrow. i have nothin: on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else — on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to _ on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to do _ on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to do for _ on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to do for the _ on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to do for the next - on the programme tomorrow. i have nothing else to do for the next four. nothing else to do for the next four days. nothing else to do for the next four da s. . .,
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nothing else to do for the next four da s. , , ._ nothing else to do for the next four da s. , days. thursday, friday, saturday sorted out- _ days. thursday, friday, saturday sorted out. now _ days. thursday, friday, saturday sorted out. now for _ days. thursday, friday, saturday sorted out. now for something i sorted out. now for something completely different. more than one and a half million people have paid upfront for their own funeral, or a relative's. but new rules being introduced by the financial regulator could mean some people may not get the funeral plan they were promised. sarah is taking a look. good morning. the average cost of a funeral is around £4000 and so you can see why people plan ahead but there are some big changes for this sector are coming down the tracks. good morning, everyone — we're talking about funeral plans today. you pay a lump sum or instalments. the plan covers everything from undertakers fees to the cost of a coffin. around 1.6 million people have a funeral plan. but until now, the industry hasn't been officially regulated. that's left some people unprotected, when providers fail. that's what happened to roy and linda smith from hull. linda was diagnosed with terminal cancer last year. when it'd sunk in, i did, you know, everything from literally finances to picking up the phone and making an appointment to go and sort out about a funeral because i know how stressful they are.
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i think the first i heard about it was when i got a letter from the auditors and i thought, "oh, well, bye—bye, £1,700!" you know — ta—ra, not going to get that back! nobody wants to have a pauper's funeral — that must be the worst, most upsetting thing. linda has been told she is unlikely to get that money back. now from the end ofjuly things will change. the financial conduct authority will regulate the industry. firms will have to sell products which offer fair value. they must be well—run companies, with sufficient resources. there will be no more high—pressure selling. from the summer, only authorised firms will be able to offer funeral plans. in total, there are 72 providers. but so far 30 firms still haven't applied to get regulated. two applications have been withdrawn altogether. let's speak to sheldon mills from the financial conduct authority.
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good morning to you. just talk us through what happens if a company does not get authorised, cannot operate, what is the impact on customers? irate operate, what is the impact on customers?— operate, what is the impact on customers? ~ ., , ., customers? we are bringing funeral lans into customers? we are bringing funeral plans into regulation _ customers? we are bringing funeral plans into regulation by _ customers? we are bringing funeral plans into regulation by the - customers? we are bringing funeral plans into regulation by the end - customers? we are bringing funeral plans into regulation by the end of. plans into regulation by the end of july. july plans into regulation by the end of july, july 29, and working very hard with the industry to ensure as many as possible of those funeral plan providers can come through into regulations through our authorisation is progress. but those which don't, we are working with the largest firms in the industry to try to ensure as many of the backlog go into those larger firms so that vulnerable customers can effectively get a funeral when they need it. for those firms not transferred to transferred it depends if there's enough money in the trust for the to get a refund or get back some of their money or get a funeral. in the
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worst-case — their money or get a funeral. in the worst-case scenario, _ their money or get a funeral. in the worst-case scenario, could - their money or get a funeral. in the worst-case scenario, could people| worst—case scenario, could people lose all of the money they have paid insofar? irate lose all of the money they have paid insofar? ~ ., ., , ., insofar? we are hoping that we can aet insofar? we are hoping that we can net as insofar? we are hoping that we can get as many _ insofar? we are hoping that we can get as many funeral— insofar? we are hoping that we can get as many funeral plan _ insofar? we are hoping that we can get as many funeral plan providers| get as many funeral plan providers through the process as we seek to improve regulation in this market, but for those who don't get through the process, and who haven't kept the process, and who haven't kept the money in the trust, they might well be customers who lose out. irate well be customers who lose out. we have heard that 30 operators still have heard that 30 operators still have not even applied to get authorised, so how many plans could be at risk? irate authorised, so how many plans could be at risk? ~ ., �* ~ ., be at risk? we don't know the recise be at risk? we don't know the precise numbers _ be at risk? we don't know the precise numbers of _ be at risk? we don't know the precise numbers of plans - be at risk? we don't know the precise numbers of plans that j be at risk? we don't know the - precise numbers of plans that could be at risk. the main funeral plans providers that account for a significant proportion of this market are going through and authorisations process so that should give most customers some comfort at major providers are going through the process. it should be limited but we are working as hard as we can to try to get solutions to some of these issues are. irate as we can to try to get solutions to some of these issues are. we know in the loner some of these issues are. we know in the longer term _ some of these issues are. we know in the longer term that _ some of these issues are. we know in the longer term that regulation - some of these issues are. we know in the longer term that regulation will i
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the longer term that regulation will help but it doesn't seem fair that so many people could potentially miss out, lose money through this transition process, so what is your advice to those people who are worried, what help is there for them? ~ . . worried, what help is there for them? ~ ., ., ., ., worried, what help is there for them? . ., ., ., ., , ., them? we have asked all funeral plan roviders them? we have asked all funeral plan providers to — them? we have asked all funeral plan providers to write _ them? we have asked all funeral plan providers to write to _ them? we have asked all funeral plan providers to write to their _ providers to write to their customers, whether or not they are going through authorisations, to of whether they will get their funeral plan and their money is safe. if you have not heard from your funeral plan provider, take a look at our list. that sets out the firms that have applied for authorisation. if they have done so, you probably don't need to take any action at this stage. if you are one of the customers of the 30 which have not applied for authorisation, contact that provider. in addition you can also contact us at the fca if you have any concerns.— also contact us at the fca if you have any concerns. briefly, it will creater have any concerns. briefly, it will greater regulation _ have any concerns. briefly, it will greater regulation mean - have any concerns. briefly, it will greater regulation mean and - have any concerns. briefly, it will greater regulation mean and end | have any concerns. briefly, it will. greater regulation mean and end to cold calling, high pressure sales
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tactics? ~ , . ~' , cold calling, high pressure sales tactics? , ., tactics? absolutely. a key plan of our regulation — tactics? absolutely. a key plan of our regulation is _ tactics? absolutely. a key plan of our regulation is that _ tactics? absolutely. a key plan of our regulation is that third-partyl our regulation is that third—party providers cannot earn commission, meaning that should be an end to this cold calling and the significant pressure sales tactics we have seen in this market. sheldon mills, we we have seen in this market. sheldon mills. we have _ we have seen in this market. sheldon mills, we have to _ we have seen in this market. sheldon mills, we have to leave _ we have seen in this market. sheldon mills, we have to leave it _ we have seen in this market. sheldon mills, we have to leave it there. - mills, we have to leave it there. thank you very much. from the fca. in the short term, challenges for customers but in the longer term they will have greater financial protections if a company does fail and go bust. thank you. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. foreign secretary liz truss says an invasion of ukraine is highly likely and insists nothing is off the table as western allies impose sanctions against russian financial interests. if we see, which i feel we are likely to see, a full—scale invasion of ukraine, we will similarly act rapidly. we will act in concert with our international allies to send a very clear message to vladimir putin that we are not going to allow him to win. president biden abandons plans for a summit with vladimir putin after the kremlin's decision to order troops to separatist—held areas of ukraine. uefa is almost certain to switch this season's champions league final away from st petersburg amid the ukraine—russia crisis.

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