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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 24, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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hello, welcome to bbc news. the headlines... russia launches a major military assault on ukraine by land, air and sea. there have been explosions near major cities, including the capital kyiv. as the russian army moved in, there was international condemnation of vladimir putin. and let us take you straight to the house of commons where there is now a debate and the prime minister will be talking to mps. prime minister will be talking to mp5. with prime minister will be talking to mps. with permission i will update a house on our response to president putin's onslaught against a free and sovereign european nation. shortly after for sovereign european nation. shortly
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afterfor ami spoke to sovereign european nation. shortly after for ami spoke to president zelensky of ukraine is the first missiles struck has is beautiful and innocent country and brave people and i assured him of the unwavering support of the united kingdom. i can tell the house that, at this stage, ukrainians are offering a fierce defence of their families and their country. and i know that every honourable member will share my admiration for their resolve. earlier today, president putin delivered another televised address and offer offered the absurd pretext that he wanted the denazification of ukraine. he is hurling his military regime against a bespoke neighbour in breach of his own explicit pledge and every principle of civilised behaviour between states. spurning the best efforts of this country and our allies to avoid bloodshed. for
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this, putin will stand condemned in the eyes of the world and of history. he will never be able to cleanse the blood of ukraine from his hands. and although the uk and our allies tried every avenue for diplomacy until the final hour, i am driven to conclude that putin was always determined to attack his neighbour no matter what we did. now we see him for what he is. a bloodstained aggressor who believes in imperial conquest. i am proud that britain did everything within our power to help ukraine prepare for this onslaught and we will do our utmost to offer more help as our brave friends defend their homeland. our embassy took the precaution on the 18th of february of relocating from kyiv to another city in western ukraine, where our ambassador continues to work with the ukrainian
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authorities and to support british nationals. now we have a clear mission. diplomatically, politically, economically and, eventually, literally, this hideous and barbarous venture of vladimir putin must end in failure. at the g7 meeting this afternoon we agreed to work in unity to maximise the economic price that putin will pay his aggression, and this must include ending in europe has a collective dependence on russian oil and gas. it has served to empower putin for too long, so i welcome the german chancellor's excellent decision to halt nord stream 2. countries that comprise half the world economy and now engaged in maximising pressure, economic pressure on one that makes up a mere
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2%, for our part today, the uk is enhancing the most severe package of economic sanctions that russia has ever seen. with new financial measures, we are taking new powers to target russian finance in addition to the banks we have already sanctioned this week. today, in concert with the united states, we are imposing a full asset freeze on the tv. more broadly, these powers will enable us to totally exclude russian banks from the uk financial system, which is by far the largest in europe, stopping them from accessing sterling and clearing payments through the uk. —— asset freeze on vtb. with half of russia's trade currently in us dollars and sterling, i am trade currently in us dollars and sterling, iam pleased trade currently in us dollars and sterling, i am pleased to tell the house that the united states is taking similar measures. these powers will also enable us to ban russian state and private companies from raising funds in the uk,
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banning dealing with their securities and making loans to them. we will limit the amount of money that russian nationals will be able to deposit in their uk bank accounts and sanctions will also be applied to belarus for its role in the assault on ukraine. overall, we will be imposing asset freezes on more than 100 new entities and individuals on top of the hundreds we have already announced. this includes all the major manufacturers that support putin's war machine. furthermore, we are also banning aeroflot from the uk. on top of these financial measures and in full concert with the united states and eu, we will introduce new trade restrictions and stringent export controls similar to those that they in the us are implementing. we will bring forward new legislation to ban
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the export of all dual use items to russia, including a range of high—end and critical technological equipment and components in sectors including electronics, telecommunications and aerospace. legislation to implement this will be made early next week. these trade sanctions will constrain russia's military, industrial and technological capabilities for years to come. we are bringing forward measures on unexplained wealth orders with the economic crime bill to be introduced before the house rises for easter and we will set out further details before easter on a range of policies to be included in the full bill in the next session, including on reforms to companies house and a register of overseas property ownership. we will set up a new dedicated kleptocracy sell in the national crime agency to target
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sanctions evasion and target corrupt russian assets in the uk, meaning oligarchs in london will have nowhere to hide. mr speaker, i know that this house will have great interest in a potential of cutting russia out from swift, and i can confirm, as i have always said, that nothing is off the table. but for all these measures to be successful, it is vital that we have the unity of our partners, the unity in the g7 and otherforums, and, mr speaker, russian investors are already delivering their verdict on the wisdom of putin's actions, and so far today, wisdom of putin's actions, and so fartoday, russian wisdom of putin's actions, and so far today, russian stocks are down by as much as 45%, wiping $250 billion from their value in the
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biggest one—day decline on record. see the bank, russia's biggest spender is down by 45% and gazprom down by 49%, while the rouble is down by 49%, while the rouble is down to record lows against the dollar. we will continue on a remorseless mission to squeeze russia from the global economy piece by piece day by day and week by week, and we will of course use britain's position every international forum to condemn the onslaught against ukraine and we will counter the kremlin�*s blizzard of lies and disinformation by telling the truth about putin's war of choice and his war of aggression. and we will work with our allies on the urgent need to protect other european countries that are not members of nato and who could become targets of putin's playbook of
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subversion and aggression. and we will resist any creeping temptation to accept what putin is doing today — there can be no creeping normalisation, not now, not in the months to come, not in the years ahead. we must strengthen nato�*s defences still further, so today i called for a meeting of nato leaders which will take place tomorrow, and i will be convening the countries that contribute to the joint expeditionary force, which is led by the united kingdom and comprises both nato and non—nato members. last saturday, i warned that this invasion would have global economic consequences and this morning the oil price has risen strongly. the government will do everything possible to safeguard our own people from the repercussions to the cost of living. and of course, we stand
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ready to protect our country from any threats, including in cyberspace. above all, the house will realise the hard and heavy truth that we now live in a continent where an expansionist power deploying one of the world's most formidable military machines is trying to redraw the map of europe in a blood and conquer an independent state by force of arms. and it is vital for the safety of every nation that putin's squalid venture should ultimately fail and be seen to fail. however long it takes, that will be steadfast and unflinching role of the united kingdom, and i hope that every member of this house and of our great allies, certain that together we have the power and the will to defend of peace and justice as we have always done. and i say to the
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people of russia, again, his president hasjust people of russia, again, his president has just authorised an onslaught against a fellow slavic people, i cannot believe that this horror is being done in your name or that you really want the pariah status that these actions will bring to the putin regime. and to our ukrainian friends, in this moment of agony, i say that we are with you and we are on your side. you are right —— you're right to choose your own destiny is a right to united kingdom and our allies will always defend, and in that spirit, ijoin you in saying... and i commend the statement to the house.— statement to the house. leader of the opposition. — statement to the house. leader of the opposition, keir— statement to the house. leader of the opposition, keir starmer. - statement to the house. leader of i the opposition, keir starmer. thank ou, mr the opposition, keir starmer. thank you. mr speaker- — the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker. in _ the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker. in this _ the opposition, keir starmer. thank you, mr speaker. in this dark - the opposition, keir starmer. t�*ié'riaz you, mr speaker. in this dark hour, our thoughts, you, mr speaker. in this dark hour, ourthoughts, our you, mr speaker. in this dark hour, our thoughts, our solidarity, and our thoughts, our solidarity, and our resolve with the ukrainian
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people. invading troops marched through the streets, missiles shall their cities and they have been cast into a war through no fault of their own because putin fears their freedom and because he knows that no people will choose to live under his rule unless. to do so at the barrel of a gun. the consequences of putin's war of aggression will be horrendous and tragic for the people of ukraine. but also for the russian people, who had been plunged into chaos by a violent elite, who have stolen their wealth, stolen their chance of democracy, and stolen their future. chance of democracy, and stolen theirfuture. and we must prepare ourselves for difficulties here. we will face economic pain as we free
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europe from dependence on russian gas and oil and clean our institutions from money stolen from the russian people. but the british public have always been willing to make sacrifices, to defend democracy on our continent and we will again. the consequences of putin's actions will be felt throughout the world for years, and will be felt throughout the world foryears, and ifear will be felt throughout the world for years, and ifearfor will be felt throughout the world for years, and i fear for decades will be felt throughout the world for years, and ifearfor decades to come. russia's democratic neighbours and every other democracy that lives in the shadow of autocratic power are watching their worst nightmare unfold. so all of us who believe in democracy over dictatorship, in the rule of law over a reign of terror, in freedom over the jackboot of tyranny must unite and take a stand.
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we must suppose the ukrainian people in theirfightand we must suppose the ukrainian people in their fight and we must ensure that putin fails. putin will eventually learn the same lesson that european tyrants learned in the last century, that the result of the world is harder than he imagines, that the people's desire for freedom burns brighter than he can ever extinguish, and that the light of liberty will prevail over his darkness. forthat liberty will prevail over his darkness. for that to happen, we must make a clean break with the failed approach to handling putin, which, after georgia, after crimea, after donbas, has fed his belief that the benefits of aggression outweigh the costs. we must finally show him that he is wrong. that means doing all that we can to help ukraine defend herself, by providing
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weapons, equipment and financial assistance as well as humanitarian support for the ukrainian people. we must urgently reinforce and reassure our nato allies in eastern europe who now stand at the frontier of putin's aggression. and the hardest possible sanctions must be taken against the putin regime. it must be isolated. it's finance is frozen, its ability to function crippled. that means excluding russia from financial mechanisms like swift and banning trade in russian sovereign debt. i welcome the set of sanctions outlined by the prime ministerjust now and pledge opposition support forfurther measures. now and pledge opposition support for further measures. and there are changes we must make here in the uk. for too long, our country has been a safe haven for the money that putin and his fellow bandits stole from
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the russian people. it must now change. cracking open the shell companies in which stolen money is hidden will require registration. bring it forward immediately, prime minister, and labour will support it, along with the other measures the prime minister has just outlined. thank you, and we will support it. mr speaker, this must be a turning point in history. we must look back and say, this terrible day was actually went putin doomed himself and doomed his plan to reassert russian force as a means of controlling eastern europe to defeat. we know how putin operates, so we know how to defeat him. he seeks division, so we must stand united. he hopes for inaction, so we must take a stand. he believes that
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we are too corrupted to do the right thing, so we must prove him wrong. i believe we can, and in this dark hour, we can step towards the light. thank you, mr speaker. i want to say how grateful i am for the thames in which he hasjust spoken and the robust support he is offering to the government and to the western alliance, mr speaker, at a very difficult time, and i think the whole house can turn to some of the whole house can turn to some of theissues the whole house can turn to some of the issues that he raise and can be proud of the role the uk has played in pioneering military support, logistical support to the ukrainians, the role we played in bringing together a ferocious package of sanctions which we will now implement, and we will bring our allies together, mr speaker, to
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protect nato, to show the president —— that president putin will get a tougher western alliance as a result of his actions, not a weaker western alliance, and i think that events will show that the russian president has profoundly miscalculated. he believes he is doing this for his own political advantage. i believe the exact opposite will prove to be the exact opposite will prove to be the case, because of the resistance that will be mounted against what he is doing, notjust in ukraine but around the world. we will support those ukrainians, we will support them economically, diplomatically, politically and, yes, military as well, and i know in due time we will succeed. . . ., , succeed. can i welcome my honourable friend a's statement _ succeed. can i welcome my honourable friend a's statement this _ succeed. can i welcome my honourable friend a's statement this afternoon? i friend a's statement this afternoon? this house _ friend a's statement this afternoon? this house and this country are united — this house and this country are united in— this house and this country are united in our defence of democracy and our— united in our defence of democracy and our support for the ukrainian
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people — and our support for the ukrainian people. vladimir putin has initiated war in— people. vladimir putin has initiated war in mainland europe. the response must _ war in mainland europe. the response must be _ war in mainland europe. the response must be unequivocal and absolutely clean _ must be unequivocal and absolutely clean so _ must be unequivocal and absolutely clear. so will my honourable friend confirm _ clear. so will my honourable friend confirm that the government is putting in— confirm that the government is putting in place every possible economic sanction so that russia feels _ economic sanction so that russia feels absolutely the cold wind of isolation — feels absolutely the cold wind of isolation and the russian people understand that vladimir putin has brought— understand that vladimir putin has brought their state to a pariah state? — brought their state to a pariah state? |— brought their state to a pariah state? . ~ , brought their state to a pariah state? ., ~ , ., ., state? i thank my honourable friend and she is absolutely _ state? i thank my honourable friend and she is absolutely right - state? i thank my honourable friend and she is absolutely right in - state? i thank my honourable friend and she is absolutely right in what l and she is absolutely right in what the government is setting out to do and i do indeed believe that that will be the result that putin and his... . ~ his... let me thank the prime minister for _ his... let me thank the prime minister for advanced - his... let me thank the prime minister for advanced copy i his... let me thank the prime minister for advanced copy of| his... let me thank the prime . minister for advanced copy of the statement and let me also welcome the very close contact he has kept with the ukrainian president, of
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course, importantly, overnight. i was grateful i had the chance to meet this afternoon with the ukrainian ambassador to the uk and with ukrainian mps. our thoughts and support is very much with each and every one of them, as it is with all other people of ukraine. although last night's events have been proper sized and predicted for some time, the act of russian violence, aggression and tyranny are no less shocking. what we are witnessing is a full—scale invasion. it is an act of war. this is, first and foremost, an unprovoked attack on the peace and innocence of ukraine and of its people. but it is equally an attack on international law, an attack on our european democracy, an attack on a piece that our continent has so carefully built over the last 75 years. president putin and president
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putin alone bears responsibility for these horrific acts, and it is he and his kremlin cabal who must pay a massive price for their actions. it is important to say to the russian people that we know that putin is not acting in their name. he is a dictator, he is an imperialist, he is a tyrant. he is much a threat to his own people as he is to all of us. mr speaker, this is a moment for unity. and it is especially a moment for european unity. all of the economic sanctions that are now finally being implemented have one clear objective, the complete economic isolation of the russian state. can the prime minister confirm that this is the objective and that he has agreed that with his international allies? that economic
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isolation must include sanctions on putin and his network of oligarchs and agents and an expulsion from countries around the world, sanctions on his banks and their ability to borrow and function and sanctions on his energy and mineral companies. and as i said yesterday, it must finally mean clearing up the sera of dirty russian money that has been running through the city of london for years. and i know all the complications involved, but can i ask the prime minister that the actions that have been taken to suspend russia from the swift payment system, one of the steps that would hit the putin regime the hardest, butjust as we rightly seek to punish putin, we must redouble our support and solidarity for the ukrainian people. can the prime minister give further details on the humanitarian aid being deployed and the plans in place to offer refuge and sanctuary where necessary to
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those displaced? and what plans are in place to evacuate the families of uk citizens currently in ukraine given commercial flights have uk citizens currently in ukraine given commercialflights have now stopped? mr speaker, let us not fall for the kremlin propaganda that they are prepared to soak up any sanctions. if we act now, if the sanctions. if we act now, if the sanctions are targeted enough, swift enough, severe enough, if we impose nothing less than economic isolation, putin and his cronies will suffer the consequences of their actions. will suffer the consequences of theiractions. so will suffer the consequences of their actions. so let us act together, stand together, and most of all, let us stand with the people of all, let us stand with the people of ukraine. flan of all, let us stand with the people of ukraine. . of all, let us stand with the people of ukraine-— of ukraine. can i thank the right honourable _ of ukraine. can i thank the right honourable gentleman _ of ukraine. can i thank the right honourable gentleman for - of ukraine. can i thank the right honourable gentleman for the i of ukraine. can i thank the right - honourable gentleman for the wisdom and statesmanship with which he has just spoken. and just on his points in particular, we have put a thousand troops on standby to help with the humanitarian exodus in the adjacent countries, we have people
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in the adjacent countries to help uk nationals come out, and he is quite right, mr speaker, that the way to make the sanctions work as we discussed today in the g7, where there is a great deal of unity, is that we do them together and we do them at the same time, which is what we are doing. speaker: we have some important meetings _ speaker: we have some important meetings and will be run this to 6:30pm — meetings and will be run this to 6:30pm. we will keep a list, like we did the _ 6:30pm. we will keep a list, like we did the other day, to ensure everybody gets a voice. you have to sit down _ everybody gets a voice. you have to sit down it — everybody gets a voice. you have to sit down it is— everybody gets a voice. you have to sit down. it is a very important matten — sit down. it is a very important matten i— sit down. it is a very important matter. i now come to the chair of the foreign — matter. i now come to the chair of the foreign affairs select committee.— the foreign affairs select committee. ., . ., ,., committee. introducing what sound like the tougher— committee. introducing what sound like the tougher sanctions - committee. introducing what sound like the tougher sanctions we - committee. introducing what sound like the tougher sanctions we have | like the tougher sanctions we have seenin like the tougher sanctions we have seen in years. may i ask the prime minister, however, to look wider than simply the russian people and look at those enabling putin's
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economy, those who sit on boards of the businesses that finance them, whether they are former chancellors of germany or former prime ministers of germany or former prime ministers of france? may i ask him to look here close to home at those who enable, who propagate the propaganda thatis enable, who propagate the propaganda that is being used to undermine putin because my own people and three people everywhere and update the treason act to identify them and call them what they are? traitors. can i also ask the prime minister will ask —— one last question, but when he speaks to people around the world, that he speaks the truth through the bbc russian service and in languages other than russian to the people of russia, so they know they do not need to side with the tyrant. i they do not need to side with the rant. . ~ , . they do not need to side with the rant. ., ,, , . ., tyrant. i thank him very much, and he is absolutely _ tyrant. i thank him very much, and he is absolutely right, _ tyrant. i thank him very much, and he is absolutely right, we - tyrant. i thank him very much, and he is absolutely right, we have - tyrant. i thank him very much, and he is absolutely right, we have to i he is absolutely right, we have to look at those who abet the putin regime, and there are many of them
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and we are looking at ways we can address threats to this state, and we are, of course, making sure that the messages from this house, which is so impressive in their unity, should be registered by the people of russia. because we mean no ilk towards them. they are as much, in many ways, the victims as the people of ukraine, this appalling regime, and they need to know what is going on. . ., ~ , , on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what _ on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what is _ on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what is going _ on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what is going on _ on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what is going on with - on. would the prime minister tell us if he can what is going on with the i if he can what is going on with the russian troops going through chernobyl? that sent a chill through a lot of people pass my thoughts when we heard about it. —— a lot of
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people's thoughts. i when we heard about it. -- a lot of people's thoughts.— people's thoughts. i hesitate to cive the people's thoughts. i hesitate to give the house _ people's thoughts. i hesitate to give the house a _ people's thoughts. i hesitate to give the house a running - people's thoughts. i hesitate to - give the house a running commentary on a very fluid and dangerous situation, but to the best of my knowledge, she is right on what she says. mr knowledge, she is right on what she sa s. ~ ., z: knowledge, she is right on what she sa s. ~ ., 11, says. mr speaker, for 50 years, britain gave _ says. mr speaker, for 50 years, britain gave refuge _ says. mr speaker, for 50 years, britain gave refuge to _ says. mr speaker, for 50 years, britain gave refuge to those - britain gave refuge to those expeued britain gave refuge to those expelled from the baltic states. if ukraine gets overwhelmed, will be offered to give sanctuary to a government in exile pending ukraine's future freedom? flit government in exile pending ukraine's future freedom? of course, i thank my honourable _ ukraine's future freedom? of course, i thank my honourable friend. - ukraine's future freedom? of course, i thank my honourable friend. of - i thank my honourable friend. of course, we will give all support that we can logistical or otherwise, as britain always has done, to government in exile, and the point i made to president of ukraine this morning was that it might be necessary for him find a safe place for him and his cabinet to go. ilrrui’ith for him and his cabinet to go. with president putin _ for him and his cabinet to go. tn president putin responsible for
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for him and his cabinet to go. ii�*u president putin responsible for this catastrophic human tragedy, the liberal democrats join all sides to stand in solidarity with the people of ukraine and i thank the prime ministerfor his of ukraine and i thank the prime minister for his statement. today must be a wake—up call, the west has been too complacent over putin's that for too long. we have taken for granted ourfragile that for too long. we have taken for granted our fragile alliances so crucial for the defence of freedom, emboldening putin, this outrageous act of aggression. the west cannot be complacent any longer. so will the government reversed its proposed troop cuts to the british army and offer far greater military support to our nato allies in eastern europe? mr speaker, putin must face the most punitive sanctions, the world must isolate russia like the rogue state it is, including the state backed oil giants, 20% owned by bp. so will the prime minister committed to banning uk investment
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in russian oil and gas companies with immediate effect? mr speaker, on his oint with immediate effect? mr speaker, on his point about _ with immediate effect? mr speaker, on his point about investment - with immediate effect? mr speaker, on his point about investment in - on his point about investment in russian oil and gas, as i have said, we must move away from all our dependencies on russian oil and gas and that is the objective of the uk government. we are lucky in this country in that we have only 3% of our gas that comes from russia, other european countries are in a much more exposed position. on his point about supporting eastern europeans, as he knows, we have doubled the size of our commitment to estonia, we have done bigger in poland, another 350 marines were in the skies above romania, i do not believe there is another country in nato currently doing more to strengthen nato's eastern defences. thank you, mr speaker. we have
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strong historical ties with ukraine so i welcome this robust approach. my so i welcome this robust approach. my constituency also has seen significant property investments by russian investors. can i urge my honourable friend to accelerate the introduction of a register of beneficial ownership of property? she's completely right, and we need to unpeeled the facade of these companies so we can see who owns the property concerned. companies so we can see who owns the preperty concerned-— property concerned. thank you, mr seaker. property concerned. thank you, mr speaker- when _ property concerned. thank you, mr speaker. when he _ property concerned. thank you, mr speaker. when he warned - property concerned. thank you, mr speaker. when he warned that - property concerned. thank you, mr - speaker. when he warned that batman need nothing more to compass their ends than the goodman —— bad men. in his statement, he said our mission is clear. what did he mean by using
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the word militarily? was he referring to rewriting further defence? defensive lessons weapons to enable ukraine to defend itself? yes. defensive lessons weapons to enable ukraine to defend itself?— ukraine to defend itself? yes, i don't want _ ukraine to defend itself? yes, i don't want to — ukraine to defend itself? yes, i don't want to go _ ukraine to defend itself? yes, i don't want to go into _ ukraine to defend itself? yes, i don't want to go into detail, - don't want to go into detail, because it is a very sensitive and difficult business, but yes, mr speaker, we have done, we continue to do so, and i believe i have the support of the house in intending to continue to do so. i thank the prime ministerfor his words and early commitment to the economic crime bill and kleptocracy. will there be a foreign lobbying bill? will there be amendments to data protection act to stop unscrupulous law firms offering intimidation services to oligarchs and kleptocrats and will the nca be
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properly funded as the report suggested so it will be able to take on the kleptocrats, autocrats and oligarchs in this country? this on the kleptocrats, autocrats and oligarchs in this country? first on the kleptocrats, autocrats and oligarchs in this country? as i said in my opening _ oligarchs in this country? as i said in my opening statement, - oligarchs in this country? as i said in my opening statement, we - oligarchs in this country? as i said in my opening statement, we are| in my opening statement, we are setting up a new kleptocracy cell in the national crime agency to target the national crime agency to target the individuals he mentions. let the national crime agency to target the individuals he mentions.- the individuals he mentions. let us be under no _ the individuals he mentions. let us be under no illusion, _ the individuals he mentions. let us be under no illusion, we _ the individuals he mentions. let us be under no illusion, we are - the individuals he mentions. let us be under no illusion, we are on - the individuals he mentions. let us be under no illusion, we are on thej be under no illusion, we are on the brink of a potentially huge humanitarian crisis which could see a loss of life and widespread suffering for the ukrainian people and to serve the desires of the russian president. the attack on ukraine is likely to cause mass displacement of people, potentially triggering a significant refugee crisis in europe so can the prime minister tell us what he is doing to support the ukrainians who choose to stay and those who flee? she
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support the ukrainians who choose to stay and those who flee?— stay and those who flee? she makes an important — stay and those who flee? she makes an important point _ stay and those who flee? she makes an important point because - stay and those who flee? she makes an important point because the - an important point because the humanitarian impact threatens to be enormous and that's why i've said what i've said about supporting those refugees as they come out of ukraine. we've got to make sure we do everything we can to stabilise the ukrainian economy and support the ukrainian economy and support the government as much as we can and that's why i announced the $500 million development aid on top of the £100 million we've already given. ourfriends and the £100 million we've already given. our friends and allies are working with us to do much more. studio: we are bringing you updates on the question of the russian invasion. has been the most successful and history of freedom and democracy,
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and as one of the art attacks, we have a special responsibility to defend it. while today's sanctions are welcome, i cannotjust be economic measures. we need a fundamental review of her military capability, whose assumptions may be out of date. mr capability, whose assumptions may be out of date. ~ ,,, ., ,, out of date. mr speaker, the integrated — out of date. mr speaker, the integrated review _ out of date. mr speaker, the integrated review begins - out of date. mr speaker, the | integrated review begins with out of date. mr speaker, the - integrated review begins with the assertion that the most important area for our national security is the euro atlantic area, as i believe i said to the honourable gentleman opposite on tuesday. that's why we have continued with the investment that we have in nato, where the second—biggest... but he knows, he's right in what he says at what's at stake. this is about the whole idea of that wonderful thing that was so
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inspiring last week, of a europe holding free. that fantastic revolution in 1989 and 1990 when communism fell. it was a great moment for humanity, and we mustn't allowed it to slip through our fingers. i allowed it to slip through our finaers. ., ~' allowed it to slip through our finaers. ., ,, ., _ allowed it to slip through our finaers. ., ,, ., ., fingers. i would like to say on behalf of _ fingers. i would like to say on behalf of the _ fingers. i would like to say on behalf of the people - fingers. i would like to say on behalf of the people of - fingers. i would like to say on i behalf of the people of norwich fingers. i would like to say on - behalf of the people of norwich that we share our solidarity with people in ukraine. the warm words will not defend ukrainian people. i've spoken to people who have been liaising with tribune is, people who have been fighting privatisation. they say one thing — they will not run from their homes. they will defend theirfamilies. i support from their homes. they will defend their families. i support the from their homes. they will defend theirfamilies. i support the prime minister's assertion that we will be providing more defensive capabilities for that end, but let me say one thing. will you agree, prime minister, that we must have an
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end with this by a negotiated settlement and not by an escalation of military means? mr settlement and not by an escalation of military means?— of military means? mr speaker, i think the whole _ of military means? mr speaker, i think the whole house, _ of military means? mr speaker, i | think the whole house, everybody of military means? mr speaker, i i think the whole house, everybody in the world would want president putin to have chosen the path of negotiation. you had that moment, and that's why, if you remember, we had that discussion in this house on tuesday about that peerless moment which we all discussed. he had that opportunity, and i'm afraid he's missed it. he's chosen the path of overwhelming violence and destruction. i'm afraid that puts us on a very, very different course, and we have to accept that reality. everybody will wholeheartedly support the prime minister's sanctions, hopefully against all 140 russian oligarchs and against all the nato banks. the prime minister also described the russian state as
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also described the russian state as a pariah state, and he's right because they have broken international criminal law. can we actually implement our view of the pariah state by ensuring that everybody involved in that decision, if they leave russia to go abroad, face international criminal sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what — sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what we _ sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what we can _ sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what we can now _ sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what we can now do - sanctions wherever they go? that is exactly what we can now do thanksl sanctions wherever they go? that is i exactly what we can now do thanks to the measures that this house has passed. the measures that this house has assed. . ~ the measures that this house has assed. ., ~' ,, ~ the measures that this house has assed. ., ,, ~ .,~ , passed. thank you, mr speaker. this mornin: , passed. thank you, mr speaker. this morning. we — passed. thank you, mr speaker. this morning, we woke _ passed. thank you, mr speaker. this morning, we woke to _ passed. thank you, mr speaker. this morning, we woke to the _ passed. thank you, mr speaker. this morning, we woke to the worst - morning, we woke to the worst possible news, and i make no apology and hoping for a diplomatic solution. however, my party and i condemn the escalating russian aggression. this is a fluid and developing situation, and we are now in uncharted territory. i can update the house that whilst there have been calls in this place for
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alexander to cease broadcasting, negotiation have been happening in the background and i can confirm that he has suspended broadcasting. shouting. we that he has suspended broadcasting. shouting. ~ , , ., shouting. we must prepare for the worst, and shouting. we must prepare for the worst. and l — shouting. we must prepare for the worst, and i would _ shouting. we must prepare for the worst, and i would ask _ shouting. we must prepare for the worst, and i would ask the _ shouting. we must prepare for the worst, and i would ask the prime - worst, and i would ask the prime minister what strategy is he bringing forward to increase the capacity of north sea oil and gas so that we can support ourselves and eu member states and protect our people from a further increase in the cost of living? mr from a further increase in the cost of livin: ? ~ ,,, ., ,, from a further increase in the cost of livin? ~ w , from a further increase in the cost oflivin? ~ , of living? mr speaker, i must say i disauree of living? mr speaker, i must say i disagree profoundly _ of living? mr speaker, i must say i disagree profoundly with _ of living? mr speaker, i must say i disagree profoundly with what - of living? mr speaker, i must say i disagree profoundly with what he i of living? mr speaker, i must say i i disagree profoundly with what he has had to say about negotiating now. i don't think that option is open to us. we must do our best to support and protect the people of ukraine, and protect the people of ukraine, and working with our international friends and allies to constrict what vladimir putin can do. on his point
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about russia today, mr speaker, i simply observed that the former leader is... sorry, i'm so sorry! his leader. i understand the please he entered. they don't seem to cut much ice. i he entered. they don't seem to cut much ice. . , �* he entered. they don't seem to cut much ice. .,, �* , ., he entered. they don't seem to cut much ice._ steve. j much ice. iwasn't standing. steve. laughter i strongly welcome the further set of sanctions. we look forward to further steps being taken in the days ahead and not being held back by perhaps some of the slower moving members of the alliance in europe. what does the prime minister agree that if sanctions are really to bite on putin and his gangster
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government, then it will inevitably mean cost and inconvenience to uk economic interests, but that cost will be nothing compared to what people of ukraine are going through, and we stand with them this evening? yes, i'm afraid he's right. my right honourable friend is right. it will mean cost, it will mean inconvenience, it will mean difficulty for us in the uk. but that will be a price worth paying, mr speaker, for defeating the objectives of vladimir putin and showing that aggression does not pat’- showing that aggression does not .a . showing that aggression does not a. canl showing that aggression does not i pay-_ can ljust pay. dame diana johnson. can i 'ust follow the question i pay. dame diana johnson. can i 'ust follow the question on i pay. dame diana johnson. can i 'ust follow the question on the i follow the question on the honourable member for the isle of wight about the compacting cut it off to see —— combating kleptocracy? whether additional powers will be required and resources to do their
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work? i required and resources to do their work? . ~ , . required and resources to do their work? ., ,, , . ., work? i thank her very much, and the will work? i thank her very much, and they will of— work? i thank her very much, and they will of course. _ work? i thank her very much, and they will of course. they - work? i thank her very much, and they will of course. they have - they will of course. they have plenty of existing statute that the existing powers they will have will be the ability to peel back the facade of ownership, which i think will be extremely valuable.- will be extremely valuable. thank ou, mr will be extremely valuable. thank you, mr speaker. _ will be extremely valuable. thank you, mr speaker. whilst - will be extremely valuable. thank you, mr speaker. whilst this - you, mr speaker. whilst this terrible appalling incident is of course directly the cause of russia, i think it's appropriate that we also recognise that over the last 14 years, the uk, the eu, the us collectively have not been attentive to russia in the way that we should. in my right honourable friend saved that whatever happened in the past, moving forward, we are not going to let russia fall between her fingers again? mr let russia fall between her fingers auain? ~ ,,, ., ,, let russia fall between her fingers auain? ~ .,~ ,,
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again? mr speaker, i think the lesson of 2014 _ again? mr speaker, i think the lesson of 2014 is _ again? mr speaker, i think the lesson of 2014 is that - again? mr speaker, i think the lesson of 2014 is that the - again? mr speaker, i think the l lesson of 2014 is that the whole again? mr speaker, i think the - lesson of 2014 is that the whole of the west failed to respond in the way that we should, and when a sovereign country was invaded and part of it was occupied, i'm afraid it was quite wrong that we try to manage the situation with the processes that we did, which in the end produced absolutely nothing except finally this catastrophic invasion today. we have learned a bitter lesson about how to deal with vladimir putin.— vladimir putin. thank you, mr speaker- _ vladimir putin. thank you, mr speaker- l _ vladimir putin. thank you, mr speaker. i agree _ vladimir putin. thank you, mr speaker. i agree with - vladimir putin. thank you, mr speaker. i agree with the - vladimir putin. thank you, mr i speaker. i agree with the prime minister that it seems like the curtain has now come down on that era that began in 1989, and we've lived in an era of change since then. this feels like a change. in this new era, the permissive environment that we created for the kremlin to live, to invest and to party in london, sometimes with the prime minister himself, that must now come to an end. so, let me
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ask... so, let me ask the prime minister this — will he understand undertake to ensure that every visa issued to a russian duel now national �*s review, and that citizenship should be stripped away? yes, we are doing that, though i think it's worth the house remembering the point that i made the other day. not every russian is a bad person. the other day. not every russian is a bad person-— the other day. not every russian is a bad erson. . ~ ~ .,~ a bad person. thank you, mr speaker. can i a bad person. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome — a bad person. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the _ a bad person. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the package _ a bad person. thank you, mr speaker. can i welcome the package of - can i welcome the package of sanctions the prime minister has set out? while i understand while it hasn't been possible to suspend russia from the swift... can i ask what work we are doing with our allies to offer them reassurance so that we can get to a position when
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they can? that is by far the biggest thing that will isolate the russian economy. mr; thing that will isolate the russian econom . g ., ., ., , economy. my honourable friend, the bi est economy. my honourable friend, the biggest thing — economy. my honourable friend, the biggest thing would _ economy. my honourable friend, the biggest thing would be _ economy. my honourable friend, the biggest thing would be if _ economy. my honourable friend, the biggest thing would be if everyone i biggest thing would be if everyone stopped taking russian hydrocarbons. swift is extremely important, and it's a belgian company, as i'm sure the house knows. we're trying to make progress with our friends for obvious reasons, and it has to be donein obvious reasons, and it has to be done in unison. i’m obvious reasons, and it has to be done in unison.— done in unison. i'm grateful, mr seaker, done in unison. i'm grateful, mr speaker. this — done in unison. i'm grateful, mr speaker, this morning - done in unison. i'm grateful, mr speaker, this morning i - done in unison. i'm grateful, mr speaker, this morning i spoke l done in unison. i'm grateful, mr. speaker, this morning i spoke with friends in kyiv who are leaving the country with their family, their children, and we've all seen the scenes from the capital. i send my deepest thanks to the embassy team who are doing all they can to support people, but can i ask the prime minister about two areas, economic and continuing support for defensive capability? will both of those areas of support intensify and
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can he assure the house that the government will continue the deepest possible conversations with the government and ukraine to ensure that no matter the assault that comes to europe from vladimir putin, we will be supporting them in a meaningful sense?— we will be supporting them in a meaningful sense? yes, on that last oint, the meaningful sense? yes, on that last point, the answer _ meaningful sense? yes, on that last point, the answer is _ meaningful sense? yes, on that last point, the answer is certainly - meaningful sense? yes, on that last point, the answer is certainly yes, i point, the answer is certainly yes, and for instance, the other day i was looking at two british minesweepers being fitted, as i'm sure he knows, which are due to go to ukraine. the question will be access. that's what it all depends on. . ~' access. that's what it all depends on. . ~ , ., access. that's what it all depends on. . ~ ~ access. that's what it all depends on. ., ~ access. that's what it all depends on. thank you, mr speaker. it's c stal on. thank you, mr speaker. it's crystal clear _ on. thank you, mr speaker. it's crystal clear from _ on. thank you, mr speaker. it's crystal clear from this _ on. thank you, mr speaker. it's crystal clear from this active - crystal clear from this active aggression that putin doesn't seek finland dilation on his borders, he seeks his bets to keep a belarus in the south. does my right honourable
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friend agree that we need to build on the outcome of our integrated events review? we do need to think differently about eastern europe. and with his announcement, it seems there is a consensus in this house that can allow us to bring forth emergency legislation to bring those important measures to really hit those hard and hit them now. i important measures to really hit those hard and hit them now. i think that is clearly _ those hard and hit them now. i think that is clearly the _ those hard and hit them now. i think that is clearly the will _ those hard and hit them now. i think that is clearly the will of _ those hard and hit them now. i think that is clearly the will of the - that is clearly the will of the house and the will of the government, which is why we'll be taking those important measures and bringing them forward on monday. mr; bringing them forward on monday. id�*i thoughts bringing them forward on monday. m: thoughts are with bringing them forward on monday. m; thoughts are with the ukrainian people at this time, and while i welcome the sanctions of prime minister's announced today, can you update the house on whether he plans to sanction the major state on russian banks, such as the non—state bank, alpha bank?
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russian banks, such as the non-state bank, alpha bank?— bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. thank you. — bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. thank you. mr _ bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. _ bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. the - bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. the w - bank, alpha bank? yes, mr speaker. | thank you, mr speaker. the w chapel in my constituency is a focal point for the ukrainian diaspora, and prayers are being set for their countrymen. but what ukrainian �*s in the uk have identified, being grateful for the military support that has already been forthcoming, is that there is immediate need for medical battlefields supplies, clothing for troops and camouflage gear. can my right honourable friend assure the house that they will be forthcoming? i assure the house that they will be forthcoming?— forthcoming? i thank my right honourable _ forthcoming? i thank my right honourable friend _ forthcoming? i thank my right honourable friend very - forthcoming? i thank my right honourable friend very much, | forthcoming? i thank my right - honourable friend very much, and he raises a very important issue. we are working on exactly those supplies right now. i are working on exactly those supplies right now.— supplies right now. i thank the prime minister for _ supplies right now. i thank the i prime minister for his statement. i welcome the sanctions announced today. but can you assure that the
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sanctions will also target relatives and connected parties? like the right honourable member for swindon, he mentioned the economic crime. the review of the official secrets act, why can't we bring them forward and do them now? they would get huge support and would be weighted for some of these for nearly two years. mr speaker, i can tell him that we will certainly be making sure that we are able to sanction and do sanction relatives and other interested parties. it'll be a rolling programme of intensifying sanctions. " �* ., ., , sanctions. 1993... i'm in no doubt that the signatories _ sanctions. 1993... i'm in no doubt that the signatories of _ sanctions. 1993... i'm in no doubt that the signatories of the - sanctions. 1993... i'm in no doubt that the signatories of the united | that the signatories of the united states and the united kingdom gave ukraine the confidence to give up its nuclear deterrent. will my right honourable friend support the united
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states whatever extent is prepared to go to send along side whatever military support it's up there —— it's a prepared to do so? he military support it's up there -- it's a prepared to do so?- it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely _ it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely right _ it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely right to _ it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely right to remind i it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely right to remind the | it's a prepared to do so? he is absolutely right to remind the house of the 1994 budapest memorandum, which had exactly that effect and created that obligation on us. mr created that obligation on us. m speaker, the prime minister will be aware that we are on this side of the house very keen on these sanctions. although does he share with me the worry that the record of driving out dictators and demagogues with these sanctions isn't always a successful? does he share my concern that if we read what putin has been saying these last few hours, he's a man that might not stop at ukraine? he might go into a nato country, and
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are we playing that scenario because many of us think that might be the next step. the many of us think that might be the next ste -. ., ., ., , next step. the right honourable gentleman _ next step. the right honourable gentleman is — next step. the right honourable gentleman is absolutely - next step. the right honourable gentleman is absolutely right i next step. the right honourable j gentleman is absolutely right to raise that appalling possibility, and it is vital that we reaffirm again that under article five of the nato treaty, we stand. where behind everyone of our nato allies and will come to their defence. band everyone of our nato allies and will come to their defence.— come to their defence. and on consent -- _ come to their defence. and on consent -- iain _ come to their defence. and on consent -- iain duncan - come to their defence. and on consent -- iain duncan smith. j come to their defence. and on i consent -- iain duncan smith. with ukrainian men _ consent -- iain duncan smith. with ukrainian men and _ consent —— iain duncan smith. tn ukrainian men and women dying consent —— iain duncan smith. try ukrainian men and women dying to fight for theirfreedoms ukrainian men and women dying to fight for their freedoms today, those were calling for negotiation at this point can only please that rambling wreck of the nazi sitting in the kremlin. can i say to my friend, the ambassador from in the kremlin. can i say to my friend, the ambassadorfrom ukraine, asked desperately whether nato would look at a no—fly zone. could my right honourable friend stepped to the dispatch box and make it clear that in this case, he rules nothing
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out? mr that in this case, he rules nothing out? ~ ,,, ., ,, that in this case, he rules nothing out? ~ ., ,, ,, ., that in this case, he rules nothing out? ~ .,~ ,, ., ., that in this case, he rules nothing out? ~ ,, ., ., , out? mr speaker, i know that my riaht out? mr speaker, i know that my right honourable _ out? mr speaker, i know that my right honourable friend _ out? mr speaker, i know that my right honourable friend is - out? mr speaker, i know that my right honourable friend is a i out? mr speaker, i know that my right honourable friend is a great| right honourable friend is a great military expert, and he will understand the attractions of the no—fly zone. i remember the no—fly zonein no—fly zone. i remember the no—fly zone in 1991, as i recall in northern iraq. the situation here is very different. we would face the risk of having to shoot down russian lands, and that is something that i think the house would want to contemplate with caution —— russian planes. contemplate with caution -- russian lanes. �* ~' ., contemplate with caution -- russian lanes. . ,, ., ,, ., planes. and locking out russian state money. — planes. and locking out russian state money. l _ planes. and locking out russian state money, i hope _ planes. and locking out russian state money, i hope the - planes. and locking out russian state money, i hope the primel state money, i hope the prime minister can reassure me that that will include our overseas territories and dependencies that must be included, and i note that there are protests in a number of russian cities across russia at the moment, and celebrities and russia have been speaking out. i do hope that we will be offered all the
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support that we can for those people likely to be shunned by the fascist imperialist regime.— imperialist regime. yes, and can i sa that imperialist regime. yes, and can i say that one _ imperialist regime. yes, and can i say that one of — imperialist regime. yes, and can i say that one of the _ imperialist regime. yes, and can i say that one of the reasons - imperialist regime. yes, and can i say that one of the reasons why i | say that one of the reasons why i want to keep our fantastic british embassy in moscow, even though the temptation is to sunder diplomatic relations, i want to keep it there to support groups such as the ones he mentions. bab to support groups such as the ones he mentions-— to support groups such as the ones he mentions._ i've i to support groups such as the ones l he mentions._ i've given he mentions. bob stewart. i've given evidence for — he mentions. bob stewart. i've given evidence for war _ he mentions. bob stewart. i've given evidence for war crimes _ he mentions. bob stewart. i've given evidence for war crimes trials. - he mentions. bob stewart. i've given evidence for war crimes trials. it i evidence for war crimes trials. it was genocide and crimes against humanity people were charged with. can i ask my right honourable friend and the house to agree with me that any russian who kills a ukrainian must remember that one day, they may well be bought to court for crimes against humanity or genocide? yes.
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against humanity or genocide? yes, mr speaker. — against humanity or genocide? yes, mr speaker, and not _ against humanity or genocide? yes, mr speaker, and notjust any russian. anyone who sends a russian into battle to kill innocent ukrainians.— into battle to kill innocent ukrainians. ., ~ ukrainians. thank you, mr speaker. president zelensky _ ukrainians. thank you, mr speaker. president zelensky has _ ukrainians. thank you, mr speaker. president zelensky has called i ukrainians. thank you, mr speaker. president zelensky has called for i president zelensky has called for the toughest possible sanctions. that must mean immediate. so, in his statement, he talked about in the next session for the economic measures, including on companies and on the register of overseas property ownership, but in answer to the right honourable member for swindon, he said something about bringing forward on monday, so which is his? will have the same effect on monday? we will be bringing it forward on monday. i'm gratefulfor the support of the opposition. we want immediately to start cracking down
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on these individuals. studio: we are going to leave that debate now. just to sum up what was said, the prime minister began that debate by saying how he now believes that president putin was always determined to attack his neighbour all along, determined to attack his neighbour allalong, despite determined to attack his neighbour all along, despite those diplomatic talks. borisjohnson said putin will quote never be able to claim the of —— blood ukraine from his lands. he denounced him as a bloodstained aggressor who believes an imperial conquest. the prime minister announced what he called the largest and most severe sanctions that russia has ever seen, including an asset freeze on more than 100 russian casa mise —— companies. and new financial measures to exclude russian banks. he also said the government will ban the russian
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airline from the united kingdom, and he also said in terms of other majors, nothing is off the table. you've been watching bbc news. right, much more coming up, but first let's get a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. it's been us whole day with wintry showers. some sleet in the south of the country during the afternoon on thursday. we can look forward to a much calmer day with lighter winds and more sunshine on friday, although the morning will be a little on the nippy side. here's our rater, and this is the extent of the wintry showers. —— radar. still very blustery through the evening, gusts in excess of 40 mph. the winds will start to ease as we go through the course of the night. this is because
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high pressure is building in from the southwest. things tend to settle down. we have clearing skies and the temperatures drop as well, so i widespread frost to come across northern parts of the uk. in the south, 4 or 5 degrees. here's a high pressure building in. notice there is a weather front and low pressure to the north, that will come close to the north, that will come close to us and brush the very far northwest. generally speaking, it is a fine day on friday. might be one or two showers around in the morning, but they should fade and for england and wales, it's sunshine all around. very decent and eastern scotland, decent enough and belfast, but you can see here in the western isles, pretty cloudy. temperatures not desperately low, around 9—11 celsius. high pressure is dominating the weather. it's driving our
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weather in the uk, but it's on the edge of that high pressure which means the weather fronts in the low pressure goes around that area of high pressure, and here, always more breezy and a bit more cloud, whereas further east and south, the better the weather will be. overall, saturday is looking dry and bright at the very least for most of us, with temperatures around 12 degrees in the south, 10 degrees in aberdeen. on sunday, it looks like we are in for a fine day across most of the country, but come monday, i think it will cloud over. one of these weather fronts will come in and bring some outbreaks of rain. you can see the rain here on monday in some of the towns and cities. bye—bye.
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with are live in ukraine and the country at war after a huge russian military offensive by land, sea and air. the onslaught began just before dawn, with a barrage of russian missiles against multiple targets right across the country. then with russian attack helicopters and fighterjets homes in on the ukrainian army vladimir putin had this warning for anyone trying to stand in his way. translation: whoever tries to interfere with us _ or threaten our country should know that russia's response will be immediate and lead to such consequences that have never been experienced in history.
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here in the capital,

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