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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  February 24, 2022 10:00pm-10:46pm GMT

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tonight at ten... we're live in ukraine — a country at war, after a huge russian military offensive, by land, sea and air. the onslaught began just before dawn, with a barrage of missiles on multiple targets right across the country. then, with russian attack helicopters and fighterjets homing in on the ukrainian army, vladimir putin had this warning for anyone trying to stand in his way. translation: whoever tries to interfere with us, - or threaten our country, should know that russia's response will be immediate and lead to such consequences that have never been experienced in history.
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here in the capital, fearing the worst, some are desperate to leave. others take shelter. their president calls on the international community to help his country. putin started a war against ukraine, against the whole democratic world. he wants to destroy my country. he wants to destroy our country, everything we have been building, what we live for. as the invasion progressed, reports of civilian casualities. but the ukranian people, remain defiant. i will stand up and go, i will do everything for ukraine, as much as i can, with as much energy as i have. i will always only be on my motherland's side. the russian advance has been met with universal condemnation and tougher sanctions from the west. putin is the aggressor. putin chose this war. and now he and his
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country will bear the consequences. putin will stand condemned in the eyes of the world - and of history. he will never be able to cleanse - the blood of ukraine from his hands. tonight, this country is under martial law and a curfew in the capital is in place. what now for ukraine as russia begins to tighten its grip? and in the sport: european football's governing body, uefa, will meet tomorrow, when a decision will be made to remove russia of the right to host this year's champions league final. good evening and welcome
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to a specially extended bbc news at ten from the ukrainian capital, kyiv — a country under attack, after a huge russian military offensive, by land, sea and air. fierce fighting is taking place, including in several areas close to here, with russian forces capturing the disused chernobyl nuclear power plant north of kyiv. many thousands of ukrainians are seeking shelter or trying to leave the major cities. the authorities here say more then 50 people have been killed, and dozens wounded. in a televised address at around 6am moscow time, president putin announced what he called a "special military operation" in the eastern donbas region — aimed, he said, to create the "demilitaration and denazification of ukraine". it came as missile strikes were reported on a number of military targets.
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explosions could be heard in several cities in the east of the country, as well as here in kyiv. blasts were reported everywhere, with russia saying it's destroyed more than 70 military targets, including 11 airfields. and following the airstrikes came the land invasion, with russian tanks and troops advancing. they breached the border in three main directions — from the east, the south and the north, including from belarus, russia's long—time ally. with the first of our reports tonight, our international correspondent, orla guerin, has the very latest. one of the opening salvos. in russia's war on ukraine. a missile strike on an airport in the west of the country. in kyiv today, frightening new dawn for europe and ukraine. the city of 3 million awoke
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to sirens and an invasion. soon, a panicked exodus from the ukrainian capital, as the eu spoke of one of the darkest hours since world war ii. and darkened skies, as russian attack helicopters targeted a military airport outside kyiv. ukraine says several were shot down. the invasion was by air, sea and land. president putin, who insisted it would never come, warning that no—one should try to stop him. translation: no-one should try to stop him. translation:— no-one should try to stop him. translation: whoever tries to interfere with _ translation: whoever tries to interfere with us _ translation: whoever tries to interfere with us or _ translation: whoever tries to interfere with us or threaten - translation: whoever tries to i interfere with us or threaten our country should know that russia's response will be immediate and lead to such consequences that have never been experienced in history. hours after he spoke _ been experienced in history. hours after he spoke of _ been experienced in history. hours after he spoke of this _ been experienced in history. hours after he spoke of this was the - after he spoke of this was the picture in cities across the
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country. images from ukraine's northern and southern borders showed moscow's forces streaming in. ukraine's beleaguered president, volodymyr zelensky, addressed the nation, dressed for battle. translation:— nation, dressed for battle. translation: ~ ., ., ., ., translation: what do we hear today? it is not 'ust translation: what do we hear today? it is notjust rocket _ translation: what do we hear today? it is notjust rocket explosions, - it is notjust rocket explosions, combat and the roaring of aircraft, this is the sound of a new iron curtain, lowering and closing russia away from the civilised world. our national task is to make this curtain not on our territory, but in the homes of russians. ukrainians were not safe in _ the homes of russians. ukrainians were not safe in their own - the homes of russians. ukrainians were not safe in their own homes | were not safe in their own homes today. here, the aftermath of a strike on a block of flats in kharkiv, ukraine's second city. missile fragments now on display in
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the playground. from early morning in eastern ukraine, we found queues at atms, now there is war, people want money in their pockets and they fear it may run short. like many here, natalia is trying to comprehend what has befallen ukraine. trying to work out how to protect her two—year—old, karina. translation: we protect her two-year-old, karina. translation:— protect her two-year-old, karina. translation: ~ ., , ., translation: we are shocked, we are totally shocked. _ translation: we are shocked, we are totally shocked. we _ translation: we are shocked, we are totally shocked. we are _ translation: we are shocked, we are totally shocked. we are afraid for - totally shocked. we are afraid for our children, for ourfamilies. totally shocked. we are afraid for our children, for our families. are our children, for our families. are our children, for our families. are you thinking _ our children, for our families. are you thinking about trying to move? translation:— you thinking about trying to move? translation: where can i go? we don't know where _ translation: where can i go? we don't know where to _ translation: where can i go? we don't know where to go. _ translation: where can i go? we don't know where to go. who - don't know where to go. who will have us? nobody, nowhere is waiting for us. i don't know, ijust don't know. for us. i don't know, i 'ust don't know. a, , for us. i don't know, i 'ust don't know. , ., , ., know. more queues at the petrol stations. many _ know. more queues at the petrol stations. many want _ know. more queues at the petrol
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stations. many want to _ know. more queues at the petrol stations. many want to be ready| know. more queues at the petrol i stations. many want to be ready for whatever may come. like andre, who felt the explosions overnight. translation: i felt the explosions overnight. translation:— felt the explosions overnight. translation: ., . ., , translation: i heard it clearly, the air was really — translation: i heard it clearly, the air was really shaking _ translation: i heard it clearly, the air was really shaking -- _ translation: i heard it clearly, the air was really shaking -- the - translation: i heard it clearly, the air was really shaking -- the earth . air was really shaking —— the earth was really shocking. so now we are waiting for fuel. we will buy some so we can be mobile, in case our communications are cut. we have to prepare, what else can we do? in communications are cut. we have to prepare, what else can we do? in the battle for ukraine, _ prepare, what else can we do? in the battle for ukraine, russia _ prepare, what else can we do? in the battle for ukraine, russia is - battle for ukraine, russia is controlling the skies. here, ukrainian forces respond. with small arms fire. they are outgunned and have been suffering losses. we don't know how many. the attack is a
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projection of russian strength and western weakness. frenzied international diplomacy and the threat of sanctions failed to stop it. this nation is now under sustained assault. a day has changed everything for ukraine and full security in europe. well, within the last few minutes, we have been hearing the sound of shelling here in the distance. president putin has been taking territory by force today. he invaded a democratic state which has long desired tojoining nato. nato says the invasion was long planned and carried out in cold blood. and of course, tonight, that other international concern, the confirmation from ukraine that after a long, hard fight, russian forces
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have gained control of the chernobyl nuclear zone and the former power plant. now, management at the plant say they have no —— say there have been no casualties there, but ukraine's president says this amounts to a declaration of war on europe and people will be wondering tonight by the time they wake up tomorrow, how much more of their country will vladimir putin trying to take? many thanks for that, orla guerin reporting live. for many ukrainians, their worst fears became a reality in the early hours, waking up to the news that their country was being invaded. we've spent the day talking to some of those, now having to adjust to life in a war zone. ukrainian troops burn piles and piles of documents. what they contain, we don't know. but so great is the fear they could fall into russian hands, they must be destroyed. the enemy is literally at the gates.
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not far up the road, ukrainian armour, in a capital city braced for the worst. and in the trafficjam, in every vehicle on this highway sit families who, for weeks, have prayed for peace. this is the main road out of the capital. that why is poland, it's lviv in the west, and the city there. armoured personnel carriers here and traffic as far as the eye can see trying to get out. the nearby petrol station is doing brisk business. in an atmosphere of dread. but while some fear for their lives, others will wait for the moment. we want to stay in our apartment with our family. we don't want to leave and we are staying in kyiv. are you worried
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about what's going on? of course we worry, because i woke up at 5am and i listened. and until now, i don't believe about it, the situation, but we will wait. the warren of train tunnels under kyiv are now train tunnels. alexander is down here with his wife and two—year—old son. i am alexander is down here with his wife and two-year-old son.— and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared _ and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared for — and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared for my _ and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared for my boy, _ and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared for my boy, he - and two-year-old son. i am very, very scared for my boy, he says. | also biding their time, in an apartment in the heart of the capital, a group of young civil rights activists with dreams for their country. like yuri, aged 21, convinced ukraine can prevail over mighty russia.
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we win. you think you will win? yes, we will win- — ukrainians and ukrainian army will win. i believe. you will survive this. yeah. a hopeful assessment, but his friend is not so confident. are you worried about your life, about what could happen? yeah, of course, it's scary because it's a war. a war too close — as the country defenders passed by, the hopes of this land, its future on their shoulders. the kremlin insists its military operation in ukraine will last as long as is necessary. president putin who announced the action early this morning warned that any outside interference would lead to an "immediate" response never previously experienced in history.
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but there's a sense of shock among some ordinary russians, and protests tonight in moscow and st petersburg. from moscow our correspondent steve rosenberg reports. there are moments that change the course of history. would this be one? russia invaded ukraine. its president threatened the west... translation: if anyone tries to stand in our way or even i threaten our country, our people, they should know russia will respond immediately, and this will lead to such consequences the likes of which you have never experienced in your history. russian state tv went into overdrive, backing the assault, claiming ukrainian soldiers were surrendering en masse. a different mood here, at one of russia's last—surviving independent papers. to show solidarity with ukraine, tomorrow's edition will be
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in russian and ukrainian. the paper's editor, dmitry muratov, won last year's nobel peace prize. he believes that president putin has done irreparable damage to his country. translation: unfortunately, | i have to say very bitter words. i think that today, february 24th, russia's future was taken away from it. our peace—loving russian people will now feel the hatred of the world, because we are starting a third world war in the centre of europe. vladimir putin comes across now as a leader with an almost messianic idea — to force ukraine back into moscow's orbit, even if that means war. what the public might think about that doesn't come into it. he seems determined to achieve his goal. the actions of a government can demonise a whole nation, but keep in mind —
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amongst the public here, there is little support for war with ukraine. i'm sorry, so shocked. ijust can't help crying. i think that most of russia don't support this, it's horrible. - and why don't they support it? because it's not our war, - it's war by putin, biden or anyone else, not our nation. "i think the ukrainian soldiers will surrender," she says, "and they should. it's terrible to be at war with ukraine." in moscow tonight, hundreds took to the streets. "no to war," they chanted, determined to make their voices heard. but they were silenced. you can arrest people, but you can't force people to support the invasion
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of a neighbouring country. this is not a conflict the russian public wants. this is the kremlin�*s war. and that is the point isn't it, steve? what is it a vladimir putin once and who can stop him? i steve? what is it a vladimir putin once and who can stop him? i think vladimir putin — once and who can stop him? i think vladimir putin is _ once and who can stop him? i think vladimir putin is fuelled _ vladimir putin is fuelled by resentment, resentment with how the cold war ended with the west declaring victory and russia are losing power and territory. he is motivated by almost semi—religious belief that ukraine must be with russia, must be in russia's orbit and russia, is a great power, has the right to its own sphere of influence. i also think he feels disdain for the west and western leaders, he thinks they are weak and disunited. what can the west do about this? it is very difficult to say. the kremlin will have factored
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in sanctions, the kremlin will know america is not going to put boots on the ground, doesn't want to fight in ukraine, the west doesn't want a war with russia. russia knows that. but i would say this, if you have been in power for i would say this, if you have been in powerfor 22 i would say this, if you have been in power for 22 years as vladimir putin has, as either president or prime minister, you start to feel invincible, you start to feel you don't put a foot wrong and you are teflon. that is when mistakes start to creep in. and from speaking to people on the streets and witnessing the strength of feeling against this offensive, i wonder whether this russian invasion of ukraine will turn out to be vladimir putin's fatal error?— turn out to be vladimir putin's fatal error? ,, ., , ., fatal error? 0k, steve, many thanks. steve rosenberg, _ fatal error? 0k, steve, many thanks. steve rosenberg, live _ fatal error? 0k, steve, many thanks. steve rosenberg, live in _ fatal error? 0k, steve, many thanks. steve rosenberg, live in moscow. - leaders around the world have been expressing their disgust and outrage at the invasion.
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the eu, which is holding an emergency summit this evening, called it a "barbaric attack" that threatened the stability of europe. borisjohnson said it was "an attack on democracy and freedom around the world". and this evening the us presidentjoe biden announced new sanctions, on technology exports, banks and individuals, which he said would impose a "severe cost" on the russian economy. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports on the global response. four days, weeks, western politicians paid court to vladimir putin, doing what they could to pull the russian leader and his ministers back from the brink. yet their diplomacy, the deterrence, their phone calls failed. now the world must face the consequences of this man's defiance. a burden that inevitably falls largely on this man's shoulders.— man's shoulders. putin is the aggressor- — man's shoulders. putin is the aggressor. putin _ man's shoulders. putin is the aggressor. putin chose - man's shoulders. putin is the aggressor. putin chose this i man's shoulders. putin is the l aggressor. putin chose this war man's shoulders. putin is the - aggressor. putin chose this war and now he and his country will there the consequences. today i am
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authorising additional strong sanctions and new limitations on what can be exported to russia. this is going to impose severe cost on the russian economy both immediately and over time. after the russian economy both immediately and over time-— and over time. after consulting g7 artners, and over time. after consulting g7 partners. the _ and over time. after consulting g7 partners. the us _ and over time. after consulting g7 partners, the us imposed - partners, the us imposed sanctions on five big russian banks, including the state bank. it made it harder for russian firms to do business in foreign currencies and it curbed russia's ability to import vital technology. this evening the french president spoke to mr putin from the elysee palace and demanded an immediate halt to moscow's offensive that he said marked a turning point in european history. translation: , ., , ., translation: president putin has not onl attacked translation: president putin has not only attacked ukraine, _ translation: president putin has not only attacked ukraine, he _ translation: president putin has not only attacked ukraine, he has - only attacked ukraine, he has flouted the sovereignty of ukraine and caused the most serious attack on peace and stability in europe for decades. ., �* , , , decades. tonight in brussels, eu leaders agreed _ decades. tonight in brussels, eu leaders agreed their— decades. tonight in brussels, eu leaders agreed their own - decades. tonight in brussels, eu| leaders agreed their own package decades. tonight in brussels, eu i leaders agreed their own package of
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sanctions, freezing russian assets, blocking its banks's access to european financial markets, but not, it would seem curbing any sales of russian gas. their aim, to avoid division. the concern felt particularly by those on the front line. ~ ., ., , ., ., line. we have to be united around massive sanctions, _ line. we have to be united around massive sanctions, severe - line. we have to be united around i massive sanctions, severe sanctions on putin, on russia. we cannot allow to cross another rubicon for putin. what is very important is the sanctions _ what is very important is the sanctions are coordinated, that is between — sanctions are coordinated, that is between the european union, the united _ between the european union, the united states, canada, great britain, — united states, canada, great britain, japan, australia, throughout the democratic world. nato promised to do even more to reinforce its eastern flanks, but made clear no troops would be sent to ukraine, which is not a member of the military alliance. the to ukraine, which is not a member of the military alliance.— the military alliance. the kremlin lus the military alliance. the kremlin plus macro _ the military alliance. the kremlin plus macro aim _ the military alliance. the kremlin plus macro aim is _ the military alliance. the kremlin plus macro aim is to _ the military alliance. the kremlin plus macro aim is to re-establishj plus macro aim is to re—establish its sphere of influence, rip up the
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global rules that have kept us safe for decades and submerge the values that we hold dear. in a for decades and submerge the values that we hold dear.— that we hold dear. in a recorded statement _ that we hold dear. in a recorded statement to downing _ that we hold dear. in a recorded statement to downing street, . that we hold dear. in a recorded . statement to downing street, boris johnson did, however, promise ukraine more defensive weapons. ukraine more defensive weapons. ukraine is a country that for decades has enjoyed freedom and democracy and the right to choose its own destiny. we and the world cannot allow that freedom just to be snuffed out. we cannot and will not just look away. our mission is clear, diplomatically, politically, economically and eventually military, this hideous and barbaric venture of vladimir putin must end in failure. ., ., , in failure. the united nations security council _ in failure. the united nations security council met - in failure. the united nations security council met in - in failure. the united nations - security council met in emergency session to discuss the actions of one of its own. in fact, its current
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president, an invasion by this man's country in clear breach of the very purpose of this body.— purpose of this body. president putin, purpose of this body. president putin. step _ purpose of this body. president putin, stop your _ purpose of this body. president putin, stop your troops - purpose of this body. president putin, stop your troops from i putin, stop your troops from attacking ukraine. give peace a chance, too many people have already died. but chance, too many people have already died. �* , . chance, too many people have already died. ,. , chance, too many people have already died. �* ,. , ., chance, too many people have already died. ,. , ., died. but such pleas are now falling on deaf ears _ died. but such pleas are now falling on deaf ears. and _ died. but such pleas are now falling on deaf ears. and the _ died. but such pleas are now falling on deaf ears. and the people - died. but such pleas are now falling on deaf ears. and the people of - on deaf ears. and the people of ukraine are paying the price. james landale, bbc news. tough words for borisjohnson. he was speaking in the commons as he called force the most severe sanctions russia has ever seen. conflict on our continent was not after all, conflict on our continent was not afterall, consigned conflict on our continent was not after all, consigned to history. assumptions of safety in europe shaken. our parliament, our prime minister confronting the politics of
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war. , ., . ., war. putin will stand condemned in the e es war. putin will stand condemned in the eyes of — war. putin will stand condemned in the eyes of the _ war. putin will stand condemned in the eyes of the world _ war. putin will stand condemned in the eyes of the world and - the eyes of the world and of history. he will never be able to cleanse the blood of ukraine from his hands. now we see him for what he is, a bloodstained aggressor who believes in imperial conquest. but how to confront him? the - believes in imperial conquest. but how to confront him? the uk - believes in imperial conquest. but how to confront him? the uk is i how to confront him? the uk is announcing _ how to confront him? the uk is announcing the _ how to confront him? the uk is announcing the largest - how to confront him? the uk is announcing the largest and - how to confront him? the uk is. announcing the largest and most severe package of economic sanctions that russia has ever seen. we will continue on a remorseless mission to squeeze russia from the global economy piece by piece, day by day and week by week.— and week by week. note, that will not mean british _ and week by week. note, that will not mean british lives _ and week by week. note, that will not mean british lives being - and week by week. note, that will not mean british lives being put . and week by week. note, that willj not mean british lives being put in harm's way, but a tighter squeeze on sanctions. the hope, stopping russian business swelling to our economy will hurt. there are ten areas of sanctions, including an asset freeze against all major russian banks and laws to stop the
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russian banks and laws to stop the russian governments and firms getting money from the uk financial markets. sanctions against 100 companies and individuals, oligarchs and backers of vladimir putin. some exports will be suspended, equipment that can be used by the military, some high and oil refinery goods and a ban on the russian airline landing in the uk. ~ , ., i. a ban on the russian airline landing inthe uk. ~ , ., ,., in the uk. why have you started a war in europe? — in the uk. why have you started a war in europe? diplomacy- in the uk. why have you started a war in europe? diplomacy seems| in the uk. why have you started a i war in europe? diplomacy seems at an end, more shouting _ war in europe? diplomacy seems at an end, more shouting than _ war in europe? diplomacy seems at an end, more shouting than talking, - end, more shouting than talking, perhaps? the russian ambassador summoned to see the foreign secretary, unceremoniously booted out of the meeting ten minutes later. liz truss telling her counterparts, russia lied to the world. the opposition called in, but this time for a common cause, to share intelligence. our political parties largely instead. unusual unity, all parties united in
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condemnation at this dangerous moment of history. it will cost for us? ~ , , ., , , moment of history. it will cost for us? ,, .,, us? we must prepare ourselves for difficulties here. _ us? we must prepare ourselves for difficulties here. we _ us? we must prepare ourselves for difficulties here. we will— us? we must prepare ourselves for difficulties here. we will face - difficulties here. we will face economic pain as we free europe from dependence on russian gas and oil and clean our institutions from money stolen from the russian people. but the british public have always been willing to make sacrifice to defend democracy on our continent. and we will again. for our politicians, the prime minister, the challenge is so immense. the first political generation in so long to have to grapple with war on our continent like this. and while ukraine is more than 1000 miles away, this isn't remote, we all feel this in a jagged backdrop of what happens around here and in the cost of our everyday living. it may be a price for us all. an unusual evening
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meetings convened in whitehall, ministers, grim faced on the way in. talking up the scale of the uk action. i talking up the scale of the uk action. ., _, ., ~ action. i am confident we will take the most robust _ action. i am confident we will take the most robust and _ action. i am confident we will take the most robust and action - the most robust and action necessary. it the most robust and action necessary-— the most robust and action necessa . , ., , ., , necessary. it is the most ambitious set of sanctions _ necessary. it is the most ambitious set of sanctions leading _ necessary. it is the most ambitious set of sanctions leading edge - set of sanctions leading edge russia — set of sanctions leading edge russia. �* ., , russia. but the government is downbeat _ russia. but the government is downbeat in — russia. but the government is downbeat in what _ russia. but the government is downbeat in what lays - russia. but the government is - downbeat in what lays ahead, paving downing street in the yellow and blue of ukraine but symbols and sanctions may not be enough to make putin stop. in a moment we'll hear from our europe editor katya adler in brussels, and our north america editor smith in washington. but first, let's talk to laura kuenssberg at westminster. we heard tough words from the prime minister, from dominic raab the foreign secretary, but we wonder how the british government believes it can actually affect the way vladimir
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putin is behaving?— putin is behaving? clive, two seemingly — putin is behaving? clive, two seemingly contradictory - putin is behaving? clive, two i seemingly contradictory things putin is behaving? clive, two - seemingly contradictory things are true, it is the case the government really believes the sanctions will be heavy, they will be painfulfor russia and that they are very significant steps. but it is also the case that they don't believe tonight they will suddenly put a stop to the terrible scenes we have seen on our screens and that you have witnessed on the ground today. it is even the case of the foreign secretary believes we may be in for quite a protracted conflict here, something quite long and drawn—out, with russia and ukraine for some time. the current ukrainian government becoming insurgents and meanwhile, western sections strangling the russian economy over time in a way that ultimately will become unpalatable. what ever the prognosis and who tonight would predict any of this with any certainty, two things we know are already the case. but we all have to grapple with. number one, for the government, all of us, the public,
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the order that we have lived with for many years has been profoundly shaken by this, there is no question about that. second, if even if you want to look away, this absolutely matters to us at home, whether that will be the price of petrol or even the price of a loaf of bread. boris johnson and the cabinet heard what i am told as ominous warnings from advisers this evening about what the next couple of days might bring and evenif next couple of days might bring and even if it is really important to say, the uk has no intention of putting british pits on the ground and british military lives in harm's way, what the next few days and what the next few weeks bring really does matter is to us all, it matters very much. katya adler in brussels, eu leaders have been meeting tonight, what have they been saying?— they been saying? well, even before this emergency— they been saying? well, even before this emergency summit, _ they been saying? well, even before this emergency summit, one - they been saying? well, even before this emergency summit, one eu - this emergency summit, one eu official— this emergency summit, one eu official said he thought this was going _ official said he thought this was going to — official said he thought this was going to be one of the toughest and
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most emotional summits the eu has ever held _ most emotional summits the eu has ever held. from what i am hearing inside _ ever held. from what i am hearing inside there — ever held. from what i am hearing inside there tonight, he absolutely was not _ inside there tonight, he absolutely was not wrong. there is a conviction amongst _ was not wrong. there is a conviction amongst a _ was not wrong. there is a conviction amongst a number of eu leaders that they feel_ amongst a number of eu leaders that they feel russia's aggression in ukraine — they feel russia's aggression in ukraine is— they feel russia's aggression in ukraine is personal, that vladimir putins— ukraine is personal, that vladimir putin's ultimate aim is to destabilise europe and change the balance _ destabilise europe and change the balance of power. for former iron curtain— balance of power. for former iron curtain countries and eu and nato members. — curtain countries and eu and nato members, they feel very exposed and some _ members, they feel very exposed and some leaders on the way into this meeting _ some leaders on the way into this meeting expressed anger that tougher sanctions _ meeting expressed anger that tougher sanctions were not introduced earlier— sanctions were not introduced earlier against russia. then you have other— earlier against russia. then you have other eu countries pulling in a different— have other eu countries pulling in a different direction. yes, all 27 leaders have signed up to a new expanded — leaders have signed up to a new expanded sanction package, they want other sanctions against belarus. but germany, _ other sanctions against belarus. but germany, italy, so reliant on gas imports — germany, italy, so reliant on gas imports and business ties with russia, — imports and business ties with russia, they say they would like to keep the _ russia, they say they would like to keep the tougher sanctions for another— keep the tougher sanctions for another day. others accuse them of self—interest. other countries
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neighbouring ukraine are worrying about a _ neighbouring ukraine are worrying about a new migration crisis in europe — about a new migration crisis in europe in— about a new migration crisis in europe in case ukrainians try to flee the — europe in case ukrainians try to flee the country and they have been appealing _ flee the country and they have been appealing for solidarity. to flee the country and they have been appealing for solidarity.— appealing for solidarity. to you, sarah, in appealing for solidarity. to you, | sarah, in washington. president biden spoke to the american people tonight. is there a sense that he believes that american actions could bring an end to the fighting, or is it pie in the sky in a sense for him? ~ , , ., , him? well, there is very little hope here that even _ him? well, there is very little hope here that even the _ him? well, there is very little hope here that even the sanctions - here that even the sanctions that president — here that even the sanctions that president biden— here that even the sanctions that president biden described - here that even the sanctions that president biden described as- president biden described as crushing _ president biden described as crushing and _ president biden described as crushing and devastating - president biden described as crushing and devastating are j crushing and devastating are actually— crushing and devastating are actually going _ crushing and devastating are actually going to _ crushing and devastating are actually going to have - crushing and devastating are actually going to have any. crushing and devastating are i actually going to have any kind of immediate — actually going to have any kind of immediate effect. _ actually going to have any kind of immediate effect. threatening i actually going to have any kind of i immediate effect. threatening them in advance _ immediate effect. threatening them in advance did— immediate effect. threatening them in advance did not _ immediate effect. threatening them in advance did not deter— immediate effect. threatening them in advance did not deter vladimir. in advance did not deter vladimir putin— in advance did not deter vladimir putin and — in advance did not deter vladimir putin and in— in advance did not deter vladimir putin and in the _ in advance did not deter vladimir putin and in the white _ in advance did not deter vladimir putin and in the white house, i in advance did not deter vladimir. putin and in the white house, they accept _ putin and in the white house, they accept it— putin and in the white house, they accept it will— putin and in the white house, they accept it will take _ putin and in the white house, they accept it will take time _ putin and in the white house, they accept it will take time before - putin and in the white house, they accept it will take time before the. accept it will take time before the impact _ accept it will take time before the impact of— accept it will take time before the impact of these _ accept it will take time before the impact of these economic- accept it will take time before the i impact of these economic measures accept it will take time before the - impact of these economic measures is actually— impact of these economic measures is actually felt _ impact of these economic measures is actually felt in — impact of these economic measures is actually felt in russia _ impact of these economic measures is actually felt in russia and _ impact of these economic measures is actually felt in russia and could - impact of these economic measures is actually felt in russia and could do - actually felt in russia and could do anything _ actually felt in russia and could do anything to— actually felt in russia and could do anything to pressure _ actually felt in russia and could do anything to pressure vladimir- actually felt in russia and could do. anything to pressure vladimir putin. the us— anything to pressure vladimir putin. the us has— anything to pressure vladimir putin. the us has also— anything to pressure vladimir putin. the us has also announced - anything to pressure vladimir putin. the us has also announced today. anything to pressure vladimir putin. j the us has also announced today an extra _ the us has also announced today an extra 7000 — the us has also announced today an extra 7,000 troops _ the us has also announced today an extra 7,000 troops going _ the us has also announced today an
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extra 7,000 troops going to - the us has also announced today an extra 7,000 troops going to europel extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that— extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that is— extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that is in— extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that is in addition— extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that is in addition to _ extra 7,000 troops going to europe and that is in addition to thousands| and that is in addition to thousands they have _ and that is in addition to thousands they have already— and that is in addition to thousands they have already sent _ and that is in addition to thousands they have already sent to _ and that is in addition to thousands they have already sent to poland, i they have already sent to poland, romania — they have already sent to poland, romania and _ they have already sent to poland, romania and the _ they have already sent to poland, romania and the baltic _ they have already sent to poland, romania and the baltic states. i they have already sent to poland, l romania and the baltic states. that is to bolster— romania and the baltic states. that is to bolster those _ romania and the baltic states. that is to bolster those nato _ romania and the baltic states. that is to bolster those nato allies - romania and the baltic states. that is to bolster those nato allies on i is to bolster those nato allies on ukraine's— is to bolster those nato allies on ukraine's borders, _ is to bolster those nato allies on ukraine's borders, there - is to bolster those nato allies on ukraine's borders, there is no. ukraine's borders, there is no intention— ukraine's borders, there is no intention whatsoever- ukraine's borders, there is no intention whatsoever they - ukraine's borders, there is noj intention whatsoever they will ukraine's borders, there is no. intention whatsoever they will go ukraine's borders, there is no- intention whatsoever they will go in to defend _ intention whatsoever they will go in to defend ukraine _ intention whatsoever they will go in to defend ukraine or— intention whatsoever they will go in to defend ukraine or they— intention whatsoever they will go in to defend ukraine or they will- to defend ukraine or they will engage — to defend ukraine or they will engage militarily— to defend ukraine or they will engage militarily at _ to defend ukraine or they will engage militarily at all. - to defend ukraine or they will engage militarily at all. the i to defend ukraine or they will. engage militarily at all. the us is meeting — engage militarily at all. the us is meeting military— engage militarily at all. the us is meeting military aggression - engage militarily at all. the us is meeting military aggression with| meeting military aggression with economic— meeting military aggression with economic actions, _ meeting military aggression with economic actions, deploying - meeting military aggression with - economic actions, deploying economic weapons, _ economic actions, deploying economic weapons, and — economic actions, deploying economic weapons. and they— economic actions, deploying economic weapons, and they know _ economic actions, deploying economic weapons, and they know that - economic actions, deploying economic weapons, and they know that is - economic actions, deploying economic weapons, and they know that is not i weapons, and they know that is not likely— weapons, and they know that is not likely to _ weapons, and they know that is not likely to have — weapons, and they know that is not likely to have an _ weapons, and they know that is not likely to have an effect _ weapons, and they know that is not likely to have an effect quickly and i likely to have an effect quickly and that is— likely to have an effect quickly and that is causing _ likely to have an effect quickly and that is causing a _ likely to have an effect quickly and that is causing a real— likely to have an effect quickly and that is causing a real sense - likely to have an effect quickly and that is causing a real sense that. that is causing a real sense that this crisis— that is causing a real sense that this crisis is— that is causing a real sense that this crisis is testing _ that is causing a real sense that this crisis is testing america's i this crisis is testing america's place — this crisis is testing america's place on _ this crisis is testing america's place on the _ this crisis is testing america's place on the world _ this crisis is testing america's place on the world stage. - this crisis is testing america's place on the world stage. itsi place on the world stage. its position— place on the world stage. its position as _ place on the world stage. its position as a _ place on the world stage. its position as a superpower. if| position as a superpower. if measures— position as a superpower. if measures they _ position as a superpower. if measures they are - position as a superpower. if measures they are coming i position as a superpower. if i measures they are coming up position as a superpower. if _ measures they are coming up with and announcing _ measures they are coming up with and announcing behind _ measures they are coming up with and announcing behind their— measures they are coming up with and announcing behind their defiant - announcing behind their defiant words _ announcing behind their defiant words are — announcing behind their defiant words are unlikely _ announcing behind their defiant words are unlikely to _ announcing behind their defiant words are unlikely to have - announcing behind their defiant words are unlikely to have any. words are unlikely to have any immediate _ words are unlikely to have any immediate effect. _ words are unlikely to have any immediate effect. we - words are unlikely to have any immediate effect. we will leave it there, immediate effect. we will leave it there. sarah _ immediate effect. we will leave it there, sarah smith _ immediate effect. we will leave it there, sarah smith in _ immediate effect. we will leave it | there, sarah smith in washington, katya adler in brussels and our political editor laura kuenssberg at westminster, many thanks to you all. russia has one of the globe's largest armed forces,
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and there are questions as to how the ukrainians here will be able to defend themselves on their own against one of the most powerful militaries in the world. our defence correspondent jonathan beale has this assessment a warning — his report contains flashing images. early this morning came the russian version of shock and awe. images that a worried world is watching. russia using its formidable arsenal, rockets and cruise missiles, it said, to target ukraine's military defences. russia has launched strikes right across the country, including the main eu of kyiv, the port of odesa. russian forces are reported to have entered ukraine from belarus in the north, from russia itself in the east and from russia itself in the east and from crimea in the south, which russia invaded in 2014. western intelligence already assessed that russia had massed up to 190,000 troops on ukraine's border. that is
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slightly less than ukraine's entire armed forces of around 200,000. but russia has more advanced weapons, it has long—range cruise and ballistic missiles. and some of the world's most sophisticated air defence systems. russia's key advantage is in the air. it has around 300 combat aircraft, including fighterjets and aircraft, including fighterjets and a tank helicopter —— and tang helicopters on the border. ukraine has just over helicopters on the border. ukraine hasjust over 100. helicopters on the border. ukraine has just over 100. thea;r helicopters on the border. ukraine has just over 100.— has just over 100. they will very . uickl has just over 100. they will very quickly gain _ has just over 100. they will very quickly gain air _ has just over 100. they will very quickly gain air superiority. - has just over 100. they will very quickly gain air superiority. as i quickly gain air superiority. as soon as they do, the over 200,000 ukrainian troops stopped being an army that can manoeuvre and reposition itself to fight whichever axis the russians advance on and instead becomes a collection of independent units that will struggle to reposition themselves without coming under air attack. so that is where ukrainians face very hard choices. ., ,., , where ukrainians face very hard choices. ., , ., ., , choices. there are reports of heavy fiuuhtin choices. there are reports of heavy fiaahtin on choices. there are reports of heavy fighting on the _ choices. there are reports of heavy fighting on the line _ choices. there are reports of heavy fighting on the line of _ choices. there are reports of heavy fighting on the line of contact -
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choices. there are reports of heavy fighting on the line of contact in i fighting on the line of contact in the east, where ukrainian forces have been defending against russian—backed separatists for the past eight years. but tonight, british military intelligence says there has been no sign of a russian breakthrough there yet. it is where many of ukraine's best trained and best equipped forces are dug in. some western officials fear they could be encircled. the us and britain are among the few countries that have supplied ukraine with weapons, but these are mostly short—range, anti—tank and surface—to—air missiles. their best chance may be to defend key cities. kyiv is a central objective, its political— kyiv is a central objective, its political significance it is the seat — political significance it is the seat of— political significance it is the seat of the ukrainian government, but russia — seat of the ukrainian government, but russia must be seen to capture it and _ but russia must be seen to capture it and must— but russia must be seen to capture it and must physically remove the ukrainian — it and must physically remove the ukrainian government and neutralise its institutions. and it is hard to see how— its institutions. and it is hard to see how it— its institutions. and it is hard to see how it can do that without capturing _ see how it can do that without capturing kyiv. so i think the
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defence _ capturing kyiv. so i think the defence of kyiv is vital to the position— defence of kyiv is vital to the position of the ukrainian forces. the key— position of the ukrainian forces. the key question is whether president putin will achieve his political objectives through military means. and how long can ukraine hold out on its own? jonathan beale, bbc news. oil prices surged to their highest level in seven years, as a result of the military action in ukraine. uk wholesale gas prices also rose sharply today — up by 60% at one point — which will push up heating bills even further. while the uk gets very little of its oil and gas from russia directly, europe does, and as the west uses the economy as its main response to vladimir putin, our economics editor faisal islam looks at whether we will all pay the price. the economy is an important battleground here — the key weapon for the west against putin's russia, and it's also the way in which these huge events will most clearly affect households across the uk. you can see the profound impact
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of this invasion on the world economy in today's global markets. a barrel of crude oil already above $100 for the first time in seven years. that will filter into petrol prices which, on average, are at a record of £1.50 a litre. it could push them up a further ten or 20 pence. on the gas markets, the international price up 60%, £3.50 a therm. household energy bills already going up right now by a record. if this conflict lasts weeks or months, that could happen again in the winter. and that's not the end of it. food prices too stand to be affected. the conflict is likely to interrupt the supply of grain from ukraine, which is responsible for an eighth of world supplies. but the economy's also a weapon here — the impact already being felt on the russian currency, down to a record low against the dollar,
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with the russians having to prop up the rouble using some of its war chest of over $600 billion in currency in gold reserves. the russian stock market crashed this morning, losing up to 40% of its value, as its main banks and energy giant gazprom at one point halved in value. but russian gas supplies, including through ukraine, continued uninterrupted. quite literally, dollars, euros and pounds are flowing into the kremlin and companies it controls, selling its main export as the western world decries what russia is doing with that funding. so, there's no embargo on russian energy exports like there was for saddam hussein's iraq when he invaded kuwait 30 years ago. serious sanctions that could cripple the russian economy would also have a painful and material impact on britain, on the rest of europe, politically, economically and socially. today's tranche of sanctions did up the ante, targeting russia's
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second—biggest bank, vtb, its major airline, aeroflot, more oligarchs, but without the international agreement needed on the very hardest measures. faisal islam, bbc news. more than 100 pro—ukraine supporters gathered outside downing street to protest against russia's invasion. so, how do the thousands of ukrainians living in the uk feel about the events of this fateful day? our special correspondent lucy manning has been to meet those watching anxiously from afar. they are more than 1,500 miles away, but the invasion feels so close. denis is a child psychiatrist. tatiana is a volunteer. both have parents in ukraine. i was talking to them this morning. i wanted to convince my mum to leave and go to poland, but despite the fact that she is not terribly healthy at the moment, she refuses to go.
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what more do you want the british government to do? i think people need to understand that this is not 1938, this is 1939, and the entirety of the global peace is at peril. denis is able to contact his father. he's clear what he wants from the uk — more weapons. how can they help you? just, er... weapons. are you afraid in lviv? no, no, no. in lviv, people are not afraid. tatiana manages to contact her partner's parents. they have just managed to get a bus out of ukraine to get across the border to poland. "we said we are going
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to london," irina tells her. "there said there was only room on the bus for one of us," she says, "but i begged them to allow us both to go." tatiana is overwhelmed with anxiety about her own parents. last week, her dad stood with protesters in london. her parents only returned home yesterday. i can't contact with them. it is terrible because i am worried and i am sad. minutes later, she received distressing news. herfriend had been killed on the first day of fighting. my friend's died. i'm so sorry. that's hard. and i'm scared, because it is near my parents' home. tonight, she finally managed to speak to them. in a day, theirfreedom gone and trapped in a war. lucy manning, bbc news.
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russia has long been resisting ukraine's shift towards the european union, but president putin's sense of grievance goes back to the collapse of the soviet union, and even further, to russia's historical loss of territory and power. our world affairs editor, john simpson, looks at what is motivating the russian leader. it's hard to avoid the feeling that the world as we've known it since the berlin wall came down in 1989 has changed for good. the soviet empire in europe was finished and western notions of freedom had triumphed. after almost two more years, the revolution had reached russia itself. but after a hapless coup attempt by the kgb, boris yeltsin emerged
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as the man who would dismantle the old soviet system and introduce much greater democracy. yeltsin's eventual successor was an ex—kgb officer, vladimir putin. he always insisted he didn't want to revive the old soviet union, and he seemed to fit in well with the diplomatic niceties of a world which was now dominated by the united states. yet all the time, he was quietly rebuilding russia's armed forces, which had fallen into decay. putin was on a mission to make russia a superpower again. western leaders, though, just saw him as someone they could do business with. the problem is that they approached russia with optimism and thinking that russia can be engaged with like a western liberal democracy, not realising just how rapidly russia is retreating back into its own historical comfort zone of hostility not only
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to the outside world, but to its own population, and to its own very specific view of history, where it nurses grievances that are just unrecognisable to the outside world. ukraine, especially, seemed to obsess him. he hated the way it had gone through independence when the soviet union collapsed. the pro—democracy orange revolution was an affront to him. by 2014, he infiltrated his soldiers into crimea — which belonged to ukraine — and completely contrary to international law, he just took it over. a few months later, at a press conference in moscow, i offered him the opportunity to say he didn't want a new cold war, but he pointedly refused to say that. translation: it's all _ about protecting our independence, our sovereignty and our right to exist. and yet, the west still carried on doing business
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with vladimir putin as though he was just like any other leader. it was a classic case of self—deception. putin's big supporter now is china, underxijinping. no condemnation over ukraine from mrxi. suddenly, the world has changed. we're in new territory now, and it looks distinctly like cold war, mark ii. john simpson, bbc news. as we've been doing this week, let's get a final thought from our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet. i suppose the big question is, what now? i mean, where do we go from here after this incredible day? clive, it may not be the time to quote lenin, but i can't help but think of his famous phrase where there are decades where nothing happens and there are weeks when
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decades happen. this week

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