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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 25, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. explosions. explosions over ukraine's capital kyiv as the country fights for its future against a russian offensive by land, sea and air. a ukrainian official says a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing onto a residential street. crowds spend the night in subway stations with their children fearing more missile strikes. as others see their homes destroyed and lives ruined. the european union announces what it calls massive new sanctions on russia, as world leaders come together to condemn putin.
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and people around the world take to the streets to protest russia's actions. the financial impact of the crisis starts to become clear. stock markets tumble, gas prices surge and petrol soars to a record high, and there are fears this could all make the cost of living crisis worse. i'll have the details. we expect a dry and sunny day in many areas but it is a frosty start with icy stretches in the north. i will bring you the details throughout the programme. it's friday, the 25th of february. explosions have been heard over ukraine's capital of kyiv this morning, as the country fights for its future, in the first major ground war in europe in decades. there are reports a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing into a residential building, setting it on fire. thousands have fled their homes,
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but men aged between 18 and 60 have been told they can't leave the country by the ukrainian government. jonah fisher reports. this was the night after the day when everything changed for ukraine and for europe. explosions above the capital kyiv. a city of 3 million under attack, but fighting back. air defences appear to have shot something, possiblya missile, down. safety now means going underground. metro stations becoming bomb shelters as russia turns on its neighbour. ukraine's beleaguered president, now in military clothes, addressed the nation. peaceful cities are now military targets, volodymyr zelensky said — warning ukrainians that they were now on their own and they shouldn't expect anyone to come to their aid. on thursday, the full
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force of the russian military was unleashed. from the air came planes, helicopters and missile strikes. on the ground, tanks rolled across the borders to the north and to the south. from occupied crimea, seized eight years ago, russia gained ground, as it did advancing from belarus. the site of the chernobyl nuclear disaster has now changed hands. crucially, an attempt at a lightning strike on kyiv appears to have been thwarted. an airstrip just outside the capital was captured by russians arriving by helicopter then taken back in fighting by ukrainians later in the day. having long believed this was unthinkable, the streets heading west out of kyiv quickly filled as people desperately tried to leave. they will be at europe's door soon.
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spurned by nato and under attack from the north, south and east, how long can ukraine hold out? jonah fisher, bbc news. let's speak now to our correspondent james waterhouse in kyiv. this time yesterday we were seeing the start of this. that this time yesterday we were seeing the start of this.— the start of this. that is right. it miaht the start of this. that is right. it might look _ the start of this. that is right. it might look nice _ the start of this. that is right. it might look nice this _ the start of this. that is right. it might look nice this morning - the start of this. that is right. it| might look nice this morning but this is what a capital city looks like when it is under attack. a curfew has just finished. it finished at 7am. there have been reports of missile strikes across the city. we have heard from president zelensky confirming that. we have had two air raid sirens. we have twice been to the bomb shelter ourselves. people have taken cover in other places like metro stations,
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underground restaurants that were once full of atmosphere and life. this city has a very different feel this morning. we have heard faint explosions in the distance. not yet clear what it was all where it was coming from. it could be the missile attacks that have been reported. it is a very difficult time for a city and a country that is increasingly feeling a stranglehold imposed by russian forces. the air base you talked about earlier has now fallen to russian forces along with the chernobyl power plant which represents a larger advance coming from the north, and president zelensky said he is concerned with russian troops advancing north from the south, from annexed crimea. there has been heavy fighting in a city in the north of ukraine. there
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has been loud bangs and pictures a burning coming from there. the russian backed a separatist leader in the east has reported stiff resistance from ukrainian forces. yesterday the message from moscow was ukrainians would put down their weapons and not put up a fight. we now know ukraine is fighting. the question is for how long they can keep that up and when does kyiv fall? , ._ keep that up and when does kyiv fall? , , fall? yesterday we saw cars queueing with --eole fall? yesterday we saw cars queueing with peeple trying _ fall? yesterday we saw cars queueing with people trying to _ fall? yesterday we saw cars queueing with people trying to leave _ fall? yesterday we saw cars queueing with people trying to leave the - with people trying to leave the city. of those who are still there today, can they see evidence of damage, can they see evidence of attacks in the city? i damage, can they see evidence of attacks in the city?— attacks in the city? i think the only evidence _ attacks in the city? i think the only evidence people - attacks in the city? i think the only evidence people will- attacks in the city? i think the only evidence people will see | attacks in the city? i think the i only evidence people will see our attacks in the city? i think the - only evidence people will see our if they are directly impacted. i do not want to use that phrase carelessly. if there was a missile impact close to them. otherwise we often see it on social media. but at the moment, when a city is invaded or comes
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under attack in this way, you have little sounds, little flashes of light on the horizon. it is hard to pinpoint what is going on and it adds to the confusion. the more broader, constant sense you get is the uncertainty. when a city is under attack, the slightest noise, the sound of a car backfiring, a firework. fireworks have been banned in the city. that keeps people on edge. what has changed in the past 24 edge. what has changed in the past 2a hours, the familiar sound of air raid sirens, the occasionaljet flying over. ukraine is coming under a pincer movement from russian forces. as far as the president is concerned, there are already russian saboteurs, as he puts it, in the city. both he and the us are clear minded about this. they think
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vladimir putin is going to look to overthrow the ukrainian government. that puts the focus very much here on kyiv, and that goes alongside what we are seeing in the country. james waterhouse in kyiv. thank you. president biden has promised to limit russia's ability to be part of the global economy through financial sanctions. we're joined now by our north america correspondent david willis. sanctions is the means by which the rest of the world is hoping they can influence russia's actions. what rest of the world is hoping they can influence russia's actions.- influence russia's actions. what is the us plan? _ influence russia's actions. what is the us plan? the _ influence russia's actions. what is the us plan? the us _ influence russia's actions. what is the us plan? the us announced i influence russia's actions. what is - the us plan? the us announced today sanctions against banks and oligarchs. as far as russia is concerned, five banks and ten individuals. whom president biden described as corrupt billionaires.
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there was no mention on vladimir putin himself on that list today, although the united states says it retains the right to escalate those sanctions as it sees fit in accordance with russia's movements on the ground. these are sanctions which the united states believes will cripple potentially the russian economy and could even force it into recession. they acknowledge however, american officials, it could take some time for the impact of these sanctions to be felt in russia. in the meantime, much can happen. david, thank you. the prime minister has also unveiled fresh economic sanctions on russia, calling it the "largest and most severe" package it has ever faced. these include. freezing the assets of all major russian banks and excluding them from the uk financial system. 100 companies and individuals
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will face financial sanctions, including several oligarchs and russia's biggest defence company. the exportation of military equipment and oil refinery goods will be suspended. and the russian airline aeroflot has been banned from landing in the uk. let's get more now from our political correspondent nick eardley, who's outside downing street. there are cause for more. we know ukraine president said these sanctions imposed on russia are not enough. there are cause even at home for the prime minister to go further. ., for the prime minister to go further. . ., ~ further. can he? there are. i think the government _ further. can he? there are. i think the government here _ further. can he? there are. i think the government here is _ further. can he? there are. i think the government here is pretty - further. can he? there are. i think| the government here is pretty clear it is prepared to go further in the coming days and weeks to target more oligarchs and potentially look at other organisations in industries linked to the war effort in ukraine, as well. one thing in particular borisjohnson has pushed for
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behind—the—scenes but cannot get international agreement on is to ban russia from a system called swift, which facilitates international payments. the thinking in downing street is it would have a major impact on the russian economy. but the uk does not want to move on its own on this and i understand germany in particular is not in the same place when it comes to banning that at this stage. i expect the uk to keep putting pressure on international allies to do that. more broadly, borisjohnson met the cabinet last night to discuss the latest situation in ukraine. it was a pretty bleak assessment that cabinet got, the latest in a long run of bleak assessments from the uk. there is a message from the uk that they think there is a significant resistance in ukraine and they point to what they see as
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and they point to what they see as an anti—war movement emerging in russia. as a sign that even within his own borders, president putin faces some opposition. i think what you are going to see is a message from politicians here that this is not something that will be sorted in the next days. this could potentially be a long run thing. borisjohnson potentially be a long run thing. boris johnson talked potentially be a long run thing. borisjohnson talked yesterday potentially be a long run thing. boris johnson talked yesterday about hobbling the russian economy in time. that is a view shared by other ministers that this could be a protracted affair, and that will have an impact on the economy here, something that the prime minister and other politicians were talking about in parliament yesterday. thanks very much. we can speak now tojohn herbst, the former united states ambassador to ukraine. good morning. and thank you for joining us. there are cause for more
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sanctions to be put in place, from ukraine and domestically, us, uk and mainland europe.— mainland europe. should that be the case? certainly- _ mainland europe. should that be the case? certainly. our— mainland europe. should that be the case? certainly. our idea _ mainland europe. should that be the case? certainly. our idea should - mainland europe. should that be the case? certainly. our idea should be. case? certainly. our idea should be to inflict maximum damage on moscow as quickly as possible. it is a big mistake for the biden administration. i understand trouble moving on swift because other countries need to be agreed. but sanctions on the central bank of russia would be more crushing than the others. and imposing sanctions individually on hundreds of senior russians and their families as opposed to just russians and their families as opposed tojust a russians and their families as opposed to just a few. it was an opportunity lost but we could do it tomorrow. ., ' . ., , tomorrow. how effective would they be in terms — tomorrow. how effective would they be in terms of _ tomorrow. how effective would they be in terms of time _ tomorrow. how effective would they be in terms of time and _ tomorrow. how effective would they be in terms of time and immediate l be in terms of time and immediate economic impact on russia? certainly if we sanction — economic impact on russia? certainly if we sanction the _ economic impact on russia? certainly if we sanction the central— economic impact on russia? certainly if we sanction the central bank- economic impact on russia? certainly if we sanction the central bank of - if we sanction the central bank of russia, it would have immediate impact. you need to understand, the speech president biden gave was like a big wet blanket for people in
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ukraine fighting for their lives. they look to be uplifted with american support. they saw something wishy—washy. we want to encourage people in ukraine as they deal with russian tanks and missiles, they need moral support as well as material support and they did not receive that today from the west. swift is the banking system that allows money to be transferred. a counter to that is russia has its own system so it would not be too much of an impact, even though it is called for to be obstructed. the rouble is not _ called for to be obstructed. tue: rouble is not particularly called for to be obstructed. tte: rouble is not particularly powerful as a currency, the dollar is, so it would have a strong impact. the world has been dealing with a rogue arana for years and they did not hesitate to kick iran and north korea out of swift. i think they are thinking about the possible impact on their economy. pare thinking about the possible impact
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on their economy.— thinking about the possible impact on their economy. are you surprised b the on their economy. are you surprised by the timeline? _ on their economy. are you surprised by the timeline? warnings _ on their economy. are you surprised by the timeline? warnings were - on their economy. are you surprised by the timeline? warnings were in l by the timeline? warnings were in place. the announcement came at three o'clock uk time. 27 hours ago. and then action was swift. has three o'clock uk time. 27 hours ago. and then action was swift.— and then action was swift. has that surrised and then action was swift. has that surprised you? _ and then action was swift. has that surprised you? no. _ and then action was swift. has that surprised you? no. western - surprised you? no. western intelligence has been excellent on this and essentially laid out what the russians have done. one thing thatis the russians have done. one thing that is a surprise. not that ukrainians are fighting back. they have done rather well taken down russian planes, helicopters, tanks. this fight for airfield near kyiv, which ukrainians were able to read again. ukraine is fighting and fighting admirably. we need to make sure they have the means to fight. the weapons we send have to continue. the weapons we send have to continue-— the weapons we send have to continue. . , , ., u, the weapons we send have to continue. . , , ., ., continue. there has been a call also for more physical— continue. there has been a call also for more physical help _ continue. there has been a call also for more physical help on _ continue. there has been a call also for more physical help on the - for more physical help on the ground. you are talking about weapons being sent. president biden said he will not send troops to ukraine to fight russia. why? and
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ukraine to fight russia. why? and would that ukraine to fight russia. why? fich would that change? that ukraine to fight russia. why? £“tc would that change? that is not ukraine to fight russia. why? £3“tc would that change? that is not going to change. ukraine is not a nato ally and we have an obligation to defend nato allies but we also have an obligation to help this democracy defend itself from a larger power committing an act of aggression to control the country and we can do that, being smarter and faster with sanctions, making sure we provide more weapons and keep them coming, now by ground, because of the russian air strike. and also more nato forces in the east. we should be using our skills with cyber and the information sphere to get into russia by social media with accurate reporting. the russian people do not want soldiers fighting civilians in ukraine and they do not want soldiers dying in ukraine. we need to provide evidence. this is an unpopular war in russia. there are re orts unpopular war in russia. there are reports on — unpopular war in russia. there are reports on reuters _ unpopular war in russia. there are reports on reuters that _ unpopular war in russia. there are
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reports on reuters that the - unpopular war in russia. there are reports on reuters that the deputy ukrainian defence minister saying russian forces may enter areas outside kyiv today. if that happens, there is a point where if there is no military back—up, no physical defences in place, because the ukrainians do not have enough against the russians, that ukraine will fall. t against the russians, that ukraine will fall. ., , against the russians, that ukraine willfall. ., , ., , will fall. i would be astonished if that happened- _ will fall. i would be astonished if that happened. ukraine - will fall. i would be astonished if that happened. ukraine is - will fall. i would be astonished if that happened. ukraine is a - will fall. i would be astonished if| that happened. ukraine is a large country. forthe that happened. ukraine is a large country. for the russians to take kyiv they will have to send soldiers into the city and a lot of soldiers will die. a lot of ukrainian civilians will die. if we can get that information to russia that will cause problems for putin. the kyiv government can relocate. and it continue effective resistance. that is what is going to happen. even if the russians captured the president there would be other members of the government organising resistance.
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this is not a three—week affair. i think putin will rule the day he sent troops into ukraine. == think putin will rule the day he sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the da .. sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the day" because _ sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the day.. because ukraine _ sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the day.. because ukraine will- sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the day.. because ukraine will fight. - sent troops into ukraine. -- rue the day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop — day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop on _ day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop on a _ day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop on a plane _ day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop on a plane before - day.. because ukraine will fight. he did not hop on a plane before the i did not hop on a plane before the bad guys arrived. putin understand for his people, this war is a problem. this is why he is telling his people only russian peacekeepers are in ukraine and only in the east, whereas russian bums have fallen on cities throughout the country and they are killing civilians. if this information gets in, there is a political problem for putin. d0 information gets in, there is a political problem for putin. do you think physically — political problem for putin. do you think physically ukraine _ political problem for putin. do you think physically ukraine can - political problem for putin. do you think physically ukraine can match the might of the russian military force? qt the might of the russian military force? .., , ., the might of the russian military force? , ., ~ ., , force? of course not. the afghans could not match _ force? of course not. the afghans could not match the _ force? of course not. the afghans could not match the might - force? of course not. the afghans could not match the might of- could not match the might of american forces and yet somehow they won. if the ukrainian people are
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willing to fight, even when the military is on the ropes, the russians have a problem. they do not have enough troops in the country to occupy the whole place. they would have to send the entire military to do that. if the ukrainian people are willing to engage in partisan war and they say they are, polls showing 45% of ukrainians willing to take up arms. it if that happens, putin could flatten the country and still have to worry about bombs on the streets, snipers, assassins, and thatis streets, snipers, assassins, and that is a political problem for him. if ukraine is fighting even at half strength three months from now. putin is losing. john herbst, former united states ambassador, thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. "a dark day for europe"
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is the headline in the times, which along with every other papers is dominated by russia's attack on ukraine. there's also a photo of a woman who was injured in an air strike — she is a 53—year—old teacher who was injured we understand when russian forces bombed one of the eastern cities. we will get more detail from a photojournalist working in the area and depicting how people are already being injured and affected. the daily telegraph's headline warns of a "new cold war as putin strikes". the paper also features a photograph of an injured ukrainian soldier. "ukraine's agony" is the i newspaper's headline, alongside a photo of a woman clasping her hands.
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the paper says more than 50 people have been killed, hundreds are injured and hundreds of thousands are trying to flee on gridlocked roads. we'll be bringing you the latest on this story all morning, but for some more background on the conflict — head to the dedicated page on the bbc news website. now the weather with sarah. good morning. good morning. a much quieter day compared to what we had this time last week, when we were battling storm units. today high pressure is in charge with settled weather and sunshine, but it is a cold morning. a sharp frost in some areas and icy stretches, even snow showers in the north. blustery showers in the north. blustery showers this morning in scotland, parts of northern england, northern ireland, but they fade quickly so a lot of dry weather today with blue sky. cloudy later in northern ireland and scotland and some rain
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in the north—west but most of the places dry with light wind and temperatures around 8—12 degrees. once the sun sets, it will turn cold quickly. clear skies and in england and wales, light winds. more cloud in scotland and northern ireland and more of a breeze here. temperatures not falling as low. in england and wales, many getting down to freezing, or even below in the countryside. a cold and frosty start to saturday. we have not seen a lot of frost recently in england and wales. sunshine in england and wales. sunshine in england and wales. breezy across scotland and northern ireland with more cloud and some rain across the far north—west. top temperatures 9—10 for most on saturday. the weather front moves in from the west into sunday. it tends to fizzle out as it pushes eastwards but the odd spot of rain for sun. sunshine to the east and west of the
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front. temperatures around 8—11. mixed, but a spell of quieter weather over the next couple of days. russia's attack on ukraine has already impacted financial markets around the world. here, there are fears it will have consequences for both the economy and our personal finances. ben's looking at the details for us this morning. the impact pretty much immediate and possibly long—term. there are few things financial markets dislike more than instability, chaos and uncertainty. russia's invasion of ukraine delivers all three. and worryingly, the predictable market turmoil could affect you and me. it's the oil and gas price moves that are most worrying. a barrel of crude oil now costs
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more than 100 dollars. it's at the highest level in seven years. motoring groups are warning we are looking at petrol price increases. 1.55 a litre could be a reality soon. that would mean filling up the tank would set you back £85. but: not much of the uk's oil comes from russia — just six per cent — so why are we still going to be paying so much more at the pump? it is the amount of oil and gas russia provides to global markets and because they are globally traded commodities, the price is set on a global scale rather than a local scale in the uk. russia provides around a0—50% of your�*s gas, which is a lot bigger than it does for the uk. 20-30% of is a lot bigger than it does for the uk. 20—30% of europe's oil. so it is a big player with oil and gas in europe as a whole.
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this isn't a supply problem yet. there is plenty of oil out there. but the high wholesale cost means we will end up paying more. and it isn'tjust petrol. at one point yesterday, the wholesale cost of gas rose by more than 60 perc ent, ending the day up by a third. that remains below those super high levels we saw in december, but it still spells bad news for household bills. the energy price cap is already going up from £1200 to nearly two thousand in april. one bank now thinks that in october the cap will go up to an eyewatering £3200. then there are food prices. ukraine is nicknamed the breadbasket of europe because of the amount of grain and wheat it produces and exports. the uk doesn't import much of that because we produce so much ourselves — so, again, no supply issue, but there is a price issue. global costs of all sorts of raw food products have gone up.
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and that could feed into the cost of living. i think this is one of those situations where what we're reading in the news headlines is going to be felt by the average household relatively quickly. so, at the moment, we're expecting inflation to peak around 7.5% in april, largely due to the increase in energy prices. depending on how severe the sanctions are — the extent of the impact of that on energy prices — it wouldn't be surprising to see inflation of around 10% in the major european economies, and i wouldn't be surprised if that was feeding into the numbers as recently as the beginning of spring. we've seen increased economic sanctions against russia and there have been calls to go further — but the toughest measures will also hurt our economy. as nina was saying then — the reality is households already struggling will feel the impact of this. and soon.
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the other point to make is there is a double whammy effect notjust in household bills and fuel costs, but if businesses feel the increased cost, that will be passed on to us in the prices we pay for things. which we have seen already before this. thanks. it will be a morning on bbc breakfast where we balance looking at politics, talking about sanctions, and also images coming to us this morning. we want to show you some footage. this is a live picture. we understand we are looking at a building in kyiv. the story as we understand it is there was an aircraft brought down that crashed into an apartment block. the images you can see are what are clearly devastating consequences. we will keep you up—to—date throughout. we understand emergency
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services are in attendance there. time for the news where you are. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london has proposed that property held be allies of russian president vladimir putin here in the capital be seized. transparency international — an anti—corruption think tank — estimates that over £1 billion worth of london property is owned by russians accused of corruption, or with links to the kremlin. yesterday the prime minister announced a raft of new sanctions on russia following the invasion of ukraine, which included freezing assets on a further 100 russian individuals and entities. our researchers found £1.5 billion worth of property of concern owned by russians, often with links to the kremlin. over a quarter of that is in the city of westminster, nearly a fifth of it is in the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, and a tenth in camden.
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in fact, an awful lot of this property is within a mile of buckingham palace, so there really is quite a concentration, right in the heart of the city. the o2 arena will reopen from ten o'clock this morning after having to close following damage caused during storm eunice. the greenwich landmark was evacuated on friday last week as gusts of up to 80 miles per hour shredded the roof. the 02 said that they had carried out rigorous safety checks and deemed the venue "safe, secure, and structurally sound". workers in london put in over £7 billion worth of unpaid overtime last year — that's according to analysis by the trades union congress. the findings, published today, also suggests that almost a fifth of londoners did unpaid overtime — averaging around eight hours a week. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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onto the weather now. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning, but a bright one. the wind is a lot lighter today, and that's all thanks to a ridge of high pressure which is building. now, we could see a little bit more cloud bubbling up through the afternoon, perhaps some hazy sunny spells, and temperatures reaching 11 celsius — just feeling a little milder in the lighter wind, but also with the addition of the sunshine. now, overnight conditions remain — it's dry and it's clear. could get a little bit of mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning, but the temperature also dropping — —2 the minimum, so we could see a little bit of frost first thing tomorrow. now, high pressure still in charge for saturday, so it is going to be another fine and dry day. plenty of sunshine around after a chilly start tomorrow, but the wind will start to strengthen through the course of saturday afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, again, around 11 celsius. now, we're still with the high pressure for sunday, but it's slipping away. another fine day for the end of the weekend — we've still got some sunshine — perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud.
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still quite breezy on sunday, as well, but, as we head into next week, the influence of low pressure — so things turning progressively more unsettled through monday with some outbreaks of rain. but for the weekend, dry and fine, some chilly nights. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, you're watching breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we will be keeping you up—to—date with the latest on the crisis in ukraine. we have pictures coming through, latest pictures. in the capital kyiv, what you are seeing is a residential building and what we understand, unconfirmed as of yet, that this has been damaged after an
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aircraft or a missile has been shot down, it is not clear which has caused the damage but that has been shot down by ukrainian forces and this is the damage we are seeing this is the damage we are seeing this residential building. yesterday this residential building. yesterday this time we were seeing buildings damaged, as well, we understand emergency services have been in attendance. lode emergency services have been in attendance-— attendance. we will see jonah fisher, attendance. we will see jonah fisher. who — attendance. we will see jonah fisher, who is _ attendance. we will see jonah fisher, who is in _ attendance. we will see jonah fisher, who is in the - attendance. we will see jonah fisher, who is in the studio. i attendance. we will see jonah l fisher, who is in the studio. he spent many years in kyiv, four years or so, and i'm spent many years in kyiv, four years orso, and i'm wondering, as spent many years in kyiv, four years or so, and i'm wondering, as you look at these pictures come it is not entirely clear what has happened, a plane was brought down, crashed into a residential building. we have been looking at those pictures — we have been looking at those pictures overnight. it is not clear whether— pictures overnight. it is not clear whether it — pictures overnight. it is not clear whether it was a plane that was shut down _ whether it was a plane that was shut down or— whether it was a plane that was shut down or possibly a missile that was shut down— down or possibly a missile that was shut down over kyiv but very dramatic _ shut down over kyiv but very dramatic —— macro shot down. clearly it has— dramatic —— macro shot down. clearly it has been_ dramatic —— macro shot down. clearly it has been coming under a sustained barrage _ it has been coming under a sustained
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barrage of— it has been coming under a sustained barrage of attack from the russians overnight — barrage of attack from the russians overnight. let's look at the picture from _ overnight. let's look at the picture from the _ overnight. let's look at the picture from the last 24 hours or so. pretty dramatic— from the last 24 hours or so. pretty dramatic stuff. what we saw yesterday morning is a repeat of what _ yesterday morning is a repeat of what we — yesterday morning is a repeat of what we are seeing now. the russians hitting _ what we are seeing now. the russians hitting targets all across ukraine and that— hitting targets all across ukraine and that was really the first indication that we got that this was not going _ indication that we got that this was not going to be a conflict that was localised — not going to be a conflict that was localised to eastern ukraine, though separatist— localised to eastern ukraine, though separatist republics on that side in that hashed area. some were thinking it might _ that hashed area. some were thinking it mightjust be in that part. very clear— it mightjust be in that part. very clear that — it mightjust be in that part. very clear that everywhere was now a target _ clear that everywhere was now a target for — clear that everywhere was now a target for russia, targeting kyiv, as it has — target for russia, targeting kyiv, as it has been today, kharkiv, odesa. ukraine has been surrounded — kharkiv, odesa. ukraine has been surrounded on three sides by the russian — surrounded on three sides by the russian military, the military lmild-up— russian military, the military build—up both in the north, east and to the _ build—up both in the north, east and to the south — build—up both in the north, east and to the south. what we saw yesterday
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once the _ to the south. what we saw yesterday once the fighting was under way was an advance _ once the fighting was under way was an advance from crimea, territory at the russians— an advance from crimea, territory at the russians seized from ukraine back the russians seized from ukraine hack in— the russians seized from ukraine back in 2014, so tanks have been seen _ back in 2014, so tanks have been seen moving into the southern part of ukraine — seen moving into the southern part of ukraine here. there has also been fighting _ of ukraine here. there has also been fighting around kharkiv in eastern ukraine _ fighting around kharkiv in eastern ukraine and perhaps, more interestingly, also movement from belarus _ interestingly, also movement from belarus a — interestingly, also movement from belarus. a different country but russian — belarus. a different country but russian troops are based there. they have been_ russian troops are based there. they have been moving south from belarus. you will _ have been moving south from belarus. you will see _ have been moving south from belarus. you will see chernobyl, the site of the nuclear— you will see chernobyl, the site of the nuclear accident in 1986, has now changed hands and is under the control— now changed hands and is under the control of— now changed hands and is under the control of the russians. perhaps the most _ control of the russians. perhaps the most significant battle of yesterday took place here. an air base just outside — took place here. an air base just outside kyiv. crucially very important if the russians were going to very— important if the russians were going to very quickly get troops on the ground _ to very quickly get troops on the ground and moved for an early strike in kyiv _ ground and moved for an early strike in kyiv. those helicopters are the
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russian _ in kyiv. those helicopters are the russian helicopters that flew in yesterday, troops very quickly put on the _ yesterday, troops very quickly put on the ground at this airstrip and there _ on the ground at this airstrip and there were — on the ground at this airstrip and there were fears it would then be a place _ there were fears it would then be a place where the russians would be able to _ place where the russians would be able to bring in large amounts of troop— able to bring in large amounts of troop for— able to bring in large amounts of troop for a — able to bring in large amounts of troop for a quick strike on the ukrainian _ troop for a quick strike on the ukrainian capital kyiv. that has not happened. — ukrainian capital kyiv. that has not happened, at least so far, because there _ happened, at least so far, because there was— happened, at least so far, because there was a — happened, at least so far, because there was a ukrainian fightback yesterday afternoon and yesterday evening, _ yesterday afternoon and yesterday evening, and we now understand that that airstrip _ evening, and we now understand that that airstrip is back under ukrainian control. there had been some _ ukrainian control. there had been some people who thought that this might— some people who thought that this might not— some people who thought that this might not last that long because of this year— might not last that long because of this year in— might not last that long because of this year in balance between the power. — this year in balance between the power, the military might of the russians— power, the military might of the russians as compared to the ukrainians. perhaps vladimir putin, the russian — ukrainians. perhaps vladimir putin, the russian president, was hoping this would — the russian president, was hoping this would be a quick battle. well, all the _ this would be a quick battle. well, all the indications are that, although the ukrainians have their backs _ although the ukrainians have their backs to— although the ukrainians have their backs to the war, they are not giving — backs to the war, they are not giving up. _ backs to the war, they are not giving up, it will not be quick, this— giving up, it will not be quick, this could _ giving up, it will not be quick, this could be quite a long, quite a bloody— this could be quite a long, quite a bloody battle and a long and bloody war. ., ., ~'
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bloody battle and a long and bloody war. ., ., ~ ., war. earlier we were talking to the former united _ war. earlier we were talking to the former united states _ war. earlier we were talking to the former united states ambassadorl war. earlier we were talking to the i former united states ambassador to ukraine and he was saying exactly that. he was making comparisons to afghanistan. it is not as simple as look at the military might of russia and that of ukraine, it is about the determination of ukraine keep fighting. t determination of ukraine keep fiuuhtin. .,, determination of ukraine keep fiuuhtin. ., ~ ., fighting. i was living in ukraine for four years. _ fighting. i was living in ukraine for four years. it _ fighting. i was living in ukraine for four years. it was _ fighting. i was living in ukraine for four years. it was really - for four years. it was really inconceivable for people at that point _ inconceivable for people at that point to — inconceivable for people at that point to have an attempt made by russia _ point to have an attempt made by russia to — point to have an attempt made by russia to try and take the whole country — russia to try and take the whole country because even if russia does occupv _ country because even if russia does occupy kyiv. — country because even if russia does occupy kyiv, some of the major cities, — occupy kyiv, some of the major cities, such— occupy kyiv, some of the major cities, such is the feeling, the patriotic— cities, such is the feeling, the patriotic sense ukrainians have about — patriotic sense ukrainians have about them being independent and separate _ about them being independent and separate from russia, that it would surely _ separate from russia, that it would surely only— separate from russia, that it would surely only set the stage for a long. — surely only set the stage for a long, bitter insurgency, potentially a lengthy— long, bitter insurgency, potentially a lengthy civil war. the assumption for a _ a lengthy civil war. the assumption for a long _ a lengthy civil war. the assumption for a long time and the assumption a lot of— for a long time and the assumption a lot of people make just a day or so a-o lot of people make just a day or so ago was _ lot of people make just a day or so ago was that vladimir putin realise that and _ ago was that vladimir putin realise that and that this would all be an elaborate — that and that this would all be an elaborate game, he was pushing for concessions in a really coercive way but the _ concessions in a really coercive way but the evidence of the last 24
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hours — but the evidence of the last 24 hours is — but the evidence of the last 24 hours is sadly that the worst case scenario— hours is sadly that the worst case scenario for— hours is sadly that the worst case scenario for ukraine has come true, it really— scenario for ukraine has come true, it really seems vladimir putin is determined taking as much of country as possible _ determined taking as much of country as possible and most likely installing a government favourable to him _ installing a government favourable to him. , ., , ., installing a government favourable to him. , ., i. ~ , installing a government favourable to him. , ., ~ , , to him. every hour you will keep us up-to-date- _ to him. every hour you will keep us up-to-date. thank _ to him. every hour you will keep us up-to-date. thank you _ to him. every hour you will keep us up-to-date. thank you so - to him. every hour you will keep us up-to-date. thank you so much, . to him. every hour you will keep us - up-to-date. thank you so much, jonah up—to—date. thank you so much, jonah fisher. more than 100 ukrainian citizens — both soldiers and civilians — died in the first day of conflict. thousands more have fled their homes into neighbouring countries. let's hear what the situation is like on the ground right now, with human rights journalist sara cincurova, who's currently in kharkiv, in the east of the country. very good morning to you. where are you and what is your situation? home you and what is your situation? now i am in kharkiv, _ you and what is your situation? now i am in kharkiv, in _ you and what is your situation? now i am in kharkiv, in a _ you and what is your situation? tum-o" i am in kharkiv, in a hotel, you and what is your situation? tum-o" lam in kharkiv, in a hotel, so iam in kharkiv, in a hotel, so right now it is pretty safe. the night has been relatively calm, although yesterday i was doing a story at the train station here in
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kharkiv and unfortunately i witnessed hundreds if not thousands of desperate people trying to flee and catch trains, and the trains, many of them have been cancelled. there was supposed to be one last train leaving for kyiv that never arrived and i don't know, maybe it arrived and i don't know, maybe it arrived in the night but i had to leave the train station. so the situation on the ground with regard to the idp and refugee crisis really is dramatic and it was really dramatic for me as an independent journalist, as i was reporting from the ground, but right now i am happy to report i am safely in a hotel in kharkiv. ., ~ , to report i am safely in a hotel in kharkiv. . ~ , ., , to report i am safely in a hotel in kharkiv. w , ., , , kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people _ kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people are — kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people are so _ kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people are so keen _ kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people are so keen to - kharkiv. take us through, why is it that people are so keen to leave . that people are so keen to leave kharkiv? we were hearing a moment ago, it is one of the places there has been some shelling. what has actually happened in terms of any military action?— military action? there is some fiuuhtin military action? there is some fighting around _ military action? there is some fighting around the _ military action? there is some fighting around the city, - military action? there is some fighting around the city, but i fighting around the city, but fortunately so far the night within
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the city has been calm. although we heard some tanks coming in yesterday, we don't actually know, but this could be ukrainian tanks, as well, just preparing to defend the city. but the night in the city centre has been relatively calm. however, of course, yesterday i was on a night train travelling further east when the news of the russian invasion came through and people started panicking and i was on a train and this old man asked the train and this old man asked the train attended what was going on and the tray attendant said the war has started. people were really panicking and i caught the first train to go to kharkiv, where i have met with hundreds of people who arrived with their belongings, their pets, their cats and dogs, saying, we note that war has broken out again and let's not forget that this is eastern ukraine. although kharkiv has been one of the safer places backin
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has been one of the safer places back in the day, people still remember what it is like to live in a war zone and i have also met with many families and young people who were travelling further east to dangerous areas but said we want to spend the war with our families, while other people were trying to catch a train to the west of the country or to kyiv.— catch a train to the west of the country or to kyiv. what we have seen for two _ country or to kyiv. what we have seen for two days _ country or to kyiv. what we have seen for two days now, - country or to kyiv. what we have seen for two days now, we - country or to kyiv. what we have seen for two days now, we have| country or to kyiv. what we have . seen for two days now, we have live cameras in kyiv and we have seen these early morning scenes, we have heard the sirens winding out, which is eerie, even from a distance. you were describing a moment ago the sounds that people where you are can hear. explosions in the distance, the sound of tanks, whether or not you know whose tanks they are. i can only imagine what that feels like. right, so, as i was saying, i think, you know
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it is relatively calm so we are still among the luckiest part of the population so far but of course it has been total panic and at 1.1 was at the train station reporting, doing stories, as i am an independentjournalist, and i asked the train station officer and i said to her, nobody knows what is going to her, nobody knows what is going to happen, should we hide inside the metro? should we wait for trains, what should we do? she said to me, well, i know nothing more than you. you should just sit and pray. what you should 'ust sit and pray. what about you should just sit and pray. what about access _ you should just sit and pray. what about access to _ you should just sit and pray. what about access to basic _ you should just sit and pray. what about access to basic needs? are shops open, access to money, the banks, that kind of thing? paint a picture for us. banks, that kind of thing? paint a picture for us— picture for us. ok, so i have not been outside _ picture for us. ok, so i have not been outside of _ picture for us. ok, so i have not been outside of the _ picture for us. ok, so i have not been outside of the hotel- picture for us. ok, so i have not been outside of the hotel sincel picture for us. ok, so i have not. been outside of the hotel since this morning, but yesterday i walked through the city and overheard people saying that atms are not working any more, there are apparently problems with water
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pressure and obviously there will probably be problems with electricity. there was only one shop that remained open based on what i have seen, of course, i have not seen the whole of the city, but only one shop remained open and it was the supermarket and people were essentially buying tonnes of food and litres of water and i imagine thatis and litres of water and i imagine that is the people who decided to spend this crisis or in this war at home and i have also seen pictures on social media of people hiding either in the metro here in kharkiv, underneath churches, various shelters. the situation really is dramatic and we are preparing for the worst of. taste dramatic and we are preparing for the worst of-_ the worst of. we wish you well, thank you _ the worst of. we wish you well, thank you very _ the worst of. we wish you well, thank you very much _ the worst of. we wish you well, thank you very much for - the worst of. we wish you well, | thank you very much for sharing the worst of. we wish you well, - thank you very much for sharing your experiences this morning. sara cincurova, who is a journalist in kharkiv, one of the cities in the east. it is a big city, as we saw
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earlier, as we were going through some of the affected areas. we can speak now to british ex—pat peter cribley, who's lived in ukraine for six years. he's now in the west of the country, after leaving kyiv a few weeks ago. good morning to you. tell me about your situation. you left kyiv. yes. your situation. you left kyiv. yes, i left k iv your situation. you left kyiv. yes, i left kyiv several _ your situation. you left kyiv. yes, i left kyiv several weeks - your situation. you left kyiv. yes, i left kyiv several weeks ago, - your situation. you left kyiv. yes, i left kyiv several weeks ago, it i i left kyiv several weeks ago, it seemed like a prudent matter and i had a bit of a plan to visit ivano—frankivsk and a working holiday. that was delayed due to meet catching a covid and finally i managed to leave three weeks ago. the situation in ivano—frankivsk is a bit different to kharkiv. kharkiv was the first place i moved to when i first came to ukraine so i can picture it pretty precisely, as it has been described. i can understand
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the sense of dread people might be feeling, when i was there originally a lot of people were internally displaced people from the next —— from luhansk and donetsk and the fighting has caught up with them. are you feeling safer you are, near the romanian border?— are you feeling safer you are, near the romanian border? much safer than i would in kharkiv _ the romanian border? much safer than i would in kharkiv or _ the romanian border? much safer than i would in kharkiv or in _ the romanian border? much safer than i would in kharkiv or in kyiv, _ i would in kharkiv or in kyiv, especially given the missile strikes taking place. ukrainian armed forces and government are doing their absolute best to hold off this russian and belarusian advance and are doing incredibly impressive and brave work, despite what feels like a lack of support for them. sanctions are all well and good but there is so much more that can be done. people are talking about bringing in a no—fly zone and letting the ukrainians do the job on the ground. more pushing to take oligarch assets and nationalise them
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or, as i overheard elliott, with some piquant�*s plan, to remove them from their hands and of course removing russia from swift. we in terms of actual fighting there is relatively little, although we have had some shelling of the airport, which i can confirm, i was out getting in agency groceries, sorry to say i was one of those panic buyers myself, having extra drinking water. as i was returning to my appointment we heard five swift explosions which pretty much confirmed a russian missile attack on the airport before leaving ivano—frankivsk. tell on the airport before leaving ivano-frankivsk._ on the airport before leaving ivano-frankivsk. ., ,., , ., ivano-frankivsk. tell me about your situation, what _ ivano-frankivsk. tell me about your situation, what life _ ivano-frankivsk. tell me about your situation, what life is _ ivano-frankivsk. tell me about your situation, what life is like _ ivano-frankivsk. tell me about your situation, what life is like in - situation, what life is like in ukraine. your partner is ukrainian, you teach some students remotely. i was looking at the notes, you were saying that people in ukraine are being productive, they understand this situation but by no means count out. �* , ,., ,
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this situation but by no means count out. �* , , ., this situation but by no means count out. “ , ., out. absolutely. one of the most impressive _ out. absolutely. one of the most impressive moments _ out. absolutely. one of the most impressive moments for - out. absolutely. one of the most impressive moments for me - out. absolutely. one of the most - impressive moments for me yesterday there obviously short cues items like bread and food that keeps. tins were emptied from the shelves. those are mostly older people. i went to donate blood as soon as i heard what was going on in the area and there were queues when i got there of at least 100 young people, students, older people. a couple of hours later, by the time i managed to leave the centre, the queue had tripled and the staff working at that donation centre, and i think this really shows the ukrainian spirit, were supposed to close it at three and said they would refuse to close until the last person had donated. we are talking a staff of two receptionists, two doctors and five nurses working around the clock to allow people to try and be useful in any way they can. ukrainian is literally giving their last drops of blood to defend this country. t
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blood to defend this country. i understand your partner has been refused a uk visa in the past. yes. that situation _ refused a uk visa in the past. yes. that situation appear _ refused a uk visa in the past. yes. that situation appear to _ refused a uk visa in the past. 123 that situation appear to be quite fluid at the moment. what is your future plan?— future plan? when we say fluid, i received an _ future plan? when we say fluid, i received an e-mail _ future plan? when we say fluid, i received an e-mail and _ future plan? when we say fluid, i received an e-mail and there - future plan? when we say fluid, i received an e-mail and there was future plan? when we say fluid, i i received an e-mail and there was a received an e—mail and there was a statement by the uk yesterday about making visas more accessible. but of course that is not possible. the visa application centre in kyiv is obviously short. the one that was openedin obviously short. the one that was opened in lviv is only open to friends and families are realistically speaking there are no legal avenues for ukrainian refugees to enter the uk. unlike island which has related a full visa waiver for people entering. if the uk wants to help this is one way in which it can do so. previously it ukrainians have felt like persona non grata in the uk. applications go missing, the dedicated time that should be allowed for visas, we are told,
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takes three weeks in 90% of cases. i have to say 90% of cases with people i have spoken to have taken six weeks or longer so these targets will not be hit in the six months before, in the three months before, in december when we applied again for a simple transit visa to fly through to another wedding in mexico. t through to another wedding in mexico. , ., , ., mexico. i understand your frustration. _ mexico. i understand your frustration. are _ mexico. i understand your frustration. are you - mexico. i understand your. frustration. are you staying? mexico. i understand your- frustration. are you staying? the situation, frustration. are you staying? the situation. as _ frustration. are you staying? the situation, as you _ frustration. are you staying? t“t2 situation, as you said, is fluid and it is much safer for me to shelter in place right now than to add to any of the chaos on the road to the border but i will be assessing how things change and making decisions based on that, if i can move to a safer location if that becomes necessary i will do so and that will be closer to the polish border and then hopefully, if i can, travel over to poland if necessary. t then hopefully, ifi can, travel over to poland if necessary. i wish ou well, over to poland if necessary. i wish you well. thank— over to poland if necessary. i wish you well, thank you _ over to poland if necessary. i wish you well, thank you so _ over to poland if necessary. i wish you well, thank you so much - over to poland if necessary. i wish you well, thank you so much for i you well, thank you so much for talking to us. stay safe and thank you very much. peter cribley, a british expat living in ukraine has left kyiv and now gone to the of the
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country. left kyiv and now gone to the of the count . , 2 left kyiv and now gone to the of the count . , . , , country. very much focusing this mornin: country. very much focusing this morning on _ country. very much focusing this morning on what _ country. very much focusing this morning on what is _ country. very much focusing this morning on what is happening i country. very much focusing this morning on what is happening in| morning on what is happening in ukraine and how it is affecting people directly but also talking about the sanctions across the world. there have been many misses of sanctions that will be brought in against president putin. the of sanctions that will be brought in against president putin.— against president putin. the eu unveiled fresh _ last night, the eu unveiled fresh measures targeting russian banks, companies and oligarchs. we're joined now by our brussels correspondent, jessica parker. there has been much talk of the sanctions. bring us up to date on what the eu is saying. the sanctions. bring us up to date on what the eu is saying.— sanctions. bring us up to date on what the eu is saying. the eu has more or less _ what the eu is saying. the eu has more or less agreed _ what the eu is saying. the eu has more or less agreed a _ what the eu is saying. the eu has more or less agreed a package . more or less agreed a package although it is yet to be formally signed off, but it includes targeting russia's financial sector further with the aim of raising borrowing costs, inflation, is welcome in the russian economy. also an export ban on aircraft parts that will particularly hit russia's commercial airlines. also an export ban so it cannot upgrade its oil refineries, as well. and, as well,
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talking about trying to limit visa access, as you are saying, for certain individuals such as oligarchs. those are some of the measures. they stopped short of what some have called for and we are particularly at this call for it from ukrainian politicians, to basically chuck pressure out of the international payments system swift, and also the other massive issue is energy imports from russia. the eu gets about 40% of its gas from russia. there have been calls for it to start looking to curb its imports in order to hit the russian economy but of course that would hit europe, as well, and energy costs for households and families. they have stopped short of doing that. i think there is an argument being made that you need to keep something in reserve but some people are saying, well, could it get much worse given the situation we are seeing unfold in kyiv this morning? abs, the situation we are seeing unfold in kyiv this morning? b. tat the situation we are seeing unfold in kyiv this morning?— in kyiv this morning? a lot of reality checks _ in kyiv this morning? a lot of reality checks around - in kyiv this morning? a lot of reality checks around this. i i in kyiv this morning? a lot of- reality checks around this. i think the us authorities have admitted
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themselves that it would be a month or more before russians actually feel those oligarchs feel any different because of those sanctions. i am looking at comments from president zelensky this morning following on from announcements about sanctions round the world and he has been very clear that sanctions are not enough. they haven't worked. _ sanctions are not enough. they haven't worked. many - sanctions are not enough. t“t2 haven't worked. many months what sanctions are not enough. t“t21 haven't worked. many months what we saw was a build—up of russian troops on the border of ukraine and the threat, the continued threat of sanctions from the eu, from america, the uk, that didn't deter president putin and i think the feeling is, in ukraine, it will not deter him now, the invasion is under way. one of the invasion is under way. one of the arguments is that the sanctions, tomorrow they will not cause a lot of pain in president putin's inner circle that over time they will. one of the questions is, will that be too late? i had a note from a
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colleague in poland this who has told us that more than 1000 ukrainians fleeing the war have arrived by train in the south—eastern city and many stayed overnight in the train station on camp beds as hotels are fully booked. a pretty sobering thought this morning for those families. thank you very much for that. another element to the story, we will be trying to get more on that because we have seen a number of images coming in this morning. we know there have been more explosions in and around kyiv and elsewhere so we will keep you up—to—date on all the developments this morning. let's find out what is happening outside in the uk. good morning. we have a fairly quiet speu good morning. we have a fairly quiet spell of weather out there today, a ridge of high pressure in charge of things, so a lot of dry weather, some sunshine on offer but it is certainly a chilly morning. quite a sharp frost around and some icy stretches across parts of northern
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ireland and scotland in particular. the cold air mass, the blue colours, with that reach a higher pressure moving its way in from the west so still if you show it here and there over the next few hours for scotland, and northern england. fading quickly and lots of drier, brighter weather on the cards today. it will cloud over a bit from the north—west or any sunshine to any hazy for northern ireland and scotland, with arrival of rain later in the day. further south and east, the rest of the uk, lighter winds coming in from the west or north—west and bringing some sunshine. top temperatures between eight and 12 degrees, so it will feel fairly pleasant where you see those lighter winds and the sunshine towards the south. a bit warmer than yesterday and fewer showers around. this evening and tonight, a tale of two halves. scotland and northern ireland, fairly cloudy and breezy, if you spot a drizzly rain so temperature not falling too low for and wales under the clear skies we expect a sharp frost so even in sometimes in cities temperatures close to freezing but could be a few
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degrees below in the countryside. a chilly start to the weekend but high pressure dominating saturday. slowly easing away towards the east, where the fun trying to move in from the north—west. that means a lot of dry settled weather, england and wales will see the lion's share of the sunshine, more cloud for scotland and northern ireland but towards the east are some brighter spells. freeze in the north—west, some rain for the western isles through the day, but most places looking dry and settled at those temperatures, ten to 12 degrees or so for some of us, it will feel reasonably pleasant on saturday. similar on sunday, but the high pressure starts to ease away to the east so that will allow this frontal system to nudge its way eastwards but it will fizzle out as it bumped into that area as high pressure so not completely dry on sunday. we have this weather front bringing a few splashes of rain and slowly eastwards across the uk but there will be drier, brighter weather to the east of that and also returning from the west later in the day. reasonably light winds for most
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on sunday and temperatures between around eight to 11 degrees. as we move through sunday night into monday we start to see more rain working its way in from the west, so here is the outlook chart. many areas are seeing a bit of rain through the day on monday but certainly nothing too heavy or destructive compared to all that rain we had earlier on this week and the flooding. things are looking much quieter as we head into the first week of march. thank you, we will see you later on. countries around the world have been lighting up their landmark buildings in ukraine's flag colours, to show their solidarity. let's ta ke let's take you around some of the images. you will recognise this. this was the front of 10 downing street illuminated in yellow and blue. let's move on. germany's capital lit up the brandenburg gate. meanwhile, in paris, city hall — the seat of the mayor and local administration — was the chosen landmark.
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elsewhere, this was the city hall in norway's capital of oslo. in italy, rome's colosseum was lit up in solidarity. and in helsinki, finland's capital, numerous buildings were illuminated in yellow and blue. there have also been a number of protests around the world. people standing in solidarity with ukraine. demonstrators pleading with putin to end the invasion. close to home, in manchester's st peter's square, hundreds of people attended a vigil, including man city left—back and ukrainian international oleksandr zinchenko, pictured here. of course further coverage on the programme this morning of all the very latest developments. a busy morning, there are many, many new elements to the story including air strikes, we understand, carrying on. we know sirens have been heard in the capital city kyiv so we will
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speak to our correspondence after 7am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london has proposed that property held by allies of russian president vladimir putin here in the capital be seized. transparency international, an anti—corruption think tank, has identified what it says is a concentration of property in london owned by russians accused of corruption or with links to the kremlin. yesterday, the prime minister announced a raft of new sanctions on russia following the invasion of ukraine. our researchers found £1.5 billion worth of property of concern owned by russians, often with links to the kremlin. over a quarter of that is in the city of westminster, nearly a fifth of it is in
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the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, and a tenth in camden. in fact, an awful lot of this property is within a mile of buckingham palace, so there really is quite a concentration, right in the heart of the city. the o2 arena will reopen from 10 o'clock this morning after having to close following damage caused during storm eunice. the greenwich landmark was evacuated on friday last week as gusts of up to 80 miles per hour shredded the roof. the 02 said that they had carried out rigorous safety checks and deemed the venue "safe, secure and structurally sound". workers in london put in over £7 billion worth of unpaid overtime last year, that's according to analysis by the trades union congress. the findings — published today — also suggests that almost a fifth of londoners did unpaid overtime, averaging around 8 hours a week. if you're heading out on public transport this morning,
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this is how tfl services are looking right now. just minor delays on the circle line. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning, but a bright one. the wind is a lot lighter today, and that's all thanks to a ridge of high pressure which is building. now, we could see a little bit more cloud bubbling up through the afternoon, perhaps some hazy sunny spells, and temperatures reaching 11 celsius — just feeling a little milder in the lighter wind, but also with the addition of the sunshine. now, overnight conditions remain — it's dry and it's clear. could get a little bit of mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning, but the temperature also dropping — —2 the minimum, so we could see a little bit of frost first thing tomorrow. now, high pressure still in charge for saturday, so it is going to be another fine and dry day. plenty of sunshine around after a chilly start tomorrow, but the wind will start to strengthen through the course of saturday afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, again, around 11 celsius. now, we're still with the high pressure for sunday,
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but it's slipping away. another fine day for the end of the weekend — we've still got some sunshine — perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud. still quite breezy on sunday, as well, but, as we head into next week, the influence of low pressure — so things turning progressively more unsettled through monday with some outbreaks of rain. but for the weekend, dry and fine, some chilly nights. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. explosions. explosions over ukraine's capital kyiv as the country fights for its future against a russian offensive by land, sea and air. a ukrainian official says a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing onto a residential street. crowds spend the night in subway stations with their children, fearing more missile strikes. as others see their homes destroyed and lives ruined. the european union announces what it calls massive new sanctions on russia, as world leaders come
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together to condemn putin. and people around the world take to the streets to protest russia's actions. good morning, a largely dry and settle day to day but it is a cold start. we have frost around, icy stretches and some lying snow towards the north. all the details on bbc breakfast. it's friday, the 25th of february. explosions have been heard over ukraine's capital of kyiv this morning, as the country fights for its future in the first major ground war in europe in decades. there are reports a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing into a residential building, setting it on fire. thousands have fled their homes, but men aged between 18 and 60 have been told by ukraine not to leave the country.
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the latest line is the ukrainian army has blown up a bridge in the north of the capital to slow the advance of russian tanks. jonah fisher reports. this was the night after the day when everything changed for ukraine and for europe. explosions above the capital kyiv. a city of 3 million under attack, but fighting back. air defences appear to have shot something, possiblya missile, down. the morning light shows damage to an apartment block where the debris fell. safety now means going underground. metro stations becoming bomb shelters as russia turns on its neighbour. ukraine's beleaguered president, now in military clothes, addressed the nation. peaceful cities are now military targets, volodymyr zelensky said — warning ukrainians that they were now on their own and they shouldn't expect anyone to come to their aid.
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on thursday, the full force of the russian military was unleashed. from the air came planes, helicopters and missile strikes. on the ground, tanks rolled across the borders to the north and to the south. from occupied crimea, seized eight years ago, russia gained ground, as it did advancing from belarus. the site of the chernobyl nuclear disaster has now changed hands. crucially, an attempt at a lightning strike on kyiv appears to have been thwarted. an airstrip just outside the capital was captured by russians arriving arriving by helicopter, then taken back in fighting by ukrainians later in the day. having long believed this was unthinkable, the streets heading west out of kyiv quickly filled as people desperately tried to leave.
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they will be at europe's door soon. spurned by nato and under attack from the north, south and east, how long can ukraine hold out? jonah fisher, bbc news. as you can imagine it is a fast moving situation and we will keep you up—to—date about everything happening. we can take a live image this morning over the capital city of kyiv and the picture emerging is one of relative calm. there were sirens earlier this morning. but relative calm as we speak to you now. let's speak now to our correspondent james waterhouse in kyiv. there is a big picture here which is a lot of troop movements and what appears to be major russian
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offensive and we look behind you and it is this strange appearance of calm. paint is a picture of how you see things this morning. that calm ou see things this morning. that calm you describe is not normal. it - see things this morning. that calm | you describe is not normal. it might be peaceful, but until 36 hours ago, this was a city that staunchly refused to change its characteristics, being a young and vibrant city. we havejust characteristics, being a young and vibrant city. we have just had another thud of an explosion from afar. a young and vibrant city. that changed yesterday. streets are empty and there is a curfew. we have had more reports of rocket attacks. at 4am. president zelensky has urged other countries to come and help. he said if they don't, russia may come knocking on your door. this is a city very much under attack. we have had three air raid sirens this
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morning and everyone had to pack up and go downstairs to a makeshift underground car park converted. there are beds on wheels, rows of chairs, they are laying on cereal for those who want it. people are trying to keep children calm, pushing their prams back—and—forth to put the babies to sleep. it is a difficult and uncertain time and all the while kyiv finds itself at the heart of a russian advance. there has been heavy fighting on the air base 30 kilometres away. it is not clear who is in control there. the deputy defence minister thinks russian troops could be in the area surrounding kyiv by this afternoon, later today, as he put it. it is calm, but calm in the eye of a bigger storm. brute calm, but calm in the eye of a bigger storm-— calm, but calm in the eye of a bigger storm. we will show you ictures, bigger storm. we will show you pictures. we — bigger storm. we will show you pictures, we understand - bigger storm. we will show you | pictures, we understand images bigger storm. we will show you i pictures, we understand images of bigger storm. we will show you - pictures, we understand images of an apartment block. maybe you know more
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detail locally. we understand the apartment block in kyiv, which was may be hit by an aircraft brought down, but very substantial damage to what is clearly a residential area. exactly. this is why when president putin says we will only target military and strategic sites, that is of no consolation or comfort. this is the reality of war. we had reports of a missile intercepted by an anti—missile system in the capital that spread debris. the apartment block, we had reports of three people injured. no more word on that. the government has said that across the country there has been at least 137 ukrainian deaths, including citizens and soldiers. we are starting to get a picture of the
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losses and that will continue. there has been heavy fighting overnight in a city 200 miles north—east of here. there was loud gunfire there and pictures of buildings burning. heavy fighting in occupied territories to the east. and leaders there said ukrainian forces were putting up a stiff defence, which is the opposite of what moscow claimed yesterday, that ukrainian forces were downing their weapons and letting russia come through. what is causing the president of ukraine the most worries were advancing russian troops from annexed crimea working their way north. there has been fighting in the west. that is ukraine falling under a stranglehold by incoming russian troops. what is clear, ukrainians are fighting. the question is how long they can fight for. thank you. let's speak to our correspondent jenny hill in moscow now.
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the sanctions came in place. widely touted. some criticism they do not go far enough. is there any sign what has been put in place so far may make a difference? t do what has been put in place so far may make a difference?- may make a difference? i do not think many _ may make a difference? i do not think many people _ may make a difference? i do not think many people here - may make a difference? i do not think many people here expect l think many people here expect sanctions will deter mr putin. he addressed business leaders yesterday in a televised meeting, saying russia had expected sanctions and was prepared. russia has vast reserves. the thinking here is it may well be able to weather that storm. you can expect counter sanctions. the federal aviation agency here is talking about retaliatory measures against britain in response to britain banning aeroflot from landing. so watch this space. what is interesting here is last night in more than 50 cities across russia, people took to the streets to protest against the wall.
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the numbers were relatively small but this is a country —— against the war. it takes courage for people to come onto the streets and voice dissent. in moscow i saw people gathering. young people. but we saw nearly 1000 arrests, a result of this largely peaceful demonstrations. there is some concern among the population about what is happening. it is unpopular, the idea of a war that will present high costs in human terms and potentially economic terms. very difficult to get a sense of what people genuinely feel. protesters were in the grand scheme of things really rather small. we had an update from the defence ministry and for them it is going well, they said yesterday the task of the day had been successfully completed. more
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than 80 ukrainian military targets, they say, had been knocked out. we are talking air bases, missile defence systems and so on. i suppose we want to know what is mr putin's endgame. he has said he does not want to occupy ukraine but then he said he did not plan to invade. we know that he sees ukraine as a territory he thinks should be under russian control. yesterday, a kremlin spokesperson said the plan was to neutralise ukraine's military potential. when he was asked if there should be a change of government to ukraine, he replied no comment. what is clear is that mr putin is consumed by an idea about what russia should be. as far as he is concerned russia should see a return to what he would describe as the glory days of the soviet union and he is driven increasingly by his ambition to make sure russia has an increased amount of power and
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influence within europe and on the world stage. influence within europe and on the world stage-— influence within europe and on the world stage. influence within europe and on the world state. 2, ~' 2 ., ., world stage. thank you. we can go to washington- — world stage. thank you. we can go to washington- we _ world stage. thank you. we can go to washington. we are _ world stage. thank you. we can go to washington. we are going _ world stage. thank you. we can go to washington. we are going to - world stage. thank you. we can go to washington. we are going to talk - washington. we are going to talk about sanctions. there have been comments from president zelensky and he says that the world is continuing to observe what is going on in ukraine from afar. the other, it is sanctions imposed are not enough. he is reacting to what president biden amongst others has announced. yes and no amongst others has announced. t2; and no response yet from the white house to that implied criticism from ukrainian leader. president said last night this was a dangerous moment for europe and freedom all around the world. he announced sanctions against russian oligarchs and banks. five banks, ten
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individuals, who president biden described as corrupt billionaires. he announced plans to restrict the escort of american technology to russia. and the deployment of —— the export of american technology. and the deployment of us troops to europe to shore up europe's eastern flank. latertoday, president biden is due tojoin flank. latertoday, president biden is due to join a virtual meeting of nato leaders at which they will apparently map out a response to the rather aggressive stance taken by russia. indeed, the feeling of those in the white house now is president putin is planning to overthrow, to attack you have, overthrow the democratically elected government there of president zelensky and install a puppet regime, one loyal to moscow. indeed, the us secretary of state antony blinken said last
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night that he was convinced as he put it that was president putin's plan. the prime minister has also unveiled fresh economic sanctions on russia, calling it the "largest and most severe" package it has ever faced. these include... freezing the assets of all major russian banks and excluding them from the uk financial system. 100 companies and individuals will face financial sanctions, including several oligarchs and russia's biggest defence company. the exportation of military equipment and oil refinery goods will be suspended. and the russian airline aeroflot has been banned from landing in the uk. we showed you earlier images of capitals around the world showing solidarity with people of ukraine with buildings lit up. in downing street, we can see the ukrainian flag being flown, a sign of solidarity no doubt with the people
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there. let's get more now from our political correspondent nick eardley, who's outside downingstreet. you would have seen the flag being raised. there are calls from president zelensky that sanctions announced by the west need to go even further. the question is whether that request will be heeded. yes. that is right. downing street itself was lit up, the colours of the ukrainian flag last night. as cabinet ministers arrived for their meeting. it sounds like the meeting was ominous, the warnings they got from intelligence and defence chiefs painting a bleak picture of what is going on on the ground in ukraine. as you say, there is a question over sanctions, and the package we got yesterday is one of the most severe that has ever been imposed by the uk, according to downing street. there is the question over whether
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more oligarchs, potentially more companies could be targeted by asset freezes in the next days and weeks. i think that is an option. there has been discussion about the swift system, the international payment system, the international payment system used by the financial world. there was a push from the uk at a g7 meeting to have that included in the sanctions regime. i do not think downing street thinks that is likely to happen anytime soon. there has been pushed back from other countries and the view in number 10 is you need full agreement from the international community for that to work. that does not seem on the cards just yet. more work. that does not seem on the cardsjust yet. more broadly, the view in london i think, and in other capitals, is the sanctions are about in time having a big impact on the russian economy. there does not seem to be much of a view here that it
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will happen immediate impact on president putin's actions. there seems to be an acceptance he is hell—bent on what we are seeing on the ground in ukraine at the moment. it is about getting resolve among uk and its allies potentially for a protracted stand—off which will have an economic impact here as well. thanks. let's talk now to our correspondent sarah rainsford, who's in dnipro. this is central ukraine. what picture can you paint from there? taste picture can you paint from there? 2 headed here last night from eastern ukraine, from the donbas region, where russian troops are expected to advance and are clashing now with ukrainian troops along the front line there, which has been a fix front line for eight years, but which russian forces are intending to advance and take more territory
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than those regions there. what we so yesterday were explosions throughout the day. we spoke to people about what they planned to do. 7000 people from the donbas region took evacuation trains to carry them west across the country to relative safety. we also saw cars on the road as we drove west, south—west, from the donbas. a lot of cars from the donbas region. as we passed through one significant town on the way, we saw soldiers and work men with heavy machinery, building a massive checkpoint. they were laying concrete blocks and putting down sandbags and preparing to fortify the city. attempts to stop any russian advance that way east to west across ukraine. people are nervous and worried about what the future holds in this region, even as
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the bombardment of kyiv continues. in terms of the people, you referenced yesterday the streets and the people in the city where you are, what reaction has there been as we are in des two of action? there are bombs landing. military... major military incursions being witness. it beggars belief. in this country. people did not expect this to the last minute, despite the warnings. somewhere deep inside people could not accept this would happen. even now in the donbas region, i spoke to a woman yesterday who said she just could not face uprooting her life and children for the second time, having fled the fighting eight years ago when it began in the east, and she did not want to believe she was
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going to have to be on the move again. she is staying put for now, even though it is clear russian forces are attempting to burst through that front line. and here and across cities in ukraine, there was a curfew and after ten o'clock no one was allowed out until 7am. some people rushing to get home. people seeming pretty nervous about these dramatic changes in their country overnight. a day now of war, waking up to the reality that this looks like it is the reality for some time to come. here there were no explosions last night. there had been on the first night. it seemed quiet here yesterday. although this is a strategic city on the river denny pro and there has been fighting to the south and to the north in kharkiv. people are not sure what the time ahead holds. so
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nervous signs here as well as across ukraine today. we can speak now to robert brinkley, the former uk ambassador to ukraine. it is sobering to hear sarah describing reactions from people she spoke to, people who thought this would not happen and notwithstanding the warnings given by diplomats in the warnings given by diplomats in the recent weeks. and then we see images of what warfare looks like, warfare in europe.— images of what warfare looks like, warfare in europe. is heartbreaking. i remember being in dnipro and kyiv and other ukrainian cities while ambassador in ukraine, peaceful ukraine. what is happening now to the people of that peaceful country is tragic. of course, russia has been at war with
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ukraine the past eight years. it may only be in the past few days the mask has slipped and russia admits quite openly that it is at war with ukraine but it was russia who annexed crimea in 2014 and stirred up annexed crimea in 2014 and stirred up the war in the donbas that has been going on at a low level ever since. ., . ., ., since. you are a former uk ambassador— since. you are a former uk ambassador to _ since. you are a former uk ambassador to ukraine - since. you are a former uk| ambassador to ukraine and since. you are a former uk - ambassador to ukraine and know since. you are a former uk _ ambassador to ukraine and know about how diplomacy works. this morning, we are hearing from president zelensky, who is saying we have to put russia at the negotiating table. he is pleading with allies from around the world, if russia will not talk to ukraine, you must talk to them and yet we heard from boris johnson yesterday that he was saying the time for negotiation and diplomacy with vladimir putin has passed. diplomacy with vladimir putin has assed. ., diplomacy with vladimir putin has assed. 2, 2, , diplomacy with vladimir putin has assed. ., ., , ., ., t' diplomacy with vladimir putin has assed. ., ., .,~ ., diplomacy with vladimir putin has assed. ., ., , ., ., ~ ., passed. how does that work now? all credit to president _
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passed. how does that work now? all credit to president zelensky, - credit to president zelensky, democratically elected by 73% of his people, who threw —— who has throughout tried to pursue a peaceful solution. throughout tried to pursue a peacefulsolution. it throughout tried to pursue a peaceful solution. it is a difficult time now russia has launched this massive invasion. now is not the moment to sit down and talk nicely with putin. there have been a procession of western leaders in the past weeks going to moscow to talk to him. sometimes for hours. as president macron said, they were lied to. putin said he would not invade ukraine when all the plan was to do that. i think yes of course, the way for diplomatic resolution must always stay open but now is not the moment to ask for talks. this must always stay open but now is not the moment to ask for talks.- the moment to ask for talks. this is a country you _ the moment to ask for talks. this is a country you know _ the moment to ask for talks. this is a country you know well. _ the moment to ask for talks. this is a country you know well. i - the moment to ask for talks. this is a country you know well. i am - a country you know well. i am looking at comments from the
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president saying the enemy, russia, has been stopped in most directions. for the rest of us, the picture that is emerging, this is a country under attack from many different sides. when you look at the scale of what is happening and how it has been organised, what do you see? ukraine is a big country- _ organised, what do you see? ukraine is a big country. it _ organised, what do you see? ukraine is a big country. it is _ organised, what do you see? ukraine is a big country. it is the _ organised, what do you see? ukraine is a big country. it is the biggest - is a big country. it is the biggest country in europe by land area. as you say, russia is attacking from various directions. there is a great fog of war. it is difficult to know what is happening from outside but we know russia has large military forces. it is moving them into ukraine. the other thing quite clear is the ukrainians are fighting back. they are defending their country and resisting. this is going to be a difficult fight for the russians,
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even though they have that large military capability. t even though they have that large military capability.— military capability. i appreciate our military capability. i appreciate your expertise. _ military capability. i appreciate your expertise. the _ military capability. i appreciate your expertise. the former - military capability. i appreciate your expertise. the former uk| your expertise. the former uk ambassador to ukraine speaking this morning. we will keep you up—to—date with the situation this morning. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london has proposed that property held by allies of russian president vladimir putin here in the capital be seized. transparency international — an anti—corruption think tank — has identified what it says is a concentration of property in london owned by russians accused of corruption or with links to the kremlin. yesterday the prime minister announced a raft of new sanctions on russia following the invasion of ukraine. our researchers found £1.5 billion worth of property of concern owned by russians, often with links to the kremlin.
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over a quarter of that is in the city of westminster, nearly a fifth of it is in the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, and a tenth in camden. in fact, an awful lot of this property is within a mile of buckingham palace, so there really is quite a concentration, right in the heart of the city. the o2 arena will reopen from 10:00 this morning after having to close following damage caused during storm eunice. the greenwich landmark was evacuated on friday last week as gusts of up to 80 miles per hour shredded the roof. the 02 said that they had carried out rigorous safety checks and deemed the venue "safe, secure and structurally sound". workers in london put in over £7 billion worth of unpaid overtime last year — that's according to analysis by the trades union congress. the findings, published today, also suggests that almost a fifth of londoners did unpaid overtime — averaging around eight hours a week.
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well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning, but a bright one. the wind is a lot lighter today, and that's all thanks to a ridge of high pressure which is building. now, we could see a little bit more cloud bubbling up through the afternoon, perhaps some hazy sunny spells, and temperatures reaching 11 celsius — just feeling a little milder in the lighter wind, but also with the addition of the sunshine. now, overnight conditions remain — it's dry and it's clear. could get a little bit of mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning, but the temperature also dropping — —2 the minimum, so we could see a little bit of frost first thing tomorrow. now, high pressure still in charge for saturday, so it is going to be another fine and dry day. plenty of sunshine around after a chilly start tomorrow, but the wind will start to strengthen through the course of saturday afternoon.
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temperatures tomorrow, again, around 11 celsius. now, we're still with the high pressure for sunday, but it's slipping away. another fine day for the end of the weekend — we've still got some sunshine — perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud. still quite breezy on sunday, as well, but, as we head into next week, the influence of low pressure — so things turning progressively more unsettled through monday with some outbreaks of rain. but for the weekend, dry and fine, some chilly nights. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. wa nts to wants to bring you some pictures from ukraine. ukrainian military, this is footage we understand has been filmed on mobile phones in the early hours of the morning. footage of what is said to be a gun between
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ukrainian defenders in the north—eastern city and russian attackers. the head of the local administration has had a large military convoy has headed past the city towards the capital kyiv. some of these niches have been posted in twitter from the city of sumy. we will keep verifying the pictures we get through this morning. those pictures were mobile footage from ukraine's military. jonah fisher is with us all morning. spent four years there is a correspondence and what is emerging is we are seeing some of these pictures and they are coming all the and some of the realities of the actual fighting that is going on which is something we haven't seen much of so far. to which is something we haven't seen much of so far.— much of so far. to update you further about _ much of so far. to update you further about what _ much of so far. to update you further about what we - much of so far. to update you further about what we have i much of so far. to update you i further about what we have been hearing in the last hour or so, the ukrainian defence ministry has whined about a possible convoy of
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russian vehicles moving into kyiv itself. one of the vehicles, perhaps a ukrainian military vehicle, has been seized by the russians and is leading a convoy towards kyiv at the moment and possibly very close to it, so that alert has been put out by the ukrainian ministry of defence. inks are obviously very fluid all over the country, things are changing very rapidly but let's look at how the last 24 hours have gone. we have a map here which gives you a bit of a sense about how widespread the fighting, the air have been. each of those red squares there, that is one of the different cities that has been struck yesterday morning when the russians launched their attack. kyiv, the ukrainian capital, kharkiv, biggest city in eastern ukraine, all the way down to edessa near the black sea. once those attacks began yesterday, that was when people realise this
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was not going to be a conflict localised to eastern ukraine. you can see that hashed area, the so—called separatist republics in eastern ukraine that have effectively been controlled by russia for the last eight years or so. once there strikes took place we realised this was much bigger than anything we have seen then yesterday russia gave the instructions to send its tanks in. there was a massive build—up to the north, the east, the west. we saw tanks rolling in from crimea, russia seized crimea from ukraine back in 2014, there has been a significant progress made in this area. they're from russia in the north there has been a movement south of tanks towards kharkiv, sumy and most interesting of all, from belarus, which is a separate country, of course, but there are
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russian troops stationed there and yesterday a significant number of russian troops moved south from belarus, cutting into chernobyl, the site of the nuclear accident in 1986. russians we believe now control chernobyl. we have marked out gostomol, possibly the most significant battle yesterday took place there. the russians flew in helicopters. you can see them there with troops on board, they landed, put the troops down. it looked like they were going to try to seize that airstrip with a view to quickly deploy more troops on the ground, possibly with the idea of making a lightning strike, trying to seize kyiv, decapitating the regime, but in perhaps a pro—russian government in perhaps a pro—russian government in place, saving themselves the
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necessity to go city by city, as we are seeing now, and try and capture them. what happened from ukrainian side as they are saying there was a fight back. it appears the airstrip is now back, at least partially, under ukrainian control and so the russians have not been able to use it but we believe that some of the russians who went into that airstrip may be part of this convoy that the defence ministry of ukraine is warning about, moving towards kyiv itself. very changing picture by the hour across ukraine and the sense is that this is not going to be a quick conflict. if vladimir putin yesterday thought ukrainians would simply roll over and that it would be hasty, quick victory for the russians, i think we have seen now although the ukrainians are, to a significant extent, really, out man, out equipped by the much stronger
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mission military, they are not simply going to desert their post, they are fighting back where they can and i think the scene is set in many ways for a prolonged struggle certainly around some of these bigger cities. thank you very much, we will be back with you through the programme. we're joined now by the defence minister, ben wallace. good morning. good morning. what is the latest you — good morning. good morning. what is the latest you can _ good morning. good morning. what is the latest you can tell— good morning. good morning. what is the latest you can tell me _ good morning. good morning. what is the latest you can tell me in _ good morning. good morning. what is the latest you can tell me in terms - the latest you can tell me in terms of information you have been getting at this moment in time? our of information you have been getting at this moment in time?— at this moment in time? our verified assessment — at this moment in time? our verified assessment of _ at this moment in time? our verified assessment of the _ at this moment in time? our verified assessment of the last _ at this moment in time? our verified assessment of the last 36 _ at this moment in time? our verified assessment of the last 36 hours - at this moment in time? our verified assessment of the last 36 hours is i assessment of the last 36 hours is that russia has taken none of its objectives in accordance with its plan. it has failed, as your contributorjust plan. it has failed, as your contributor just said there, plan. it has failed, as your contributorjust said there, to take one of its key objectives, which was the airfield to the north of kyiv. in fact they used special forces and the ukrainians have resisted undertaking that back. they have lost approximately 450 personnel,
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the russian forces. they have lost a significant number of tanks and armoured vehicles and indeed the ukrainians have brought down a fighterjet, or i think three at least, and a number of helicopters and if you remember president putin, one of his reasons for this was all about putting forces into the donbas. he has failed to break through the donbas line of control which was supposed to be one of the reasons he was doing this. while russia is huge in its forces, and while russia is obviously entering ukraine through a number of different access, from the north, the south, from belarus, and remember the promise that they were going to leave belarus, and through the east of the country, they haven't achieved their goals so far. i think what is important is two things. one of the bravery of ukrainians and the determination to stand up for the values and choices
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over the last decade and secondly that putin had in his mind, in his articles and speeches, but somehow ukrainians were just waiting to be liberated by the great tsar and he would turn up in ukraine and they were cheer him. we'll set that is not true, and irrational way to think. it shows how out of touch with his own people he is. —— we all said. that is the last observation from the last 24 hours, there have been 56 protests in 56 cities in russia against this. earlier in the week i compared putin to tsar nicholas the first of russia in the mid 19th century, who was completely out of touch with his own people and conquered or tried to conquer crimea and other places and let russia desperately out of date, out of touch with its leaders, which paved the way for what happened eventually in the soviet union. i think president putin has not had his way. that would be something of note if it were not so sad, that was on the
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backs of lives of ukrainians and the breaking of international law which we all have to stand up for it. breaking of international law. what would be the consequences of that on putin? ., , , , ., putin? hopefully it will be tough sanctions. _ putin? hopefully it will be tough sanctions, and _ putin? hopefully it will be tough sanctions, and the _ putin? hopefully it will be tough sanctions, and the uk _ putin? hopefully it will be tough | sanctions, and the uk announced asset freezes on russian banks yesterday, announced the banning of aeroflot stop possibly the most significant raft of sanctions i have seen against a single country for many decades. a very tough set of sanctions. even more, over100 personnel to be sanctioned, banks, goods stopped being exporting, and thatis goods stopped being exporting, and that is partly because the international community have realised what they are witnessing is unacceptable and sanctions only really work when we do it at the multinational level so that is the first consequence. i think the second consequence is there are people like president macron who, time and time again, try to reach out to president putin and he has
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made a feel of a number of people's efforts for diplomacy and i think people like president macron will not forget that. i think president putin is slowly but surely building a wall around himself will stop he will be isolated and i think his legacy will be isolation. t5 legacy will be isolation. is diplomacy off the table with mr putin? t diplomacy off the table with mr putin? ., 2, diplomacy off the table with mr putin? ~ ., ., putin? i think at the moment diplomacy — putin? i think at the moment diplomacy is _ putin? i think at the moment diplomacy is absolutely - putin? i think at the moment diplomacy is absolutely off i putin? i think at the moment. diplomacy is absolutely off the table. we try. i went to moscow, liz truss went, the prime minister spoke regularly to president putin and met him in a number of occasions, as did practically every president or prime minister of senior countries in the west. i am minister of senior countries in the west. iam not minister of senior countries in the west. i am not sure what more diplomacy it would achieve at this moment in time. i think it is important to have a diplomatic link, important to have a diplomatic link, important for us to give messages to the kremlin direct. we summoned defence attache to the ministry of defence yesterday to remind him of russia's obligations to the geneva convention, to make sure it treats
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prisoners of war with respect, next year it upholds humanitarian law, and also my colleague the foreign secretary summoned the russian ambassador to make the clear point that they have broken it. we need some diplomacy, we need some links, but fundamentally this is not at the moment a diplomatic space. this is a naked, aggressive, military invasion of a country that made one mistake in putin's eyes, which was to choose europe and european values and not the kremlin. taste europe and european values and not the kremlin-— europe and european values and not the kremlin. ~ . , , ., the kremlin. we have seen reports of some countries _ the kremlin. we have seen reports of some countries cutting _ the kremlin. we have seen reports of some countries cutting diplomatic - some countries cutting diplomatic ties with russia. is that under consideration in terms of the uk? not at present. we don't have much diplomats in russia, they don't have many after the murder in salisbury after dinner and they don't have many. it is important to keep lines in europe. we have links, i have the ability to speak to my defence counterpart because what we don't
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want in this environment is a miscalculation. we do not want an escalation that could trigger a proper war in nato countries. if the russians decide to invade a nato country, under article five, that would trigger a nato military response and could lead to a proper... not proper, there is a proper... not proper, there is a proper war now in ukraine, but a war across europe. making sure that there are no misunderstandings mean we need diplomatic lines of communication and we will maintain that. fit communication and we will maintain that. �* , ., ., , that. at this moment, the latest we have had from _ that. at this moment, the latest we have had from ukraine, _ that. at this moment, the latest we have had from ukraine, from - that. at this moment, the latest we have had from ukraine, from the i have had from ukraine, from the defence ministry, is that there is a convoy of russian tanks heading into kyiv. what would it take for the uk to offer military support for troops to offer military support for troops to assist its allies? t to offer military support for troops to assist its allies?— to assist its allies? i spoke to my ukrainian counterpart _ to assist its allies? i spoke to my ukrainian counterpart this - to assist its allies? i spoke to my. ukrainian counterpart this morning and late last night. the russian federation are currently tens of kilometres away from kyiv. that is
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not far. kilometres away from kyiv. that is not far- my — kilometres away from kyiv. that is not far. my defence _ kilometres away from kyiv. that is not far. my defence intelligence i not far. my defence intelligence a . en not far. my defence intelligence agency published _ not far. my defence intelligence agency published on _ not far. my defence intelligence agency published on its - not far. my defence intelligence agency published on its website j agency published on its website about two weeks ago projected lines of attack by russia and one of them was going to be from the north down towards kyiv, to encircle kyiv, which is why it is so significant that they have failed to get that airport their so—called elite troops because without getting the airport near kyiv they will find it much harder. i was very, very determined that we provided defensive weapons to ukraine to defend themselves, and we have done that at quite a significant scale. wejoined significant scale. we joined america, significant scale. wejoined america, we were really the first country in europe to do so. there are now four or five other countries. i think we definitely have a moral obligation to continue to do that, to resist mission efforts, and we will do whatever it methods we can and it is not easy at the moment because obviously the russians have closed the airspace but we have to do what we can. [30 but we have to do what we can. do ou but we have to do what we can. do you think there should be boots on the ground, uk boots on the ground?
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no. britain, isaid the ground, uk boots on the ground? no. britain, i said very clearly about a month ago, we will not be sending british troops to fight directly with russian troops. we are going to hold the line in nato, we have always supported ukraine's application to nato over the last 15 years. not every country has wanted them to join. years. not every country has wanted them tojoin. we have done the next best thing, which is train over 20,000 ukrainians, provided them with the full capabilities which they are using right now but i am not putting british troops directly to fight russian troops. that would trigger a european war because we are a nato country, and rush it would therefore be attacking nato, and so i have to do what we can within the rules that we have and i also think, you know, and i was not in that camp because i felt a long time ago that putin has become irrational, but for many people, capitals around the world have looked at this scenario and said, look, he will not do this, he will
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threaten like a bullet but will not invade because why would he do that? i mean, why would he become a pariah, which he is about to be? white would he pray for these laws the way he is doing? and so they didn't really, i think, believe, including the ukrainians. a number of senior ukrainians i visited in november to warn of what was coming, i think they have realised they are not dealing with a rational man. t not dealing with a rational man. i must ask one question. time is limited. president zelensky has said in reaction to the sanctions announced by the west, including the uk yesterday, further sanctions, he said, like yesterday, the world's most powerful forces are watching from afar. that was his reaction to the sanctions, the implication being very clear that these are not enough. do you think the sanctions imposed so far are enough to deter president putin, to have an impact? the sanctions britain announced yesterday on top of the ones we have going back to 2014 are probably the strongest i have seen put against
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the country. we will freeze assets in russian banks, ben aeroflot, stop russians putting deposits in banks. stop them using the city of london. we would like to go further, to do the swift system, the financial system that allows the russian to move money around the world, to receive payments for its gas, but like so many things these are international organisations and if not every country wants them to be thrown out of the swift system it becomes difficult so we will work on that today and tomorrow. i know my prime minister has the support of the whole of the house of commons to do these measures, plus legal aid or defensive legal aid that we have talked about. but we cannot make other countries do it. we will work all the magic, do all we can in diplomacy, the prime minister will address the nato leaders are summits today, that is all the leaders of the nato countries, but we have more to do stop the raft we can
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unilaterally do is the strongest raft i have seen for many decades. ben wallace, defence secretary, thank you for your time with us this morning. thank you for your time with us this morninu. . ., thank you for your time with us this morninu. ., ~ i. we are very much trying to give you a picture of the politics, discussion of the sanctions, possibly most important what is happening to individuals caught up in the crisis. what we know is that since the invasion thousands of ukrainians have fled their homes to neighbouring countries and to more rural areas in the country itself with huge queues, which you may have seen, for at borders, petrol stations and cash machines. scottish ex—pat stuart mckenzie left his home in kyiv yesterday and travelled to poland. he's been filming hisjourney. i'm at the borderjust now. got outjust in time, we're heading — most people, you can see the border. cars arejust piling up behind me. we've probably still go another three hours' wait. i managed to get the family outjust as we heard some bombs going off, as well, so... but i've got my mother—in—law,
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my wife, my two children. we've still got to get her out. you know, my mother—in—law doesn't have an international passport, but i'm sure common sense will prevail when we get there. it's a very somber mood here, there's not many people... nobody�*s talking to each other, everybody�*s just in their cars or standing outside trying to stretch their legs. but no—one's... everybody�*s in disbelief, to be honest. it's a surreal experience. we'rejoined now by ukrainian resident, nataly kharaman, who's still at home in north ukraine, and lyubov velychko — a journalist who we spoke to yesterday, just after she fled the capital, kyiv. she's now reached the west of the country. good morning. when we spoke yesterday it was very uncertain times for you and your family where are you now and what was a jelly—like? are you now and what was a jelly-like?— are you now and what was a “ell -like? ,., ., ., ., ., jelly-like? good morning. i am now 300 metres — jelly-like? good morning. i am now 300 metres south _ jelly-like? good morning. i am now 300 metres south of— jelly-like? good morning. i am now 300 metres south of kyiv _ jelly-like? good morning. i am now 300 metres south of kyiv in - 300 metres south of kyiv in
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vinnytsia. i spent 18 hours to make this road. 18 hours were 300 kilometres. we were so exhausted because there was huge traffic from kyiv and then to vinnytsia. actually, where we are sleeping, only for two hours, i came to vinnytsia at 6am. right now it is 9am. this was very exhausting, how many people are trying to escape. nataly, thank you forjoining us. you are east of kyiv and i understand you have a # __ understand you have a # —— a son 90, doctor 12, tell me what your situation is —— a son, 19,
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a daughter who is 12. taste what your situation is -- a son, 19, a daughter who is 12.— what your situation is -- a son, 19, a daughter who is 12. we are staying ut. the a daughter who is 12. we are staying pub the night— a daughter who is 12. we are staying put. the night was _ a daughter who is 12. we are staying put. the night was not _ a daughter who is 12. we are staying put. the night was not too _ a daughter who is 12. we are staying put. the night was not too rough, i put. the night was not too rough, there was some humming and fires and we were woken up a few times tonight because of more heavy weapons firing. but it was relatively quiet. right now we are waiting for an attack from the air. we were warned about it and we are trying to
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you are remarkably calm for the situation you are in and describing. the bombings you are hearing and feeling immediately for your own safety. just to be clear, you will stay in your flat, stay away from the walls because you fear some kind of immediate humming or some kind of action that may affect you directly —— some kind of immediate bombing. we have no car but i don't think it is the proper time to move anywhere and i can imagine people suffering on the borders and we did it once in 2014. we fled our hometown, donetsk when troops came into the town. but now the situation... stay a bit calm
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and what to do, we are hoping to get through this once again and the situation is quite different and we are afraid because brovary to the east of kyiv, at this side, the ship will invade if they could —— russia will invade if they could —— russia will invade if they could —— russia will invade if they could. so hopefully this will work out ok. if the situation gets worse we will go down into the basement. we have packed our necessary things. water and blankets. packed our necessary things. water and blankets-— and blankets. lyubov, 'ust hearing what nataly * and blankets. lyubov, 'ust hearing what nataly is h and blankets. lyubov, 'ust hearing what nataly is saying, i and blankets. lyubov, just hearing what nataly is saying, the - and blankets. lyubov, just hearing| what nataly is saying, the situation
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is desperate for those who are there. you are now out of the city but i know you still have friends and family in kyiv. we are getting reports right now that there are clashes in the northern district of kyiv city. we have reports there are russian tanks, tens of kilometres away from the city. what are they saying to you in terms of how they see the next few days? t saying to you in terms of how they see the next few days?— saying to you in terms of how they see the next few days? i don't feel that they are _ see the next few days? i don't feel that they are in _ see the next few days? i don't feel that they are in panic. _ see the next few days? i don't feel that they are in panic. they - see the next few days? i don't feel that they are in panic. they are i that they are in panic. they are also quite calm and they stay optimistic no matter what. that is why i love ukrainians so much. even in such a crisis we are not getting into a huge panic and we are still trying to do what we can to stay safe and to help our army. so i don't think that you will see pictures how ukrainians are running and grabbing shops or crying and
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yelling on the streets. when i was travelling in kyiv and i was going through other villages, i saw that people are really calm and it makes me also very optimistic. white lyubov velychko, thank you very much. you shed yourjourney with us when you are fleeing your home in kyiv yesterday. nataly, the bravery you have shown and to talk to us and inform us what is going on where you are is highly impressive and inform us what is going on where you are is highly impressive— are is highly impressive and we appreciate _ are is highly impressive and we appreciate it — are is highly impressive and we appreciate it and _ are is highly impressive and we appreciate it and of _ are is highly impressive and we appreciate it and of course - are is highly impressive and we | appreciate it and of course send are is highly impressive and we i appreciate it and of course send our best wishes to you and your family and hope you can stay safe, thank you. there will be occasions of one or two sound problems which is what was happening there as we were talking to lyubov particularly. let's take a moment to
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look at the weather. good morning. a quiet weather day ahead here, a ridge of high pressure in charge. some blue sky, sunshine, but it is a chilly old start to the day, we have yellow warnings out for ice across northern ireland, ice and snow for scotland. still one or two showers around over the next few hours but they fade away, lots of dry weather out there today, lots of blue sky and sunshine but it will cloud over northern ireland and the west of scotland with some rain in the far north—west later. dry elsewhere, lighter winds than recent days so it will feel a bit warmer if you are heading out. around eight to 11 degrees today. once the sun sets in the evening it will turn cold across england and wales where we have light winds and clear skies. not quite as cold tonight for scotland and northern ireland because there is more of a breeze coming in here and more cloud, as well. in the coldest spot in towns and cities, down to freezing, colder
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in the countryside. a frosty start to saturday morning a lot of dry, settled weather through tomorrow with sunshine around. thank you very much. countries around the world have been lighting up around the world have been lighting up their landmark buildings in the colours of the ukrainian flag to show solidarity. this was the front of number 10 downing street illuminated in yellow and blue. downing street is flying the flag of ukraine in solidarity. germany's capital lit up the brandenburg gate. meanwhile in paris, city hall — the seat of the mayor and local administration, was the chosen landmark. elsewhere, this was the city hall in norway's capital of oslo. images are projected there. in italy,
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rome's colosseum was lit up in solidarity. and in helsinki, finland's capital, numerous buildings were illuminated in yellow and blue. as well as buildings lighting up in solidarity with ukraine, protests have also ta ken place around the world, with demonstrators pleading with putin to end the invasion. close to home in manchester's st peter's square, hundreds of people attended a vigil, including man city left—back and ukrainian international oleksandr zinchenko pictured here. i think you can see him. a sense of some of the pictures that are emerging around the world. i think this morning on the programme there is a lot of breaking news. just bring it up to date with a couple of things we are hearing and always alongside what we are broadcasting in a moment, lots of caution. some reports are coming in on the last few minutes, that there have been clashes in one of the northern districts of the capital city kyiv.
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we cannot confirm those at the moment and we treat them with some caution. and they have been a number of incidents, since dawn, when the air raids rang out, there were explosions heard in many cities across ukraine. that explosions heard in many cities across ukraine.— explosions heard in many cities across ukraine. at the moment we understand — across ukraine. at the moment we understand the _ across ukraine. at the moment we understand the ukrainian - across ukraine. at the moment we understand the ukrainian defencel understand the ukrainian defence ministry has reported there is a convoy of russian led tanks heading into kyiv. we spoke to the defence secretary ben wallace a short time ago and he said they are tens of kilometres away from the capital. he has also estimated that russia has lost more than 450 personnel. he also made clear at the time for diplomacy right now is probably not now. but he said that can never be taken off at the table.— taken off at the table. alongside all of the politics _ taken off at the table. alongside all of the politics and _ taken off at the table. alongside all of the politics and talks - taken off at the table. alongside all of the politics and talks of i all of the politics and talks of sanctions, many images coming in this morning. we will pause and listen in a bit. this is the
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north—eastern city of sumy and there is a gun battle which you will be able to hear between russian attackers and ukrainian military. gunfire what we know is that every is a population of 260,000 people. it is a regional capital —— sumy stop it is hard to work out where these places are. it is 19 miles from the russian border. those are the latest pictures in terms of some of the fighting happening in the early hours of this morning and as we speak. to early hours of this morning and as we seak. 2, , early hours of this morning and as we seak. ., , i. early hours of this morning and as we seak. ., , , ., ., ., we speak. to bring you up-to-date on what president _ we speak. to bring you up-to-date on what president zelensky, _ we speak. to bring you up-to-date on what president zelensky, the - what president zelensky, the ukrainian president, has said. he has said that russia will have to talk sooner or later. vision forces fighting civilian areas. we also have reports that ukrainians are fighting back and much speculation now that this would be a long,
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protracted conflict. he had also hailed ukrainians in the face of the russian advance and urge them to protest against the war. itatar protest against the war. war coverage _ protest against the war. war coverage after _ protest against the war. war coverage after eight headlines coming up. —— more coverage after atm.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. explosion. explosions over ukraine's capital kyiv as the country fights for its future against a russian
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offensive by land, sea and air. a ukrainian official says a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing onto a residential street. crowds spend the night in subway stations with their children fearing more missile strikes. as others see their homes destroyed and lives ruined. the european union announces what it calls massive new sanctions on russia, as world leaders come together to condemn putin. and people around the world take to the streets to protest russia's actions. the financial impact of the crisis starts to become clear. stock markets tumble, gas prices surge and petrol soars to a record high, and there are fears this could all make the cost of living crisis worse. i'll have the details. good morning, a dry, quiet day. blue sky and sunshine but a cold start with frost and icy stretches around. i will bring all the details
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shortly. it's friday, the 25th of february. explosions have been heard over ukraine's capital of kyiv this morning, as the country fights for its future in the first major ground war in europe in decades. there are reports a russian aircraft has been shot down over the city, crashing into a residential building, setting it on fire. thousands have fled their homes, but men aged between 18 and 60 have been told by ukraine government not to leave the country. jonah fisher reports. this was the night after the day when everything changed for ukraine and for europe. explosions above the capital kyiv. a city of 3 million under attack, but fighting back. air defences appear to have shot something, possiblya missile, down. the morning light shows damage to an apartment block where the debris fell.
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safety now means going underground. metro stations becoming bomb shelters as russia turns on its neighbour. ukraine is on its own, president zelensky warned. but 4am russian forces struck territory with rockets, he said. they say civilians are not a target, it is a line. the reality is they do not differentiate between which areas to attack. on thursday, the full force of the russian military was unleashed. from the air came planes, helicopters and missile strikes. on the ground, tanks rolled across the borders to the north and to the south. from occupied crimea, seized eight years ago, russia gained ground, as it did advancing from belarus. the site of the chernobyl nuclear disaster has now changed hands.
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crucially, an attempt at a lightning strike on kyiv appears to have been thwarted. an airstrip just outside the capital was captured by russians arriving by helicopter, then taken back in fighting by ukrainians later in the day. having long believed this was unthinkable, the streets heading west out of kyiv quickly filled as people desperately tried to leave. they may soon be crossing into the european union. spurned by nato and under attack from the north, south and east, how long can ukraine hold out? jonah fisher, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent james waterhouse in kyiv. good morning. we spoke to the defence secretary earlier and raised
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theissue defence secretary earlier and raised the issue that reports are there is a convoy of russian tanks heading into kyiv and his response was they were tens of kilometres away. what more do you know of that? t were tens of kilometres away. what more do you know of that?- more do you know of that? i think that is going _ more do you know of that? i think that is going to — more do you know of that? i think that is going to come _ more do you know of that? i think that is going to come as _ more do you know of that? i think that is going to come as not i that is going to come as not surprising to authorities here. we have had intense fighting yesterday and antonov airport 30 kilometres away, where russian paratroopers tried to take it. there was a counter artillery strike. not clear who has taken control there. it is part of a big advance. the chernobyl power plant has been taken over by russian troops and staff taken hostage. to the north—east in sumy heavy fighting and burning buildings. also, troops coming up from the south. the tanks you mention are part of this stranglehold, a pincer hold, which is getting tighter on kyiv. this is a city that is quiet. that is not
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normal. the advertising hoardings are usually lit up, giving the time and temperature. they are off for the first time. buildings that were illuminated at night are now dark. there is a curfew here, and a quiet, barely any vehicles or people wandering around. this is what a city looks and feels like when it is under attack. what happens next? as everin under attack. what happens next? as ever in this crisis, we do not quite know. we know that according to the government there are russian summiteers as they say, inside the city. will they try to take out infrastructure? —— saboteurs. there is a sound of a jet over there. when the airspace is shut you know it will be a military aircraft. it is a city on edge. people are taking shelter. we went to an underground car park today as an air raid siren has gone off. it is a deeply sad and
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dangerous day for this country. you are there in — dangerous day for this country. you are there in the _ dangerous day for this country. you are there in the context of a journalist reporting. i have noticed, we have spoken in the last two hours, you have more protective equipment. has there been a significant change in the feel in what is about to happen in kyiv today? what is about to happen in kyiv toda ? , ., ~ 2, today? yes, i think... we have security guys — today? yes, i think... we have security guys here _ today? yes, i think... we have security guys here who - today? yes, i think... we have security guys here who give i today? yes, i think... we have security guys here who give us| today? yes, i think... we have i security guys here who give us this advice. when you hear an air raid siren it is simple, it means there is a looming threat. we do not quite know what it is. when people are advised to get underground, there is the uncertainty. there are threats that come and go. at the moment there is a calm in the storm but it feels incredibly uncertain. this has been a sad acceleration of this crisis. it started with people being used to russian aggression, living with it, be it fighting, fake news,
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all the pressure people feel. and then you get the uncertainty and forecasts of when an invasion would happen. you have russia long saying it is our right to do military drills on our land or with allies, thatis drills on our land or with allies, that is what we do. today and yesterday we know that was a lie. russia was planning a full—scale invasion and that is what is happening. we do not know their aim. president putin claims it is not to occupy. as far as the west is concerned, moscow is looking to topple the government. how do you do that? will they storm the city? we do not know. that? will they storm the city? we do not know-— that? will they storm the city? we do not know. james, with reports of tanks heading _ do not know. james, with reports of tanks heading towards _ do not know. james, with reports of tanks heading towards kyiv, - do not know. james, with reports of tanks heading towards kyiv, we i do not know. james, with reports of| tanks heading towards kyiv, we have been looking at pictures and you have described today, i think the word calm was used with a shot of the city and how unusual that he is. today, are people you are talking to expecting to see in the middle of
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kyiv a russian military presence? yes. we are seeing it in other of the country. we are seeing russian paratroopers with white labelling on their uniforms to make them distinctive from ukrainian forces, because these are soldiers who speak most often russian, they use similar equipment, similar uniforms. we have seen convoys moving on roads in unconfirmed footage from all directions. we also know ukraine is prepared to fight and we are seeing heavy fighting. at least 137 ukrainians have lost their lives in the past 24—hour is. you know that is only going to go up. yes, there is a fight and claims they are holding the line to the east, even the separatist backed militants say they are being met with stiff resistance. the ukraine
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army is stronger. it is better trained and equipped. but this is a military superpower. that is encroaching on ukraine. given those tanks being reported as ten kilometres away, given that we are not clear about the state of the key airfield 30 kilometres away, given that we have seen troops in eastern cities like kharkiv and kramatorsk, and given the familiar sights, kyiv, the main target in any invasion or military operation, the capital city, people are preparing for that scenario. in this battle for ukraine's identity, it goes on, but we do not know what will happen if and when those troops arrive. what is the reception going to be? how will they try to topple a government?— will they try to topple a covernment? ~ . . ., , will they try to topple a covernment? 2 2, , ., government? we wait. james, thanks. james waterhouse _ government? we wait. james, thanks. james waterhouse in _ government? we wait. james, thanks. james waterhouse in kyiv. _ let's speak to our correspondent
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jenny hill in moscow. we heard from ben wallace this morning reporting on the information they have that there are russian aircraft that have been downed and helicopters have been downed. and strong resistance on many fronts as the russian military operation comes in. what are you hearing officially from moscow? you in. what are you hearing officially from moscow?— in. what are you hearing officially from moscow? you are not going to see that on — from moscow? you are not going to see that on state _ from moscow? you are not going to see that on state tv _ from moscow? you are not going to see that on state tv and _ from moscow? you are not going to see that on state tv and state i see that on state tv and state newspapers. as far as the kremlin is concerned, it is going very well. we heard from the ministry of defence last night, who said as they put it in the daily tasks had been successfully completed and that they had knocked out more than 80 ukrainian military targets, including airbases and missile defence systems. they say they are not targeting ukrainian cities, simply going after ukrainian military targets. this mission from their perspective is to neutralise their perspective is to neutralise
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the military potential of ukraine. it is difficult for us to save from here what vladimir putin's endgame is in ukraine. a spokesman for the kremlin was asked that question. he was asked, do you want a change of government in kyiv? to which he replied, no comment. it is increasingly clear to most analysts that mr putin sees ukraine as a territory which in his view should be under russian control. and that drives all of what we see in terms of the coverage on state television here. mr putin has said himself that here. mr putin has said himself that he had no choice but to act because of the security risk represented to russia. we know he is concerned about nato and potential nato expansion. but that is the tone of the way this is reported. last night
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there were small but significant protests in more than 50 cities in russia. i say significant because russia. i say significant because russia is not a country that tolerates the voice of protest. we saw around 1800 arrests. i saw protesters in moscow last night, largely young people. a lot of police out and almost 1000 people we are told were detained for taking to the streets to voice dissent. mr putin's strategy in ukraine. it is not a view shared across the country. many russians, particularly the older ones, those sitting and watching state run media, support mr putin and many may share his vision for the russia of the future, which he would like to see, taking on more power and influence within europe and on the world stage. and so this is a society which is divided in that respect but a country where it is difficult to get a sense of what
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people feel because many are simply afraid to talk about their genuine feelings, particularly if they go against what the kremlin wants them to think, feel and save. it is worth talking about sanctions. i think most people here fear that sanctions will not deter mr putin from his current course of action, although we know international analysts say they will cause deep economic damage. russians will feel the pinch. it may be that the kremlin spins that and russians are led to believe the west is punishing them and it is the fault of the west they are living under sanctions. do expect counter sanctions to be announced here on the west in the coming days. announced here on the west in the coming days-— announced here on the west in the coming days. announced here on the west in the cominu da s. 2, ., , . 2 coming days. thank you very much. we are balancing — coming days. thank you very much. we are balancing out _ coming days. thank you very much. we are balancing out the _ coming days. thank you very much. we are balancing out the conversations i are balancing out the conversations about the politics and what is being said in terms of sanctions with
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information we receive all the time about developments on the ground. you may have seen our correspondent in kyiv referencing reports of clashes in some areas, limited areas, within the northern areas of the city itself. we understand from comments of the ukrainian state border service, saying an enemy subversion and reconnaissance group have entered the northern district of kyiv and they are asking citizens to inform them of their movements. they say, make molotov cocktails. peaceful civilians be careful, stay indoors. we have heard sounds of fighting in the district. also we have had reports of russian tanks having overpowered and ukrainian tank but from the ukrainian defence ministry saying a convoy of russian tanks is
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heading into kyiv. we understand when we spoke to the defence secretary earlier, his understanding on that information was they were tens of kilometres outside the capital. those are the latest pieces of information in terms of military movements. there is a lot of politics right now. a lot of talk about sanctions and what difference they might make. and whether those proposed by the west are enough, whilst we have had president zelensky asking for more. we can speak to adam fleming in downing street. i apologised, we can speak to adam fleming in downing street. iapologised, nick is in downing street. we spoke to ben wallace earlier, the defence secretary. put to him whether sanctions are enough and what happens next, if more will be put on the table, particularly as there has been consternation there is not enough from the ukrainian president.
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i think the view in the uk government is that more sanctions are definitely an option. they have been talking about potentially sanctioning more oligarchs, more banks, companies linked to key industries in russia. and involved industries in russia. and involved in the war effort in ukraine as the uk government sees it. there has been a call between borisjohnson and ukraine's president zelensky about the current situation and sanctions was one thing they talked about and other ways the uk could offer practical assistance. we know boots on the ground are not an option but the uk has been talking about potentially sending equipment to help. president zelensky was told by borisjohnson that to help. president zelensky was told by boris johnson that the to help. president zelensky was told by borisjohnson that the uk was willing on ukraine and full of admiration for the bravery of its
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forces. the prime minister said it was a key objective of the uk government that president putin should fail in what he is trying to do. jenny was talking about protests, anti—war protest in russia, which came up in this call between borisjohnson and president zelensky. the ukrainian leader saying western leaders should encourage protests to take place in russia over the next days. the latest we are hearing from the uk government through the ukrainian government is there has been heavy losses on both sides, the ukrainian and russian. borisjohnson and president zelensky discussed the latest situation in kyiv and increasing shelling seen around the capital. taste increasing shelling seen around the caital. ~ , ., increasing shelling seen around the caital. 2 , ., ., , increasing shelling seen around the caital. 2 , 2, ., , ., , capital. we will be hearing as many lines as we — capital. we will be hearing as many lines as we can _ capital. we will be hearing as many lines as we can from _ capital. we will be hearing as many lines as we can from the _ capital. we will be hearing as many lines as we can from the uk i lines as we can from the uk government. and the likelihood of more sanctions? tt is
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government. and the likelihood of more sanctions?— more sanctions? it is fairly plausible _ more sanctions? it is fairly plausible we _ more sanctions? it is fairly plausible we will _ more sanctions? it is fairly plausible we will see i more sanctions? it is fairly plausible we will see morej more sanctions? it is fairly - plausible we will see more sanctions on individuals. that idea of a crackdown on international payments through the swift system. ben wallace told breakfast that that is something the uk wants to do, but it is clear the international consensus on that is not there yet. boris johnson push for it in a g7 meeting but other countries including germany were reluctant. listen to what the defence secretary had to say more broadly on the uk's assessment on how the russian invasion is progressing and whether it is going according to plan. fiur it is going according to plan. our verified assessment of the last 36 hours _ verified assessment of the last 36 hours is _ verified assessment of the last 36 hours is that russia has taken none of its _ hours is that russia has taken none of its objectives in accordance with its plah _ of its objectives in accordance with its plah it— of its objectives in accordance with its plan. it has failed as your contributors said there to take one of its _ contributors said there to take one of its key _ contributors said there to take one of its key objectives, which is the
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airfield _ of its key objectives, which is the airfield to — of its key objectives, which is the airfield to the north of kyiv. in fact, _ airfield to the north of kyiv. in fact, they— airfield to the north of kyiv. in fact, they used special forces and the ukrainians have resisted and taken _ the ukrainians have resisted and taken that— the ukrainians have resisted and taken that back. so the ukrainians have resisted and taken that back.— taken that back. so how that develo -s taken that back. so how that develops over _ taken that back. so how that develops over the _ taken that back. so how that develops over the next i taken that back. so how that. develops over the next hours, taken that back. so how that i develops over the next hours, we will have to keep an eye on. it is worth pointing out, speaking to people in downing street, there is a feeling that president putin cannot be dissuaded from his current course of action, that the sanctions introduced, the ones announced last night, are about putting pressure on the russian economy in time. i think there is a feeling in here, the uk government, it could be a protracted stand—off between the west and ukraine and between russia. stand-off between the west and ukraine and between russia. indeed. thank ou. let's speak to lord peter ricketts, a former national security adviser to the uk government. are you surprised by what has happened now? t
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are you surprised by what has happened now?— are you surprised by what has happened now? are you surprised by what has ha ened now? 2, 2, _ happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we — happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we are _ happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we are waking _ happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we are waking up _ happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we are waking up in - happened now? i am horrified by it, to think we are waking up in europe | to think we are waking up in europe to think we are waking up in europe to see tanks rolling into a democratic, brave country on our borders is terrible. but we have had this russian military build—up going on for month so it is not surprising they have decided to use military force. i am afraid their objective is to topple the ukrainian government and replace it with a puppet regime, turn ukraine into a pro—russian weak state on their border, as part of president putin's paranoid hatred of nato and feeling he has to surround himself with buffer states. that is the objective. clearly it will not be easy. ukraine is fighting bravely hour by hour as we are seeing, but we have to be prepared for dark news over the next days. dark news? they are going to continue relentlessly i think. putin has committed everything on this gamble. ifear we
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are likely to see an effort to overthrow the government and install a pro—russian regime in kyiv and throughout the country. with all that has of continued repression against ukrainian people and potentially a long guerrilla war. this could be a long, protracted, hostile conflict going on on the borders of europe. what should we do? the west has done the right things. the toughest possible sanctions. support to the brave ukrainian people.— sanctions. support to the brave ukrainian people. they are not the tou~hest ukrainian people. they are not the toughest possible _ ukrainian people. they are not the toughest possible sanctions. i ukrainian people. they are not the toughest possible sanctions. a i ukrainian people. they are not the i toughest possible sanctions. a tough set of sanctions. _ toughest possible sanctions. a tough set of sanctions. i _ toughest possible sanctions. a tough set of sanctions. i would _ toughest possible sanctions. a tough set of sanctions. i would like - toughest possible sanctions. a tough set of sanctions. i would like to i set of sanctions. i would like to see them tougher still. i would like decisive action to stop corrupt money placed in london, for example in the property market. disconnecting russia from the international system makes sense. we also have to accept this is not going to change putin's mind. having
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gone this far and crossed into military action, i think he will press it through to some conclusion. i do not think sanctions. him. sanctions are about increasing the cost to russia notjust now but in the long—term, and perhaps showing the long—term, and perhaps showing the russian people their leader has put them on a reckless adventure. it is disconnecting russia from the modern world, turning it into a pariah state and over time that might work in russian public opinion but i do not think it will in the medium term.— but i do not think it will in the medium term. 2 ., 2, , 2, 2, , medium term. what does it do to help eo - le medium term. what does it do to help --eole in medium term. what does it do to help people in ukraine? _ medium term. what does it do to help people in ukraine? we _ medium term. what does it do to help people in ukraine? we are _ medium term. what does it do to help people in ukraine? we are clear i i people in ukraine? we are cleari think the west _ people in ukraine? we are cleari think the west is _ people in ukraine? we are cleari think the west is not _ people in ukraine? we are cleari think the west is not going i people in ukraine? we are cleari think the west is not going to i people in ukraine? we are clear i . think the west is not going to fight a war with russia in ukraine and that has been clear from the start. we are reduced to helping them from the outside. that is not ideal but the outside. that is not ideal but the best we can do. arming, economic support, doing everything we can to increase the price to russia but at
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the end of the day, we are not able to stop this russian invasion. we have to be clear about that. those in ukraine. — have to be clear about that. those in ukraine, what— have to be clear about that. those in ukraine, what will— have to be clear about that. those in ukraine, what will be _ have to be clear about that. those in ukraine, what will be will- have to be clear about that. those in ukraine, what will be will be, i in ukraine, what will be will be, and it isjust russia that will be the consequence, and ukraine will be facing either a long protracted war or russian occupation. long protracted war or russian occupation-— long protracted war or russian occupation. long protracted war or russian occuation. 2, , . 2, 2 long protracted war or russian occuation. 2, , . 2, occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is — occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is what _ occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is what is _ occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is what is in _ occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is what is in front - occupation. that is the choice? i am afraid that is what is in front of i afraid that is what is in front of us. a, afraid that is what is in front of us, a, a, ~ , afraid that is what is in front of us. a, a, a , a, us. have we failed in the west to revent us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? _ us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? i _ us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? i do _ us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? i do not _ us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? i do not think - us. have we failed in the west to prevent this? i do not think that l us. have we failed in the west to l prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do prevent this? i do not think that is fair- i do not— prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do not think, _ prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do not think, in _ prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do not think, in the - prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do not think, in the end, - prevent this? i do not think that is fair. i do not think, in the end, if. fair. i do not think, in the end, if russia and putin were determined to use their massive military might to overcome ukraine, unless we were going to fight a world war against russia in the centre of europe, we could not have prevented it. should we have taken _ could not have prevented it. should we have taken note _ could not have prevented it. should we have taken note in _ could not have prevented it. should we have taken note in 2014 - could not have prevented it. should we have taken note in 2014 with - we have taken note in 2014 with crimea? ., ., ~' we have taken note in 2014 with crimea? . ~ _, ., crimea? looking back we could have done more in _ crimea? looking back we could have done more in 2008 _ crimea? looking back we could have done more in 2008 when _ crimea? looking back we could have done more in 2008 when russia - crimea? looking back we could have. done more in 2008 when russia went into georgia, and more over crimea
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into georgia, and more over crimea in 2014. would that have changed putin's mind, i don't know. this man is paranoid and i do not think he is thinking rationally.— thinking rationally. there is a debate in _ thinking rationally. there is a debate in the _ thinking rationally. there is a debate in the lords _ thinking rationally. there is a debate in the lords today. i thinking rationally. there is a i debate in the lords today. what would be an ideal outcome on that debate? , ., , , debate? the strongest possible unanimity across _ debate? the strongest possible unanimity across the _ debate? the strongest possible unanimity across the lords, - debate? the strongest possible - unanimity across the lords, support for what the government is doing and support for the brave ukrainian people and a recognition we are embarked on a new security situation in europe, long—term confrontation with a hostile russia. until we can change russia's mind perhaps with a new generation of leaders that they need to come back into cooperation with the west. it is a time for solidarity with you ken, unity, support for what the government are doing and pressure on them to go further. ., , a , ., further. lord peter ricketts, former british ambassador _ further. lord peter ricketts, former british ambassador to _ further. lord peter ricketts, former british ambassador to france - further. lord peter ricketts, former british ambassador to france in -
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further. lord peter ricketts, former british ambassador to france in the| british ambassador to france in the british ambassador to france in the british government's first national security adviser and former representative to nato, thanks. we can focus our attention on kyiv. this is the live image. we have shown it this morning. what we know from this morning is that in the early hours sirens once again were sanding. there were sounds of distant explosions. since then, there have been... information from our correspondence says small bursts of small arms fire heard within the city. this is within the last 13 minutes. he said it is impossible to know what it signifies. the suggestion is russian saboteurs it had been suggested were operating inside the city. we can go to a
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ukrainian mp now. good morning. what do you know about the situation in the city? we do you know about the situation in the ci ? ~ ., , ., do you know about the situation in theci ?~ ., , , ., the city? we have seen a couple of subversive — the city? we have seen a couple of subversive groups, _ the city? we have seen a couple of subversive groups, saboteurs - the city? we have seen a couple of. subversive groups, saboteurs coming into the city on tanks with ukrainian flags but it turned out those were russian soldiers. a subversive group. one of them i know for sure has already been destroyed, but the others, as you suggest, we are hearing news from part of the city that others are also operating there. defence has finally been gathered together and people are organising themselves. this is
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important. because we can see russia is using tactics. it is sad to hear this cynical discussion in the international audience with regard to how can we help ukraine. to stand with ukraine, that is nice. we appreciate that. we were expecting when the devastating sanctions were announced they would be really devastating, that they would have impact on putin to stop his brutal attack on innocent people, on an innocent country. if i attack on innocent people, on an innocent country.— innocent country. ifi may, can i brina innocent country. ifi may, can i bring your— innocent country. ifi may, can i bring your attention _ innocent country. ifi may, can i bring your attention to - innocent country. ifi may, can i bring your attention to a - innocent country. ifi may, can i bring your attention to a couple| innocent country. ifi may, can i l bring your attention to a couple of things we are reporting here. this is quotes from the state border
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service, which you will be familiar with. this is in relation to the subversion groups you reported that are in the city already. these are the quotes on the official website saying, we are asking citizens to inform us of their movements, make molotov cocktails, destroy the occupiers. so this is a real and genuine call to arms for individual citizens who are living in the city. do you not think that is our last resort, if they were not stopped by armed forces and they could not have been, because they are subversive groups. and so citizens would have to come in. that is territorial defence. supporting municipal police, about citizens taking actions. we have done it in 2014
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when we were fighting for our right forfreedom. i think when we were fighting for our right for freedom. i think that is why the call is coming from the authorities as well. ., ~ , ., call is coming from the authorities as well. ., ~' , ., , call is coming from the authorities as well. ., ~ y., , . call is coming from the authorities as well. ., ~ ,, , . ., as well. thank you very much for our as well. thank you very much for your time- _ as well. thank you very much for your time- we — as well. thank you very much for your time. we wish _ as well. thank you very much for your time. we wish you - as well. thank you very much for your time. we wish you and - as well. thank you very much for your time. we wish you and yourl your time. we wish you and your family very well. it is a fast moving situation, we know. we will talk to the leader of the opposition sir keir starmer in a few minutes. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london has proposed that property held by allies of russian president vladimir putin here in the capital be seized. transparency international — an anti—corruption think tank — has identified what it says is a concentration of property in london owned by russians accused of corruption or with links to the kremlin. yesterday the prime minister announced a raft of new sanctions on russia following the invasion of ukraine.
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our researchers found £1.5 billion worth of property of concern owned by russians, often with links to the kremlin. over a quarter of that is in the city of westminster, nearly a fifth of it is in the royal borough of kensington and chelsea, and a tenth in camden. in fact, an awful lot of this property is within a mile of buckingham palace, so there really is quite a concentration, right in the heart of the city. the 02 arena will reopen from 10:00 this morning after having to close following damage caused during storm eunice. the greenwich landmark was evacuated on friday last week as gusts of up to 80 miles per hour shredded the roof. the 02 said that they had carried out rigorous safety checks. an intensive care nurse at st george's hospital in tooting has turned her experiences of working on covid wards into a book. anthea allen kept a diary
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throughout the pandemic, which has influenced her book life, death and biscuits — she said some memories of on the ward evoked powerful feelings. it's like it didn't happen in some ways. it's like... it was like working in a spaceship, it was like some surreal experience that happened that we just waded through. sometimes it's painful to look back, and sometimes you can't actually believe it happened. a brief check on the tubes. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning, but a bright one. the wind is a lot lighter today, and that's all thanks to a ridge of high pressure which is building. now, we could see a little bit more cloud bubbling up through the afternoon, perhaps some hazy sunny spells, and temperatures reaching 11 celsius — just feeling a little milder in the lighter wind, but also with the addition of the sunshine. now, overnight conditions remain — it's dry and it's clear. could get a little bit of mistiness by dawn tomorrow morning, but the temperature also dropping — —2 the minimum, so we could see
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a little bit of frost first thing tomorrow. now, high pressure still in charge for saturday, so it is going to be another fine and dry day. plenty of sunshine around after a chilly start tomorrow, but the wind will start to strengthen through the course of saturday afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, again, around 11 celsius. now, we're still with the high pressure for sunday, but it's slipping away. another fine day for the end of the weekend — we've still got some sunshine — perhaps a little bit more in the way of cloud. still quite breezy on sunday, as well, but, as we head into next week, the influence of low pressure — so things turning progressively more unsettled through monday with some outbreaks of rain. but for the weekend, dry and fine, some chilly nights. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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uk charlie stayt and naga munchetty. politicians from the political divide are united in the response to russia's aggression. we're joined now by the labour leader — sir keir starmer. good morning. thank you forjoining us this morning. as you will understand there is a lot of news coming into us all the time and you may have heard a moment ago we were speaking to a ukrainian mp who was confirming this report that there are russian subversives, as they are being described, have now entered kyiv and what we understand is that they came in on what appeared to be a convoy of ukrainian tanks which have been captured by russian insurgents and there has been five fights within the city itself. i wonder what your reaction to the very latest news is. this wonder what your reaction to the very latest news is.— very latest news is. this news is cominu very latest news is. this news is coming in _ very latest news is. this news is coming in very _ very latest news is. this news is coming in very fast _ very latest news is. this news is coming in very fast now - very latest news is. this news is i coming in very fast now particularly in relation to kyiv and it is of course very serious. what we see here is russia invading a european
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country and this is an act of aggression and it is very, very important that we stand with and support the people of ukraine. you can see in the very many reports coming through the anxiety, the courage of the ukrainian people as they see this being inflicted, something they never thought would happen. what putin wants is to divide nato, divide our allies, and we will not allow that to happen. here in the uk i think earlier you referenced the mood in parliament. putin wants our political parties to divide on this issue. we are not going to do so. the labour party's support of nato and their allies and ukraine is unshakeable and will not divide in our parliament on this crucial issue at this crucial time. i would like to contrast to thoughts with you. president zelensky
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comments, i am quoting, with you. president zelensky comments, iam quoting, he with you. president zelensky comments, i am quoting, he says the world is continuing to observe what is going on in ukraine from afar. now, this seems to be implicit in that situation that they are looking and not doing. that thought with you. also these words from the ukrainian state border service. this was just into us in the last few minutes. officially on their website. two ukrainian citizens. make molotov cocktails, destroy the occupiers. to individual civilians, this would be, living in those cities that now feel they are under attack. i cities that now feel they are under attack. , ,., ~' cities that now feel they are under attack. , ., ~ ., ., attack. i spoke to the ukrainian ambassador— attack. i spoke to the ukrainian ambassador yesterday - attack. i spoke to the ukrainian ambassador yesterday and - attack. i spoke to the ukrainian ambassador yesterday and he l attack. i spoke to the ukrainian | ambassador yesterday and he is attack. i spoke to the ukrainian - ambassador yesterday and he is very clear that he wants the full package of sanctions, he wants the most effective action taken against the putin regime that will notjust isolate russia but will cripple the ability of russia to function. i
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think that is a concern shared certainly by me, that in the past we have not been effective and strong enough. when it comes to crimea, the donbas, or other examples and that has allowed putin to think that the benefits of aggression outweigh the costs. this time we must be united with our allies, with the strongest possible response, providing support in ukraine, financial support, the equipment that is being provided to ukraine, dealing with the humanitarian issues and sections, the like of which we haven't seen before. i don't think the sanctions the prime minister put forward earlier this week were stronger. yesterday he put forward a stronger package. i immediately said we would support that. i want the government to go further. on monday there will be further legislation and we will push the government further. i do want to be absolutely clear that a
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moment like this with russia, in an act of aggression, invading ukraine, in the uk our political parties will stand together. i in the uk our political parties will stand together.— in the uk our political parties will stand together. i am mindful, and it is clearl a stand together. i am mindful, and it is clearly a factor, _ stand together. i am mindful, and it is clearly a factor, that _ stand together. i am mindful, and it is clearly a factor, that these - stand together. i am mindful, and it is clearly a factor, that these are - is clearly a factor, that these are the strongest sanctions that have been put in place against russia, but then again i look at the comments of president zelensky, that was this morning, since the sanctions were announced, who is saying the sanctions imposed are not enough. i know there is a sense of unanimity within parliament, that there is support for what the government is trying to do. i immediately specific sanctions that you think should be in place that have not been in place? that is not a criticism of what has been done, but more what you think could be done above and beyond. yes. but more what you think could be done above and beyond. yes. there is the swift system. _ done above and beyond. yes. there is the swift system, which _ done above and beyond. yes. there is the swift system, which is _ done above and beyond. yes. there is the swift system, which is all - done above and beyond. yes. there is the swift system, which is all about i the swift system, which is all about the swift system, which is all about the money exchanges in and out of russia. we need to take action in relation to that.—
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relation to that. should that be done now? _ relation to that. should that be done now? are _ relation to that. should that be done now? are you _ relation to that. should that be done now? are you saying - relation to that. should that be done now? are you saying thatj relation to that. should that be l done now? are you saying that is relation to that. should that be - done now? are you saying that is a decision for now.— decision for now. that is now decision- _ decision for now. that is now decision- i — decision for now. that is now decision. i called _ decision for now. that is now decision. i called for - decision for now. that is now decision. i called for it - decision for now. that is now| decision. i called for it earlier this week and yesterday, it is eight now decision and we, the labour party, would support it in fault. we think that should happen now. there are further measures on sovereign debt that need to be taken, and here in the uk we have got to break open some of the shell companies that are holding money and supporting putin or his regime. we have been needing to do this for some years now. there is a frustration in parliament that the government has not got on with this. what i have said to the prime minister is, whatever criticism i have for you not having done it now, do it now, if you bring forward legislation, we the labour party will vote for it, we can bring this through parliament very, very quickly because those shell companies are hiding assets that are supporting putin and we have to get
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our house in order and we can do that. there is such a well in parliament at the moment, if the prime minister bring forward legislation on monday it will go through very, very quickly. there is a need for — through very, very quickly. there is a need for honesty _ through very, very quickly. there is a need for honesty in _ through very, very quickly. there is a need for honesty in this _ through very, very quickly. there is| a need for honesty in this equation. one of those areas is the reality check of what this could mean for people here in the uk and i know at the same time as we look at the desperate scenes in ukraine, the fact is that people are still putting petrol in their cars, still trying to pay the bills. i think you referenced in the commons the cost, and there is a cost that we may well feel on a day—to—day basis if we bring in even tougher sanctions. can you be clear about what that could mean for people?— mean for people? yes, there is a cost, of course. _ mean for people? yes, there is a cost, of course. the _ mean for people? yes, there is a cost, of course. the costs - mean for people? yes, there is a cost, of course. the costs beingl cost, of course. the costs being paid by the people of ukraine are very high and all of us looking at those images of men, women and children, the anxiety and the courage on theirfaces. children, the anxiety and the courage on their faces. our hearts
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sink at what they are going through. back here, there will be implications, and i made that clear in parliament yesterday. we have got to ensure that europe is not so dependent on oil and gas from russia. that will have an implication here. it may have implications in relation to what we call cost of living, the bills people see. but that having been said, it was open to the government weeks ago to take more effective action to bring down the cost of energy bills for so many households. we the labour party said, look, oil and gas companies have already had profits they were not expecting in the north sea and because of the global prices. put a windfall tax on that and bring down those energy bills by up to £600. the government has not done that. it should have done it and now we will see even
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greater stress, done it and now we will see even greaterstress, i done it and now we will see even greater stress, i think, done it and now we will see even greater stress, ithink, and done it and now we will see even greater stress, i think, and those energy bills for so many households in this country. 5ir energy bills for so many households in this country-— in this country. sir keir starmer, leader of the _ in this country. sir keir starmer, leader of the labour _ in this country. sir keir starmer, leader of the labour party, - in this country. sir keir starmer, | leader of the labour party, thank you for your time. bringing you some news we are getting through. russian operatives are now in kyiv, in the capital of ukraine, this is ukrainian officials confirming our social media the defence ministry has said, i quote the enemy —— i quote, the enemy is in the district. around five kilometres north of kyiv parliament in a city centre. they have been encouraging locals to make molotov cocktails to fight back while advising others, those who don't want to fight, to seek shelter. the quote is, peaceful residents be careful, do not leave the house. we have been speaking to people who are sheltering at home and just waiting to see what happens today in kyiv we're joined in the studio this
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morning by our correspondent jonah fisher. your insight is useful here. we spent four years in kyiv as a correspondent. these high streets and places you know well. you're watching the stories unfold. to pick u . watching the stories unfold. to pick u- on what watching the stories unfold. to pick up on what you _ watching the stories unfold. to pick up on what you are _ watching the stories unfold. to pick up on what you are saying - watching the stories unfold. to pick up on what you are saying they're l up on what you are saying they're about obolon, it is a northern suburb of kyiv, just along the river and we have been hearing reports all morning of russian vehicles being cited, elated to it by the ministry of defence of ukraine, that they are on the move and there have been reports of gunfire. very much an active situation. we would assume those are troops who have come down from belarus, coming south and have managed to make their way as far as kyiv. a very serious situation in kyiv. a very serious situation in kyiv at the moment but let's look back at how we got here. we are now just over 2a hours into this russian invasion of ukraine. if you look at the map we have got here, this was what happened yesterday morning. these were the air attacks which
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struck in the early hours of yesterday morning and it was at this point when we sawjust how widely those attacks were taking place that we got the sense this was not going to be a conflict localised to the eastern part of ukraine, that hashed area, the part that is controlled by russian backed forces. they have been thought this conflict would just be taking part there. very clear from yesterday and the events both in the air and on the grounds that russia wanted a lot more than that. is this the russian forces which of course we know web based all around the sides of ukraine over the last several months. what we saw was russian troops coming in from crimea, crimea being seized from ukraine in 2014. there has been a movement to the north from there. we know there are clashes going on there, also in kherson. you can see
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kharkiv, the bigger city in eastern ukraine, clashes along that border voices coming in from russia and interesting, belarus, different country from russia but which has a significant number of troops based in belarus and yesterday those troops moved south, crossing the border and taking control of chernobyl, where of course the nuclear accident took place in 1986. russia is now in control of that, it may be quite useful asset in terms of the space they have if they want to begin with voices. we have highlighted gostomel, an airstrip on the outskirts of kyiv. we have done that because perhaps the most important battle of yesterday took place here. russia attempted, or indeed they did, fly helicopters to land at that base just outside kyiv. you can see them there. they captured the airstrip and the reason they did not, people think, is because they were looking at the
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possibility of it very quickly getting a large amount of troops into that air base and launching a lightning strike on the capital kyiv, perhaps seizing it and making this war much shorter. that has not happened, there was a ukrainian fightback yesterday afternoon and evening and russia does not now control that airstrip. we have heard contesting reports about exactly who is in charge but it is not entirely controlled by the russians so they have not been able to use it in that way. in the last hour there have been new pictures coming in about devastation. there are reports that an aircraft or a missile has struck this building in kyiv, dramatic pictures from this morning of the air defence system in kyiv. it is unclear exactly what it was that came down on this building, whether it was a plain, cruise missile, even some suggestions it might have been a ukrainian plane shot down by the russians. we willjust have to wait and try to work out exactly what
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happened but a real sense of how terrifying it is at the moment for the 3 million people who live in kyiv at the moment. the real takeaway from yesterday was that if there was any prospect of vladimir putin hoping that it was going to be a rout, that the ukrainians will not fight back a rout, that the ukrainians will not fightback against what they know is a much bigger and better equipped military force from russia, well, that certainly did not happen. ukrainians are so far have been putting up a pretty stiff fight with their backs to the wall. the indications at the moment i that this will not be a quick battle, a quick war, that the ukrainians will fight every step of the way.- fight every step of the way. thank ou ve fight every step of the way. thank you very much- — it has been good to have you in the studio to explain all this and that explanation will continue across the bbc news channel throughout the day and online and on radio. let's take a moment to look at the weather. good morning. after all the wet and windy weather we have seen recently, something a little quieter outside over the next couple of days. this
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is the pitch this morning in newcastle, county down. blue sky overhead, but we have still got some lying snow across parts of northern ireland, scotland and parts of northern england. a cold morning, icy stretches in the north and quite a sharp frost but we are expecting a lot of dry weather and sunshine through the day. a cold air mass with us at the moment, but also this ridge of high pressure is nudging in so it will mean unless we do pitch out there today and for most of us lightly dry. one or two showers at the moment tending to fade over the next hour or so. what a crowd we can get ireland and western scotland later in the day with some rain in the final of the west but for the bulk of the uk we are looking at the lightly dry day. lighter winds than recently coming in from the west or north—west at those temperatures will be somewhere between eight to 11 degrees or so, feeling fairly pleasant towards the south and east. we have a slight wind and sunshine overhead. but sunshine by day means chilly overnight because we have clear
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skies and light winds are so particularfor england skies and light winds are so particular for england and wales, expecting a cold night ahead. work clever scotland and northern ireland and what we sow temperatures holding up and what we sow temperatures holding up in mid single figures down to a south—east england and east anglia come into the middle is, those temperatures down to freezing, even in some towns and cities, cold in the countryside. that we can start up the countryside. that we can start up on that chilly note, a pressure still very close sitting to the east. a weather front trying to move in from the west but not making too many inroads on saturday. it will bring more cloud again for northern ireland and scotland with the breeze picking up here. for much of england and wales, blue skies through the day, lighter winds from us of the rate —— from a southerly direction so it mildly. not too much change into the second half of the weekend but we will see at high pressure nudging to the east, allowing this weather front to start to move across the uk but as it does so and bumped into that high pressure it will be fizzling out. a bit of rain here and there, particularly to the
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west to start off on sunday, but the rain becoming increasingly light and patchy, an area of cloud drifting eastwards into the afternoon and we keep some sunny spells across eastern scotland and eastern england and brightness returning from the west later in the day. top temperatures eight to 11 degrees, not too far from what we would expect for this time of year. it looks like things will turn more unsettled again into the first part of the coming week, so some rain, not as heavy as it has been, for monday and tuesday. drying through next week. thank you very much. our coverage this morning focusing in on developments in ukraine. specifically in kyiv and you may have seen images of what appears to be a residential apartment block with substantial damage. those images have come through over the past couple of days. we images have come through over the past couple of days.— past couple of days. we will take ou there past couple of days. we will take you there now. _
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alex lourie travelled from the donbas region in the east, to the capital city of kyiv, documenting the scale of the devastation. we can speak to him now and take a look at some of the images he captured. good morning. we will talk about what you have seen on the way but first of all the image of the apartment block behind you, the residential building, something we have seen and now you are there. can you tell us exactly what is being reported that has happened? this is a different apartment _ reported that has happened? this is a different apartment building - reported that has happened? “in 3 3 a different apartment building than the images from yesterday, which was from the outskirts and since then i have come to kyiv and this is pretty similar scene, another big munitions crater right behind me. a bunch of civilians clearing the rubble. different city, different apartment building, same situation. what building, same situation. what caused it? _ building, same situation. what caused it? there _ building, same situation. what caused it? there is _ building, same situation. what caused it? there is not - building, same situation. what caused it? there is not a - building, same situation. what| caused it? there is not a whole building, same situation. what - caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty _ caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty right _ caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty right now _ caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty right now but - caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty right now but it - caused it? there is not a whole lot of certainty right now but it was i of certainty right now but it was hit by something from the russian military. it hit by something from the russian milita . ., . hit by something from the russian milita . ., , ., military. it was not something... was it something _
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military. it was not something... was it something that _ military. it was not something... was it something that had i military. it was not something... was it something that had been l was it something that had been brought down by ukrainian defences? i don't have any information on that. �* , ,., , i don't have any information on that. �* ,,., , .,, that. absolutely fine. the last thin . that. absolutely fine. the last thin we that. absolutely fine. the last thing we want _ that. absolutely fine. the last thing we want to _ that. absolutely fine. the last thing we want to do _ that. absolutely fine. the last thing we want to do is - that. absolutely fine. the last thing we want to do is have i that. absolutely fine. the last. thing we want to do is have any disinformation. do we know anything about the impact this has had on the people living in that building? it is a residential building. i people living in that building? it is a residential building.- is a residential building. i think ou can is a residential building. i think you can see — is a residential building. i think you can see the _ is a residential building. i think you can see the impact. - is a residential building. i think you can see the impact. most l is a residential building. i think i you can see the impact. most people right now i focused on clearing the rubble. there is a tractor here with a lot of municipal workers, responders and basically picking up the pieces making sure no one got hurt in the rubble. do the pieces making sure no one got hurt in the rubble.— hurt in the rubble. do we know of any injuries _ hurt in the rubble. do we know of any injuries or — hurt in the rubble. do we know of any injuries or fatalities? - hurt in the rubble. do we know of any injuries or fatalities? i - hurt in the rubble. do we know of any injuries or fatalities? i don't l any in'uries or fatalities? i don't have any injuries or fatalities? i don't have any information _ any injuries or fatalities? i don't have any information that i i any injuries or fatalities? i don'tl have any information that i thank you. talk to me about yourjourney. you are freelance you. talk to me about your 'ourney. you are freelancei you are freelance photo 'ournalist. talk to you are freelance photo 'ournalist. ran to me — you are freelance photo 'ournalist. talk to me about i you are freelance photo 'ournalist. talk to me about what i you are freelance photo journalist. talk to me about what you - you are freelance photo journalist. talk to me about what you have i you are freelance photo journalist. i talk to me about what you have seen with the tension building to is where we are now. for with the tension building to is where we are now.— with the tension building to is where we are now. for 9996 of the last where we are now. for 99% of the last month. _
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where we are now. for 99% of the last month. it _ where we are now. for 99% of the last month, it was _ where we are now. for 99% of the last month, it was the _ where we are now. for 99% of the last month, it was the same i where we are now. for 99% of the last month, it was the same as i last month, it was the same as staying at home in the us and london. people going on dates, going shopping, going to work and we woke up shopping, going to work and we woke up yesterday in a completely different world, different city, almost a different universe. after putin's speech, i forget, almost a different universe. after putin's speech, iforget, it is almost a different universe. after putin's speech, i forget, it is such a blur but when he recognised the dnr and lnr the move a mood shifted and it was a one—way trip to the hell you seen out. and it was a one-way trip to the hell you seen out.— hell you seen out. some of the imaaes hell you seen out. some of the images of _ hell you seen out. some of the images of war, _ hell you seen out. some of the images of war, all— hell you seen out. some of the images of war, all of _ hell you seen out. some of the images of war, all of them, i hell you seen out. some of the images of war, all of them, a l hell you seen out. some of the i images of war, all of them, a pretty powerful and you have captured them really well today. talk to me about this woman featured on the front pages. 53—year—old woman that you saw. its, pages. 53-year-old woman that you saw. �* , ., , pages. 53-year-old woman that you saw. ~ , ., , .,
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saw. a couple of us, three of us are travelling. — saw. a couple of us, three of us are travelling, three _ saw. a couple of us, three of us are travelling, three journalists, - travelling, three journalists, friends, and we saw this gigantic plume of smoke. we were coming from donbas to the north and we were trying to see the origin of it and we took a turn into this apartment complex that was just blasted to smithereens and the first thing you saw was this poor woman covered in blood, bandaged up. i don't speak ukrainian or russian but i was able to get her name, her age, she is a teacher, she took me into her appointment, indicated she was injured by a falling shard of mirror, which was completely covered in blood and she is alive, walking, thank god. but that is howl encountered her. thank god. but that is how i encountered her.— thank god. but that is how i encountered her. you say she is alive and walking _ encountered her. you say she is alive and walking and _ encountered her. you say she is alive and walking and thank- encountered her. you say she is i alive and walking and thank goodness indeed. how is she now? this alive and walking and thank goodness indeed. how is she now?— indeed. how is she now? as far as i know. indeed. how is she now? as far as i know- what — indeed. how is she now? as far as i know- what is _ indeed. how is she now? as far as i know. what is your _ indeed. how is she now? as far as i know. what is your plan? _ indeed. how is she now? as far as i know. what is your plan? there i indeed. how is she now? as far as i know. what is your plan? there arej know. what is your plan? there are other pictures _ know. what is your plan? there are other pictures you _ know. what is your plan? there are other pictures you have _ know. what is your plan? there are other pictures you have taken i know. what is your plan? there are other pictures you have taken and l know. what is your plan? there are other pictures you have taken and i | other pictures you have taken and i wonder what it is like for you behind the lens and you see what you
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see, what you decide to document. it see, what you decide to document. lit is horrible! you know... documenting people at their lowest point. these are normal people like you and me. they are notjust are normal people like you and me. they are not just a are normal people like you and me. they are notjust a bloody are normal people like you and me. they are not just a bloody face or the face of war. helena was a teacher. i cannot stress how different it was two days ago. she was probably buying groceries and stuff, just like you or me and now she is the face of a war and it is so tragic, so sad. we she is the face of a war and it is so tragic, so sad.— she is the face of a war and it is so tragic, so sad. we wish you well, thank ou so tragic, so sad. we wish you well, thank you very _ so tragic, so sad. we wish you well, thank you very much. _ so tragic, so sad. we wish you well, | thank you very much. documentation is so important in this time, thank you forjoining us. alex lourie, a freelance photojournalist. you will see many front pages of pictures done up of that woman, her inner air strike in ukraine. she is a teacher
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and alex has been documenting many images. jonah fisher has beenjoining us. he has expertise in ukraine, spent four years there. there have been a number of developments this morning, a lot involving aircraft, we had from ben wallace earlier saying a number of russian aircraft had been brought down, and helicopters, and now i am reading that russia is planning aeroplane is registered in the uk from landing or crossing its airspace. not so surprising. lhlat the uk from landing or crossing its airspace. not so surprising.- all. airspace. not so surprising. not at all. we airspace. not so surprising. not at all- we heard _ airspace. not so surprising. not at all. we heard earlier— airspace. not so surprising. not at all. we heard earlier this - airspace. not so surprising. not at all. we heard earlier this week i airspace. not so surprising. not at| all. we heard earlier this week that the uk band aeroflot, the russian carrier, from to the uk so we can see that in the context of the marked deterioration in relations between the uk and russia. on the broader point about flight and control of the area in ukraine, that is really vital for ukraine's ability to stay afloat in this conflict, that they do not allow russia to dominate the air. if
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ukraine allows russia to control the air it will limit their ability to move forces around and be able to sponsor the russian forces on the ground. it is desperately important for the ukrainians that they do not allow russia to dominate from the sky. allow russia to dominate from the s . ~ allow russia to dominate from the s , ~ . ., , ., allow russia to dominate from the sky. we can show one or two images and as these — sky. we can show one or two images and as these pictures _ sky. we can show one or two images and as these pictures coming - and as these pictures coming sometimes it is quite hard to work out what we have seen. this is a live picture which we understand is another place where there has been damage done by a rocket or maybe a downed aircraft. lt damage done by a rocket or maybe a downed aircraft. it is damage done by a rocket or maybe a downed aircraft.— downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when _ downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when you — downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when you see _ downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when you see simply i downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when you see simply in i downed aircraft. it is very hard to know when you see simply in the| know when you see simply in the aftermath of one of these attacks or strikes exactly what has happened. this is kyiv. strikes exactly what has happened. this is kyiv-— this is kyiv. yes. this morning we saw an apartment _ this is kyiv. yes. this morning we saw an apartment block. - this is kyiv. yes. this morning we saw an apartment block. the i this is kyiv. yes. this morning we | saw an apartment block. the initial assumption it was a missile, then
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there was talk of perhaps ukraine having shot down a russian plane and then there was suggesting it might be of ukrainian plane shot down by the russians. that has also been claimed. almost everything that happens here gets spun in different directions from different sides and thatis directions from different sides and that is the building which was struck when something fell out of the sky the very early hours of this morning. we have to wait and see it through the debris to find out exactly what it was that was taken out of the sky and why it fell. aha, out of the sky and why it fell. a final thought. you have spent time there, many years. this is not going to be a quick in and out operation, as russia may have liked, or it putin may have like to have implied it would have been. if putin may have like to have implied it would have been.— it would have been. it doesn't feel like that. there _ it would have been. it doesn't feel like that. there was _ it would have been. it doesn't feel like that. there was a _ it would have been. it doesn't feel like that. there was a sense i like that. there was a sense yesterday morning, i think, that what russia, what vladimir putin was trying to do was a real shock and awe tactic. target life out of the country with aircraft and missiles and then send the tanks it in hope
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of a quick victory. it is now critically that will not happen. it critically that will not happen. it has been really good having you here with us with your experience. thank you. it's 8:59. it is the first major ground war in europe in decades. we can speak to james waterhouse who is in kyiv now. i know you, like we are, are trying to keep up on the various bits of information. can you hear us ok?
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines. explosions over ukraine's capital kyiv as the country fights for its future against a russian offensive by land, sea and air. in the past few minutes, videos online appear to show russian tanks driving through the city. sarr live pictures from my neighbourhood in kyiv damaged in russian missile strikes. fighting has been reported in cities across the country, including in ukraine's second city, kharkiv. if you are in ukraine and watching this, let me know how you are, where you are, and why you have taken the decision to stay. if you are
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