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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 23, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. ukraine tells citizens not to visit russia and warns those already there to leave the country, amid an intensification of russian aggression against the country. president putin says the security of russia and its citizens are non—negotiable in a speech marking a public holiday to another country's armed forces. the british foreign secretary liz truss defends the speed and scale of the uk sanctions against russia, after labour and some conservative mps said those sanctions do not go far enough. if we see, which i fair grotheer sanctions do not go far enough. if we see, which i fair grotheer we are likely to see, a full—scale invasion of ukraine, we will similarly act rapidly and we will act in concert
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with our international allies, to send a very clear message to vladimir putin that we are not going to allow him to win. lisp; vladimir putin that we are not going to allow him to win.— to allow him to win. usa is almost certain to switch _ to allow him to win. usa is almost certain to switch the _ to allow him to win. usa is almost certain to switch the champions i certain to switch the champions league final away from st petersburg, amid the crisis. in other news, one of the biggest scandals in the history of the national health service here in the uk, bbc panorama reports only repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire. and at least one person is killed and ten others missing as torrential rain causes flash flooding in australia. hello and welcome if you're
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watching in the uk or around the world. ukraine has told citizens to leave russia immediately because of what it calls the intensification of russian aggression against ukraine. a statement from the ukraine foreign ministry also urge citizens not to travel to russia. it comes as the uk's foreign secretary liz truss has said the country will use every leave at our disposal to stop russian threats, after president putin ordered troops into two ukrainian region is held by russian backed separatists. liz truss says that britain will escalate sanctions in the event of a full—scale invasion of ukraine, saying nothing would be off the table. but the opposition mp, the shadow foreign secretary david lammy, isjoined by some conservative mps and calling for tougher sanctions. some conservative mps and calling fortoughersanctions. he some conservative mps and calling for tougher sanctions. he has said that the threshold has been breached and that current measures are simply not strong enough. meanwhile, a summit between president biden and president putin suggested at the
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weekend will not now take place, and talks between the us secretary of state and the russian foreign minister sergey lavrov have also been cancelled. antony blinken says it makes no sense to go forward with those talks. and president putin has said that moscow is still open to diplomatic solutions with the west, and claims he is always open to honest dialogue. but the australian prime minister scott morrison has said that he believes a full—scale invasion of ukraine will begin within the next 2a hours. this report is from mark lobel. kremlin firepower spotted near the russian city of rostov—on—don, close to the ukrainian border. translation: i'm really concerned a huge war may break out. - worried to tears. satellite images also capture military vehicles, and a troop hospital across the borderfrom ukraine's capital in southern belarus.
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this map explains how a russian invasion could stretch beyond the two separatist areas in grey here, which are already recognised by russia as independent. the us president thinks putin also includes the ukrainian—controlled yellow areas as part of his responsibility to protect. he asserted that these regions actually extend deeper than the two areas he recognised, claiming large areas currently under thejurisdiction of the ukraine government. this is the beginning of a russian invasion of ukraine. it's likely us influence was behind a significant german decision to punish russia by stopping a major pipeline meant to export gas from russia to europe in its tracks, with further sanctions from the us, uk, japan, canada and europe hitting russian banks, oligarchs and blocking access to money markets, with more to follow if things get worse.
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it would be an escalation in those sanctions, nothing would be off the table in the event of a full invasion. and we are working very closely with our allies, the americans, europeans and, indeed, the g7, to make sure we inflict pain on the putin regime. if we're serious, - we've got to go hard. a threshold has been breached. this sending in "peacekeepers" ? we know what the soldiers will be | doing when they go into ukraine. | and so, on that basis, _ i think the mood of the entire house of commons yesterday _ was that the government were not being strong enough. president putin's response to all that? translation: our country is always open for direct and honest dialogue in the search of solutions to the most complex problems. but i repeat, the interests of russia and the security of our citizens are not negotiable to us.
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leaving everyone guessing what his next move will be. one neighbour claims to know. this is the new usual, so to speak. we have an aggressive neighbour who is interested in recreating an empire, who believes in the right to subjugate others and has a disregard for national self—determination. this is a threat to all of us. the eastern ukrainian town of kharkiv sits close to the rebel—held areas. school drills are under way, in case they find themselves in the firing line. explosion. the sound of bombing on ukraine's current front line could soon get louder. it also appears the diplomatic window is closing — as nato's chief warns, this is the most dangerous moment in european security for a generation. mark lobel, bbc news. early i spoke to james waterhouse,
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who gave me the latest from the ukrainian capital, and what is happening with the escalating crisis with russia and almost 200,000 troops at the border.— with russia and almost 200,000 troops at the border. ukrainians are used to eight _ troops at the border. ukrainians are used to eight years _ troops at the border. ukrainians are used to eight years of _ troops at the border. ukrainians are used to eight years of russian - used to eight years of russian aggression. i think, used to eight years of russian aggression. ithink, in used to eight years of russian aggression. i think, in a strange way, the last fortnight, some are getting used to the strange situation of the west giving grim forecasts, while the ukrainian government takes a very different assessment of things. that said, this advice for ukrainians to leave russia immediately, and for citizens not to travel to russia, it represents a bigger shift in tone from president zelensky and his government. until now, the messaging has been, stay calm, don't panic. he has been, stay calm, don't panic. he has given a second such address in as many days, in front of a full map of ukraine, making the point, he included all of the occupied territories in this crisis. he described patriotism as someone who defends their land against their
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enemy. he signed an orderfor reservists to be called up to the armed forces. this follows from an address from his defence minister, to troops, saying there will be losses ahead, saying there will be losses ahead, saying there will be losses and ordeals ahead, hold your nerve, hold the line. that is very much a shift in how ukraine is viewing this crisis.— much a shift in how ukraine is viewing this crisis. james, in terms ofthe viewing this crisis. james, in terms of the scale — viewing this crisis. james, in terms of the scale of _ viewing this crisis. james, in terms of the scale of ukraine, _ viewing this crisis. james, in terms of the scale of ukraine, if- viewing this crisis. james, in terms of the scale of ukraine, if there - of the scale of ukraine, if there was a full invasion, just give us an idea of how hard would it be for russian troops to hold down such a vast country? we know many, many ukrainians have said they would fight, they would resist. how mammoth a task would that be for russia? , , , ., ., , �* russia? this is the bit that doesn't com - ute. russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute- if _ russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute- if you — russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute. if you have _ russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute. if you have ukraine - russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute. if you have ukraine as i russia? this is the bit that doesn't compute. if you have ukraine as a| compute. if you have ukraine as a country, the vast majority do not want to be occupied. they do not want to be occupied. they do not want to be taken over. you can argue that russian leaning parts of ukraine have already fallen, with the annexation of crimea and what
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has happened in the east and the donbas region. then you have the historical trait over the past eight years, where the more aggressive russia is, the more ukraine the's sense of general national identity is galvanised, its sovereignty, and the more politically it leans to the west on issues like eu membership and nato membership. so, if you put all that aside, you then have, yes, granted, 150,000 estimated russian troops gathered along the border. they have been for some time. russia is a military superpower. then you also have the ukrainian army, that is much stronger than it was eight years ago, when it was caught by surprise. it has received billions of dollars in funding, training, equipment. and president zelensky has given a number of 200,000 troops that will be willing to fight. the majority are based on the east, where all the instability is happening. it's hard to tell you
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that i would buy the russian troops have indeed crossed the border. you're a member with crimea, they were called the little green men, where soldiers started popping up before a more sizeable official military presence was imposed by russia. so, with all of the apparatus in place, any potential incursion would be drawn out, and it would be bloody, frankly, that would be catastrophic. that is why the west is so desperate to avoid this. yes, they are lining up sanctions. the other concern for ukrainians is, nato members have made it clear that it is extremely unlikely that any nato troops will fight, help with ukraine's defence, in an escalation of the war. yes, they are moving troops to eastern europe, stationing them their more permanently. at the overall picture is a messy one. it would be farfrom overall picture is a messy one. it would be far from straightforward, and it would be ordinary people at the heart of it, and both the russian and ukraine side, that would bear the brunt.
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we have also been hearing from caroline davies, who is reporting now on the response to the announcements on international sanctions. the kremlin have been consistently fairly robust in their response, which i guess is not particularly surprising. even before we knew that president putin had announced the fact that he was recognising the separatist held areas, there had already been talk about the fact that russia would be able to be resilient against these sorts of sanctions. some had even suggested it would increase russia's strength, because they'd previously had the sanctions and survived, it had made them more independent. 0thers suggested that at some point the west would come back to russia because it needed russia. plenty of that sort of dialogue continuing today, with state media reporting about things like the fact that the foreign ministry say that these are illegitimate sanctions. so a pretty robust response on that side. in response on the other side, people are already concerned about the economic impact that this might have. people were concerned about that even before this announcement was made, about any form of military
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intervention by russia. they were worried about what might happen with that economic sanctions, how it might affect their lives. now, today is a public holiday here in russia. it is dedicated to the armed forces. of course, that feels particularly resilient and important here, in an area which is very close to the ukrainian border, where they have seen this conflict going on for the course of since 2014. i think many people are wondering what president putin is planning to do with his russian troops. let's talk now to a member of the european parliament, and chair of the eu subcommittee on security and defence. she also recently led a european parliament mission to ukraine.
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what is your assessment of the sanctions that have been announced by western nations, including the uk in the united states? are they enough to stop president putin in his tracks? , ., ., ~ his tracks? first of all, i think it is aood his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that _ his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that the _ his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that the eu, _ his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that the eu, the - his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that the eu, the uk - his tracks? first of all, i think it is good that the eu, the uk and his tracks? first of all, i think it - is good that the eu, the uk and the us were able to coordinate themselves and decide swiftly on sanctions, and it is much stronger thanit sanctions, and it is much stronger than it was in 2014. what would stop vladimir putin? let's be clear, if there is a war, it is a war of choice, and the choice of one man, vladimir putin. emmanuel macron has tried, deliberately tried to extend an olive branch and create a diplomatic path. vladimir putin chose to turn his back from all his previous commitments. he is now
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inside of a narrative, rewriting history, and even denying the right for a sovereign ukraine. he is making a choice, the current sanctions are an intermediate level of sanctions. we are not yet facing an invasion of ukraine. if there has to be an invasion of ukraine, there will be additional sanctions. i am in favour of a lot of firmness and unity in the west, in defence of ukrainian sovereignty. do unity in the west, in defence of ukrainian sovereignty.- unity in the west, in defence of ukrainian sovereignty. do you think president putin _ ukrainian sovereignty. do you think president putin frankly _ ukrainian sovereignty. do you think president putin frankly doesn't - ukrainian sovereignty. do you think president putin frankly doesn't care what the west does? he has already factored and there will be sanctions, financial punishment, he is not bothered about that because, as you say, he made an ideological decision already that he wants to take at least a slice of ukraine, maybe not the whole country, but at least part of it? i maybe not the whole country, but at least part of it?— least part of it? i think it is more than a slice _ least part of it? i think it is more than a slice of— least part of it? i think it is more than a slice of ukraine. - least part of it? i think it is more than a slice of ukraine. i - least part of it? i think it is more
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than a slice of ukraine. i think i than a slice of ukraine. i think he cannot accept that there is a counter model to what he is doing in russia. ukraine is free and democratic, and he is turning his eyes towards the west, russia is not attractive any more. the russian economy is bleak, and there is no attractiveness of moscow's regime any more. so i think it is not even the question of asking for a slice of ukraine even, to matter weeks ago it was about nato threatening russia. so there is always a pretext, because the very existence of a sovereign and free ukraine is a problem for vladimir putin. but i wonder whether it is a problem for the russian people. i wonder whether the russian people. i wonder whether the russian people want to suffer, they want soldiers to die in ukraine, if they want to suffer from sanctions, just because vladimir putin is not able to attract others,
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and his regime is not the success he wanted it to be. i do wonder whether he will be followed by the russian people. he will be followed by the russian neale, , ., he will be followed by the russian --eole. ., ., ~ he will be followed by the russian neale, ., ., ~' ., he will be followed by the russian ”eole. ., ., ~' ., y., he will be followed by the russian --eole. ., . ~' ., ., ~ people. good to talk to you, thank ou ve people. good to talk to you, thank you very much- — 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming has been giving me this assessment of the announcements of uk government sanctions so far. yesterday in parliament, it was very clear that the opposition to the government wasn't just coming clear that the opposition to the government wasn'tjust coming from the opposition parties, it was coming from within the conservative party as well. chairs of select committees, former leaders, people with an interest in defence and foreign affairs saying that the comet should have gone further on target and more people in more ways. you realise the comet has a few issues to deal with here. first, expectation management. people feel boris johnson's very tough rhetoric against borisjohnson�*s very tough rhetoric against vladimir putin was boris johnson's very tough rhetoric against vladimir putin was not necessarily matched by the sanctions
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that came out. yesterday, restrictions on three wealthy individuals and five banks. then there is a bit of a process thing here as well. the government back wants to sanction members of the russian parliament, who have called for the russian government to recognise the breakaway areas of ukraine. well, that turns out, it requires some tweaks to uk legislation to be able to do that. that could take a couple of weeks. that could take a couple of weeks. that button is not yet ready to be pushed. and then you have the philosophical question of what are the sanctions for? the government says they will escalate them, as russia's actions escalate and the crisis escalates. but then people in parliament yesterday were saying, well, no, you have the biggest deterrent effect by applying tough sanctions before the escalation happens. so, the govan back was trying to strike a balance between all of those things. that is why you have liz truss, the foreign secretary, writing in the times newspaper today, and appearing on tv and radio, to say that nothing is off the table, and that the sanctions will ratchet up if they are required, and there is a long list of people that the government
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market was preparing to target in future. and that is why boris johnson is letting it be known this morning he is going to be speaking to people from the financial services world, to look at how the wiring of global finance can services world, to look at how the wiring of globalfinance can be changed to punish the russian government. so, the government back i was trying to defend what it is doing today. i was trying to defend what it is doing today-— i was trying to defend what it is doinu toda . ~ . , , . doing today. ukraine is very much centrestage _ doing today. ukraine is very much centrestage at _ doing today. ukraine is very much centrestage at westminster - doing today. ukraine is very much centrestage at westminster at. doing today. ukraine is very much| centrestage at westminster at the moment. also, partygate is back in the headlines, and new details about the headlines, and new details about the police investigation? the the headlines, and new details about the police investigation?— the police investigation? the prime minister received _ the police investigation? the prime minister received a _ the police investigation? the prime minister received a questionnaire . minister received a questionnaire from the metropolitan police, asking questions about these accusations, as many people will have received if they have been accused of breaking they have been accused of breaking the covid rules. we knew that his lawyers had filled it in and returned it and the deadline, by the end of last week. what happened now is that itv has got hold of what these forms actually look like, and it makes a very clear this is the equivalent of being to be by the police under caution. so, we think that means borisjohnson is the first prime minister to be interviewed, effectively, under
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caution as part of a police mastication. so, quite a significant moment in the party story. but a sort of fairly symbolic and significant moment. let sort of fairly symbolic and significant moment. sort of fairly symbolic and siunificant moment. ., ~ , ., significant moment. let me take you to ukraine. significant moment. let me take you to ukraine- we _ significant moment. let me take you to ukraine. we are _ significant moment. let me take you to ukraine. we are just _ significant moment. let me take you to ukraine. we are just watching - significant moment. let me take you to ukraine. we are just watching a i to ukraine. we are just watching a speech there by ukraine's top security official, that is the secretary of the national security and defence council of ukraine. he has been saying that there is a state of emergency in all ukrainian territory apart from donetsk and luhansk, that will last for 30 days, and can be extended for another 30 days as well. that is the latest from ukraine, a state of emergency, to last 30 days, extendable to another 30 days. growing preparations inside ukraine. people
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carrying firearms, with a view to resistance if there is an invasion. scott morrison has been productive within 24 hours they will be a russian invasion. —— has been predicting. just ending there, that was the top security official in ukraine, the secretary of the national security and defence council. the bbc understands that european football's governing body, uefa, is almost certainly going to switch the champions league final, it was set to be held in russia, in st petersburg. it is going to be switched to a different host city because of the escalating crisis over ukraine. the 68,000 seater stadium in st petersburg had been selected as this season's venue for the trappers league final. the uk prime minister borisjohnson has been amongst those calling for that
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game to be switched out of russia. uefa says it is closely monitoring the situation. any decision will be made in due course, if necessary, thatis made in due course, if necessary, that is what they say. at the game, in terms of the date, still expected to be played on the 28th of may, but it almost certainly will be switched away from russia because of the ukraine crisis. it's one of the biggest scandals in the history of the nhs. many babies died, while others were left with life—changing injuries following repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchannan, has been following the investigation into what went wrong. he's been speaking to one mum who lost her child after being encouraged to have a natural birth — even though her baby wasn't in the correct position. these are all his clothes. in preparation for him? yeah. kamaljit uppal�*s son should be 18 years old. the prices are still on them? the prices are still on them, yes. they were all hung in the wardrobe
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for him to come home. instead, she clings to the memory of what could have been. during her pregnancy, she was told that manpreet was in a breech position, lying on the wrong direction. i was told, "you're not having a normal delivery, it will be a c—section." but when she went into labour, the royal shrewsbury hospital encouraged her to have a normal birth. 18 hours later, her son hadn't been born. she needed an emergency cesarean. i'm still coming out of my general anaesthetic, and she said, "he's dead." and that was it. they plonked the baby in my arms, and said, "say goodbye." i just didn't know how to say goodbye. and, erm... ijust gave him a kiss, and that was it. in march 2003, just a month before manpreet�*s death, mps held a hearing amid concerns over the rising
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number of caesareans. panorama has discovered that clinical leaders from the royal shrewsbury hospital told the mps how they managed to have the lowest c—section rate in the country. the evidence we have seen show them telling the health select committee... the promotion of natural birth was part of a wider national effort, though in shropshire the evidence suggests they pursued it too vigorously. following her son's death, kamaljit uppal was called to a meeting with a hospital consultant. she still remembers what he told her. i took the wrong option of delivering. and, basically, if we'd given him a c—section earlier, 3.45, he would have lived a normal life, there would have been nothing wrong with him.
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the midwife overseeing the official review, which is looking at nearly 1900 cases, over almost two decades, say cesarean rates of the trust were consistently lower than the england average. there were cases when an earlier recourse to a cesarean section, rather than a persistence towards a normal delivery, may well have led to a better outcome for mother or baby, or both. bernie bentick retired in 2020 after spending nearly 30 years at the trust. the gynaecologist says he repeatedly raised problems with managers. i was increasingly concerned about the level of bullying . and adverse culture within the trust. - i believed that some of the ways they responded to problems - were to try to preserve _ the reputation of the organisation. in a statement, the trust say they apologised for the distress caused, but that they had made strong progress, including investing in staffing and training.
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next month, a full report into shropshire's maternity failings will be published. a public recognition of two decades of private grief. michael buchanan, bbc news, shropshire. viewers in the uk can see the full report on bbc one at 9pm. michael joins me now. just tell us a bit more about what seemed to be an on natural births?— natural births? indeed, i mean, to -ut natural births? indeed, i mean, to ut this natural births? indeed, i mean, to put this in — natural births? indeed, i mean, to put this in context, _ natural births? indeed, i mean, to put this in context, there - natural births? indeed, i mean, to put this in context, there was... . put this in context, there was... the... the reason the trust went to parliament was because there was a concern in england at the time of that there was over medicalisation of birth, and that there were too many caesarea ns of birth, and that there were too many caesareans taking place, and women were being too often encouraged to have a surgical procedure that they say was risky.
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but it set in train, in some areas, this culture of trying to keep the number of cesarean sections as low as possible. and it wasn'tjust in shrewsbury. if you remember the morecambe bay scandal in cumbria, the report into that found a dysfunctional unit and an overemphasis on normal birth at any cost. so, this problem has come up in a number of different trusts. it's also important to remember that it was part of a national campaign ljy it was part of a national campaign by the royal college of midwives for almost a decade, until about 2014. they were encouraging their members to promote natural birth. in the last week or so, nhs england have said that trust should no longer measure the number of cesarean sections that they conduct is a measurement of progress or success. so there is definitely change effort. but for a number of months it was a cultural problem that greater conference on women. people will be wondering _ greater conference on women. people will be wondering if _ greater conference on women. people will be wondering if these _ greater conference on women. people will be wondering if these were - will be wondering if these were isolated, localised failings, or if
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there were larger indications? jeremy hunt said it would be a mistake to assume these issues that are emerging and that happened in shrewsbury are limited to shrewsbury. we know, for instance, that an independent investigation, i mentioned morecambe bay, there was one going on in nottingham and east kent as well, they are likely to be pockets of poor maternity practice across the uk. bear in mind, the cqc in england now rate maternity services for safety, and they say that 41% of them, currently, require improvement in terms of safety. michael, thank you very much indeed. the world health organization and unicef, have accused formula baby milk producers of unethical marketing practices. in a new report, they say the aggressive promotion of formula milk is in breach of international commitments to protect breast—feeding.
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the likelihood of extreme wildfires will rise dramatically in the coming decades, as extreme temperatures rise. the un environment programme says even the most ambitious efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions will not prevent a dramatic surge in the frequency of extreme fire conditions such as the australian black summer between 2019 and 2020, which burned 24 million hectares of land, and killed 33 people, and countless more animals. it comes as delegates from 193 countries are expected to arrive for the programme's summit in nairobi next week. 0ne one person has been killed and ten others are missing in eastern australia after torrential rain caused flash flooding. emergency services have been inundated with calls for help from people who were stranded. heavy rain also battered sydney, cutting off roads and saturating homes and businesses. 0ur australia correspondent sent this
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report. it is the first time the rain has stopped. it has really been quite dramatic. a scary amount of rain, as described by the meteorologists in europe. 400 millimetres in less than 24 hours, mainly in south—east queensland. here where i am in new south wales as well. so many dramatic pictures of cars being submerged on the street, barely visible. we know a couple was rescued, they took shelter on a tree, actually, when a caravan was washed away in the street in sydney. streets were blocked. even the trains were flooded at some point. eur meteorology is saying that we have not seen the worst of itjust yet. this will continue for days to come. we are getting about 300
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millimetres of rain in the coming days. the concern is the flooding, and, of course, the dams being overflowed as well. this is really a continuation of the extreme weather we are seeing in australia. certainly in my time here, when i arrived, i arrived and late 2019 at the start of the catastrophic fire season, before that there were years of drought. but after that, during the season as well, i was also reporting on floods. and with the climate change debate heated here, many scientists are saying that this extreme weather is going to get more extreme weather is going to get more extreme and is going to get more frequent. climate change is heavily politicised here in australia, and with the election coming up in a couple of months, the debate will continue. at the fear is that these extreme weather events will also continue.
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back to the crisis over ukraine, and after days of fast—paced developments in the crisis, ross atkins has been taking a look at some of the key moments in the build—up of russian troops along the border with ukraine. on monday evening, president putin gave a televised address. he also signed russia's recognition of the independence of donetsk and luhansk in eastern ukraine, and ordered troops into the territories. within hours, unidentified military vehicles were filmed near them. and vladimir putin says any russian troops will be peacekeeping — to which the us says this. he calls them peacekeepers. this is nonsense. we know what they really are. all this has come after months of a russian military build—up near to ukraine. back in mid—november, this was the warning from nato. in recent weeks, we have seen large and unusual concentrations of russian forces close to ukraine's borders. moscow said this was alarmist, but neither the troops nor the concerns went away.
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0n the 8th of december, the washington post published this recent satellite image showing russian deployment. it reported a us estimate of 70,000 troops close to the border. russia didn't deny this, but in an address in late december, president putin said this. translation: the strengthening of us and nato military groupings _ on russia's borders, and the organisation of large—scale military manoeuvres are a serious cause for concern. to this, we can add putin's long—standing frustration that nato has expanded further east. and byjanuary, russian troops were arriving in belarus. it neighbours both russia and ukraine, and moscow said its actions were about repelling external aggression. it talked of compromises, too. but by february, this was the american assessment. we're in a window when an invasion could begin at any time. 0n the same day, russia claimed "our country is not going to attack anyone". but russia's military activity continued. there were naval manoeuvres
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in the black sea. this satellite image showed helicopter deployments close to the border. another showed a new pontoon bridge in belarus, less than six kilometres from ukraine. at this time, russia was also claiming it was pulling some troops out. it released these images to prove it, but nato was unconvinced. so far, we have not seen any sign of de—escalation on the ground. by this point, the americans were claiming there were 150,000 russian troops in place. which brings us to this week — with vladimir putin talking of ukraine as ancient russian soil and ordering his troops into ukraine. and while the west imposes new sanctions, he now considers his next move. that was ros atkins. there are calls for the sanctions against russia to be toughened up after vladimir putin ordered troops into those rebel held regions of eastern ukraine. the west has responded with a range of
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sanctions so far, the uk imposing sanctions so far, the uk imposing sanctions on five russian banks and three wealthy russian businessman. president biden has announced sanctions on two major banks and has cut off part of the russian economy from internationalfinancial systems. germany has shelled the nord stream to pipeline, which would have doubled the flow of russian gusts to the region. the european region is cutting off access to its banks and financial markets, as well as banning trade from the two rebel held regions. earlieri as banning trade from the two rebel held regions. earlier i spoke to the former trade secretary dr liam fox and i asked him whether he feels the sanctions announced so far against russia go far enough. i sanctions announced so far against russia go far enough.— russia go far enough. i think the west will need _ russia go far enough. i think the west will need to _ russia go far enough. i think the west will need to go _ russia go far enough. i think the west will need to go faster - russia go far enough. i think the west will need to go faster and l west will need to go faster and further. the british government has behaved honourably in this, and it is clear from what president biden was saying last night and what chancellor scholz was seen yesterday is that something has been worked
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out between the allies who will stay in lock step through at this, so i think we wait to see what comes out. the point i was making yesterday in the house of commons was, ultimately, though, whatever we decide to do over sanctions, we have to recognise there is a limit to what sanctions can achieve in a country that is not a democracy, run by a despot like putin, who does not care about the impact on the russian people, and we will have to think about how we can help ukraine to defend itself against further russian action.— defend itself against further russian action. ~ ,, ., russian action. people like sue iain duncan smith _ russian action. people like sue iain duncan smith was _ russian action. people like sue iain duncan smith was saying _ russian action. people like sue iain duncan smith was saying that - russian action. people like sue iain. duncan smith was saying that russia should be hit hard, in other words get on with it, don't wait.- get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there _ get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there is _ get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there is a _ get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there is a case _ get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there is a case for - get on with it, don't wait. well, i think there is a case for having . think there is a case for having very tough sanctions and then reducing them if russia responds to the threat to the economy. the approach that seems to have been
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taken is an incremental increase in sanctions, that if putin does not respond, sanctions will get heavier as time goes on. you can argue either way on that, but ultimately come back to the same position, which is, whatever the impact on the russian economy, the people of ukraine will need to be able to defend themselves.— ukraine will need to be able to defend themselves. there is a lot of russian money _ defend themselves. there is a lot of russian money washing _ defend themselves. there is a lot of russian money washing around - russian money washing around britain, london in particular, and washing around the conservative party, millions of pounds donated of russian money. do you regret that? should that money be given back? i should that money be given back? i think you have to be careful what you mean by russian. as boris johnson said in the commons yesterday, people who are russian and who have got uk citizenship are able to decide what to do with their own money, and that is very different from what oligarchs are doing in terms of investments. across europe, you will say that in recent years, in response to the
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2014 sanctions, russia has invested heavily in metallurgy, in energy, in critical infrastructure. these are the areas where we have got to be careful about allowing russian investment.— careful about allowing russian investment. �* , ., investment. let's look at the wider ulobal investment. let's look at the wider global picture- _ investment. let's look at the wider global picture. you _ investment. let's look at the wider global picture. you were _ investment. let's look at the wider global picture. you were defence l global picture. you were defence secretary. has there been a failure by nato in not protecting ukraine more, in allowing president biden to threaten and bully ukraine in the way that he has done?— threaten and bully ukraine in the way that he has done? well, i think we have taken _ way that he has done? well, i think we have taken our— way that he has done? well, i think we have taken our eye _ way that he has done? well, i think we have taken our eye off— way that he has done? well, i think we have taken our eye off the - way that he has done? well, i think we have taken our eye off the ball l we have taken our eye off the ball on sanctions. since 2014, russia has had a large amount of import substitution, these investments across europe which if not appeasement by western governments, is at least turning a blind eye, and when you have sanctions, you have to constantly update them, because as you said in your earlier report, countries will find a way round them over time. countries will find a way round them overtime. putin countries will find a way round them over time. putin has been paying down russian state debt over the period, making sure that russia is less dependent on imports itself, and there are lessons for us in
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that, not least in the energy sector. . ., ., sector. liam fox, the former uk defence secretary. _ sector. liam fox, the former uk defence secretary. the - sector. liam fox, the former uk defence secretary. the light - sector. liam fox, the former uk defence secretary. the light is l sector. liam fox, the former uk i defence secretary. the light is now on the covid situation in the uk, because death rates were below usual levels in january, because death rates were below usual levels injanuary, despite covid being the third leading cause of death in england and wales that month. nearly 50,000 deaths were registered, of which 3800 were caused by covid. we can talk to our head of statistics, robert cuffe. what are the implications for our understanding of what is happening with covid? it understanding of what is happening with covid? , , ., ., with covid? it reminds us that covid has not gone _ with covid? it reminds us that covid has not gone away, _ with covid? it reminds us that covid has not gone away, it _ with covid? it reminds us that covid has not gone away, it is _ with covid? it reminds us that covid has not gone away, it is not - has not gone away, it is not something you would want to be the only thing we are looking at any more, and these are the best data on deaths we get. it takes a while for a doctor to decide what triggered the deaths, not what was related to it — it is our best measure, and it says, as you said, the third leading
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cause of death in the uk, reflecting the very high numbers of people who contracted covid in december and january, and it could have been worse or better, based on those cases. you don't want to keep your eye completely off covid, but if you look at the other leading causes of death, they are all down. stroke is down, hopefully we can show that to the audience, heart attacks, deaths due to heart attacks, alzheimer's and dementia. the leading causes of death, the light blue bars show what you might expect, and a dark blue bars show what we have seen, the levels of deaths we have seen. alzheimer's and dementia at the top, the highest, but we are seeing the dark blue bar is lower than we would normally expect to see. the same goes just underneath that, heart attacks, and a little bit lowerfor strokes, for flu and attacks, and a little bit lowerfor strokes, forflu and pneumonia. so we are seeing other things that would really normally because a lot of deaths, they are below usual
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levels, so overall, the whole picture in england was that the number of deaths injanuary picture in england was that the number of deaths in january was actually a bit lower than we would see in a january before the pandemic, so even though covid has not gone away, it is not the only thing going on in society, it is not pushing the overall number of deaths up pushing the overall number of deaths up in the way it did in the past. and we have statistical data on antibody levels, i think. thea;r and we have statistical data on antibody levels, ithink. antibody levels, i think. they have been hiuh antibody levels, i think. they have been high for _ antibody levels, i think. they have been high for a — antibody levels, i think. they have been high for a long _ antibody levels, i think. they have been high for a long time, - antibody levels, i think. they have | been high for a long time, antibody sure whether you have been infected in the past or whether you have been vaccinated, so high levels, 95—97% among adults. the interesting data are younger kids. we are now seeing 80% of kids, roughly, aged under 11, who are showing antibodies to coronavirus. they have not been vaccinated, so that is all infection, and it has doubled in the last month. most of that is antibodies to 0micron. any parents will know it has run through the
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schools, and we have also seen, may be a consequence of that in recent weeks, that infection levels have started to fall quickly in those schools because immunity gives a barrier to the virus. we will know more about whether that will happen in adults as well when we get data on infections at two o'clock today, but that is playing out very clearly in younger age groups. mi but that is playing out very clearly in younger age groups.— in younger age groups. all right, robert, in younger age groups. all right, robert. good — in younger age groups. all right, robert, good to _ in younger age groups. all right, robert, good to see _ in younger age groups. all right, robert, good to see you, i in younger age groups. all right, robert, good to see you, thank. in younger age groups. all right, i robert, good to see you, thank you very much, robert cuffe there. a new report has found nhs surfaces in england are to communicate properly with people who are blind, deaf or have a disability. i discussed this with chris mccann from healthwatch england, he outlined the scale of the problem. two thirds of nhs trusts in england are failing to meet their legal duty to provide health care information on accessible formats and communication support for people who are deaf, blind or have a learning disability. that puts those trusts in breach of their duty under a legal requirement created by nhs england in 2016. what that means is there are thousands of people who are blind,
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deaf or have a learning disability who are facing barriers to care because of communication needs not being met. so at healthwatch england, we have formed a coalition with leading charities, such as the rnib and the rnid, in calling for the implementation of the accessible information standard. why do you think there are these failures? what is it down do? are people not thinking it through, are they lazy, is it money, what are the reasons? well, we think that they are not currently fulfilling their responsibility because trusts don't always have a policy in place. sometimes they do, but many that have not put it into practice are still working on implementation. some of the biggest barriers to accessible formats are a lack of resources, a need to update it systems, needs for better staff awareness.
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so we know that this is a major impact on patients, particularly the most vulnerable. people need clear information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health and care, to get the most out of services. if they cannot understand the information or have access to communication support, they can miss appointments, can't read with prescription medications. we have one particular example where a blind person was given paper forms to order a white cane. and we have seen examples where deaf people have been asked to do gp appointments over the phone. we need greater accountability, we need trusts and health and care providers to step up on this issue. chris mccann, director of communications for healthwatch england.
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pupils could be blocked from taking out student loans if they fail certain exams. there would be minimum entry requirements for some university applicants. the department for education said the measures are being considered to prevent pupils from being pushed into higher education before they are ready and to ensure that poor quality, low—cost courses are not incentivised grow uncontrollably. a bbc investigation has found children could be exposed to grooming and sexually explicit material, in some parts of the so—called metaverse. that's the name given to a range of games and experiences which can be accessed using virtual reality headsets. it's a world which facebook founder, mark zuckerberg, has called the future. angus crawford reports.
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meetjess, she's 25, a bbcjournalist, but in virtual reality, she's pretending to be a child. going in. into vr chat — one of the most popular apps. the age limit�*s 13. some rooms look innocent enough. but there's pole dancing and strip clubs, too. 0h, hello, miss, we can hang out, watch a movie or something. isn't it school time right now? there are two people to the side of me now, who are trying to get on top of each other. ok, so there's like a group of people that are, like, simulating sex. i want to say there's like five of them and they're definitely children, i'm pretty sure, because of how they sound. the avatars can go naked. and thenjess is assaulted.
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oh, my god! what was that like? horrible. it was strange. it felt like it was happening to me. stop it. leave me alone. it's like the wild west, and i wouldn't feel safe as a sibling of younger children, having my siblings play on this. and if i was a parent, i wouldn't let my children in that kind of area. it's too adult. we showed whatjess had found to andy burrows at the nspcc, and he's horrified. it'sjust the most shocking breach of any responsibility. i am angry because facebook promised us disney levels of safety. this isn't a theme park. this is a set of virtual worlds, where children are at risk of grooming, of sexual abuse, of really harmful experiences. it speaks to a corporate neglect. these are sites that are dangerous by design.
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today, we're going to talk about the metaverse... mark zuckerberg thinks the metaverse is the future of the internet, even rebranding facebook as meta, spending billions of dollars on the quest headset, which dominates the market. you need a facebook account tojoin in. there are games and apps made by meta and by other companies, too. all right, here we go. the so—called metaverse doesn't actually exist yet. that's just the name given to a series of games and virtual reality experiences you get to using a headset like this one. choose what you want to look like, your avatar, and you can start exploring. the question is, how safe is this world for children? katherine allen studies vr. i met her in her virtual office while sitting beside her in the real world. not everything's perfect in this space, is it? no, it's a bit of a wild west, to be honest. simulated sex is something that
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you see quite commonly. if we don't get on top of it, if it's not regulated and legislated, if the public aren't aware of what's really happening, children going to these spaces unsupervised, then we could see really a hotbed for potential grooming, predators and also experiences that children are having that may well be too early for them in their development. predators are just having a free—for—all with these kids. this man has been investigating vr chat rooms for months. he's worried for his safety and wants to remain anonymous. he's made a youtube film and even met and interviewed a 14—year—old who says he was groomed and raped in virtual reality. did they try to do things to you? yes _ you'll see 40—year—old men hanging out with 12—year—old boys and girls. it's like a nightclub. but if you are running a nightclub and you can't afford a bouncer, so you just leave the doors open,
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well, you're going to get shut down because, yeah, i get it, it may be expensive to hire a bouncer, but you got to do it. you have to do it because the alternative is to let kids just wander in and get destroyed. vrchat says it is, "working hard to make itself a safe and welcoming place for everyone." "predatory and toxic behaviour has no place on the platform." meta stresses it's not responsible for other companies' apps and says... "we provide tools that allow players to report and block users. we will continue to make improvements as we learn more about how people interact in these spaces." for children, the metaverse can be an exciting adventure, but it also poses a real risk of harm. angus crawford, bbc news. in the united states, the three white men convicted of murdering a black man when he was outjogging have been found guilty of federal
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hate crimes in georgia. the three defendants had already been sentenced to life in prison last month for killing him. aleem maqbool sent this report. the way that he left here, i knew we would get victory on the state and federal level, i knew that from day one. it was two years ago that ahmaud arbery was chased through a neighbourhood in which he was running close to his home. he was ambushed and shot dead. but though the police knew who killed him, no—one was arrested and charged for more than ten weeks
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and only after this video of what happened went viral. in a murder trial in november, father and son greg and travis mcmichael and their neighbour roddy bryant were found guilty of murder. now, in a hate—crimes trial, the evidence they'd exhibited a history of racism in the past, the killers' actions were deemed racially motivated. the us attorney general said the only acceptable outcome would have been the victim returning safely to his loved ones two years ago. i cannot imagine the pain that a mother feels... i ..to have her son run- down and then gunned down while taking a jog i on a public street. my heart goes out to her and to the family. - there are still questions as to why it took a viral video and a national campaign to get ahmaud arbery�*s killlers detained. without that, it's not hard to imagine that the justice of the family is thankful for, remaining elusive.
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the bbc, and bafta award—winning, drama peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. with millions of fans worldwide hooked on the story of the notorious shelby family, there are now only days to wait before the gang return to our screens. set on the streets of birmingham between the first and second world wars, the city has taken the programme to its heart, as phil mackie reports. it's nine years since tommy shelby first rode into town. since then, peaky blinders has become a global phenomenon. now it's time to say farewell to tommy and the shelby clan — at least for a while. season six will be the last on the small screen. but the man whose creation this is has plans to start making a big—screen sequel in his home city, where fellow brummies have taken the show to their hearts. birmingham is a hard place to please.
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brummies are hard people to satisfy, and ijust feared that people said, "well, this isn't us," but it seems to have really, you know, struck a chord in birmingham, as well, and that's... i think, if it hadn't been for that, it wouldn't have struck a chord elsewhere. it needed to be, you know, appreciated in its home town. most of what you see in the show never happened — it's completely made up. of course, it's a drama, it's a fiction. but there are some elements of truth in there, too. and there were real criminals called the peaky blinders who operated in this part of birmingham. and this was one of them — edward derrick. it was here in this birmingham back street that the first attack took place in march 1890 by men who were called peaky blinders. and this is his great—grandson, professor carl chinn, whose books have debunked some of the show�*s myths. it's really important to bear in mind that the real peaky blinders were not glamorous, well—dressed, charismatic anti—heroes.
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they were vicious and vile, back—street thugs who attacked each other, the police and who preyed upon the decent, respectable poor amongst whom they lived. and, no, they didn't conceal razor blades in their peaked caps. brummies know it's not historically accurate, but it hasn't stopped it becoming part of their culture. superfans love dressing up to show their devotion — there's even a peaky blinders festival in birmingham later this year. it's lovely to see places, you know, as a brummie, cos you're like, "i've been there, i've been in that pub, i know that road, i know that." and then i think other people want to come to birmingham to see it as well. it's the history about birmingham, as well. my great—granddad grew up in small heath — he used to say to me, "oh, the peaky blinders..." something, he was like, "wow!" now the waiting's nearly over, and it doesn't look like tommy shelby�*s going to go quietly. this will be the end of it. phil mackie, bbc news birmingham.
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mount etna has been roaring back to life, sending volcanic ash ten kilometres into the air over eastern sicily. a crater on the south—eastern side of the volcano spewed out lover and sent large clouds of smoke and ash over surrounding villages. mount etna is more than 3000 metres high and erupts several times a year but rarely causes any damage. and a group of yoga enthusiast in canada have been chilling out with some alpacas, braving the cold and the wind for a yoga class surrounded by alpacas, trying to find a zen in the freezing canadian winter, there they are. the classes are apparently held to raise money and keep the alpacas happy and healthy at the sanctuary.
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that is it from me for now, you can contact us via the bbc news website and app. hello again. for the rest of this week, it's going to be windy, not as windy as last weekend, but windy nonetheless. and for some of us there's also some snow in the forecast. now, we've got this weather front sinking slowly southwards today, taking its rain with it. but you can see all the snow showers waiting in the wings in the atlantic, and isobars also telling their own story — it's going to be windy. but the wind across southeast scotland and northeast england easing through the day. still gales across the north and the west and even windy inland. england and wales are getting away with a largely dry day, just a few showers, more especially in the west, the rain crossing scotland and northern ireland, with the wintry showers following on behind. and a real difference in temperatures north to south. through this evening and overnight, there goes our weather front, sinking steadily southwards. it's a cold front.
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it's taking its rain, that will tend to fragment, but it looks like it's going to pep up as it arrives in the south east, and increasingly we'll have snow showers at sea level across both scotland and northern ireland. so a risk of ice on untreated surfaces tonight, and some of us will also see some frost. so tomorrow, then, you can see what's happening with this weather front. it slowly slips southwards before moving away. the cold air, represented by the blues, follows on, and again widespread wind tomorrow once again. so there goes our weather front, taking its rain. there will be a lot of dry weather, but still snow showers at sea level across scotland and also northern ireland. 0n higher ground, we could have up to 30 centimeters of snow. at lower levels between two and ten centimeters. and it'll be blowing in the wind in scotland and northern ireland on higher routes, so there will be some blizzards at times. now, as we head through thursday, there's our weather front sinking south, and into friday high pressure starts to build in, so things so things will start to settle, but note the isobars in the east. friday is going to start off windy,
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particularly so down the north sea coastline with a few showers. but as that ridge of high pressure builds in, most of the showers will fade and the winds will slowly ease. and there'll be a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine. temperatures ranging from four in the north to 11 or 12 as we push down towards the south west. and then as we head on into the weekend, well, we still have that area of high pressure, so for england and for wales again, it's going to be windy but mostly dry. just a few showers for scotland and northern ireland. windy with some rain overnight saturday into sunday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11... ukraine is to impose a state of emergency and has told its citizens to leave russia. president putin says the security of russia and its citizens is non—negotiable. in a speech marking the public holiday to mark the country's armed forces. the foreign secretary defends the speed and scale of british sanctions against russia after labour and some conservative mps said they don't go far enough. if we say, which i fear we are likely to say, a full—scale invasion of ukraine, we will similarly act rapidly and we will act in concert with our international allies to send a very clear message to vladimir putin that we're not going to allow him to win.
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in other news — the government considers plans to propose minimum entry grades for universities in england and a limit on student numbers. one of the biggest scandals in the history of the nhs. bbc panorama reports on the repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire. and the duchess of cambridge is in denmark to learn how the country has become a world leader in its approach to early childhood development. good morning. ukraine is to impose a state of emergency. and has told its citizens to leave russia immediately,
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because of what it calls the "intensification of russian aggression against ukraine". a statement from ukraine's foreign ministry also urged citizens not to travel to russia. it comes as the uk's foreign secretary says the country will use "every lever at our disposal" to stop russian threats, after vladimir putin ordered troops into two ukrainian regions held by russian—backed separatists. liz truss says britain will escalate sanctions in the event of a full invasion of ukraine, saying that "nothing would be off the table." but many are calling for tougher sanctions including the shadow foreign secretary along with some conservative mps. david lammy says a "threshold has been breached" and that current measures are not "strong enough". a summit between president biden and president putin suggested at the weekend will not take place. talks between the us secretary of state and the russian foreign minister, sergei lavrov, have also been cancelled. anthony blinken says it makes "no sense" to go forward with the talks. meanwhile, president putin says moscow is still open to "diplomatic solutions" with the west, and claims he's always open for "honest dialogue".
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mark lobel reports. kremlin firepower spotted near the russian city close to the ukrainian border. translation: i'm really concerned a huge war may break out. worried to tears. satellite images also capture military vehicles and a troop hospital across the border from ukraine's capital in southern belarus. this man explains how a russian invasion could stretch beyond the two separatist areas in grey hair which are already recognised by russia as independent. the us president thinks putin also includes the ukrainian controlled yellow areas as part of his responsibility to protect. they actually extend _ responsibility to protect. they actually extend deeper- responsibility to protect. iie: actually extend deeper than responsibility to protect. tie: actually extend deeper than the responsibility to protect. ti21 actually extend deeper than the two areas to recognise. claiming large
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areas to recognise. claiming large areas under the jurisdiction of the ukraine government. this is the beginning of the russian invasion of ukraine. it beginning of the russian invasion of ukraine. , ~ , ,, . ukraine. it is likely us influence was behind _ ukraine. it is likely us influence was behind a — ukraine. it is likely us influence was behind a significant - ukraine. it is likely us influencej was behind a significant german decision to punish russia by stopping a major pipeline meant to export gas from russia to europe in its tracks. with further sanctions from several countries hitting russian banks, oligarchs and blocking access to money markets with more to follow if things get worse. we are working with our allies to make sure that we inflict pain on the putin regime. ii make sure that we inflict pain on the putin regime.— make sure that we inflict pain on the putin regime. if we are serious we have got _ the putin regime. if we are serious we have got to _ the putin regime. if we are serious we have got to go _ the putin regime. if we are serious we have got to go hard. _ the putin regime. if we are serious we have got to go hard. a - the putin regime. if we are seriousl we have got to go hard. a threshold has been _ we have got to go hard. a threshold has been breached. sending in peacekeepers, we know what the soldiers — peacekeepers, we know what the soldiers will be doing when they go
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in to ukraine. and so on that basis, ithink_ in to ukraine. and so on that basis, i think the — in to ukraine. and so on that basis, i think the mood of the entire house of commons yesterday was that the government were not being strong enough _ government were not being strong enou:h. , �* , government were not being strong enou:h. , �*, , enough. president putin's response to all that? — enough. president putin's response to all that? translation: - to all that? translation: our country is always open for direct and honest dialogue for the search of diplomatic solutions to the most difficult solutions deliver problems. but they security and safety of our citizens is non—negotiable for us. leaving it from guessing what his next move will be. one neighbour claims to know. , , , ., ., know. this is the new usual so to seak. know. this is the new usual so to speak- we _ know. this is the new usual so to speak. we have _ know. this is the new usual so to speak. we have an _ know. this is the new usual so to speak. we have an aggressive i speak. we have an aggressive neighbour who is interested in recreating an empire, who believes in the _ recreating an empire, who believes in the right— recreating an empire, who believes in the right to subjugate others and has a _ in the right to subjugate others and has a disregard for national self—determination. this is a threat to all— self—determination. this is a threat to all of— self—determination. this is a threat to all of us — self-determination. this is a threat to all of us— to all of us. this eastern ukrainian town sits close _ to all of us. this eastern ukrainian town sits close to _ to all of us. this eastern ukrainian town sits close to the _ to all of us. this eastern ukrainian town sits close to the rebel i to all of us. this eastern ukrainian town sits close to the rebel held i town sits close to the rebel held areas. school drills are under way
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in case they find themselves in the firing line. the sound of bombing could soon get louder. it also seems the diplomatic window is closing as the diplomatic window is closing as the eu's chief diplomat says this is the eu's chief diplomat says this is the most dangerous moment in eu security for a generation. well, we can talk now to our political correspondent nick hurley. nick, we were hearing in our report their pressure on the government to go further with sanctions. what is the government saying about what may come? , ., come? the message from the government — come? the message from the government seems _ come? the message from the government seems to - come? the message from the government seems to be i come? the message from the government seems to be that| come? the message from the i government seems to be that more sanctions are pretty much inevitable. because they think it is pretty much inevitable that things in ukraine aren't going to get any better soon and could get considerably worse. my understanding is that the view in the foreign office is that more sanctions are almost certain, regardless of what
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happened, unless there is a significant de—escalation on the russian side, which looks extremely unlikely at the moment. and that significantly more sanctions are definite if russia decides to invade other parts of ukraine as well. so there is that fairly strong rhetoric coming, you heard it from liz truss in mark's piece there as well, that more sanctions were being worked on and will be brought in soon if necessary. but there is still this feari necessary. but there is still this fear i think within the uk parliament that some of the strong rhetoric we saw earlier this month from the prime minister talking about if a single boot crossed the border then a raft of sanctions would be introduced immediately. there is a fear from some politicians here that that rhetoric hasn't been matched yet by firm enough action. remember that the uk said yesterday that three high—profile, high net worth
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russians with links to president putin would face a travel bans and asset freezes. there are five banks that are going to face asset freezes as well. the argument from the foreign office is that those are banks which are really important to the russian military, for example. the uk is also going to introduce measures against members of the russian parliament who voted to recognise the independence of these regions in ukraine. but that isn't going to come in for a couple of weeks because there is still some measures that need to be taken in parliament to make that happen. so there have been some actions taken. as i say, the fear is that that doesn't match the rhetoric that we heard earlier from the doesn't match the rhetoric that we heard earlierfrom the uk government. and when we hear prime minister's questions in an hour or so i would expect to see a bit more pressure onjohnson to go further and faster. pressure on johnson to go further and faster-— pressure on johnson to go further and faster. ~ . , ., and faster. what is the government sa in: and faster. what is the government saying about _ and faster. what is the government saying about why — and faster. what is the government saying about why it _ and faster. what is the government saying about why it has _ and faster. what is the government saying about why it has taken i and faster. what is the government saying about why it has taken the i saying about why it has taken the steps that it has taken and didn't
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come as you say, match the rhetoric and the expectation that there was? well, the argument you would hear from ministers is that they almost need to keep some measures back to try and dissuade or deter russia from going further. so the word that has been used in various conversations i've had with uk officials is they want an escalation process. so if russia invades further into ukraine, stronger, stricter, more draconian measures will be brought in, notjust by the uk but the hope in the foreign office in london is that the uk's allies will take similar measures as well. so my understanding is that there are some measures that are already being drawn up that could be brought in fairly quickly, targeting more individuals, more banks, more russian industries as well. if there is a further escalation of this process. or if president putin decides not to move back from the
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regions that he has already moved into. so that is the argument, the belief in london and other western capitals is they need to keep some of these measures back in reserve so they can go further, so they can put further pressure on russia. the question that is being asked in london by opposition politicians and we have seen a tweet in the last couple of hours from ukraine's foreign minister as well, the question is whether actually the west should be going a lot further now in introducing stricter measures on president putin's allies and on some of the banks he uses to raise capital to make sure that moscow is under no illusions about the impact this will have. because the fear that some in london have is that the rhetoric been matched by action and come in the words of one, it is like taking a pea shooter to a gunfight. thank you, nick. we can get a feel now for the mood in both ukraine and
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russia. in a moment we will speak to our bureau in kyiv but first to moscow and speak to our bureau there. vladimir putin has been speaking this morning. tell us more about what he has been sent. vladimir putin again has been told that diplomacy is on the table and he is open to any negotiations but he is open to any negotiations but he claims that russia's security will be the most important thing for the kremlin and they will not give up the kremlin and they will not give up anything. it looks like he is going to keep his rhetoric like that, his course like this. hagar going to keep his rhetoric like that, his course like this. how are --eole that, his course like this. how are people reacting — that, his course like this. how are people reacting and _ that, his course like this. how are people reacting and what - that, his course like this. how are people reacting and what is i that, his course like this. how are people reacting and what is the i people reacting and what is the reaction in the media?- people reacting and what is the reaction in the media? well, there has been no _ reaction in the media? well, there has been no reaction _ reaction in the media? well, there has been no reaction of _ reaction in the media? well, there has been no reaction of their- reaction in the media? well, there | has been no reaction of their media because it is a public holiday in russia and today's speech for vladimir putin was quite a regular one. but still i can't say that it
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is a great patriotic reaction as it has been back in 2014 when russia annexed crimea. i suppose some people are still quite puzzled about the decision to give this independence to the soap or dobey so—called people's republics will mean to russia and what will happen in terms of sanctions. —— independence to these so—called people's republics. this one was even more strict and severe sanctions could be even more grave. it is being claimed that vladimir putin is ignoring the advice of some of his generals in what he is doing there. what's the sense of how much unity there is?— unity there is? vladimir putin's meetin: unity there is? vladimir putin's meeting with — unity there is? vladimir putin's meeting with his _ unity there is? vladimir putin's meeting with his security i unity there is? vladimir putin's i meeting with his security council the day before yesterday actually looked like they would distance from him and it has been seen even
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physically they were sitting metres apart from president putin due to coronavirus restrictions. but they all looked like they are not quite sure about what he has in his mind. but still ready to support him and have to support him publicly because it is the sense of how the kremlin operates, to show this loyalty to the president is extremely important. and from this perspective, it looks like putin is alone from his allies and probably even his closest allies do not understand him and do not understand what he has in his mind. thank understand him and do not understand what he has in his mind.— what he has in his mind. thank you very much- — what he has in his mind. thank you very much- the _ what he has in his mind. thank you very much. the latest _ what he has in his mind. thank you very much. the latest reaction i what he has in his mind. thank you | very much. the latest reaction from moscow. and in ukraine the message has gone out to ukrainian citizens
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in russia that they must leave and ukraine is introducing a state of emergency. we will have the latest from ukraine injust a moment but for now we say goodbye if you are watching on bbc two. 0k, well let's pick up then with what is happening in ukraine and we can go to kyiv. what is the latest? tell us about the state of emergency.- the state of emergency. yes, well, the state of emergency. yes, well, the national _ the state of emergency. yes, well, the national security _ the state of emergency. yes, well, the national security and _ the state of emergency. yes, well, the national security and defence i the national security and defence counsel has been working 24 hours, for the third day now and its secretaryjust for the third day now and its secretary just a for the third day now and its secretaryjust a briefing and he told journalists that ukraine is sad told journalists that ukraine is sad to impose a state of emergency. it has to be okayed, it has to be allowed by the parliament within the next 48 hours but it is expected the parliament is expected to rule on this shortly in a matter of minutes
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and may one hour. so the state of emergency will work throughout the whole of ukraine, apart from the donetsk and luhansk regions where the full separation, for the ukrainian army, which is operating in the east is on, has been on for almost eight years now.- in the east is on, has been on for almost eight years now. what will the state of _ almost eight years now. what will the state of emergency _ almost eight years now. what will the state of emergency mean i almost eight years now. what will the state of emergency mean and j almost eight years now. what will i the state of emergency mean and what preparations are under way in the event of ukrainian forces needing to go into military action?— go into military action? well, the preparation. _ go into military action? well, the preparation, the _ go into military action? well, the preparation, the first _ go into military action? well, the preparation, the first preparationj preparation, the first preparation under way is what president zelenskyy said in his address to the nation yesterday which is that the country will call up its military reservists for service.
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450,000 ukrainian reservists who have military experience who have actually fought in donbas during almost eight years will be called up. but the first group of those is just 36,000. that is what the secretary said today and they will be sub scripted pretty soon. —— conscripted. i know that many men were called up today and they went to military offices today. what else? well, the state of emergency is not martial law, which is well maybe imposed in ukraine as the national security and defence council secretary said today. in case of further invasion happens. the state of emergency will not be
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felt by its citizens. it will be some casual state which in fact will give ukrainian authorities the right to shield its population from possible danger.— to shield its population from possible danger. to shield its population from ossible dancer. . ~ , ., , . possible danger. thank you very much for “oininu possible danger. thank you very much forjoining us- — we can talk to an analyst of russia based in westminster. thank you very much forjoining us. we have heard from president putin this morning saying that he is open to diplomatic engagement but russia's interests and security are non—negotiable. what's your reading of what the strategy is? what he intends to do? well, he is doing what he has been doing for this time and what we have seenin doing for this time and what we have seen in the last several days he is
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trying to threaten and to push your to agree to his terms. that is how i personally see this. but to agree to his terms. that is howl personally see this.— personally see this. but to agree what? because _ personally see this. but to agree what? because obviously, i personally see this. but to agree what? because obviously, you i personally see this. but to agree i what? because obviously, you know, negotiation means both sides moving but it doesn't look like, when he talks about negotiation, his position is shifting. fir talks about negotiation, his position is shifting.- talks about negotiation, his position is shifting. or is it? well, he — position is shifting. or is it? well, he is _ position is shifting. or is it? well, he is trying _ position is shifting. or is it? well, he is trying to - position is shifting. or is it? | well, he is trying to threaten position is shifting. or is it? i well, he is trying to threaten not only europeans but ukrainians as well to make some concessions on the ground, to make sure that they do not attack the separatist forces which we all know russia supports. and he really hopes that ukrainians wouldn't go any further. and to be honest, i have to say that at the moment the ukrainians haven't even introduced the martial law at this point, which i would expect to happen by this time anyway. another interesting point that your previous speaker mentioned is the numbers. so
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i do not personally believe that vladimir putin is intending to invade the whole territory of ukraine. i think it will be, this will be against his interests. just because the maths doesn't add up. i mean, the number of soldiers that russia has on the border with ukraine at the moment is less than what the ukrainians have, notjust in their reserves but in their regular army. so that doesn't add up. the ukrainians have, if i'm not mistaken, about 200,000 troops and the numbers that vladimir putin has at the moment on the border is just not enough to invade the country of a size of ukraine. it is not enough to invade the country of a size of ukraine.— a size of ukraine. it is understood i think it a size of ukraine. it is understood i think it is _ a size of ukraine. it is understood i think it is up _ a size of ukraine. it is understood i think it is up to _ a size of ukraine. it is understood | think it is up to 200,000, - a size of ukraine. it is understood i i think it is up to 200,000, 190,000 russian i think it is up to 200,000,190,000 russian troops on the border but they're moving things like blood supplies and hospital treatment units. which obviously would imply
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some sort of action.— some sort of action. yeah, definitely. _ some sort of action. yeah, definitely. and _ some sort of action. yeah, definitely. and i _ some sort of action. yeah, definitely. and i mean, i some sort of action. yeah, definitely. and i mean, he| some sort of action. yeah, - definitely. and i mean, he basically tries to back up his words by actions to make sure, to ensure that everybody in the west and in ukraine understands that he is serious about what he is doing. d0 understands that he is serious about what he is doing.— what he is doing. do you think that the sanctions _ what he is doing. do you think that the sanctions will _ what he is doing. do you think that the sanctions will have _ what he is doing. do you think that the sanctions will have any - what he is doing. do you think that| the sanctions will have any impact? well, at the moment the way i see i do not think these are serious sanctions. first of all because the oligarchs that were mentioned yesterday in parliament for example, they have been sanctioned before. but because i think back in 2014 and again in 2020 again by americans and the european union. but because the conflict has been ongoing for so many years it is naive to think that these people wouldn't know how to avoid sanctions on how to move their assets around the world. and i think
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this has happened for quite some time, notjust with them but with other people who have some interest in the west and have kept their money in the west. they have been withdrawing money or moving into other assets. so let us not be naive and understand who we are dealing with as well. and understand who we are dealing with as well-— pupils could be blocked from taking out student loans if they fail maths and english gcses, under government plans aimed at tightening controls on higher education in england. the proposals are set for consultation this week, and would see the introduction of both student number controls and minimum entry requirements for some university applicants. the department for education said the measures are being considered to prevent pupils from being "pushed into higher education before they are ready" and to ensure "poor—quality, low—cost courses aren't incentivised to grow uncontrollably".
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we can talk now to rachel hewitt who represents universities founded after 1992. thank you forjoining us. so this would seem to be then rolling back of the university expansion that began under tony blair. what's your reaction to it? it's not exactly clear how much it would be rolling back the expansion because it is not exactly clear how many students the proposals around minimum entry requirements would hit. but it certainly seems to be a move in the direction away from university education at a time where obviously there is a real role for universities to play in the recovery from wing. the universities to play in the recovery from win. ., universities to play in the recovery from wing-— universities to play in the recovery from win. ., , , from wing. the government says it is about restricting _ from wing. the government says it is about restricting access _ from wing. the government says it is about restricting access to _ from wing. the government says it is about restricting access to courses i about restricting access to courses that it doesn't think represent a good route to postgraduate employment. do you think that is a fair attitude.
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employment. do you think that is a fairattitude. —— employment. do you think that is a fair attitude. —— covid. employment. do you think that is a fairattitude. —— covid. i employment. do you think that is a fair attitude. -- covid.— fair attitude. -- covid. ithink universities _ fair attitude. -- covid. ithink universities are _ fair attitude. -- covid. ithink universities are committed i fair attitude. -- covid. ithink universities are committed to ensuring that universe that is what students have a high quality experience but sometimes the debate around this risks being too narrow in terms of being limited to certain metrics focused on graduate—level jobs or the number of dropouts and that could be a reductive way of looking at the whole universe experience. so i think we need to be cautious when we are talking about the quality —— the whole university experience. the the quality -- the whole university experience-— experience. the other aspect that the government _ experience. the other aspect that the government talks _ experience. the other aspect that the government talks about i experience. the other aspect that the government talks about is i the government talks about is encouraging more young people to consider going for other options, so otherforms of higher consider going for other options, so other forms of higher education or apprenticeships, which have obviously expanded enormously. yes. obviously expanded enormously. yes, and i think obviously _ obviously expanded enormously. i2: and i think obviously it is great to have a wide range of options for people looking to go into further education or higher education. but i don't think those things necessarily
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have to be at the detriment of higher education. so for example lots of million plus members are involved in degree apprenticeships and as a really good option for students who are looking for a slightly different path. so there is already a diversity of what is offered in terms of higher education, particularly among types of universities that i represent. 50 of universities that i represent. so tell us more about the degree apprenticeships because one of the aspects, one of the big things if people go for an apprenticeships revenue versus that they don't get left with huge debts that build up over the course of a degree. is that something that is an aspect of university degree apprenticeships? yeah, i think that is one aspect and also thinking about the sort of work experience that they get alongside that. obviously there are also aspects of work experience and those sorts of things built into university courses. but there is an
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opportunity for students to sort of earn while they are learning and have that type of experience. and it is a good option for lots of students. is a good option for lots of students-— is a good option for lots of students. ~ , ., ., students. ok. well, it is going to be a consultation _ students. ok. well, it is going to be a consultation announced i students. ok. well, it is going to be a consultation announced on | be a consultation announced on thursday so no doubt there will be plenty more to discuss them. thank you forjoining us now. rachel hewitt. it's one of the biggest scandals in the history of the nhs. many babies died, while others were left with life—changing injuries following repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire. our social affairs correspondent, michael buchannan, has been following the investigation into what went wrong. he's been speaking to one mum who lost her child after being encouraged to have a natural birth — even though her baby wasn't in the correct position. these are all his clothes. son should be _ these are all his clothes. son should be 18 _ these are all his clothes. son should be 18 years _ these are all his clothes. son should be 18 years old. the i these are all his clothes. son i should be 18 years old. the price is still on them. _ should be 18 years old. the price is still on them, yeah. _ should be 18 years old. the price is still on them, yeah. they - should be 18 years old. the price is still on them, yeah. they are i should be 18 years old. the price is still on them, yeah. they are all i still on them, yeah. they are all hungin still on them, yeah. they are all hung in the wardrobe for him to come
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home. , ., , . , hung in the wardrobe for him to come home. ,. , . ,., home. instead, she clings to the memory of _ home. instead, she clings to the memory of what _ home. instead, she clings to the memory of what could _ home. instead, she clings to the memory of what could have i home. instead, she clings to the l memory of what could have been. during her pregnancy she was told that he was in a breech position lying in the wrong direction. i was told ou lying in the wrong direction. i was told you are _ lying in the wrong direction. i was told you are not _ lying in the wrong direction. i was told you are not having _ lying in the wrong direction. i was told you are not having a - lying in the wrong direction. i —" told you are not having a normal delivery, it will be a c—section. but when she went into labour, the royal shrewsbury hospital encouraged her to have a normal birth. 18 hours later, her son hadn't been born. she needed an emergency cesarean. i'm still coming out of my general anaesthetic, and she said, "he's dead." and that was it. they plonked the baby in my arms, and said, "say goodbye." i just didn't know how to say goodbye. and, erm... ijust gave him a kiss, and that was it. in march 2003, just a month before manpreet�*s death, mps held a hearing amid concerns over the rising number of caesareans.
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panorama has discovered that clinical leaders from the royal shrewsbury hospital told the mps how they managed to have the lowest c—section rate in the country. the evidence we have seen show them telling the health select committee... the promotion of natural birth was part of a wider national effort, though in shropshire the evidence suggests they pursued it too vigorously. following her son's death, kamaljit uppal was called to a meeting with a hospital consultant. she still remembers what he told her. i took the wrong option of delivering. and, basically, if we'd given him a c—section earlier, 3.45, he would have lived a normal life, there would have been nothing wrong with him. the midwife overseeing the official review, which is looking at nearly 1900
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cases, over almost two decades, say cesarean rates of the trust were consistently lower than the england average. there were cases when an earlier recourse to a cesarean section, rather than a persistence towards a normal delivery, may well have led to a better outcome for mother or baby, or both. bernie bentick retired in 2020 after spending nearly 30 years at the trust. the gynaecologist says he repeatedly raised problems with managers. i was increasingly concerned about the level of bullying i and adverse culture within the trust. i i believed that some of the ways they responded to problems i were to try to preserve _ the reputation of the organisation. in a statement, the trust say they apologised for the distress caused, but that they had made strong progress, including investing
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in staffing and training. next month, a full report into shropshire's maternity failings will be published. a public recognition of two decades of private grief. michael buchanan, bbc news, shropshire. let mejust let me just tell you that we're hearing from transport for london that from tomorrow there will no longer be a requirement for passengers to wearface longer be a requirement for passengers to wear face coverings its services, although it will strongly recommend them. tomorrow courses the day that the last of the legal restrictions on covid ends. that is the requirement to self—isolate after a positive test. transport for london had continued to keep face coverings mandatory, even when the requirement for them to be mandatory elsewhere was taken away. they are now saying no longer will they be mandatory but strongly recommended. 58 flood warnings remain in place.
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they've been issued for the river severn in ironbridge and bewdley. dozens of homes have been evacuated. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. over the next few days it is going to remain windy. you will notice it nonetheless. for england and wales today largely dry, a few showers but they will be the exception rather than the rule. the scotland and northern ireland we have a band of rain sinking south and behind that it is going to turn much colder with some wintry showers. winds easing through the day. overnight the weather system moves south east and we will have snow showers to sea level across scotland and northern ireland. the risk of ice on untreated services tonight and some of us will see a frost and it will still be windy. into tomorrow, again widely windy. eventually we lose the rain from the
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south—east. there will be further snow and low levels across scotland and northern ireland before that retreats back to sleet and rain. a lot of dry weather but feeling cold in that win. hello, you're watching bbc news. our headlines. ukraine is to impose a state of emergency and urges its citizens to leave russia amid an intensification of russian aggression against the country. president putin says the security of russia and its citizens is non—negotiable. in a speech marking a public holiday to mark... the foreign secretary defends the speed and scale of british sanctions. after some mps said they didn't go far enough. the government considers plans to propose minimum entry grades for universities in england and a limit on student numbers. one of the biggest scandals in the
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history of the nhs, bbc panorama reports on the repeated failures in maternity care at hospitals in shropshire. and the duchess of cambridge is in denmark to see how the country has become a world leader in early childhood developing.
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good morning. amid the ukraine—russia crisis — it looks almost certain that european football's governing body uefa will no longer hold this season's champions league final in st petersberg after several countries, including the uk introduced sanctions against russia. the 68,000 seater gazprom stadium had been selected as this season's venue. uefa said it's "closely monitoring the situation" and "any decision will be made in due course if necessary". the champions league final is still expected to be played on the 28th of may. london mayor sadiq khan says the english capital is ready to step in with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley�*s also under consideration but is due to host the league two and championship play—off finals on that same weekend. manchester united are one of four english clubs hoping to reach that final, they're away at atletico madrid in the first leg of their last 16 tie tonight. this was united manager ralf rangnick�*s response when he was asked if the final should be moved away from russia: this is something for uefa and maybe even for some politicians birmingham city captain troy deeney says the teaching of black, asian and minority ethnic histories
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should be made mandatory in schools. deeney commissioned a yougov survey of teachers, and found the majority believe the school system has a racial bias and only 12 % feel empowered to teach diverse topics: the best part about my school in terms of my history and what i got talked about was i got to watch boots at school, which is about slavery. that was it. we've done research. we've commissioned survey is —— roots at school. teachers are not feeling empowered. i think that is very dangerous because the people we are putting in charge or empowering to teach our kids don't feel confident enough within their role to talk about subjects happening within the world. emma raducanu was forced to retire in a real marathon match in mexico overnight — her first competitive outing since defeat at the australian open. the reigning us open champion was top seed at the guadalajara open, but she was clearly struggling she had some strapping on her leg. three hours and 36 minutes she was out on court against australia's daria saville — that's the longest match of the wta season so far.
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it was a set all, with raducanu down a break 3—4 in the third when she retired. so a marathon for raducanu, meanwhile a day after alexander zverev�*s epic 5am finish in acapulco — the world number 3 has been thrown out of the mexican open after attacking the umpire's chair at the end of a doubles match. last night which went to a deciding tie—break — in which zverev argued with the umpire overall a line call. he and marcelo melo lost 6—2 4—6 10—6 to lloyd glasspool and harri heliovaara. zverev let his frsutrations out on the umpire's chair. he has now been withdrawn for unsportsmanlike conduct. finally golf and phil mickelson has apologised for comments he made over the saudi arabia backed super league. after being described as naive,
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selfish, egotistical and ignorant" by rory mcilroy he has admitted dealing with the kingdom to gain leverage over the pga tour but claims the comments were taken "out of context." our golf correspondent ian carter has more.... mickelson's comments were made to american golf writer alan schick knock and the publication last week was explosive. nicholson called the saudis scary but despite their human rights record he still wanted to do business with them to shake up the pga tour. murray mcavoy says the comments were selfish and ignorant now nicholson admits they were reckless. in a lengthy statement he apologises to anyone he offended claiming he spoke of the record and it was taken out of context. he admits golf needs change but admits that he has not been the best as a person needs time away to work on being the man that he wants to be. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. there are calls for sanctions
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on russia to be made tougher, after vladimir putin ordered troops into those two rebel—held regions of eastern ukraine. the west has responded with a range of sanctions on russia. the uk has imposed sanctions on five russian banks and three wealthy russian businessmen. president biden announced sanctions on two major banks and has cut off part of the russian economy from international financial systems. germany has shelved the nord stream two pipeline, which would have doubled the flow of russian gas to the region. and the eu is cutting off russia's access to their banks and financial markets — as well as banning trade from the two rebel—held regions. labour and some conservative mps have called for stronger sanctions against russia than the ones in out so far. pity patel, the home secretary, said uk sanctions would have a ratchet effect should there be any further incursions by russia. our sanctions package has been a
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package developed with the western allies and we have been very clear about that from the outset and the work that has taken place internationally with all our allies over recent weeks. when you look up our package alongside that of america, germany and other countries it is a significant package but actually gives a big financial blow to vladimir putin and demonstrates a great deal of disruption to him so it is a strong package but i'll should also emphasise that across western allies we have been very, very clear that it will not stop there. we intend to increase a ratchet effect on sanctions with further sanctions stood peat and invade and absolutely go further than he has done already and that he doesn't stop the activity that we are calling upon him to stop. that was the home _ are calling upon him to stop. that was the home secretary. some are saying sanctions don't go far enough in action doesn't match the rhetoric. we can talk to a
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conservative mp who is a member of the foreign affairs select committee and exley went to ukraine last month. welcome. thank you very much forjoining us. what is your view on whether these sanctions currently hit the right note or not? —— actually went to ukraine. indie hit the right note or not? -- actually went to ukraine. we need to send a strong — actually went to ukraine. we need to send a strong message _ actually went to ukraine. we need to send a strong message that - actually went to ukraine. we need to send a strong message that the i send a strong message that the vanguard measures were announced in the first tranche need to be strong because for eight years there haven't been significant consequences as putin has continued again and again to push forward so well we welcomed the we have sanctioned their military bank and one of the top ten banks i want the measures to go further and that is why raise this to the house of commons. why raise this to the house of commons— why raise this to the house of commons. ~ ., .,, , ., _, why raise this to the house of commons. ~ ., ., , , ., , ., ~ commons. what measures do you think should have been _ commons. what measures do you think should have been taken _ commons. what measures do you think should have been taken and _ commons. what measures do you think should have been taken and you - commons. what measures do you think should have been taken and you want . should have been taken and you want to see now? i should have been taken and you want to see now?— to see now? i want us to lay out very clearly — to see now? i want us to lay out very clearly that _ to see now? i want us to lay out very clearly that there _ to see now? i want us to lay out very clearly that there will - to see now? i want us to lay out very clearly that there will be i very clearly that there will be serious repercussions and ifelt very clearly that there will be serious repercussions and i felt the need to blacklist all russian state banks. all russian banks, in fact. i will to ban the city from serving
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any russian state companies and that includes the accountants and the lawyers. i wanted far broader sanctions and it does sound like thatis sanctions and it does sound like that is coming forward and i do welcome the clearly overnight we have seen from the government plans to ratchet this up but i also want to ratchet this up but i also want to look at meaningful things to limit the ability of putin to go further forward so i would like working with turkey to prevent the russian navy from being able to pass through the bosporus and that would limit their ability to go further. why do you think the government hasn't done those things? the rest of it certainly was very strong, borisjohnson of it certainly was very strong, boris johnson saying of it certainly was very strong, borisjohnson saying if russia put one foot inside ukraine they will be met with economic sanctions that they, you know, they couldn't imagine. they, you know, they couldn't imauine. ~ . , , imagine. what is interesting in the last few months _ imagine. what is interesting in the last few months as _ imagine. what is interesting in the last few months as it _ imagine. what is interesting in the last few months as it has - imagine. what is interesting in the last few months as it has been - last few months as it has been written in my view that has been leading the response internationally and when i went to ukraine in january that was the view of every parliamentarian i met but also the average ukrainian on the street that
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the uk have been a leading voice by making sure that they have the support of the international community and in that context what the government has announced today as they are acting in consult with their other allies around the world but i think we could have gone stronger and have the time to pull together a more comprehensive sanctions regime but it may well be that there is a plan they are going to announce more sanctions every two dates this week, i don't know, but thatis dates this week, i don't know, but that is now a moral question that there are russian troops. peacekeepers, absolutely not, they are paramilitaries. on the ground in what should be ukraine so i hope to see that in the next 2a hours. to see that in the next 24 hours. to think anything could have stopped vladimir putin going down the path that he has gone down? to think there has been a failure of diplomacy? i there has been a failure of diplomacy?— there has been a failure of diloma ? , , ., diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't — diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't going _ diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't going to _ diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't going to push - diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't going to push this - diplomacy? i genuinely believe that putin wasn't going to push this far. putin wasn't going to push this far because if you look at the last few months he has actually achieved a great deal. he has achieved division and identify fault lines within the western alliances, has been able to. well to give him parity with the us,
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been able to demand that people came to russia and he was able to show in the world stage that he was equal to america which i know from my previous experience working with the russians as a series of peace conferences is a key thing for them but also he has secured this task agreement and the land he already illegally occupied was his book is the focus is on don't go any further but what is really interesting is that he has clearly decided to get this and i'm very concerned i think while c has always had to operate on the basis that he could go further there is no question that not only has he but he might go even further than he has now.— than he has now. thank you very much. it's emerged that borisjohnson may have become the first uk prime minister — technically — to have been interviewed by police under caution. it's in connection with the controversy over downing street parties in lockdown. our chief political correspondent adam fleming explains
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so we knew that prime minister had received a questionnaire for the metropolitan police asking him questions about these accusations, as many people will have received if they've been accused of breaking the covid rules. we knew that his lawyers had filled it in and returned it within the deadline by the end of last week. what's happened now, though, is that itv has got hold of what one of these forms actually looks like, and it makes it very clear that this is the equivalent of being interviewed by the police under caution. so we think that means borisjohnson is the first prime minister to be interviewed, effectively, under caution as part of a police investigation. so a, kind of, quite significant moment in the party story, but a, sort of, fairly symbolic significant moment. the duchess of cambridge is on a two—day visit to denmark, taking the work of her childhood foundation abroad for the first time. kate has travelled to copenhagen to learn how the country has become a world leader in its approach to early childhood development. earlier today she received an official welcome from denmark's queen margrethe, before she visits a forest kindergarten and a domestic abuse shelter. our reporter adrienne murray is in copenhagen. this is obviously something the
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duchess cares a lot about? yes. this is obviously something the duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue — duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue that _ duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue that is _ duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue that is close _ duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue that is close to - duchess cares a lot about? yes, it is an issue that is close to the - is an issue that is close to the duchess's cart and i'm sure you saw a lot of images from yesterday where she made quite an entrance going down the slide and this morning she was visiting a forest kindergarten where she took part in activities with lots of young children and even had a good go at wood splitting. this visit really is a working trip. there have obviously been those enjoyable moments. she is here with the royal foundation centre for early childhood and it is really in admission to see what can be learned from some of the initiatives here in copenhagen so she has been meeting with health visitors, experts and also parents and children to find out more. ., ., also parents and children to find out more. ., ._ , also parents and children to find out more. ., , ., also parents and children to find out more. ., , ., , out more. today she also meets some ofthe out more. today she also meets some of the royals- — out more. today she also meets some of the royals. that's _ out more. today she also meets some of the royals. that's right. _ out more. today she also meets some of the royals. that's right. i _ out more. today she also meets some of the royals. that's right. i mean, - of the royals. that's right. i mean, i met some _ of the royals. that's right. i mean, i met some people _ of the royals. that's right. i mean, i met some people in _ of the royals. that's right. i mean, i met some people in denmark - of the royals. that's right. i mean, | i met some people in denmark and of the royals. that's right. i mean, - i met some people in denmark and the duchess was just received by the queen of denmark. the two royal
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families have close ties and, in fact, both of them have a very significant year this year with some major milestones and it was the platinum jubilee for queen elizabeth and also the golden jubilee for queen migrator but of course a big focus has been on that meeting between the duchess and the crown princess. both of them are seen as modern vials who were really going to lead the new generation. —— queen margrethe. this week they are going to visit a crisis centre where they help children and women who have had to deal with mystic violence. thank ou ve to deal with mystic violence. thank you very much- _ to deal with mystic violence. thank you very much- -- _ to deal with mystic violence. thank you very much. -- domestic - to deal with mystic violence. thank i you very much. -- domestic violence. a bbc investigation has found children could be exposed to grooming and sexually explicit material, in some parts of the so—called �*metaverse'. that's the name given to a range
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of games and experiences which can be accessed using virtual reality headsets. it's a world which facebook founder, mark zuckerberg, has called �*the future'. angus crawford reports. meetjess. she's 25, a bbcjournalist. but in virtual reality, she's pretending to be a child. going in. into vrchat — one of the most popular apps. the age limit�*s 13. some rooms look innocent enough. but there's pole dancing and strip clubs, too. oh, hello, miss, we can hang out, watch a movie or something. isn't it school time right now? there are two people to the side of me now, who are trying to get on top of each other. ok, so there's like a group of people that are, like, simulating sex. i want to say there's like five of them and they're definitely children, i'm pretty sure, because of how they sound. and thenjess is assaulted.
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oh, my god! what was that like? horrible. it was strange. it felt like it was happening to me. stop it. leave me alone. it's like the wild west, and i wouldn't feel safe as a sibling of younger children, having my siblings play on this. and, if i was a parent, i wouldn't let my children in that kind of area. it's too adult. we showed whatjess had found to andy burrows at the nspcc, and he's horrified. it'sjust the most shocking breach of any responsibility. i am angry because facebook promised us disney levels of safety. this isn't a theme park. this is a set of virtual worlds, where children are at risk of grooming, of sexual abuse, of really harmful experiences. it speaks to a corporate neglect. these are sites that are dangerous by design. today, we're going to talk about the metaverse...
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mark zuckerberg thinks the metaverse is the future of the internet, even rebranding facebook as meta, spending billions of dollars on the quest headset, which dominates the market. you need a facebook account tojoin in. there are games and apps made by meta and by other companies, too. all right, here we go. the so—called metaverse doesn't actually exist yet. that's just the name given to a series of games and virtual reality experiences you get to using a headset like this one. choose what you want to look like, your avatar, and you can start exploring. the question is, how safe is this world for children? katherine allen studies vr. i met her in her virtual office while sitting beside her in the real world. not everything's perfect in this space, is it? no, it's a bit of a wild west, to be honest. simulated sex is something that you see quite commonly. if we don't get on top of it,
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if it's not regulated and legislated, if the public aren't aware of what's really happening, children going to these spaces unsupervised, then we could see, really, a hotbed for potential grooming, predators and also experiences that children are having that may well be too early for them in their development. predators are just having a free—for—all with these kids. this man has been investigating vr chat rooms for months. he's worried for his safety and wants to remain anonymous. he's made a youtube film and even met and interviewed a 14—year—old, who says he was groomed and raped in virtual reality. did they try to do things to you? yes. you'll see 40—year—old men hanging out with 12—year—old boys and girls. it's like a nightclub. but if you are running a nightclub and you can't afford a bouncer, so you just leave the doors open, well, you're going to get shut down because, yeah, i get it, it may be expensive to hire
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a bouncer, but you got to do it. you have to do it because the alternative is to let kids just wander in and get destroyed. vr chat says it is "working hard to make itself a safe and welcoming place for everyone. "predatory and toxic behaviour has no place on the platform." meta stresses it's not responsible for other companies' apps and says... "we provide tools that allow players to report and block users. we will continue to make improvements as we learn more about how people interact in these spaces." for children, the metaverse can be an exciting adventure, but it also poses a real risk of harm. angus crawford, bbc news. un report has warned the likelihood
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of extreme wildfires will rise dramatically in the next decades and even the most ambitious attempts to curb greenhouse gas emissions will not prevent a dramatic surge in the frequency of extreme fire conditions such as australia's black summer which killed 33 people and countless more animals. it comes as delegates from hundred 93 countries are expected to arrive for the programme's summit in nairobi next week. gary brooker, the front line of the psychedelic rock band has died at the age of 76. his debut hit, a whiter shade of pale hit the charts and sold more than 10 million copies. he had been receiving treatment for cancer and the statement confirmed he died peacefully at home on saturday. we are going to bejoining our
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colleagues in politics live injust a few moments as we lead up to the top of the hour and prime minister's question solet�*sjoin the hour and prime minister's question solet�*s join one of our correspondence now for coverage. let's welcome viewers from the news channel. we are almost ten minutes away from prime minister's questions. the bbc�*s political editor laura kuenssberg and talked was now. hello to laura. let'sjust go back to ukraine. we discussed at the beginning of the programme. of course it is going to be central to prime minister's questions as well. there was a point made by chris hope here that perhaps borisjohnson's tough rhetoric when it comes to russia hasn't been matched by the sanctions despite the government saying it is the first tranche, the first barrage. is there an expectation management issue here? i think certainly the mood in the house of commons chamber yesterday after boris johnson's
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house of commons chamber yesterday after borisjohnson's statement house of commons chamber yesterday after boris johnson's statement for conservative mps as well as labour, lib dems and other parliamentarians was very much pointing that question for him, saying for a couple of weeks the uk government has been talking in very strong terms and very stiff rhetoric and remember the prime minister warned if there was anything the first to cap across the border into ukraine if they would be a terrible suggestion of hell and damnation pouring on the kremlin. maps that yesterday with what we actually solve in concrete terms and sanctions, sanctions on three wealthy individuals with links to the kremlin and sanctions against five banks and the very much was the mood in the commons that perhaps that rhetoric was mismatched with what actually ended up happening and what actually ended up happening and what we have seen since then was the government really emphasising that this is the first step, not the road. certainly there will be more stringent behaviour to come to try to squeeze russia but that certainly has left the government when i think, yeah, i best of the
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expectation management problem and i think the prime minister's questions we may well hear from borisjohnson promises of more military support from ukraine and potentially i think she will concern that there will be more sanctions to come but it raises the question as to whether or not sanctions are meant to be preventative or whether they are meant to be punitive and that is something i think the uk government is not the only one that is having to confront. is not the only one that is having to confront-— to confront. absolutely, and we soke to to confront. absolutely, and we spoke to catcher _ to confront. absolutely, and we spoke to catcher adler - to confront. absolutely, and we spoke to catcher adler in - to confront. absolutely, and we spoke to catcher adler in paris | spoke to catcher adler in paris about the eu's response and they are broadly in line with this approach. the questions raised yesterday in the debate by some would be what was the debate by some would be what was the trigger —— what would the trigger be forfurther the trigger —— what would the trigger be for further sanctions on keir starmer yesterday went quite a bit further in suggesting some of the actions the government could take right now but whether that is an balance between high —— harming uk interests as well as russian.
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ignite the reality as it is fiendishly difficult to take these decisions and there can be all sorts of unintended consequences and that is why it is not straightforward but from a political view i think we see labour pushing further tougher sanctions happening more rapidly but in a broad sense i don't think we're going to see a slanging match happening at prime minister's questions today where yes there are doubts including people in the town the tarmac —— tory backbenchers who think it is too timid but overall this consensus and politician seems to agree in thinking the government is taking a bite approach in bringing the sanctions and in terms of taking a tougher tower, approach and it is a of most of the measures the current is taking so the differences are really a pace and scale rather then whether the governments overall approach is the right one but i think what is a big
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difficult for the uk government and of course for nato is whether or not vladimir putin is someone who would respond in anything like a predictable or normal way to any of these activities. you know, one senior diplomat was saying to me yesterday you have to think of vladimir putin is trying to deal with the government of something like north korea, of the soviet union in years gone by —— not the government of the soviet union. in other words, this is not somebody in charge of a stable regime his next words can be predicted, he is an extremely volatile and that is borne out by what the defence secretary then wallace was caught saying when he was chatting to some members of the armed forces this morning. he said vladimir putin has gone full tonto. i am said vladimir putin has gone full tonto. iam not said vladimir putin has gone full tonto. i am not quite sure he wanted that informal remarks in the public domain but it is a moment of candour aboutjust how had this situation is to predict and fundamentally in the
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end how much vladimir putin cares about any of the kinds of actions that any western government is taking. downing street will say that the measures they took yesterday will affect some of his close comrade and will start to hurt the russian economy but there are questions about just russian economy but there are questions aboutjust how prepared the government was to go despite several weeks of rhetoric. i think we can dip inside the commons chamber because mps will be gathering that we will go inside the pmt is injust a be gathering that we will go inside the pmt is in just a few minutes' time and you can see it is filling up time and you can see it is filling up but right now there will be a sense of collaboration and consensus between the opposition and prime minister baldwin comes the approach to moshe —— go inside for pmqs. the prime minister has described vladimir putin as a and irrational if not the term ben wallace was caught saying. what do you want to hear the prime minister say today? i
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think we want to hear that the uk's continue determination to support ukraine, to ensure that our programme supporting the training of their troops, defensive weapons and, of course our own troops stationed in fellow nato members to help a possible humanitarian catastrophe. we are all united on nice and ijust went _ we are all united on nice and ijust went to— we are all united on nice and ijust want to echo her point and we'll went _ want to echo her point and we'll went to— want to echo her point and we'll want to help you as much as we can and i_ want to help you as much as we can and i think— want to help you as much as we can and i think today's emts will be quite _ and i think today's emts will be quite some massive as well —— todey's— quite some massive as well —— today's pmqs will be quite sombre instead _ today's pmqs will be quite sombre instead of— today's pmqs will be quite sombre instead of competitive today. we are still waitinu instead of competitive today. we are still waiting in _ instead of competitive today. we are still waiting in to _ instead of competitive today. we are still waiting in to the _ instead of competitive today. we are still waiting in to the police - still waiting in to the police investigation into events at downing street and whitehall. what is the latest on that. the
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street and whitehall. what is the latest on that.— latest on that. the latest is we don't know _ latest on that. the latest is we don't know when _ latest on that. the latest is we don't know when it _ latest on that. the latest is we don't know when it will - latest on that. the latest is we don't know when it will come, | don't know when it will come, downing street doesn't know when it will come but we can say we expect 80 eight people to be contacted by the met and asked to fill in those questionnaires and fill the minimal caution and i know some people who were believed to be on the haven't all received the questionnaires on the one hand the prime minister speaking at the weekend seem to give the impression it could all happen quite quickly but this is not a watergate style investigation of enormous criminal inquiry, it isn't then whether the lot of evidence has already been gathered and handed over to the met but yet i think at this point nobody would be also with any confidence put a date in the diary for when we will see the answers of these findings. another point, whether this is put by keir starmer of another backbench mp at
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the connections between the conservatives and some wealthy people with russian links but all gel might more broadly also the question of russian money swilling around the city government which is something that successive governments have been attacked by critics is never really getting to grips with. critics is never really getting to grips with-— critics is never really getting to ris with. ., ., ,, , grips with. lower, thank you very much. grips with. lower, thank you very much- we — grips with. lower, thank you very much. we will— grips with. lower, thank you very much. we will see _ grips with. lower, thank you very much. we will see after - grips with. lower, thank you very much. we will see after prime i much. we will see after prime minister's questions. chris, on the police report, there has been a leak of the farm, the questionnaire which was actually sent out to the 88 people including the prime minister. it looks as if it is the equivalent of being interviewed under caution. as serious as that?— as serious as that? historically that was the — as serious as that? historically that was the line _ as serious as that? historically that was the line in _ as serious as that? historically that was the line in the - as serious as that? historically that was the line in the sand i as serious as that? historically i that was the line in the sand and tony blair said he would quit if he was questioned under caution, and he wasn't. if they came back now, the met police, it would be very hard for colleagues like to villiers to unseat boris johnson for colleagues like to villiers to unseat borisjohnson because of course there is a huge conflagration happening in ukraine and although it draws out and if it settles down a bit he will be hoping to settle down
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quickly. in bit he will be hoping to settle down ruickl . , ., . ., quickly. in terms of receiving a fixed penalty _ quickly. in terms of receiving a fixed penalty notice... - quickly. in terms of receiving a fixed penalty notice... this - quickly. in terms of receiving a - fixed penalty notice... this episode has been damaging _ fixed penalty notice... this episode has been damaging and _ fixed penalty notice... this episode has been damaging and he - fixed penalty notice... this episode has been damaging and he is - fixed penalty notice. .. this episode has been damaging and he is of- fixed penalty notice... this episodej has been damaging and he is of the implementing sue gray's recommendations and i'm not going to get into it. it is recommendations and i'm not going to net into it. , ., , get into it. it is not hypothetical in principle. _ get into it. it is not hypothetical in principle, though, _ get into it. it is not hypothetical in principle, though, is- get into it. it is not hypothetical in principle, though, is that? i get into it. it is not hypothetical i in principle, though, is that? there is a principle if you are found to have broken your own government's laws, should you go? i have broken your own government's laws, should you go?— laws, should you go? i don't think the issue of— laws, should you go? i don't think the issue of a _ laws, should you go? i don't think the issue of a fixed _ laws, should you go? i don't think the issue of a fixed penalty - laws, should you go? i don't think the issue of a fixed penalty notice| the issue of a fixed penalty notice should be granted opposing a prime minister but i think the important thing is that the prime minister continues to implement the flavour but only move on from this and it is important that the met investigation continues as quickly as possible so we can move on. 50 continues as quickly as possible so we can move on.— continues as quickly as possible so we can move on. so there is anything that will come — we can move on. so there is anything that will come out _ we can move on. so there is anything that will come out of _ we can move on. so there is anything that will come out of the _ that will come out of the metropolitan police report that will make you think borisjohnson should continue his position? make you think boris johnson should continue his position?— continue his position? because we will await the _ continue his position? because we will await the conclusion _ continue his position? because we will await the conclusion of - continue his position? because we will await the conclusion of that i will await the conclusion of that inquiry but i would emphasise that
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the prime minister has apologised for the mistakes he has made. it is bu inr for the mistakes he has made. it is bu in: the for the mistakes he has made. it is buying the primers are's questions. —— time for prime minister's questions. legalaid in the —— time for prime minister's questions. legal aid in the form of defensive weapons and we wa nt we want to offer condolences to sir richard shepherd's family who died earlier this week. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties with my colleagues. br; addition to my duties with my colleagues-— addition to my duties with my collearues. j :: , .., , colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my constituency _ colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my constituency will _ colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my constituency will be _ colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my constituency will be 4296 - colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my constituency will be 42% larger i colleagues. by 2027 didcot in my i constituency will be 4296 larger than constituency will be 42% larger than it was a decade earlier. another
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place will be 49% earlier. there are thousands more houses going one end and confined in all the villages i represent and not a single new gp surgery. does my right honourable friend agree that where we build new houses we have to build new infrastructure, so that people can still access the services they need to. , ., . ., , , still access the services they need to. ,., , ,~~/ to. yes, of course my honourable friend is right, _ to. yes, of course my honourable friend is right, mr— to. yes, of course my honourable friend is right, mr speaker, i to. yes, of course my honourable friend is right, mr speaker, and l friend is right, mr speaker, and thatis friend is right, mr speaker, and that is why we are making record investment in the nhs and in schools and roads as we can, mr speaker, thanks to the strong growth in our economy and i will make sure that he gets a meeting with the relevant minister to address his immediate concerns. we now come to the leader of the opposition keir starmer. can i 'oin with of the opposition keir starmer. can ijoin with the comments of the prime minister in relation to richard shepherd. we all want to deter aggression in europe. we are not dealing with breakaway republic
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to limit republics. putin is not a peacekeeper, a sovereign nation has been invaded. the prime minster promised in the event of an invasion he would unleash a full package of sanctions. if not now, then when? mr speaker, as i said, the uk has been out in front in offering military support to ukraine and i'm grateful to what he said yesterday about the need to make sure that we keep ammunition in reserve for what could be a protracted struggle of this issue. but let the house be in no doubt about the extent of the package that has already been set out yesterday. and what we are already doing. because i don't think people quite realise that the uk is out in front. we have sanctioned 275 individuals already. yesterday we announced measures that placed banks
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were £37 billion were placed under sanctions in addition to more oligarchs. and there is more to come. and we will be stopping russia. we will be stopping russia from raising sovereign debt, stopping russian companies from raising money and stopping russian companies, as i said yesterday, even clearing in sterling and dollars on international markets, mr speaker. that will hit putin where it hurts but it is aptly vital after this first barrage we work in lockstep with friends and allies around the world. and we squeeze him simultaneously. we squeeze him simultaneously. we squeeze him simultaneously in london, paris, new york at the same time. unity, mr speaker, is aptly vital. i york at the same time. unity, mr speaker, is aptly vital.— york at the same time. unity, mr speaker, is aptly vital. i hear what the prime minister _ speaker, is aptly vital. i hear what the prime minister says _ speaker, is aptly vital. i hear what the prime minister says about i the prime minister says about sequencing and about further sanctions. but there has already been an invasion and there is
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clearly a concern across the house that his strategy, accept unintentionally, could send the wrong message. so if the prime minister... if the prime minister now brings forward his full package of sanctions, including excluding russia from financial mechanisms like swift, he will have the full support of the house. will he do so? i'm grateful. mr speaker, i think yesterday, and i am grateful by the way for the general support that the opposition have given, notjust to our economic sanctions but also to the package of military support which will, as i have said intensify. what we want to see, mr speaker, is de—escalation by vladimir putin. there is still hope that he will see sense but we are ready very rapidly to escalate our
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sanctions as i have set out. and under the measures that this house has already approved we can now target, mr speaker, any russian entity, any russian individual. we can already target notjust entity, any russian individual. we can already target not just the breakaway republics, the so—called. republics, the so—called breakaway republics in donetsk and luhansk, we can target members of the duma who voted to recognise, this is the most far—reaching legislation of its kind and i am gratefulfor his support. it does and if it is used, we will support it. we must also do more to defeat putin's campaign of lies and disinformation. russia today is his personal propaganda tool. i can see no reason why it should be allowed to continue to broadcast in this country. so will the prime minister now ask ofcom to review its licence?
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i believe that the culture secretary has already asked ofcom to review that matter, but what i will say, mr speaker, is that we live in a democracy and we live in a country that believes in free speech. i think it is important that we should leave it up to ofcom, rather than the politicians, to decide which media organisations to ban. that is what russia — media organisations to ban. that is what russia does. _ media organisations to ban. that is what russia does. the _ media organisations to ban. that is what russia does. the request i media organisations to ban. that is what russia does. the request wasj what russia does. the request was for a review and i am very glad to hear that review is now happening. mr speaker, iam not hear that review is now happening. mr speaker, i am not going to be deflected from the unity that this house needs just at the moment. deflected from the unity that this house needsjust at the moment. at the weekend... at the weekend, the prime minister said that if russia invades ukraine, he will open up the doors of russian owned companies and
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entities to find the ultimate beneficiaries within. well, russia has invaded, and it is time to act. if the prime minister brings forward the required legislation to do this, he will have labour support, so will he will have labour support, so will he commit to do so in the coming days? mr he commit to do so in the coming da 5? ~ he commit to do so in the coming da s? ~ he commit to do so in the coming das? ~ ., days? mr speaker, as i said, we are brinrrin days? mr speaker, as i said, we are bringing forward. — days? mr speaker, as i said, we are bringing forward, in _ days? mr speaker, as i said, we are bringing forward, in the _ days? mr speaker, as i said, we are bringing forward, in the next - days? mr speaker, as i said, we are bringing forward, in the next wave l bringing forward, in the next wave of sanctions, measures that will stop all russian banks, oligarchs, russian individuals raising money on london markets and we are also accelerating, mr speaker, the economic crime bill, which will enable us in the uk to peel back the facade of beneficial ownership of property in the uk and of companies. it has gone on for far too long and we are going to tackle it, under
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this government, mr speaker, but on all these measures, i think it is very important that the house remembers they are more effective when all financial centres move forward together and that is what the uk has been organising. mr the uk has been organising. ii speaker, the uk has been organising. i speaker, i the uk has been organising. ii speaker, i think the uk has been organising. i speaker, i think i heard the prime ministers say that it will be in the next session. i hope i miss her dad. i can assure him, if he brings it forward in this session, it will have our support. there is no reason to delay it. regarding the elections bill, it would allow donations from overseas to be made to uk political parties from shell companies and individuals with no connections to the uk. labour has proposed amendments to protect our democracy from the flood of foreign money drowning out the politics. we can all now say how serious this is, so
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will the prime minister now change course and support these measures in the house of lords. mr course and support these measures in the house of lords.— the house of lords. mr speaker, we have very tough _ the house of lords. mr speaker, we have very tough rules _ the house of lords. mr speaker, we have very tough rules in _ the house of lords. mr speaker, we have very tough rules in this - have very tough rules in this country to stop foreign donations, we do not accept, we don't accept foreign donations, you have to be on the register of the uk electoral register to give the uk political parties and before he starts chucking it around, i will remind him, that the largest single corporate donation to the labour party came from a member of the chinese communist party. ila. party came from a member of the chinese communist party. no, mr seaker. chinese communist party. no, mr speaker- at _ chinese communist party. no, mr speaker. at this _ chinese communist party. no, mr speaker. at this moment, - chinese communist party. no, mr speaker. at this moment, as i chinese communist party. no, mr speaker. at this moment, as the l speaker. at this moment, as the house agreed yesterday, we have to stand united. and not be deflected from it. the prime minister did not agree to change the elections bill.
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i think that is a mistake and i ask him to take it away and look at it again, those amendments in the lords. putin has invaded a sovereign european nation, he has attacked because he fears openness and democracy and because he knows that given a choice, people will not choose to live under erratic, violent role. he's six division, we must stay united. he hopes for inaction, so we must take a stand. he believes that we are too corrupted to do the right thing, so we must prove him wrong. and i believe that we can. so, will the prime minister worked across the house to ensure that this is the end of the era of oligarchic impunity, by saying that this house and this country will no longer be homes for their loot? mr country will no longer be homes for their loot? ~ ,,, ., ,, ., country will no longer be homes for their loot? ~ .«i ., ., their loot? mr speaker, i do not think any government _
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their loot? mr speaker, i do not think any government could i think any government could conceivably be doing more to root out corrupt russian money and that is what we are going to do and i think we can be proud of what we have already done and of the measures we have set out. i am genuinely grateful for the tone of his last question and for the support he is giving and he is right that it support he is giving and he is right thatitis support he is giving and he is right that it is absolutely vital that we, in the uk, should stand united and people around the world can see that the uk was the first to call out what president putin was doing in ukraine and we have been instrumental in bringing the world together to deal with the problem, together to deal with the problem, to bring together the economic package of sanctions that i have set out. there is still time for president putin, as i have said, to de—escalate, but what is at stake, be no doubt, it is notjust the democracy of ukraine, but the principle of democracy around the
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and that is why the unity of this houseis and that is why the unity of this house is so important, today, and it is absolutely vital that the united kingdom stamps together against aggression in ukraine and i am gratefulfor aggression in ukraine and i am grateful for the aggression in ukraine and i am gratefulfor the broad aggression in ukraine and i am grateful for the broad support we have had today from the leader of the opposition. have had today from the leader of the opposition-— have had today from the leader of the opposition. thank you. following last week's 0“ _ the opposition. thank you. following last week's 0&a at _ the opposition. thank you. following last week's 0&a at the _ the opposition. thank you. following last week's 0&a at the village i last week's q&a at the village association and receiving a huge number of complaints from constituents, it is clear that speeding is a major problem, not just in shaklee, but across all parts of dewsbury and denby dale. rather than action being taken after people have been killed or seriously injured in collisions, with my right honourable friend agree with me that prevention is better than the cure and that the department for transport�*s circular 2007 nights are long overdue review? yes. transport's circular 2007 nights are long overdue review?— long overdue review? yes, mr speaker. _ long overdue review? yes, mr speaker. i— long overdue review? yes, mr speaker, i thank _ long overdue review? yes, mr speaker, i thank him - long overdue review? yes, mr
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speaker, i thank him and i long overdue review? yes, mrl speaker, i thank him and share long overdue review? yes, mr- speaker, i thank him and share his passion on this issue as a cyclist and i do think that we need to crack down on speeding, which does play a role in excessive deaths on our roads and the department for transport is updating the circular that he mentions on the use of cameras and i would urge him to get in touch with the secretary of state. yesterday the society has made clear that the snp stand united against the russian invasion of ukraine, and this needs to be included with tougher and stronger sanctions. but as the chair of the foreign affairs, the select committee, ridley said, we should not be waiting for russian to clean up the russian money in the uk. underthe to clean up the russian money in the uk. under the tories, to clean up the russian money in the uk. underthe tories, a to clean up the russian money in the uk. under the tories, a seller of 30 russian money has been allowed to run through london for years. i went
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to be prime minister, the then foreign secretary, in 2017, and how raised the issue of limited partnerships, 113 of which have been used to live $20.8 billion out of the russian banks —— used to move. corruption on a massive scale. by the dependence to do nothing back and he still doing the thing now? i am grateful, i think that he was right to continue then, and i have always enjoyed talking to him, as i have told him many times, i think he is right on the issue. we do need to stop corrupt russian money in london and every other financial capital. that is why we have already taken the steps we have taken, but we are going much further to cloak the true owners of russian companies and property is in this country ——
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uncloak. property is in this country -- uncloak— property is in this country -- uncloak. . ., , property is in this country -- uncloak. . , ., , uncloak. that meeting was five years a i o, uncloak. that meeting was five years ao, offers uncloak. that meeting was five years ago. offers to _ uncloak. that meeting was five years ago, offers to work _ uncloak. that meeting was five years ago, offers to work the _ uncloak. that meeting was five years ago, offers to work the prime - ago, offers to work the prime minister. five years ago, and nothing has happened. the truth is that russian oligarchs who give the right people in power a golden handshake have been welcomed into london for years. their activities were not stopped, they were encouraged, and plenty of these golden handshake two just so happens to find their way into the coffers of the conservative party. £2.3 million, in fact, of the conservative party. £2.3 million, infact, since of the conservative party. £2.3 million, in fact, since the prime minister took office, and a leading american think tank has publicly voiced concerns about the close ties between russian money and the united kingdom's conservative party, and a block to stronger sanctions. how can our allies trust this prime minister to clean up 30 russian money in the
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uk when he won't even clean—up his own political party? will he finally commits to giving up the 2.3 million his party has raised from russian oligarchs? i his party has raised from russian oliarchs? , ,, , , oligarchs? i 'ust think it is very important — oligarchs? i just think it is very important that _ oligarchs? i just think it is very important that the _ oligarchs? i just think it is very important that the house i important that the house understandably do not raise money from russian oligarchs, and people who give money to this, we raise money from people who are registered to vote on the uk register, that is how we do it, and i think his indignation is, i'm afraid, a bit much, coming from somebody who is very own alex salmond is a presenter, as far as i know, on russia today, which the leader of the opposition has just called this country to ban. the
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the opposition has 'ust called this country to ban.— country to ban. the river wye, pollution. _ country to ban. the river wye, pollution, flooding, _ country to ban. the river wye, i pollution, flooding, house-building, pollution, flooding, house—building, are all importance to my right honourable friend, so need to discuss the future of the environment agency? i discuss the future of the environment agency? i am always ha- . environment agency? i am always ha . to environment agency? i am always happy to eat _ environment agency? i am always happy to eat my — environment agency? i am always happy to eat my friend, _ environment agency? i am always happy to eat my friend, and i - happy to eat my friend, and i congratulate him on his recent elevation, but i also must say that i think the environment agency faces many challenges and does an outstanding job of building flood defences, 340,000 homes are better protected than since 2015, we continue to invest massively to help, always happy to meet him. yesterday when i asked the prime minister about russian meddling in uk elections, he looked very shifty, before claiming he wasn't aware of any. yet when he was foreign
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secretary, in 2017, in a joint press conference with the russian foreign minister, went sergey lavrov claimed there was no evidence that russia had interfered in uk elections in any way, the now prime minister corrected him by saying there was no evidence of successful interference. so can you prime minister tell us what evidence he has a scene of unsuccessful interference? has he actually read the russia report, which is very clear that there is evidence of interference, and given that... and given that, as his defence secretary said earlier this week, information is as powerful as
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any attack, can he explain when he was turning a blind eye to allegations of russian disruption? order. i hope you'll come to the end of the _ order. i hope you'll come to the end of the question. | order. i hope you'll come to the end of the question.— of the question. i could be a lap faster ifi of the question. i could be a lap faster if i was _ of the question. i could be a lap faster if i was not _ of the question. i could be a lap faster if i was not being - faster if i was not being barracked by the sidelines. the faster if i was not being barracked by the sidelines.— by the sidelines. the challenges i want to give _ by the sidelines. the challenges i want to give the _ by the sidelines. the challenges i want to give the front _ by the sidelines. the challenges i want to give the front bench - by the sidelines. the challenges i want to give the front bench is i want to give the front bench is moving — want to give the front bench is moving quickly, we want to get speed into it _ moving quickly, we want to get speed into it. , ., ., , , moving quickly, we want to get speed into it. , . ., , , . into it. given that as his defence secretary said — into it. given that as his defence secretary said earlier _ into it. given that as his defence secretary said earlier this - into it. given that as his defence secretary said earlier this week. secretary said earlier this week that information is as powerful as any attack, can be explain why he was turning a blind eye to allegations of russian disruption? why is he playing fast and loose... water, prime minister. i why is he playing fast and loose... water, prime minister.— why is he playing fast and loose... water, prime minister. i repeat what i told her ages _ water, prime minister. i repeat what i told her ages ago, _ water, prime minister. i repeat what i told her ages ago, i _ water, prime minister. i repeat what i told her ages ago, i have _ water, prime minister. i repeat what i told her ages ago, i have seen - i told her ages ago, i have seen absolutely no evidence of successful russian interference in any election
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or electoral event, mr speaker. i or electoral event, mr speaker. i welcome the steps the government has taken to help our working families with their energy bills, the majority of people receiving at least £350 of support. can i read on and confirm that even those not eligible for the council tax rebate will still receive additional support thanks to discretionary funding set aside for local authorities? he funding set aside for local authorities?— funding set aside for local authorities? , ., , , authorities? he is absolutely right, and tell him _ authorities? he is absolutely right, and tell him that _ authorities? he is absolutely right, and tell him that the _ authorities? he is absolutely right, and tell him that the people - authorities? he is absolutely right, and tell him that the people who . and tell him that the people who receive support as they do not qualify for the council tax rebate for the and £44 from that initial. how does the prime minister thinks it looks and we are in a cost of living crisis constituents struggling to put food on the table for coats on their kids backpacks, when the members of his cabinet
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answering their toys out of their pram because they want to eat foie gras? we pram because they want to eat foie .ras? ~ ., ., . ~' pram because they want to eat foie .ras? ~ ., ., . 4' ., pram because they want to eat foie iras? ~ ., ., . ~' ., ., pram because they want to eat foie ras?~ . ., .. ,., pram because they want to eat foie ras? . ., .,, gras? we attack on a customer crisis that is caused _ gras? we attack on a customer crisis that is caused by _ gras? we attack on a customer crisis that is caused by a _ gras? we attack on a customer crisis that is caused by a verbal _ gras? we attack on a customer crisis that is caused by a verbal inflation i that is caused by a verbal inflation spike with everything we can do, and i think i right honourable friend the chancellor in particular for what he is doing to abate the cost of energy, with the living wage by the biggest ever match, helping people universal credit, the single of living is making sure we have got people into work. 430,000 more in employment now than there were before the pandemic began, that is how the attack on the cost of living, we get on with it. last month i have _ living, we get on with it. last month i have the _ living, we get on with it. last month i have the careers - living, we get on with it. issit month i have the careers fair at a college, training apprentices for the automotive and aviation industries. they are hard—working,
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which is flybe has chosen birmingham airport in constituency as its headquarters. the leaders of the couege headquarters. the leaders of the college and the airports to see how the aviation industry is recovering from the pandemic —— will he visit the college and the airport? i will be thrilled to _ the college and the airport? i will be thrilled to visit _ the college and the airport? i will be thrilled to visit eye _ the college and the airport? i will be thrilled to visit eye were found at any time. —— visit my honourable friend. pi at any time. -- visit my honourable friend. �* , , . , friend. a member is currently under investigation _ friend. a member is currently under investigation for _ friend. a member is currently under investigation for islamophobia - investigation for islamophobia following accusations he told a fellow mp that her being a muslim making uncomfortable. how to the government to punish this behaviour? with a promotion that puts the accused member in charge of the complaints procedure. and of course, we all know that the prime minister himself is no stranger to derogatory remarks about women. she said about
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muslim women. remarks about women. she said about muslim women-— muslim women. order. this is not the a- --roriate muslim women. order. this is not the appmpriate place _ muslim women. order. this is not the appmpriate place to — muslim women. order. this is not the appropriate place to be _ muslim women. order. this is not the appropriate place to be losing - muslim women. order. this is not the appropriate place to be losing this. i appropriate place to be losing this. i have _ appropriate place to be losing this. i have just — appropriate place to be losing this. i have just come from a place with the london pedicab operator association, transport for london, department for transport, where sadly, the honourable memberfor christchurch confirmed that on friday, he will be objecting once again tonight pedicab is london bill, which means it will fall. does my right honourable friend agreed with me that it is time that the legislated for pedicab is to make sure that they are safe for women and girls to use, that we did ourselves of the dodgy fares, and that the noise they create, will he work with you to legislate and regulate pedicab is?— work with you to legislate and regulate pedicab is? when i was ma or of regulate pedicab is? when i was mayor of london, _
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regulate pedicab is? when i was mayor of london, i _ regulate pedicab is? when i was mayor of london, i always - regulate pedicab is? when i was. mayor of london, i always yearned regulate pedicab is? when i was- mayor of london, i always yearned to be in a position to put us through parliament, and now i am, and i am grateful to her, we will make sure that we give parliamentary time to make this possible, and it will be a boon for cyclists and taxi drivers, it is high time we did it. we boon for cyclists and taxi drivers, it is high time we did it.— boon for cyclists and taxi drivers, it is high time we did it. we have a humanitarian _ it is high time we did it. we have a humanitarian crisis _ it is high time we did it. we have a humanitarian crisis of _ it is high time we did it. we have a humanitarian crisis of food - it is high time we did it. we have a humanitarian crisis of food povertyj humanitarian crisis of food poverty in all the constituencies represented in this house. we have more food banks than mcdonald's, the people now face starving and freezing in their homes, this very moment because of the horrific cost of addresses, and because of political choices made by this government. in 2015, the government signed up to delivering development goals domestically, including ending hunger. can the prime minister tell
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me what department is responsible for delivering this goal to end hunger domestically? and can he send me a copy of the plan to deliver it? the whole of government is engaged in that campaign, and to that end, we have expanded free school meals for five to seven—year—olds, which helps 1.3 million children, most of the healthiest of vouchers by a third, and, mr speaker, of course, there is a holiday of food and activities programme that continues to run, to the million pound fund. but the best thing we can do as a country, as a society, just keep going without a plan for economic growth, high wage, higherskilled jobs, putting bread on the table of families up and down this country. an important steelworks in my constituency produces high quality steel, and provides high—valuejobs
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to generations, but sadly, following the collapse of greensill capital, the collapse of greensill capital, the parent company has faced financial uncertainty for some time, threatening the business and thousands ofjobs. so does my right on friend agreed with me that the steel industry sits at the heart of a levelling up agenda, and who commits to working at all options to support the business through this period of uncertainty, as the government has done so effectively? i thank you very much, and i think of she does to champion steel, and i think she is right, it is of strategic importance for our country, we have to look at ways in which we can help the steel industry to have access to cheaper low carbon energy, and this government will do everything we can to ensure that that happens, but so far we have provided over £600 million since 2013 to help with the cost of energy, and we have also put in a
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£300 million industrial energy transformation fund. i want to stress to the house that that alone will not be enough, as we transition to a low carbon future i think hydrocarbons must also have their place. hydrocarbons must also have their lace. hydrocarbons must also have their ilace, , ., ., , hydrocarbons must also have their lace. ., , , hydrocarbons must also have their lace. . , ,. place. unpaid family carers are treated appallingly _ place. unpaid family carers are treated appallingly by - place. unpaid family carers are treated appallingly by this - treated appallingly by this government. i am treated appallingly by this government. iam not treated appallingly by this government. i am not talking about paid care staff in care homes, people who provide care and paid for family members. while food and energy costs skyrocket, carer�*s allowance is increasing by only £2 in april, to a resolute £69 a week. this is something that will be swallowed up by only £2 50 cost of a single lateral flow tests so that carers can keep the person with a careful safe. how can the prime minister the justify this tax on carers? i minister the 'ustify this tax on carers? ., ~ i. , . minister the 'ustify this tax on carers? ., ~ , . ., carers? i thank you very much, and i think the whole _ carers? i thank you very much, and i think the whole house _ carers? i thank you very much, and i think the whole house understands i think the whole house understands the pressures on carers, and the immense amount that they contribute
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to our society, and we are doing our best to support people throughout our country. i think the house also understands we cannot indefinitely support universal free testing. what we are doing is operating on carer�*s allowance, and of course, carers are also entitled to the increase is that we cani can i follow up the statement on monday on removing covid restrictions, i welcome the further support for the immunosuppressed and will he ensure they review the system for identifying the most vulnerable because i think some at risk are in danger of being missed, like those with blood cancers and will he ensure that the relevant testing and anti—viral drugs will be readily available alongside boosters and also for their carers? ihe readily available alongside boosters and also for their carers? he is makini and also for their carers? he is making a _ and also for their carers? he is making a very _ and also for their carers? he is making a very important - and also for their carers? he is making a very important point|
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and also for their carers? he is making a very important point about the immunosuppressed and the need to identify them correctly and we currently think there are 1.3 million and of course they will have access, not only the testing, but also to vaccinations and boosters and priority access for new therapy and priority access for new therapy and anti—virals. and priority access for new therapy and anti-virals._ and anti-virals. thank you. last october, _ and anti-virals. thank you. last october. a _ and anti-virals. thank you. last october, a promising _ and anti-virals. thank you. last october, a promising young - october, a promising young footballer in my constituency, a former winner of chelsea fc�*s star academy, was on his way home to see his mother afterfinishing academy, was on his way home to see his mother after finishing at the gym and he was stabbed 24 times, murdered just yards from his front door. one of the perpetrators allegedly was as young as 15. i would hope that the prime minister would hope that the prime minister would agree with me that four more needs to be done to stamp out the scourge of knife crime, addressing the underlying causes and will he agree to meet me and cameron's mother who said losing her 18—year—old son has left a void in her heart forever. discuss what more
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can be done to make our streets safer and ensure that other families do not ever have to suffer this heartbreaking loss. mr do not ever have to suffer this heartbreaking loss. mr speaker, i must say that _ heartbreaking loss. mr speaker, i must say that l — heartbreaking loss. mr speaker, i must say that i totally _ heartbreaking loss. mr speaker, i must say that i totally agree - heartbreaking loss. mr speaker, i must say that i totally agree with | must say that i totally agree with this and i share his feelings about his constituents and the tragedy, the tragic loss in the family concerned and we must crackdown more on knife crime, it is one of the reasons we are putting more police on the streets and it is also why we are rounding up the county lines drugs gangs and i think they play a big part in this, sadly, we have done 2000 so far and there is more to do and that is why we are recruiting many more police and giving them the powers they need to come down hard on these gangs. thank ou ve come down hard on these gangs. thank you very much- — come down hard on these gangs. thank you very much- the _ come down hard on these gangs. ’i�*ia'ya; you very much. the government's commitment of £25 million for a new electric bus fleet in warrington will have a transformational effect
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on public transport across warrington. does the prime minister agree that the right way to spend that 25 million is by buying british made buses, supporting highly skilled jobs, manufacturing jobs, right across the united kingdom? yes, i will thank my honourable friend who is a great champion for warrington. warrington has secured £20 million for new zero emission buses and i am delighted to say that this statistic i can barely believe, 80% of bosses in britainin urban areas are already produced domestically, which is a fantastic thing and i hope and i know that we all want to see more of that and i hope that warrington will consider excellent uk bus manufacturers when they come to the next contract. yesterday the prime minister told me that we can sanction junior members
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for the new sanctions package, the right honourable member for braintree told the house that we can sanction members not through the new regime, but as an extension of pre—existing rules, yet this morning the foreign secretary said that the legislation for sanctions against junior members will take weeks to be made legally watertight. so, who is right? how can we say we are standing strong against russian aggression when our sanctions response is such a model in such a mess? i response is such a model in such a mess? ~ ., response is such a model in such a mess? ~' ., ., , mess? i think the whole house will airee mess? i think the whole house will a i ree that mess? i think the whole house will agree that it _ mess? i think the whole house will agree that it is _ mess? i think the whole house will agree that it is quite _ mess? i think the whole house will agree that it is quite a _ mess? i think the whole house will agree that it is quite a thing - mess? i think the whole house will agree that it is quite a thing to - agree that it is quite a thing to sanction parliamentarians and that is what we are doing. that is what we are doing and not only that, we are putting forward, just in the last couple of days, the biggest package of sanctions against russia that we have ever introduced and we are coming forward with even more
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and they will have an impact, not just on duma members, people who voted for the secession against luhansk, they will have an impact on the entire putin regime and i am glad that the labour opposition, at least for now, supports them. thank ou. this least for now, supports them. thank you- this is — least for now, supports them. thank you- this is day _ least for now, supports them. thank you. this is day six _ least for now, supports them. thank you. this is day six for— least for now, supports them. thank you. this is day six for thousands - you. this is day six for thousands of households across east sussex who have no power or water. as we become more and more reliant on electricity, we must become more resilient. can i ask that the utility companies work together, that water companies have to have generators in place, so that water does not fail when the power does and that local resilience forums are fit for purpose and communicate with their local community? we need more help on this, help us. i their local community? we need more help on this, help us.— help on this, help us. i thank him very much — help on this, help us. i thank him very much for— help on this, help us. i thank him very much for what _ help on this, help us. i thank him very much for what he _ help on this, help us. i thank him very much for what he said - help on this, help us. i thank him very much for what he said about| very much for what he said about people in east sussex and i want to say i know how tough it is for
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people who have been short of power for days on end and it is no consolation for them for me to say that 97% who lost power have now been reconnected, but we are working as fast as we can with local authorities, with the electricity companies, to make sure they get their power back, but also ensuring that we build in more resilience for the future. mr that we build in more resilience for the future. ~ ,,, ., ,, that we build in more resilience for the future. i ,,, ., «i , , the future. mr speaker, let us be iuite the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear— the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear about _ the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear about this, _ the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear about this, is - the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear about this, is it - the future. mr speaker, let us be quite clear about this, is it not i the future. mr speaker, let us bej quite clear about this, is it not an absolute disgrace that a privy counsellor, an adviser to the queen and a former first minister of scotland sees fit to broadcast his half baked worldviews, week after week, on russian television? mr speaker, that was a brilliant, powerful question which i think the whole house are would it not have been more powerful if it had come from the leader of the scottish national party?—
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from the leader of the scottish national party? from the leader of the scottish national pa ? ., «i , ., , . national party? thank you very much. the prime minister _ national party? thank you very much. the prime minister will _ national party? thank you very much. the prime minister will have - national party? thank you very much. the prime minister will have seen - the prime minister will have seen the devastation in shrewsbury of the flooding of the river severn. this is the third year in a row that shrewsbury has faced these appalling floods. i share the caucus of 44 conservative mps who have the river severn flowing through their constituencies, will he help me and our caucus to do everything possible to find a long—term solution to managing briton's longest river and in the meantime we have put forward four opportunities for flood defences in shrewsbury to defra and witty take an interest in these, because shrewsbury cannot afford a fourth year in a row of flooding? i thank him very much for what he said and he is completely right in what he says about the river severn and the violence of flooding in the
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river severn which i have seen it for myself several times and there are still flood warnings in place along the river severn and all i can tell him is that we are working flat out to put the remediation is in place to help people who have suffered from flooding but also investing £5.2 billion in the flood defences of this country. the leader in this morning _ defences of this country. the leader in this morning as _ defences of this country. the leader in this morning as 's _ defences of this country. the leader in this morning as 's times - defences of this country. the leader in this morning as 's times is - in this morning as 's times is criticising the limited sanctions against russia. if the prime minister will not listen to members of this house, will he at length —— i can at least listen to the times newspaper? i i can at least listen to the times newspaper?— i can at least listen to the times news-iaer? . ,, . newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media — newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media and _ newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media and of— newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media and of course _ newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media and of course i - newspaper? i have the utmost respect for the media and of course i study - for the media and of course i study it as much as i possibly can, but i think i have to say that the package the uk has put forward has been leading the world and there is more
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to come and, mr speaker, i hear somebody on the opposite benches say that this is weak, it is not, it will be strong. it would be to take the web away from the 14 members of the web away from the 14 members of the labour party who say that the aggressor in ukraine is nato. that would be a strong thing to do. that is the end of— would be a strong thing to do. that is the end of prime minister's questions. pis is the end of prime minister's questions-— is the end of prime minister's questions. . , , ., , ., ., questions. as you 'ust heard, that is the as you just heard that this is the end of five ministers questionnaire with the speaker lindsay hoyle. we can i welcome a guest for this programme. looking back on the bbc�*s political editor is also here. it was an interesting line, a careful line being trodden by keir starmer the labour leader in his question is unsurprisingly about the reaction to
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russian aggression in terms of sanctions. one thing to say very clearly we support you hear on the labour benches in the actions that you take but would like you to go further and we'd like you to do it now and extremely quickly and the prime minister is saying we have taken, undertaken this action in terms of putting pressure on russia particularly financially but before we go further we want to make sure it is a coordinated action with a financial centrepiece in london and new york. does that mean there is going to be some delay?— going to be some delay? there's iioin to going to be some delay? there's going to be _ going to be some delay? there's going to be some _ going to be some delay? there's going to be some consensus - going to be some delay? there's| going to be some consensus with going to be some delay? there's - going to be some consensus with this show is knowing what the triggers might be for the government and other western governments have said very openly would be the next successive rounds of sanctions as the situation develops. i think, you know, we have been told privately and it has been suggested, you know, by some ministers publicly that things might look at russian energy
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companies and whether they look at more financial crackdowns but what was interesting is the prime minister saying on the record and explicitly there that they would stop motion sterling moving dollars through the city of london. that was not something on the table yesterday in a something that would be only major —— be a major move. the government is also trying to tread a line because belief among western allies is that an element of coordination is really, really important here and there isn't a point splintering the west, one of the most important things they do are shown unified approach would have cost the government he has been under attack because of their sanctions are not as strong as of the country so, for example, if you think about the number of individuals who are being sanctioned, the eu has targeted many more individuals than the uk has comejust three more individuals than the uk has come just three individuals more individuals than the uk has comejust three individuals in more individuals than the uk has come just three individuals in the various other sorts of comparisons. what would you say to tory mps many of them in the conservative benches
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as heads of select committees of a saying that the current is acting too slowly? what is borisjohnson waiting for? too slowly? what is boris johnson waiting for?— too slowly? what is boris johnson waitini for? ., ., ., ., waiting for? you have to look at the whole context. _ waiting for? you have to look at the whole context. when _ waiting for? you have to look at the whole context. when you _ waiting for? you have to look at the whole context. when you look- waiting for? you have to look at the whole context. when you look at i waiting for? you have to look at the i whole context. when you look at what all of this... this is a deliberately escalating strategy and you heard today the next stage of the escalation. restrictions in place for a lot longer than others, there are 118 individuals, 48 company. what impact has not individuals, 48 company. what impact has rrot done — individuals, 48 company. what impact has rrot done in _ individuals, 48 company. what impact has not done in terms _ individuals, 48 company. what impact has not done in terms of _ individuals, 48 company. what impact has not done in terms of deterring i has not done in terms of deterring vladimir putin? it is has not done in terms of deterring vladimir putin?— vladimir putin? it is not deterred him clearly. _ vladimir putin? it is not deterred him clearly, but _ vladimir putin? it is not deterred him clearly, but that _ vladimir putin? it is not deterred him clearly, but that was - vladimir putin? it is not deterred him clearly, but that was in i him clearly, but that was in response _ him clearly, but that was in response to salisbury and other things. — response to salisbury and other things, we have already taken moves because _ things, we have already taken moves because of— things, we have already taken moves because of the number of different attacks _ because of the number of different attacks we have had, but of course it is much — attacks we have had, but of course it is much more sensible to do a coordinated strategy, looking at
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finance — coordinated strategy, looking at finance and banking, that is clearly where _ finance and banking, that is clearly where we — finance and banking, that is clearly where we can make a big difference, but it— where we can make a big difference, but it has— where we can make a big difference, but it has to — where we can make a big difference, but it has to be coordinated with other— but it has to be coordinated with other major countries. do but it has to be coordinated with other major countries.— but it has to be coordinated with other major countries. other ma'or countries. do you accept that if it other major countries. do you accept that if it is all — other major countries. do you accept that if it is all done _ other major countries. do you accept that if it is all done as _ other major countries. do you accept that if it is all done as one, - other major countries. do you accept that if it is all done as one, it - that if it is all done as one, it will have a much greater impact and cause much more pain to vladimir putin? if you look at the sorts of things keir starmer was suggesting in response to his statement, trying to exclude russia from the main financial mechanisms, you do it as one, it will have more impact. it certainly would, the need for strong action— certainly would, the need for strong action is— certainly would, the need for strong action is apparent _ certainly would, the need for strong action is apparent because - certainly would, the need for strong action is apparent because if- certainly would, the need for strong action is apparent because if we i certainly would, the need for strong action is apparent because if we are| action is apparent because if we are to deter— action is apparent because if we are to deter russian _ action is apparent because if we are to deter russian aggression - action is apparent because if we are to deter russian aggression further| to deter russian aggression further invasions _ to deter russian aggression further invasions into— to deter russian aggression further invasions into ukrainian— to deter russian aggression further invasions into ukrainian territory, l invasions into ukrainian territory, we need — invasions into ukrainian territory, we need to— invasions into ukrainian territory, we need to be _ invasions into ukrainian territory, we need to be strong _ invasions into ukrainian territory, we need to be strong and - invasions into ukrainian territory, we need to be strong and robustl invasions into ukrainian territory, i we need to be strong and robust and ithink— we need to be strong and robust and i think the _ we need to be strong and robust and i think the way— we need to be strong and robust and i think the way and _ we need to be strong and robust and i think the way and feeble _ we need to be strong and robust and i think the way and feeble first - i think the way and feeble first wave. — i think the way and feeble first wave. i— i think the way and feeble first wave. idon't— i think the way and feeble first wave, i don't think _ i think the way and feeble first wave, i don't think matches i i think the way and feeble firstl wave, i don't think matches the wave, idon't think matches the strength— wave, idon't think matches the strength of— wave, idon't think matches the strength of many— wave, idon't think matches the strength of many of— wave, idon't think matches the strength of many of our- wave, i don't think matches the strength of many of our allies l wave, i don't think matches the . strength of many of our allies and wave, i don't think matches the i strength of many of our allies and i want _ strength of many of our allies and i want to— strength of many of our allies and i want to see — strength of many of our allies and i want to see russia _ strength of many of our allies and i want to see russia excluded - strength of many of our allies and i want to see russia excluded from i strength of many of our allies and i i want to see russia excluded from our financial— want to see russia excluded from our financial systems _ want to see russia excluded from our financial systems and _ want to see russia excluded from our financial systems and i— want to see russia excluded from our financial systems and i want - want to see russia excluded from our financial systems and i want to - want to see russia excluded from our financial systems and i want to see i financial systems and i want to see us get _ financial systems and i want to see us get rid _ financial systems and i want to see us get rid of— financial systems and i want to see us get rid of dirty— financial systems and i want to see us get rid of dirty money— financial systems and i want to see us get rid of dirty money from i us get rid of dirty money from politics— us get rid of dirty money from politics and _ us get rid of dirty money from politics and from _ us get rid of dirty money from politics and from the - us get rid of dirty money from politics and from the city- us get rid of dirty money from politics and from the city of. us get rid of dirty money from i politics and from the city of london and there _ politics and from the city of london and there are — politics and from the city of london and there are lots _ politics and from the city of london and there are lots of— politics and from the city of london and there are lots of things - politics and from the city of london and there are lots of things the i and there are lots of things the government— and there are lots of things the government should _ and there are lots of things the government should be - and there are lots of things the government should be doing, i and there are lots of things the i government should be doing, they and there are lots of things the - government should be doing, they do not have _ government should be doing, they do not have to _ government should be doing, they do not have to wait _ government should be doing, they do not have to wait to _ government should be doing, they do not have to wait to do _ government should be doing, they do not have to wait to do it, _ government should be doing, they do not have to wait to do it, they- not have to wait to do it, they could — not have to wait to do it, they could do— not have to wait to do it, they could do it _ not have to wait to do it, they could do it today— not have to wait to do it, they could do it today and - not have to wait to do it, they could do it today and that i not have to wait to do it, they could do it today and that is l not have to wait to do it, they. could do it today and that is why the approach _
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could do it today and that is why the approach that _ could do it today and that is why the approach that labour- could do it today and that is why. the approach that labour has been doing _ the approach that labour has been doing is— the approach that labour has been doing is we — the approach that labour has been doing is we support _ the approach that labour has been doing is we support the _ the approach that labour has beenj doing is we support the measures, the approach that labour has been i doing is we support the measures, we want you _ doing is we support the measures, we want you to _ doing is we support the measures, we want you to go — doing is we support the measures, we want you to go further, _ doing is we support the measures, we want you to go further, here - doing is we support the measures, we want you to go further, here are - want you to go further, here are concrete — want you to go further, here are concrete areas _ want you to go further, here are concrete areas where _ want you to go further, here are concrete areas where you - want you to go further, here are concrete areas where you could i want you to go further, here are . concrete areas where you could do so, where — concrete areas where you could do so, where you _ concrete areas where you could do so, where you would _ concrete areas where you could do so, where you would have - concrete areas where you could do so, where you would have a - concrete areas where you could do so, where you would have a crossl so, where you would have a cross party _ so, where you would have a cross party support _ so, where you would have a cross party support. let— so, where you would have a cross party support-— so, where you would have a cross party support. let us look at one of them. it party support. let us look at one of them- it is — party support. let us look at one of them. it is coordinated, _ party support. let us look at one of them. it is coordinated, it - party support. let us look at one of them. it is coordinated, it is - party support. let us look at one of them. it is coordinated, it is not i party support. let us look at one of them. it is coordinated, it is not a i them. it is coordinated, it is not a competition. _ them. it is coordinated, it is not a competition, it _ them. it is coordinated, it is not a competition, it is _ them. it is coordinated, it is not a competition, it is deliberately i competition, it is deliberately coordinated and the escalation strategy— coordinated and the escalation strategy is also deliberate. was it a i reed strategy is also deliberate. was it agreed that _ strategy is also deliberate. was it agreed that we — strategy is also deliberate. was it agreed that we would _ strategy is also deliberate. was it agreed that we would start i strategy is also deliberate. was it agreed that we would start with i agreed that we would start with pretty— agreed that we would start with pretty weak— agreed that we would start with pretty weak sanctions? - agreed that we would start with pretty weak sanctions? iii- agreed that we would start with pretty weak sanctions?- agreed that we would start with pretty weak sanctions? it has all been agreed _ pretty weak sanctions? it has all been agreed and _ pretty weak sanctions? it has all been agreed and the _ pretty weak sanctions? it has all been agreed and the next i pretty weak sanctions? it has all been agreed and the next things pretty weak sanctions? it has all- been agreed and the next things are part of— been agreed and the next things are part of the _ been agreed and the next things are part of the strategy and then of course — part of the strategy and then of course we — part of the strategy and then of course we have got the longer term which _ course we have got the longer term which we _ course we have got the longer term which we have already talked about. there _ which we have already talked about. there is _ which we have already talked about. there is a _ which we have already talked about. there is a strategy here and it is an escalating sanctions strategy coordinated and you have already heard _ coordinated and you have already heard some signs of what the next stages _ heard some signs of what the next stages let— heard some signs of what the next staies. , ., ., .. heard some signs of what the next staies. , ., ., «i ., ,., stages. let us look at something siecific stages. let us look at something specific that _ stages. let us look at something specific that keir _ stages. let us look at something specific that keir starmer - stages. let us look at something i specific that keir starmer suggested yesterday and reiterated today. i will show everyone this tweet in the times.
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should they just be should theyjust be banned right now? should they 'ust be banned right now? , ., , , should they 'ust be banned right now? ,., .y should they 'ust be banned right now? ,., _ ,., should they 'ust be banned right now? , ., now? obviously politician should not iet now? obviously politician should not get involved. — now? obviously politician should not get involved, ofcom _ now? obviously politician should not get involved, ofcom is _ now? obviously politician should not get involved, ofcom is independent. j get involved, ofcom is independent. you do _ get involved, ofcom is independent. you do not _ get involved, ofcom is independent. you do not want politicians directing what media you allow in a country _ directing what media you allow in a count . ., , ., directing what media you allow in a count . . , ., ., country. even in a state of emergency? _ country. even in a state of emergency? we _ country. even in a state of emergency? we have i country. even in a state of. emergency? we have robust regulation- _ emergency? we have robust regulation. it _ emergency? we have robust regulation. it is _ emergency? we have robust regulation. it is very - emergency? we have robust. regulation. it is very important that they— regulation. it is very important that they are independent, but there is no doubt _ that they are independent, but there is no doubt and i believe there is no doubt — is no doubt and i believe there is no doubt that rt is part of the disinformation strategy and ofcom i welcome _ disinformation strategy and ofcom i welcome the dean asking them to review— welcome the dean asking them to review it — welcome the dean asking them to review it. i'm sure that they would anyway, _ review it. i'm sure that they would anyway. but — review it. i'm sure that they would anyway, but they do need to do that and look— anyway, but they do need to do that and look at — anyway, but they do need to do that and look at it. politician should not ban — and look at it. politician should not ban media. iam nota i am not a fan of russia today, or of putin? this information campaign, it is right that this is being reviewed. but russia today is one of
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putin's elements and spreading misinformation that is so frequent we shared on social media feeds, thatis we shared on social media feeds, that is designed to split the best and split the consensus that we are trying to build in this country against his aggression. that is why strong measures are required, and i hope this review will not take weeks and months, each be completed in days. and months, each be completed in da s. ~ ., and months, each be completed in das. days. would you understand because ofthe days. would you understand because of the public — days. would you understand because of the public to _ days. would you understand because of the public to cave _ days. would you understand because of the public to cave other _ days. would you understand because of the public to cave other than i days. would you understand because of the public to cave other than the l of the public to cave other than the politicians have in the past appeared on russia today, both and liberal? ., appeared on russia today, both and liberal? . ., , . , , liberal? yeah, it adds credibility, revenue from _ liberal? yeah, it adds credibility, revenue from the _ liberal? yeah, it adds credibility, revenue from the politician i revenue from the politician presenting his show, as discussed, as credibility, and from the public's _ as credibility, and from the public's viewpoint, they will not be able to _ public's viewpoint, they will not be able to distinguish that. this public's viewpoint, they will not be able to distinguish that.— able to distinguish that. this has ireviousl able to distinguish that. this has previously rrot — able to distinguish that. this has previously not happen, - able to distinguish that. this has previously not happen, despite l previously not happen, despite politicians _ previously not happen, despite politicians in— previously not happen, despite politicians in this _ previously not happen, despite politicians in this concluding i politicians in this concluding concern _ politicians in this concluding concern for— politicians in this concluding concern for many _ politicians in this concluding concern for many years i politicians in this concluding. concern for many years about politicians in this concluding i concern for many years about the activities — concern for many years about the activities of — concern for many years about the activities of russia _ concern for many years about the activities of russia today, - activities of russia today, particularly _ activities of russia today, particularly acutely - activities of russia today, particularly acutely right l activities of russia today, i particularly acutely right now, activities of russia today, - particularly acutely right now, is that as — particularly acutely right now, is that as ever— particularly acutely right now, is that as ever there's _ particularly acutely right now, is that as ever there's the - particularly acutely right now, is| that as ever there's the question particularly acutely right now, is i that as ever there's the question of being _ that as ever there's the question of being aware — that as ever there's the question of being aware of— that as ever there's the question of being aware of unintended - that as ever there's the question of| being aware of unintended question two consequences _
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being aware of unintended question two consequences. she _ being aware of unintended question two consequences. she said - two consequences. she said unintended _ two consequences. she said unintended consequences. i two consequences. she said i unintended consequences. so two consequences. she said - unintended consequences. so they could _ unintended consequences. so they could potentially— unintended consequences. so they could potentially consequences i unintended consequences. so they could potentially consequences forj could potentially consequences for british— could potentially consequences for british travellers _ could potentially consequences for british travellers to _ could potentially consequences for british travellers to strike - could potentially consequences for british travellers to strike the i british travellers to strike the right— british travellers to strike the right thing _ british travellers to strike the right thing for— british travellers to strike the right thing for people - british travellers to strike the right thing for people in - british travellers to strike thej right thing for people in other countries, _ right thing for people in other countries, notably— right thing for people in other countries, notably russia, i right thing for people in otheri countries, notably russia, and right thing for people in other- countries, notably russia, and he would _ countries, notably russia, and he would say — countries, notably russia, and he would say this— countries, notably russia, and he would say this but _ countries, notably russia, and he would say this but the _ countries, notably russia, and he would say this but the bbc- countries, notably russia, and he would say this but the bbc in i countries, notably russia, and he. would say this but the bbc in other uk media _ would say this but the bbc in other uk media outlets— would say this but the bbc in other uk media outlets are _ would say this but the bbc in other uk media outlets are in _ would say this but the bbc in other uk media outlets are in russia i uk media outlets are in russia trying — uk media outlets are in russia trying to— uk media outlets are in russia trying to promote _ uk media outlets are in russia trying to promote fleet - uk media outlets are in russia trying to promote fleet fair - uk media outlets are in russia| trying to promote fleet fair and impartial— trying to promote fleet fair and impartial coverage, _ trying to promote fleet fair and impartial coverage, so - trying to promote fleet fair and impartial coverage, so it- trying to promote fleet fair and impartial coverage, so it is- trying to promote fleet fair and i impartial coverage, so it is easy for politicians— impartial coverage, so it is easy for politicians to _ impartial coverage, so it is easy for politicians to convert - for politicians to convert unintended _ for politicians to convert. unintended consequences. for politicians to convert - unintended consequences. for for politicians to convert unintended consequences. for a few weeks a . o unintended consequences. for a few weeks ago in — unintended consequences. for a few weeks ago in the _ unintended consequences. for a few weeks ago in the days _ unintended consequences. for a few weeks ago in the days you're - weeks ago in the days you're watching bbc news withjoanna gosling. our headlines. ukraine is to impose a state of emergency and urges its citizens to leave russia amid an intensification of russian aggression against the country. president putin says the security of russia and its citizens as non—negotiable in a speech marking a
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public holiday to mark the anniversary of the country's and falters. the bbc reports on repeated failures and maternity care at a hospital in shropshire. the government considers plans to propose minimum entry grades of universities in england and a limit on student numbers. in the last hour, nicola sturgeon has been speaking about ukraine and says the crisis could be the most critical moment for the world since 1916. urge the uk government to go further with sanctions and target russian interests in london. i sanctions and target russian interests in london.- sanctions and target russian interests in london. i don't think that the uk _ interests in london. i don't think that the uk government - interests in london. i don't think that the uk government is - interests in london. i don't think that the uk government is doing i that the uk government is doing their best yet with sanctions. we have had rightly some very tough rhetoric from boris johnson have had rightly some very tough rhetoric from borisjohnson in recent weeks but we now need to see that rhetoric matched by excellent
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and that is important because this is a critical moment for ukraine and also a critical moment of the world because it is a choice at this moment in history to hit putin hard with the severest of sanctions so that he understands that there will be consequences for his imperialist aggression or we don't do that and he becomes further emboldened so it is really important that the international community stands together and in solidarity with ukraine as it defends its independence and sovereignty but also stand together to act in a way that shows putin and dictators like him where there are serious consequences for this kind of action. ~ ., ., consequences for this kind of action. ., ., , ., , consequences for this kind of action. ., ., , action. what action should be taken? london is awash _ action. what action should be taken? london is awash with _ action. what action should be taken? london is awash with russian - action. what action should be taken? london is awash with russian money| london is awash with russian money and the uk government was target that wealth, those assets wherever they are and the russian interests that benefit from those assets and wealth. they will know where those assets are but there must be a very
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serious systematic approach to sanctions and there must be an effort made to ensure that aid is disrupted so that russia feels that you want to be the elite that suffer not the people of russia but this is a moment that putin has to be in no doubt in what we saw... then it moves on and put to consolidate his games and see that he can continue to act in this way with no consequences whatsoever. hate to act in this way with no consequences whatsoever. to act in this way with no conseuuences whatsoever. ~ . , consequences whatsoever. we are very keen to work _ consequences whatsoever. we are very keen to work with _ consequences whatsoever. we are very keen to work with uk _ consequences whatsoever. we are very keen to work with uk government - keen to work with uk government firstly to persuade the uk government to go further and i hope we will see the uk government go further to discuss with them how we will ensure that russian elite interests in scotland can will ensure that russian elite interests in scotland- will ensure that russian elite interests in scotland can be part of this approach _ interests in scotland can be part of this approach to — interests in scotland can be part of this approach to sanctions - interests in scotland can be part of this approach to sanctions should l this approach to sanctions should that be necessary. the scottish government is not responsible for
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international affairs and we will be a voice calling for the international community to stay united in solidarity with ukraine. we have just been having united in solidarity with ukraine. we havejust been having discussions with the consul general and also the leader the ukrainian community here in scotland and we have a role to play in ensuring that at times when those with family back in ukraine will be really anxious that there is support here for the ukrainian community and we are supporting them in giving their support to people back on their own country. fine in giving their support to people back on their own country. one of our back on their own country. one of your sanctions... _ back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, _ back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, i _ back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, i do. - back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, i do. it - back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, i do. it is l back on their own country. one of your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a matterfor— your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a matter for ofcom _ your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a matter for ofcom but _ your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a matter for ofcom but i _ your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a matter for ofcom but i think - your sanctions... yes, i do. it is a| matter for ofcom but i think there is now a very serious question about whether rt should continue to have a licence to broadcast here in scotland and i will certainly encourage off to look at that very, very seriously and they need. meet. very seriously and they need. alex salmond's continuous involvement that you agree with that? i salmond's continuous involvement that you agree with that?— that you agree with that? i don't think it is any — that you agree with that? i don't think it is any secret _ that you agree with that? i don't think it is any secret now - that you agree with that? i don't think it is any secret now that i l think it is any secret now that i don't think alex salmond should ever have had a television show on rte
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but it is even more unthinkable now that that should continue but as you know for a variety of other reasons i'm not answerable for alex salmond but hopefully he will reflect. there is a suggestion _ but hopefully he will reflect. there is a suggestion that _ but hopefully he will reflect. there is a suggestion that a _ but hopefully he will reflect. there is a suggestion that a party - but hopefully he will reflect. there is a suggestion that a party should stop there when party supporters and members appearing like that show in the uk with that?— the uk with that? absolutely and i don't think any _ the uk with that? absolutely and i don't think any elected _ don't think any elected representative right now should be complete, contemplating appearing rte and i have given that message to elected representatives here in the scottish government, parliament and ian blackford has done so in westminster. he has to take these decisions are right that the international community will have to do stand against this egregious breach of international law appearing on rte which in many ways as we know it is a state that broadcaster there to help putin spread his propaganda then i think that will be something that is completely wrong for any elected representative. —— appearing on rt.
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it's emerged that borisjohnson may have become the first uk prime minister — technically — to have been interviewed by police under caution. it's in connection with the controversy over downing street parties in lockdown. our chief political correspondent adam fleming explains so we knew that prime minister had received a questionnaire for the metropolitan police asking him questions about these accusations, as many people will have received if they've been accused of breaking the covid rules. we knew that his lawyers had filled it in and returned it within the deadline by the end of last week. what's happened now, though, is that itv has got hold of what one of these forms actually looks like, and it makes it very clear that this is the equivalent of being interviewed by the police under caution. so we think that means borisjohnson is the first prime minister to be interviewed, effectively, under caution as part of a police investigation. so a, kind of, quite significant moment in the party story, but a, sort of, fairly symbolic significant moment.
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the duchess of cambridge is on a two—day visit to denmark, taking the work of her childhood foundation abroad for the first time. kate has travelled to copenhagen to learn how the country has become a world leader in its approach to early childhood development. earlier today she received an official welcome from denmark's queen margrethe, before she visits a forest kindergarten and a domestic abuse shelter. our reporter is in open haven following the duchess. i’m our reporter is in open haven following the duchess. i'm sure you still some of— following the duchess. i'm sure you still some of the _ following the duchess. i'm sure you still some of the images _ following the duchess. i'm sure you still some of the images from - still some of the images from yesterday where she made quite an entrance going down a slide on this morning she was visiting a forest in the gas and when she took part in activities with lots of young children and even had a good go at wood splitting because this visit really is a working trip and obviously has been this enjoyable moment and she is here with the royal foundation centre for early childhood and it is a fact—finding mission and to see what can be earned from some the initiatives here in copenhagen so she has been meeting with health visitors,
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experts and also parents and children to find out more. today she also meet some _ children to find out more. today she also meet some of— children to find out more. today she also meet some of the _ children to find out more. today she also meet some of the royals. - children to find out more. today she| also meet some of the royals. matt's riuht. i am also meet some of the royals. matt's right- i am at — also meet some of the royals. matt's right. i am at the _ also meet some of the royals. matt's right. i am at the danish _ also meet some of the royals. matt's right. i am at the danish palace - also meet some of the royals. matt's right. i am at the danish palace now| right. i am at the danish palace now as we speak and the duchess was just received by queen margrethe of denmark. the two royalfamilies had close ties and in fact both of them is that it is a very significant year this to with some major milestones and the plot and even vinay for elizabeth in the golden jubilee for queen margrethe but of course a big focus has been on that meeting between the duchess and crown princess mary. both of them were seen as modern royals who were really going to lead the next generation. they were having lunch together right now and this afternoon they are going to be visiting a crisis centre which is one of many�*s charities where they will be meeting with people who help
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children and women who had to deal with domestic violence.— with domestic violence. victoria derhyshire _ will be here shortly with a one o'clock news. first, time to look at the weather with ben. that afternoon. the southern parts of the uk it is turned into a day of sunshine and some much—needed —— sunshine and some much—needed —— sunshine injust a sunshine and some much—needed —— sunshine in just a few showers, much—needed dry weather. a weather front which has been bringing cloud and rain and is that front continues its journey south eastwards icy will lead us with some much colder air spreading from the north tonight into tomorrow with some wintry showers developing our weather front. ahead of icy mainly dry with just one or two shells. icy is going to be windy out there for all of those, gusts of 50 to 60 mph in some places and temperatures rarely drop in ways we head into evening across the northern half of the uk and we start to get into that cold air so our weather front continues its journey south eastwards through this evening and over light on some
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wintry weather potentially on the back edge but icy is the showers developing across northern ireland and scotland give cause for concern, ms office yellow warning for up to 20 centimetres of show in the high ground and also the chance of frequent lightning in association with those showers which will continue to through the night bringing snow to quite low levels for a time and a weatherjourney across england and wales with temperatures dropping away behind and potentially there could be some ice as well across the northern half of the uk. frontal system clearing in the south—east tomorrow morning, someone thin is in the back edge perhaps over high ground and then icy is a sunshine and showers day but the shells will be wintry of a high ground in england and wales in at least for a time to low levels in northern ireland and parts of scotland, still accompanied with them hail, some thunder and lightning. that's a really piling up particularly in parts of scotland. another windy day, though, with gust we can expect gusting up to 65 mph potentially the most exposed spots in the north—west on a really piling up in the north—west on a really piling up particularly in parts of scotland. another windy day, though, with gust we can expect gusting up
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to 65 mph potentially the most exposed spots in the north west and the colder field, 5—9 exposed spots in the north west and the colderfield, 5—9 but exposed spots in the north west and the colder field, 5—9 but factor in the colder field, 5—9 but factor in the strength of the wind and icy will feel colder than that but as we get into friday here is something we haven't seen much of lately, high pressure building its way in, a mainly dry and the week, still one or two shelves first thing in eastern parts but then a loss of sunshine developing through the day, more cloud into the north west later and feeling a little milder, lighter winds, two, seven to ii, and feeling a little milder, lighter winds, two, seven to 11, maybe 12 degrees in the far south—west. we week and starts dry, more cloud in the north—west which will spread eastwards bringing rain for some to enable eastern part should stay dry.
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the prime minister promises to send further military support to ukraine. ukraine tells its citizens to leave russia immediately. meanwhile a defiant president putin says the security of his country is 'non—negotiable'. here, the prime minister defends the scale of government sanctions imposed on russian billionaires and banks after further criticism from the labour party. the prime minister promised that in the event _ the prime minister promised that in the event of an invasion he would unleash_ the event of an invasion he would unleash a — the event of an invasion he would unleash a full package of sanctions. if unleash a full package of sanctions. if not— unleash a full package of sanctions. if not now. — unleash a full package of sanctions. if not now, then when? it is unleash a full package of sanctions. if not now, then when?— if not now, then when? it is vital that after this _ if not now, then when? it is vital that after this first _ if not now, then when? it is vital that after this first barrage, - if not now, then when? it is vital that after this first barrage, we | that after this first barrage, we work_ that after this first barrage, we work in — that after this first barrage, we work in lock— that after this first barrage, we work in lock step _ that after this first barrage, we work in lock step with - that after this first barrage, we work in lock step with friends l that after this first barrage, we . work in lock step with friends and allies_ work in lock step with friends and allies around _ work in lock step with friends and allies around the _ work in lock step with friends and allies around the world _ work in lock step with friends and allies around the world and - work in lock step with friends and allies around the world and we i allies around the world and we squeeze — allies around the world and we squeeze him _ allies around the world and we squeeze him simultaneously. i

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