Skip to main content

tv   Why Arent We Vaccinating the...  BBC News  February 25, 2022 3:30am-4:01am GMT

3:30 am
our top stories. ex- lesions our top stories. ex-losions are heard stories. explosions are heard across the ukrainian capital with unconfirmed reports are russian aircraft has been shot down. russia's invasion enters a second day. the president says 137 citizens have been killed in violent so far. the eu is the latest in the west to take sanctions on russia, targeting its financial, energy and transport sectors. is a watershed moment. bruton is trying to _ is a watershed moment. bruton is trying to subjugate _ is a watershed moment. bruton is trying to subjugate a - is trying to subjugate a friendly european country, and he is trying to redraw the maps of europe by force. he must, and he will fail. and leaving their lives behind, the un says around 100,000 ukrainians have fled the country and urges its neighbours to keep orders open. and russians take to the
3:31 am
streets of more than 50 cities to protest the government's move. almost 2000 arrests. for many ukrainians, there many fears became a reality as they woke to news of their country being invaded. 0ur correspondence spend the day with people of kyiv as they waited to hear what might happen. ukrainian troops burn piles and piles of documents. what they contain, we don't know. but so great is the fear they could fall into russian hands, they must be destroyed. the enemy is literally at the gates. not far, up the road, ukrainian armour in a capital
3:32 am
city braced for the worst. and in the trafficjam, in every vehicle on this highway sit families who, for weeks, had prayed for peace. this is actually the main road out of the capital. that way is poland, it's lviv in the west, and you've got the city there. we've got armoured personnel carriers here and a whole line of traffic for as far as the eye can see, trying to get out. the nearby petrol station is doing brisk business in an atmosphere of dread. but while some fear for their lives, others will wait for the moment. we want to stay in our apartments with our family. we don't want to leave and we stay in kyiv. are you worried, though, about what's going on? 0h, of course, we worry, because i am wake up, like, five o'clock in the morning and i listened,
3:33 am
and until now, i don't believe about the situation, but we will wait. beneath the city streets, shelter from the russian storm. kyiv�*s warren of underground train tunnels are now bomb shelters. alexander is down here with his wife and two—year—old son. "i'm very, very scared for my boy," he says. also biding their time, staying put in an apartment in the heart of the capital are a group of young civil rights activists with dreams for their country. like yuri, aged 21, convinced ukraine can prevail over mighty russia. i say we win. you think you'll win? yeah, we will. ukrainian and ukrainian army will win. i believe it. you'll survive this?
3:34 am
yes. a hopeful assessment, but his friend artien isn't so confident. are you worried for your life? are you worried about what could happen? oh, yeah, of course. it's scary because it's a war. horns blare a war too close. as we talk, the country's defenders pass by, the hopes of this land, its future resting on their shoulder. clive myrie, bbc news, in kyiv. ukraine's president zelensky has ordered general military mobilisation is fighting against invading russian forces continues on many fronts. more detail has been revealed of the impact of the first day of fighting. 0ur reporter is here. louisa, 2a hours since russia attacked, just coming up to that moment. the ukrainian
3:35 am
president showing some more details about how precarious the situation is.— the situation is. how precarious _ the situation is. how precarious his - the situation is. how. precarious his situation the situation is. how- precarious his situation is, which is absolutely incredible. he spoke in this television address where he said, he used the term that he is russia's number one target, and his family is the number two target. he is married, his wife, they have two children, one as a teenager, one is much younger, around age, he has spoken around the danger they are in, and he confirmed he remains in the capital. let's listen in to hear what he said. translation: j listen in to hear what he said. translation:— listen in to hear what he said. translation: i remain in the caital. translation: i remain in the capital- my — translation: i remain in the capital. my family _ translation: i remain in the capital. my family is _ translation: i remain in the capital. my family is also - translation: i remain in the capital. my family is also in i capital. my family is also in ukraine- — capital. my family is also in ukraine- my _ capital. my family is also in ukraine. my children - capital. my family is also in ukraine. my children are i capital. my family is also in ukraine. my children are in | ukraine. my children are in ukraine _ ukraine. my children are in ukraine. my children are in ukraine. my family are not traitors _ ukraine. my family are not traitors. they are citizens of ukraine _ traitors. they are citizens of ukraine. where exactly they are i have _ ukraine. where exactly they are i have no— ukraine. where exactly they are i have no right to say. according to the information we have, _ according to the information we have, the — according to the information we have, the enemy has marked me
3:36 am
as target— have, the enemy has marked me as target number one. my family as target number one. my family as target— as target number one. my family as target number one. my family as target number two. they want to damage — as target number two. they want to damage ukraine politically by destroying the head of stata _ state. something of state. — something of course that will resonate with all the families that are feeling scared for theirs and ukraine. mr zelensky also was speaking about loss of life? in also was speaking about loss of life? , ., ., , .,,, life? in terms of military loss of life. this — life? in terms of military loss of life. this is _ life? in terms of military loss of life. this is the _ life? in terms of military loss of life. this is the first - of life. this is the first picture we have, confirmed figures from the ukrainian side about how many people have died on the military side. a figure of 137 equals —— he calls them harriers. —— heroes. that is listening now and hear exactly those figures. translation: , ., translation: sadly, today, we lost 137 heroes. _ translation: sadly, today, we lost 137 heroes. our _ translation: sadly, today, we lost 137 heroes. our citizens. - lost 137 heroes. our citizens. ten of them _ lost 137 heroes. our citizens. ten of them were _ lost 137 heroes. our citizens.
3:37 am
ten of them were officers. i lost 137 heroes. our citizens. l ten of them were officers. 360 people — ten of them were officers. 360 people have been wounded. defending snake island, all our soldiers — defending snake island, all our soldiers died a heroic death. they— soldiers died a heroic death. they have not surrendered. they will all _ they have not surrendered. they will all be — they have not surrendered. they will all be awarded posthumously the title of the hero — posthumously the title of the hero of — posthumously the title of the hero of ukraine. it those ago villas— hero of ukraine. it those ago villas for— hero of ukraine. it those ago villas for ukraine be remembered forever. —— let those — remembered forever. —— let those who— remembered forever. —— let those who gave their lives for ukraine _ those who gave their lives for ukraine. , , ., , ukraine. the president has ordered a _ ukraine. the president has ordered a mass _ ukraine. the president has. ordered a mass mobilisation degree. that paves the way for civilians to now, by law, get involved with the fighting, basically. it will cover the east and south of ukraine, and will last 90 days. it means civilians in terms of conscripts and reservists will be able to join that military force against russia. the military do need help. there is a strong sense of course that
3:38 am
we have been hearing that ukraine will fight till the end. there is a famous phrase now that the ukrainian president has spoken about, that they will face russians, russia will not see their backs. ., ., ,, ., ,, russia will not see their backs. ., ., ,, .,~ , ., backs. you mention snake island as well, i backs. you mention snake island as well. i was — backs. you mention snake island as well, i was watching _ backs. you mention snake island as well, i was watching on - as well, i was watching on social media earlier of people sharing basically an outpost, 13 young men that were there that were all killed as i understand it, also the exchange i think between the russian military and them also. of course on social media we of course on social media we have a different sense of seeing it minute by minute, as it all evolves. louisa, thank you for coming down to us. well, as louisa mentioned, russia has been resisting ukraine's shift towards the european union, but president putin's grievance goes back to the soviet collapse and the loss of territory and power. john simpson looks at what is
3:39 am
motivating the russian leader, and what the invasion of ukraine looks for the global balance of power. cheering it's hard to avoid the feeling that the world as we've known it since the berlin wall came down in 1989 has changed for good. the soviet empire in europe was finished and western notions of freedom had triumphed. after almost two more years, the revolution had reached russia itself. but after a hapless coup attempt by the kgb, boris yeltsin emerged as the man who would dismantle the old soviet system and introduce much greater democracy. yeltsin�*s eventual successor was an ex—kgb officer, vladimir putin. he always insisted he didn't want to revive the old soviet union,
3:40 am
and he seemed to fit in well with the diplomatic niceties of a world which was now dominated by the united states. yet all the time, he was quietly rebuilding russia's armed forces, which had fallen into decay. putin was on a mission to make russia a superpower again. the western leaders, though, just saw him as someone they could do business with. the problem is that they approached russia with optimism and thinking that russia can be engaged with like a western liberal democracy, not realising just how rapidly russia is retreating back into its own historical comfort zone of hostility not only to the outside world, but to its own population, and to its own very specific view of history, where it nurses grievances that are just unrecognisable to the outside world. ukraine, especially, seemed to obsess him. he hated the way it had gone through independence when the soviet union collapsed. the pro—democracy
3:41 am
orange revolution was an affront to him. by 2014, he infiltrated his soldiers into crimea — which belonged to ukraine — and completely contrary to international law, he just took it over. a few months later, at a press conference in moscow, i offered him the opportunity to say he didn't want a new cold war, but he pointedly refused to say that. translation: it's all about | protecting our independence, our sovereignty and our right to exist. and yet, the west still carried on doing business with vladimir putin as though he was just like any other leader. it was a classic case of self—deception. putin's big supporter now is china, underxijinping. no condemnation over ukraine from mrxi. suddenly, the world has changed. we're in new territory now,
3:42 am
and it looks distinctly like cold war, mark ii. john simpson, bbc news. russia has one of the world's largest armed forces and there are questions as to how the ukrainians will be able to defend themselves on their own against one of the most powerful military in the world. jonathan beale has his assessment of how the two sides in this latest conflict matchup, and a warning, this report contains flashing images. early this morning came the russian version of shock and awe. russia using its formidable arsenal, rockets and cruise missiles, it said, to target ukraine's military defences. russia has launched strikes right across the country, including near the capital, kyiv, the port of 0desa. russian forces are reported
3:43 am
to have entered ukraine from belarus in the north, from russia itself to the east right down to the south from crimea, which russia invaded in 2014. western intelligence already assessed that russia had massed up to 190,000 troops on ukraine's border. that's slightly less than ukraine's entire armed forces of around 200,000. but russia has more advanced weapons, it has long—range cruise and ballistic missiles. and some of the world's most sophisticated air defence systems. and russia's key advantage is in the air. it has around 300 combat aircraft, including fighterjets and attack helicopters on the border. ukraine has just over 100. pinned down, they will find it harder to defend. many of its best trained and equipped troops are in the east of the country along the line of
3:44 am
control. western intelligence officials fear they could become encircled. the us and britain are among the few countries that have supplied ukraine with weapons, but these are mostly short range and i take and surface to air missiles. the best chance may be to defend the cities. the key question is whether president putin will achieve his political objectives through military means. and how long can ukraine hold out on its own? they have targeted certain we look at how the oligarchs influence the russian president. trips are crossing the border from crimea commerce —— missiles obstruct the capital, kyiv, and airports under
3:45 am
attack. this is days after putin recognised the independence of breakaway in ukraine, and this weekend in recent years, sanctions are central to how the west response to putin. here is one example. response to putin. here is one example-— example. we are sanctioning three very — example. we are sanctioning three very high _ example. we are sanctioning three very high net _ example. we are sanctioning three very high net worth - three very high net worth individuals, gennadi tim schenker, boris rotenberg, and igor roternberg. borisjohnson igor roternberg. boris johnson calls igor roternberg. borisjohnson calls them putin's cronies. certainly they are very rich. gennady is worth an estimated $22 billion. 0nce gennady is worth an estimated $22 billion. once the largest foreign investor in russia argues that the target they make sense. everybody who knows russia probably knows putin properly. they'll know what will stop from doing terrible things, that is going after his money and to go after his money to go after the 50 top oligarchs.— to go after the 50 top oliuarchs. , ., ., . , oligarchs. these oligarchs amassed _ oligarchs. these oligarchs amassed huge _ oligarchs. these oligarchs amassed huge wealth - oligarchs. these oligarchs amassed huge wealth in l oligarchs. these oligarchs l amassed huge wealth in the 19905 as the soviet union broke apart. state assets were given to new companies, and in exchange forfunding exchange for funding politicians these men got shares in those companies. they also, as the financial times puts it, got unfettered access
3:46 am
to the corridors of power. and in some cases their wealth directly connected to putin. the times reports that while in a role in saint petersburg, putin granted timchenko an export license and the oilman went on to co—founder gunver. by went on to co—founder gunver. by 2007, around 30% of russian oil experts went through that company committed reports. and these personal connections remain. here is timchenko a putin's birthday in 2019. or boris rotenberg, a childhood friend of putin and co—owns a vast construction company. the times tells us they attended a judo training and are known to still spa. the third person named by borisjohnson, well, thatis named by borisjohnson, well, that is boris rotenberg's nephew igor. he controls a drilling company. the telegraph reports he is said to be putin'sjudo reports he is said to be putin's judo partner. reports he is said to be putin'sjudo partner. the uk says he has strategic significance to putin. and this is what these new sanctions mean in practice.— is what these new sanctions mean in practice. any assets they hold — mean in practice. any assets they hold in _ mean in practice. any assets they hold in the _ mean in practice. any assets they hold in the uk - mean in practice. any assets they hold in the uk will - mean in practice. any assets they hold in the uk will be . they hold in the uk will be frozen. the individuals
3:47 am
concerned will be banned from travelling here, and we will prohibit all uk individuals and entities from having any dealings with them. these are three examples. _ dealings with them. these are three examples. other- dealings with them. these are l three examples. other oligarchs three examples. 0ther oligarchs are also being targeted, as well as major russian companies like aeroflot, and russian banks too. there is boris johnson again.— banks too. there is boris johnson again. these powers will enable _ johnson again. these powers will enable us _ johnson again. these powers will enable us totally - johnson again. these powers will enable us totally to - will enable us totally to exclude russian banks from the uk financial system, which is of course by far the largest in europe, stopping them from accessing sterling and clearing payments through the uk. ibiiiii payments through the uk. bill brader argues that to be effective, sanctions need to be even more comprehensive. tote even more comprehensive. we know many _ even more comprehensive. - know many oligarchs were totally untouched, who live in london, who hold certain�*s money, he should be sanctioned. none of them have been touched. london is definitely part of the story. in 2008, the labour government in the uk introduced what became known as a golden visa. this residency in return for large investments, and over
3:48 am
2500 wealthy russians took up the chance. 2500 wealthy russians took up the chance-— the chance. their children go to universities _ the chance. their children go to universities in _ the chance. their children go to universities in the - the chance. their children go to universities in the uk, - the chance. their children go to universities in the uk, go| to universities in the uk, go to universities in the uk, go to schools in the uk, enjoy the luxuries, if you like, but the united kingdom and western countries offer. the united kingdom and western countries offer.— united kingdom and western countries offer. the scheme was scra ed countries offer. the scheme was scrapped last — countries offer. the scheme was scrapped last week. _ countries offer. the scheme was scrapped last week. but - countries offer. the scheme was scrapped last week. but of - scrapped last week. but of course russian money in london remains. , ' , remains. there is 1.5 pounds worth of— remains. there is 1.5 pounds worth of property _ remains. there is 1.5 pounds worth of property -- - remains. there is 1.5 pounds worth of property -- £1.5 - worth of property —— £1.5 billion worth of property and other assets linked to the kremlin regime or two prominent russians who have involvement, known involvement in corruption cases. to known involvement in corruption cases. ., , ., cases. to this, the opposition labor party — cases. to this, the opposition labor party says _ cases. to this, the opposition labor party says not - cases. to this, the opposition labor party says not enough i cases. to this, the opposition i labor party says not enough has been done. we labor party says not enough has been done-— been done. we have failed to sto the been done. we have failed to stop the flow _ been done. we have failed to stop the flow of _ been done. we have failed to stop the flow of illicit - stop the flow of illicit russian financing to britain. a cottage industry does the bidding of those linked to putin. . , bidding of those linked to putin. ., , ., bidding of those linked to putin. . , putin. that is labour. boris johnson — putin. that is labour. boris johnson has _ putin. that is labour. boris johnson has led _ putin. that is labour. boris johnson has led the - johnson has led the conservative since 2019. they have been in powerfor 12 years and the prime minister sees it differently to the opposition. i don't think any government could conceivably be doing more to root out corrupt russian
3:49 am
money. to root out corrupt russian mone . �* ~ to root out corrupt russian mone.�* ~ to root out corrupt russian mone. .,, ., money. but mrjohnson does have more plans. _ money. but mrjohnson does have more plans. six — money. but mrjohnson does have more plans, six years _ money. but mrjohnson does have more plans, six years after - money. but mrjohnson does have more plans, six years after the . more plans, six years after the conservative �*s more plans, six years after the conservative '5 first promised it, the prime minister wants to introduce a new register of ownership. introduce a new register of ownership-— introduce a new register of ownershi. ~ . . ~' , ownership. we are making sure that we open — ownership. we are making sure that we open up _ ownership. we are making sure that we open up the _ ownership. we are making sure that we open up the russian . that we open up the russian doll of property ownership, of company ownership, in london, and see who is behind everything. and see who is behind everything-— and see who is behind everything. this is the targeting _ everything. this is the targeting of _ everything. this is the l targeting of individuals. russia is a country is also being targeted. this week, and previously. back in 2014, russia annexed crimea. it supported separatists in eastern ukraine as well, and sanctions followed. they had an impact, while the global economy has grown on average 2.3% per year, for russia the figure is 0.3%. sanctions have cost russia an estimated $50 billion a year. russia, though, has taken measures to lessen the impact. nonetheless, after this we's invasion, once again the west has taken aim at its wealth. , . ., , ., wealth. these sanctions are designed — wealth. these sanctions are designed to _ wealth. these sanctions are designed to take _ wealth. these sanctions are
3:50 am
designed to take a - wealth. these sanctions are designed to take a heavy i wealth. these sanctions are | designed to take a heavy toll on the kremlin's interests and their ability to finance war. these distinctions involve freezing russian assets in the european union and blocking banks from accessing your�*s financial market. the question is, can any of this influence putin's intentions? history suggests this will be difficult.— suggests this will be difficult. . ,, ., , ., suggests this will be difficult. ., , ., ., suggests this will be difficult. . ,, ., , ., ., , difficult. he appears not to be afraid of sanctions _ difficult. he appears not to be afraid of sanctions or - difficult. he appears not to be afraid of sanctions or worried | afraid of sanctions or worried about them. sanctions that we have applied in the past have always slipped, over time. we know that people were sanctioned and then they got fake passports and they got around it. fake passports and they got around it— around it. the west will be acutely aware _ around it. the west will be acutely aware that - around it. the west will be i acutely aware that sanctions have not prevented a moment that the european union describes in these terms. these are among _ describes in these terms. these are among the _ describes in these terms. these are among the darkest - describes in these terms. these are among the darkest hours i describes in these terms. these j are among the darkest hours for europe since the end of world war ii. a major nuclear power has attacked a neighbour country. has attacked a neighbour count . �* has attacked a neighbour country-— has attacked a neighbour country. has attacked a neighbour count . . , ., country. and as we listen to that, think _ country. and as we listen to that, think back _ country. and as we listen to that, think back to - country. and as we listen to that, think back to what i that, think back to what president biden said on tuesday. president biden said on tuesday-_
3:51 am
president biden said on tuesda . ~ ., ., ., tuesday. we have no intention of fighting _ tuesday. we have no intention of fighting russia. _ tuesday. we have no intention of fighting russia. without i of fighting russia. without fi . htint , of fighting russia. without fighting, though, - of fighting russia. without fighting, though, you i of fighting russia. without fighting, though, you are i of fighting russia. without i fighting, though, you are left with sanctions. but putin's authority rests on a corrupt system of wealth and power that was 30 years in the making. he has nuclear weapons, too. it is not certain that sanctions alone can change his course. just to pick up on 1.1 saw coming in as i was watching ros atkins explain about oligarchs, the tax agencies, a russian news agency is saying that russia may retaliate for the ban on aeroflot flights to britain. they are citing the aviation authority but do not give any details on how. let me also bring you a recap of our breaking news this hour. we have been hearing reports of explosions in the ukrainian capital, care on friday morning. also unconfirmed reports coming in at the city's add defence stop an air raid by intercepting a number of muscles and downing an enemy aircraft. reuters is reporting that a missile strike has set a ukrainian border post in the south—east of the country,
3:52 am
killing and wounding some guards. but is according to the border guard service. with all these reports, of course, trying to get things confirmed by the bbc. i want to bring in margarita malikova from bbc monitoring, in kia. thank you forjoining us, i know that you are out on the street in a residential area of kyiv for supply have been watching with us response of these explosions in kyiv. what have you heard and seen?— in kyiv. what have you heard and seen? ., ., and seen? good morning. i also work u- and seen? good morning. i also work up to _ and seen? good morning. i also work up to the _ and seen? good morning. i also work up to the sound _ and seen? good morning. i also work up to the sound of - work up to the sound of explosions, then found venues, the official reports already, but ukrainian forces downed and an image and ended up crashing into a residential house on the left bank of kyiv —— kyiv. there is a fire right now over there, casualties are feared, according to the mayor of kyiv, three people injured and one person gravely injured, and we are hearing more and more reports of further casualties that are feared. also according
3:53 am
to the interior ministry, kyiv is underfire by to the interior ministry, kyiv is under fire by ballistic or cruise missiles, and people are advised to hide in bomb shelters, i am advised to hide in bomb shelters, iam next advised to hide in bomb shelters, i am next to one right now, there are people coming in. yeah. it is quite something, margarita, i coming in. yeah. it is quite something, margarita, the| coming in. yeah. it is quite i something, margarita, the kyiv now, vitali klitschko, the heavyweight champion, lots of our viewers might know him from his previous role, i know he has talked about taking up arms in recent days and weeks, but i saw that russian aircraft reportedly crashing into a kyiv apartment block, just to let our listeners know, but i can't imagine what that is like for the residents. you know, you are by a bomb shelter there, waking up early, probably, with kids and whatnot, and trying to get their families organised? yes, some people slept in the bomb shelter, but other people are still inside this block of
3:54 am
flats where i live, our bomb shelter is just the basement, we use it as the bomb shelter. i am seeing people leave, people going into their cars and leaving the city, but also some people staying and going downstairs. it is pretty calm out here because we have curfews, so you don't really see a lot of people in the streets. the curfew is from 10pm to 7am, so there is this kind of sense of calm, but of course it is very deceptive because people are very scared and hiding orfleeing. find and hiding or fleeing. and i imatine and hiding or fleeing. and i imagine there _ and hiding or fleeing. and i imagine there must i and hiding or fleeing. and i imagine there must be i and hiding or fleeing. and i imagine there must be an i and hiding or fleeing. and i i imagine there must be an awful lot of communication, whether it is on whatsapp calling each other through the night, what other through the night, what other conversations? is it about whether to leave? it is, es, about whether to leave? it is, yes. although _ about whether to leave? it is, yes, although we _ about whether to leave? it is, yes, although we also - about whether to leave? it is, yes, although we also have i about whether to leave? it is, i yes, although we also have this mandatory mobilisation, so men aged 18—60 are now not allowed to leave the country. they will be conscripted. and i am
3:55 am
getting a lot of messages of support from friends in the west as well, for which i am grateful, and my friends that were here, also very grateful. but i think right now, the main conversations centre around what we can do in the moment, solve problems and step—by—step, where do we go, where do we hide? so right now i think it is about hiding and ensuring our own safety. yes, and very _ ensuring our own safety. yes, and very striking, _ ensuring our own safety. yes, and very striking, as - ensuring our own safety. yes, and very striking, as well, i ensuring our own safety. yes, | and very striking, as well, men aged 18—60 cannot leave? band aged 18-60 cannot leave? and not leave the _ aged 18-60 cannot leave? and not leave the country, - aged 18—60 cannot leave? jifuc not leave the country, yes. margarita, we will have to talk to you some more, thank you so much forjoining us here on bbc news. stay safe, of course. another curfew in place for another hour. i am just seeing, actually, pauladams, our actually, paul adams, our correspondence, actually, pauladams, our correspondence, says "we are all in the basement after one or more explosions in the kia area this morning, it will be another long day". —— kyiv. so we are going to continue following all these stories, if
3:56 am
you want to follow developments, stay with us here on bbc world news, but also, we have our live page with all the developments minute by minute. stay with us, if you can. hello there. we're ending the working week on a largely fine and settled note, thanks to a ridge of high pressure. the winds and showers continue to ease down during the overnight period. it's a chilly start to friday morning but there will be a lot of sunshine around and it'll feel a little bit warmer than it did yesterday, too. now, here's the ridge of high pressure pushing in from the west. you can see fewer isobars, so lighter winds. this weather front, though, may bring more cloud northern ireland, western scotland later on. could start with a few blustery showers through the morning. these will fade away, the winds will turn lighter, plenty of sunshine bar a little fair weather cloud into the afternoon. more cloud for northern ireland and western scotland, thanks to that weather front i showed you, and outbreaks of rain for western scotland. could see a little bit of wintriness over the higher
3:57 am
ground as well. but the temperatures a bit higher than yesterday's — 7—11, maybe 12 degrees across the far south—west. as we head through friday night, it stays cloudy for scotland and northern ireland — quite breezy here, too. for england and wales, we'll have clear skies. lighter winds here, so another chilly night to come. maybe a touch of frost out of town. less cold further north and west, where we have more cloud and more breeze. into the weekend, then, this area of high pressure over the near continent will influence the weather across england and wales. but you'll see the further north—west you go, closer to this weather front, it's likely to be cloudier and also breezier, so more cloud for scotland and northern ireland through the day, could see some outbreaks of rain for the north—west of scotland. it should be drier further south and east but for england and wales, another largely fine, dry and settled day. and after that chilly start, with all the sunshine around, it'll be quite mild with top temperatures of 10—12 degrees, so feeling quite springlike. similar story for england and wales on sunday, though this weather front may have a bit more influence. this area of low pressure will have more of an influence across the country — during monday, it'll bring us
3:58 am
outbreaks of rain. so, sunday starts off dry and bright, plenty of sunshine across england and wales. that weather front, though, fading as it moves its way eastwards to bring a bit more cloud around. but again, scotland and northern ireland probably seeing most of the cloud through the day and temperatures again similar to saturday's — 8—11 degrees. on monday, that area of low pressure i showed you brings wetter conditions for a time on monday but then, high pressure builds back in and the rest of the week looks largely fine and settled with some spells of sunshine.
3:59 am
4:00 am
this is bbc news. our top stories. explosions are heard across the ukrainian capital with unconfirmed reports and russian aircraft has been shot down. this comes as russia's invasion enters the second day. 137 citizens have been killed in violence so far. the eu is elated in the west to take sanctions on russia, targeting its financial, energy and transport sectors. it is a watershed moment. putin is t in: to watershed moment. putin is trying to subjugate - watershed moment. putin is trying to subjugate a - watershed moment. putin is| trying to subjugate a friendly european country, and he is trying to redraw the maps of europe by force. he must and he will fail. leaving their lives behind, the
4:01 am
un says

50 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on