Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 23, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

1:30 pm
took place in march 1890 by men who were called peaky blinders. and this is his great grandson, professor carl chinn, whose books have debunked some of the show�*s myths. it's really important to bear in mind that the real peaky blinders were not glamorous, well—dressed, charismatic antiheroes. they were vicious and vile backstreet thugs. super fans love dressing up to show their devotion. there is even a peaky blinders festival in birmingham later this year. it's lovely to see places you know as a brummie. because you're like, i've been there, i've been in that pub, i know that road. you have a very powerful enemy... now the waiting is nearly over, and it doesn't look like tommy shelby is going to go quietly. this won't be the end of it. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. time for a look at the weather, here's ben rich.
1:31 pm
those places that had flooding today i seeing something brighter and looking and feeling a bit springlike. but there is something more wintry in the way. this area ablett pressure approaching the north—west and a frontal system already bringing rain to parts of scotland and northern ireland. that will move to the south—east living colder air behind. so this band of rain pushing across scotland and northern ireland down into northern england. ahead of that sunny spells and behind its wintry showers starting to develop and turning increasingly windy with gusts of 60 miles an hour in parts of north—west scotland. temperatures also dropping away as the afternoon wears on. through this evening and tonight a band of rain continues to sink southeast with wintry weather on the back edge. it is these wintry showers in parts of scotland and northern ireland that have caused this yellow warning to be issued for snow of up to 20 centimetres over
1:32 pm
the hills in scotland but also for some lightening in amongst the showers. so some hail and snow and lightening potentially in these showers. some snow potentially of a higher ground. quite a mild night towards the south but cold further north and those wintry showers continue to pile on across scotland and northern ireland even to quite low levels through the morning. tending to confine the snow to the hills in the afternoon. some snow in the showers across england and wales especially over high ground once again. quite a windy day particularly gusty on some excels spots in the north and west. —— exposed spots. it could be blizzard conditions for some temperatures north to south between five and 9 degrees. but as we get into friday something we've not seen much of lately, high pressure building its way into the picture and that should
1:33 pm
give us a mostly dry and to the week. we in eastern parts but they clear away and then quite a lot of sunshine on friday. the wind light and the temperature is higher at seven, 12 degrees. and the weekend set to start on a dry note with the best of the sunshine towards the south and east of the uk. sunday drive for many but some rain in parts of the north—west. a reminder of our top story. the prime minister promises to spend further military support to the ukraine as the country tells its citizens to leave russia immediately. that's all from the bbc news at one — so it's goodbye from me — and on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s news teams where you are. good afternoon.
1:34 pm
i'm chetan pathak. it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news... good morning. amid the ukraine—russia crisis — it looks almost certain that european football's governing body uefa will no longer hold this season's champions league final in st petersberg after several countries, including the uk introduced sanctions against russia. the 68,000 seater gazprom stadium had been selected as this season's venue. uefa said it's "closely monitoring the situation" and "any decision will be made in due course if necessary". the champions league final is still expected to be played on the 28th of may. london mayor sadiq khan says the english capital is ready to step in with the tottenham hotspur stadium one option. wembley�*s also under consideration but is due to host the league two and championship play—off finals on that same weekend. manchester united are one of four english clubs hoping to reach that final, they're away at atletico madrid in the first leg of their last 16 tie tonight. this was united manager ralf rangnick�*s response when he was asked if the final should be moved away from russia. this is something for uefa and maybe even for some
1:35 pm
politicians to decide upon. i think we all hope — not only here in england, but in the whole of europe, if not in the rest of the world — that things will de—escalate. nobody could really be interested in a sort of war within europe. so this is more important, actually, than a champions league game, if we're honest. next to tennis. then world number three alexander zverev has apologised after being thrown out of the mexican open for attacking the empire's chair at the end of a doubles match. icy went to a deciding tie—break in which they live argued with the umpire over that line call and once the decision was made to let his frustration out on the empire's chair. he has now been withdrawn from the tournament for unsportsmanlike contact. the
1:36 pm
smack conduct. he has taken to social media to say... ——conduct. he has taken to social media to say... andy murray's bid to reach 700 wins on the atp tour will have to wait a little longer after losing to jannik sinner at the dubai tennis championships. another second round exit for andy murray who has gone out of the stage for his past four tournaments dating out to the australian open last month. the decisive break, tight first, much more dominant in the second winning four of the final five games to a 7—56— to win. emma raducanu was forced to retire in a real marathon match in mexico overnight — her first competitive outing since defeat at the australian open. the reigning us open champion was top seed at the guadalajara 0pen,
1:37 pm
but was clearly struggling with her left hip after spending three hours and 36 minutes on court in herfirst round match against australia's daria saville. raducanu was down a break in the deciding set when she called it a day. mixed fortunes for british riders. mac having this crashing early on but managed to complete the 112 mile stage. miss murk cavendish. adam yates is up to fourth overall after stage four of the uae tour. after 112 miles of riding it came down to a battle between the briton who rides for ineos grenadiers and tour de france champion tadej pogacar. the slovenian had enough energy left to take the victory and the overall lead. yates is now 15 seconds behind him with three stages to go. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport there are multiple calls for sanctions against russia to be more
1:38 pm
punitive after president putin ordered his troops into those two areas in eastern ukraine. usa, uk, germany have responded with a range of measures. the uk has imposed sanctions on five russian banks and three wealthy russian businessmen. president biden announced sanctions on two big banks and has cut off part of the russian economy from international financial systems. germany has put on hold a big gas pipeline nord stream two which would have doubled the flow of russian gas to the region. he was cutting up or shufs to the region. he was cutting up or shut�*s access to their banks and financial markets as well as banning —— the financial markets as well as banning -- the eu financial markets as well as banning —— the eu has cut off russia's access to their banks and financial markets as well as banning trade. icy was a hot topic at prime minster�*s questions. icy was a hot topic at prime minster's questions.- icy was a hot topic at prime minster's questions. mist and seaker, minster's questions. mist and speaker. we _ minster's questions. mist and speaker, we all _ minster's questions. mist and speaker, we all want - minster's questions. mist and speaker, we all want to - minster's questions. mist and speaker, we all want to deter aggression in europe. we are not
1:39 pm
dealing with breakaway republics. putin is not a peacekeeper. a sovereign nation has been invaded. the prime minster promised that in the event an invasion he would release a full package of sanctions. if not now, then when? went back as if not now, then when? went back as i say, the uk have been out in front offering military support ukraine and i am gratefulfor what he said yesterday about the need to make sure that we keep ammunition in reserve for what, as you say, could be a protracted struggle over this issue. let be a protracted struggle over this issue. , , ., ., , ., issue. let us be in no doubt about the extent — issue. let us be in no doubt about the extent of— issue. let us be in no doubt about the extent of the _ issue. let us be in no doubt about the extent of the package - issue. let us be in no doubt about the extent of the package which i issue. let us be in no doubt about l the extent of the package which has already been set out yesterday and what we are already doing, mr speaker, because i don't think people quite realise the uk is out in front and we have sanctioned 275 individuals already. yesterday we announced measures that placed banks where £37 million under sanctions in addition to more oligarchs. mr
1:40 pm
speaker, that is more to come and we will be stopping russia from raising sovereign debt, stopping companies, russian companies from raising russian companies from raising russian money and stopping russian companies, as i said yesterday, even clearing sterling and links on international markets. that will hit putin where it hurts but it is absolutely vital that after this first barrage we work in lockstep with friends and allies around the world. we squeeze them simultaneously in london, in paris, in new low in munich at the same time. unity, mr speaker is absolutely vital —— in new york, in munich. i absolutely vital -- in new york, in munich. ., ., munich. i hear what the prime minister says _ munich. i hear what the prime minister says about _ munich. i hear what the prime | minister says about sequencing munich. i hear what the prime - minister says about sequencing and further sanctions. there has already beenin further sanctions. there has already been in invasion and is clearly a
1:41 pm
concern across the house that his strategy... i accept unintentionally. could send the wrong message. so if the prime minister... if the prime minister now... full package of sanctions including excluding russia from financial mechanisms like swift and a ban on trading in russian sovereign debt he will have the full support of the house. will he do so? mr speaker, iam support of the house. will he do so? mr speaker, i am grateful. support of the house. will he do so? mr speaker, iam grateful. i support of the house. will he do so? mr speaker, i am grateful. i said yesterday and i'm grateful by the way for the general support that the opposition have given, notjust to our economic sanctions but also to the package of military support that, as i have said, will intensify. what we want to see, mr speaker, is de—escalation by vladimir putin. that is still hope that he will see sense but we are already very rapidly to escalate our sanctions, as i have set out. and
1:42 pm
under the measures that this house has already approved, we can now target, mr speaker, any russian entity, any russian individual. we can already target notjust entity, any russian individual. we can already target not just the breakaway republics, the so—called breakaway republics, the so—called breakaway republics, the so—called breakaway republics in donetsk and luhansk, we can target members of the duma voted to recognise them. this is the most far—reaching piece of legislation of its kind and i'm glad that it has to support. keir starmer. glad that it has to support. keir starmer- it _ glad that it has to support. keir starmer. it does _ glad that it has to support. keir starmer. it does have - glad that it has to support. keir starmer. it does have my - glad that it has to support. keir. starmer. it does have my support glad that it has to support. keir- starmer. it does have my support and if used we will — starmer. it does have my support and if used we will support _ starmer. it does have my support and if used we will support it. _ starmer. it does have my support and if used we will support it. we - starmer. it does have my support and if used we will support it. we must. if used we will support it. we must also do more to defeat putin's campaign of lies and disinformation. russia today is his personal propaganda tool. —— russia today. i can see no reason why it should be allowed to continue to broadcast in this country. will the prime minister now ask 0fcom to review its
1:43 pm
licence? i minister now ask 0fcom to review its licence? , , licence? i believe my right honourable _ licence? i believe my right honourable friend - licence? i believe my right honourable friend the - licence? i believe my right - honourable friend the secretary of state for culture media and support has already asked 0fcom to review that matter but what i will say mr speaker is that we live in a democracy and we live in a country which believes in free speech and i think it is important that we should leave it up to 0fcom rather than to politicians to decide which media organisations to ban. that is what russia does!— organisations to ban. that is what i russia does!_ request russia does! keir starmer. request was for review— russia does! keir starmer. request was for review and _ russia does! keir starmer. request was for review and i _ russia does! keir starmer. request was for review and i am _ russia does! keir starmer. request was for review and i am very - russia does! keir starmer. request was for review and i am very glad . russia does! keir starmer. request| was for review and i am very glad to hear that that the is now happening. mr speaker, iam not hear that that the is now happening. mr speaker, i am not going to be deflected from the unity that this house needs at the moment. at the weekend, the prime minister said that if russia invades ukraine he will open up the matryoshka dolls of russian owned companies and russian
1:44 pm
owned entities to find the ultimate beneficiaries within. well, russia has invaded and it is time to act. if the prime minister brings forward the required legislation to do this, he will have labour support. so will he will have labour support. so will he commit to do so in the coming days? he commit to do so in the coming da s? ~ , mr he commit to do so in the comingl days?_ mr speaker, he commit to do so in the coming - days?_ mr speaker, we days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing — days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing forward, _ days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing forward, as _ days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing forward, as i _ days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing forward, as i said, - days? prime minster. mr speaker, we are bringing forward, as i said, in - are bringing forward, as i said, in the next wave of sanctions measures that will stop all russian banks, oligarchs and individuals raising money on london markets and we are also accelerating, mr speaker, the economic crime bill which will enable us in the uk to peel back the... in the next session, to peel back the facade, to peel back the facade of beneficial ownership of property in the uk and of companies. it has gone on for far too long and we are going to tackle it under this
1:45 pm
government, mr speaker, but on all these measures i think it is very, very important that the house remembers they are more effective when all financial centres move forward together and that is what the uk has been organising. mr the uk has been organising. ij�*i speaker, i think the uk has been organising. “i speaker, i think i heard the prime minister say that the economic crime bill will be in the next session. i hope i miss her back but i can assure him if he brings it forward in this session in coming days it will have our support. —— i hope i misheard that. there is no reason to delay that. as it stands, the bill would allow unfettered donations from overseas to be made to uk political parties from shell companies and individuals with no connection to the uk. labour has proposed amendments to protect our democracy from the flood of foreign money drowning our politics. we can all now see how serious this is. so,
1:46 pm
will the prime minister now change course and support these measures in the house of lords? mr course and support these measures in the house of lords?— the house of lords? mr speaker, we have very tough _ the house of lords? mr speaker, we have very tough laws, _ the house of lords? mr speaker, we have very tough laws, tough - the house of lords? mr speaker, we have very tough laws, tough rules i the house of lords? mr speaker, we have very tough laws, tough rules in| have very tough laws, tough rules in this country to stop foreign donations. we don't expect foreign donations. we don't expect foreign donations. you have to be on the register of, in the uk, and actual register of, in the uk, and actual register to give to a uk political party and before he starts joking around, mr speaker, iwouldjust remind him that the largest single corporate donation to the labour party came from a member of the chinese communist party. after meeting with ukrainian consul general in scotland's first minister urged the uk government to go further and target russian... in further and target russian... i�*i london. we have quite rightly had some very tough rhetoric from the uk
1:47 pm
government in recent weeks. we now need to see that x max by accident. that is important because this is a critical moment for uk but also critical moment for uk but also critical moment for uk but also critical moment of the world —— rhetoric matched by accident. the choice at this moment in history is to hit putin hard with the severest of sanctions so that he understands there will be consequences for this imperialist aggression or we don't do that and he becomes even further emboldened so it is really important that the international community stands together in solidarity with ukraine as a defenders independence and sovereignty but also stand together to act in a way that shows putin and dictators like him that there are serious consequences for this kind of action.— this kind of action. much of the uk do? london _ this kind of action. much of the uk do? london is _ this kind of action. much of the uk do? london is awash _ this kind of action. much of the uk do? london is awash with - this kind of action. much of the uk do? london is awash with russian | do? london is awash with russian money and _ do? london is awash with russian money and the — do? london is awash with russian money and the uk _ do? london is awash with russian money and the uk government i do? london is awash with russian i money and the uk government must target that wealth, those assets, wherever they are in the russian interests that benefit from those assets and wealth. now, they will
1:48 pm
know where those assets are but they must be a very serious systematic approach to sanctions and there must be an effort made to ensure that traders disrupted so that russians feel that obviously with all sanctions you want it to be the that suffer, not the people of russia, but this is a moment where putin has to be left in no doubt because what we have seen in the past with crimea and gora, georgia before it is that the world is a gas for a period of time but then it moves on and putin is left to consolidate its games and think that he can continue to act in this way of no consequence whatsoever.— this way of no consequence whatsoever. ~ . ., , whatsoever. what will scottish government — whatsoever. what will scottish government do? _ whatsoever. what will scottish government do? because i whatsoever. what will scottish | government do? because there whatsoever. what will scottish i government do? because there will whatsoever. what will scottish - government do? because there will be a consequence too. we government do? because there will be a consequence too.— a consequence too. we are very keen to work with _ a consequence too. we are very keen to work with uk — a consequence too. we are very keen to work with uk government - a consequence too. we are very keen to work with uk government firstly i to work with uk government firstly to work with uk government firstly to see uk government go further and i hope we will see the uk go further. to discuss with them to see how we can ensure that russian elite interests in scotland can be part of this approach to sanctions should
1:49 pm
that be necessary and although the scottish government is not a responsible for international affairs we will be a voice calling for the international community to stay united in solidarity with ukraine. we havejust been having discussions with the consul general and also the leader of the ukrainian community here in scotland. we have got a role to play. at times there is ukraine will be anxious to ensure that there were supportive ukrainian community and supporting them and giving their support to their country. giving their support to their count . ., , country. one of the things. .. keir starmer proposer _ country. one of the things. .. keir starmer proposer rt _ country. one of the things. .. keir starmer proposer rt the - country. one of the things. .. keir starmer proposer rt the russian | starmer proposer rt the russian television station should be allowed to broadcast here. you agree with that? ., , to broadcast here. you agree with that? . , , ., , that? that is in the serious question — that? that is in the serious question about _ that? that is in the serious question about whether i that? that is in the serious question about whether rtj that? that is in the serious i question about whether rt should continue to have a licence and i wouldn't wish to take it very seriously indeed.
1:50 pm
just tells what your organisation transparency uk campaign is full. we work transparency uk campaign is full. - work to promote integrity and against corruption around the world and a huge part of that in terms of events today is to address the amount of dirty money in international financial flows that find their way into the british economy which the national crime agency estimates be around £100 billion a year and it is that sort of money that we really want to be seen the target of an effective sanctions regime in response to the current situation. did sanctions regime in response to the current situation.— current situation. did you say 100 million a year _ current situation. did you say100 million a year or— current situation. did you say 100 million a year or 100 _ current situation. did you say 100 million a year or 100 billion i current situation. did you say 100 million a year or 100 billion a i million a year or 100 billion a year? million a year or 100 billion a ear? ' :: :: million a year or 100 billion a ear? ' $1 $1 , ., million a year or 100 billion a ear? ' i: i: , ., . million a year or 100 billion a ear? ' :: i: , ., .,y ., million a year or 100 billion a ear'iiij, ., .,y ., , ., year? 100 billion a year is what the national crime _ year? 100 billion a year is what the national crime agency _ year? 100 billion a year is what the national crime agency estimates. l year? 100 billion a year is what the i national crime agency estimates. can ou national crime agency estimates. can you explain what dirty money is? ed dirty money is the process of corruption from other countries around the world, in ben lomond, theft, bribery, state capture assets that are stolen from low and
1:51 pm
middle—income countries are also money belonging with those who have something to hide. the problem is that those numbers are based on what we can see in the uk has a particular problem with the secrecy that it allows for example from the initiative of property in the uk which is often a target for those who have got something to hide. bud who have got something to hide. and so --eole who have got something to hide. fific so people would use the dirty who have got something to hide. e"ic so people would use the dirty money to buy expensive houses. what else? house are up in london? —— how does it end up in london? we have estimated our research just over the last week that there is £1.5 billion worth of property and other assets which is linked to the kremlin regime or two prominent russians who have involvement, loan involvement in corruption cases. that is what we can see based upon company property ownership records but it probably is just the tip of the iceberg because
1:52 pm
all too often it finds its way into the country through anonymous shell companies based in the british 0verseas territories and through use and abuse of the companies register here, allowing owners of the significant british assets to remain anonymous. —— true owners. in significant british assets to remain anonymous. -- true owners. in terms ofthe anonymous. -- true owners. in terms of the calls _ anonymous. -- true owners. in terms of the calls for— anonymous. -- true owners. in terms of the calls for the _ anonymous. -- true owners. in terms of the calls for the british _ of the calls for the british government to impose more tax sanctions and tougher sanctions, what would you be suggesting it could do, bearing in mind you've just said those shell companies anonymous, for example? {3.35 just said those shell companies anonymous, for example? gas and coming know. _ anonymous, for example? gas and coming know, the _ anonymous, for example? gas and coming know, the sanctions i anonymous, for example? gas and coming know, the sanctions that i anonymous, for example? gas and i coming know, the sanctions that have been announced against individual so far are relatively modest. three people. they are people who have already been sanctioned another regime so the government has perhaps take the low hanging thus far. we recognise there is clearly a diplomatic tightrope to be walked on this incredibly difficult and fragile situation at the moment but also of other sanctions against individuals are to follow they need to come relatively quickly... don't
1:53 pm
necessarily have time to move assets out of the country but really the urgent thing to do with the secrecy problem is we debated in the commons early this afternoon is to bring forward that economic crime bill because that has measures in it which would shut down that massive secrecy loophole around overseas property ownership in the uk which has been allowed to persist for far too many years now. {eek has been allowed to persist for far too many years now.— has been allowed to persist for far too many years now. ok. and they san that too many years now. ok. and they sang that comic _ too many years now. ok. and they sang that comic financial— too many years now. ok. and they sang that comic financial sanctionsj sang that comic financial sanctions that have been imposed on the three billionaires and five banks, but particularly billionaires, what will stop them doing? it particularly billionaires, what will stop them doing?— particularly billionaires, what will stop them doing? it will stop them moving money _ stop them doing? it will stop them moving money into _ stop them doing? it will stop them moving money into and _ stop them doing? it will stop them moving money into and out - stop them doing? it will stop them moving money into and out of i stop them doing? it will stop them moving money into and out of the | stop them doing? it will stop them i moving money into and out of the uk. it will usually freeze their assets in this country and they usually carry a travel ban with them as well. we are talking about billionaires and we expect it will be a source of irritation to some individuals but as we said they have been sanctioned elsewhere before so they used to this to the extent to which this initial batch of sanctions causes real disruption and reconsideration on matters in the
1:54 pm
coming when the mains to the kremlin remains to be seen. —— reconsideration on matters in the kremlin remains to be seen. thanks for talking to us. children in the philippines were forced to learn via online classes for two years. volunteer teachers in the south of the country have come up with an idea to keep children up to date with education. it is wendy. this railway track in the south of the philippines as well use which made it the perfect choice for a creative project. volunteer teachers of this wooden trolley along the rails visiting three different neighbourhoods a day three times a week. it is packed to the gunwales with blackboards books and pencils that they used to teach more than 60
1:55 pm
children. the that they used to teach more than 60 children. ., ., , . ., , children. the main ob'ective of this mobile library h children. the main ob'ective of this mobile library is i children. the main objective of this mobile library is firstly _ children. the main objective of this mobile library is firstly to _ children. the main objective of this mobile library is firstly to teach i mobile library is firstly to teach those struggling to lead to read and secondly to teach counting, adding and subtracting to children that are poor with numbers.— poor with numbers. schools in the phili ines poor with numbers. schools in the philippines was — poor with numbers. schools in the philippines was shot _ poor with numbers. schools in the philippines was shot for _ poor with numbers. schools in the philippines was shot forjust i poor with numbers. schools in thej philippines was shot forjust under two years because of the covid—19 pandemic on the rise in a con infections has meant that many are still closed so when the mobile classroom arrives the kids can't wait to get their hands on the books. it is important that we do this especially now there is a pandemic and the children cannot do face—to—face learning. education is very important for these children. most of the volunteer teachers come from poor back on the sale so they know what it is like to have nothing and are delighted to have the opportunity to help these children, fire their imaginations and keep their dreams alive. when car, bbc news. a front man of the psychedelic
1:56 pm
rock band has died at the age of 76. the group's debut hit, white state of pale reach the top of the chart 0f pale reach the top of the chart —— a whiter shade of pale reached the top of the charts in 1976. now it is time for the weather. much needed drier weather after the flooding problem is we have had lately but for the north—east swell of cloud approaching on the satellite picture, an area of low pressure with a weather front which has been bringing cloud and rain and is that funk continues its journey south eastwards it will deals with much colder air spreading from the north during tonight into tomorrow with
1:57 pm
some wintry showers starting to develop behind our weatherfronts, outbreaks of rain pushing down into parts of northern england, north wales by the end of today, ahead of it may need which is one or two showers, going to be windy out there for all of us, gusts of 50 to 60 mph in some places and temperatures really dropping away as we head into the evening across the northern half of the uk. we start to 60 mph in some places and temperatures really dropping away as we head into the evening across the northern half of the uk. we start to get on that cold air. as are weather fun can its journey south—east was through this evening and tonight is in whether potentially in the back edge but it is these showers developing across northern ireland and scotland to give cause for concern, mess of his yellow running for up to 20 centimetres of snow over high ground but also the chance of —— met office yellow warning. snow it quite low levels of time, what a fun journey south—east was a crossing in wales, temperatures dropping way behind and potentially they could be some ice as well. frontal system clearing from the south—east tomorrow. someone and the—iness package perhaps over high ground and then
1:58 pm
it's sunshine and showers stay and sometimes will be wintry but the high ground in england and wales in at least four times to low levels in northern ireland parties of scotland still accompanied with some hail, some thunder and lightning. that's no is really piling up about scotland. another windy day, gusts we can expect gusting up to 65 mph potentially the most exposed spots in the north—west. the colder feel that factor in the strength of the wind and icy will feel cold from that. high pressure building its way and maybe try into the week. lots of cloud into the day, cloud and north—west later and feeling a little milder, lighter winds, two, 7-11, little milder, lighter winds, two, 7—11, maybe 12 degrees in the far south—west. we can star striker more cloud of the north—west. that will spread eastwards bringing rain for some on based in part should stay
1:59 pm
dry.
2:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines: ukraine tells its citizens to leave russia immediately, saying it is becoming increasingly difficult to protect them. in becoming increasingly difficult to protect them-— protect them. in the last hour, president _ protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky _ protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky has - protect them. in the last hour, president zelensky has called l protect them. in the last hour, l president zelensky has called for tougher sanctions on russia. translation:— tougher sanctions on russia. translation: ~ ., , translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the russian _ translation: ukraine welcomes new sanctions on the russian federation. l sanctions on the russian federation. we hope _ sanctions on the russian federation. we hope and expect that these sanctions will be enhanced in the nearest _ sanctions will be enhanced in the nearest future. the government has defended the scale of sanctions imposed on russian billionaires and banks after further criticism from the labour party. it is vital that after this first
2:01 pm
barrage, we work in lockstep with friends and allies around the world and we squeeze him.

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on