Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 12, 2022 2:00am-2:31am GMT

2:00 am
welcome to bbc news. i'm lewis vaughan jones. our top stories: attacks on ukraine target more cities and extend further into the country and russian troops regroup around the capital kyiv. "everything is destroyed," he says. "there is no electricity, no gas." an air strike on dnipro damages apartment blocks and hits a factory. we have a special report from the city. the site is one of complete devastation. the smoke is still rising from the ruins of this building hours after the missiles struck. concerns grow above the protection of ukraine's clear
2:01 am
power plant is shelling and air raids threaten their safety. and struggling to a new life in the uk, the ukrainian orphans waiting to meet their new host families. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. first, the russian military offensive has widened across ukraine and its forces are now closing in on the capital kyiv. some cities came under direct shelling for the first time, including lutsk and ivano—frankivsk in the west. and to the east, dnipro, a place of refuge for ukrainians fleeing other parts of the country, was also hit. almost 2 million people have been displaced internally and 2.5 million have left the country. our first report is from orla guerin, who's been to the frontline close to the town of bucha, near kyiv, where russian troops are battling ukrainian forces
2:02 am
just 15 miles — 2a kilometres — from the capital. the lonely road towards russian positions on the outskirts of kyiv. we head carefully towards the commuter town of bucha, bombed day and night. there are battlegrounds along the way. well, this is as far as we can go. we have just come through the last ukrainian checkpoint. up ahead is no man's land, and the next checkpoint is in the hands of the russians. we have been hearing the sounds of battle in the last few minutes with outgoing shelling from here towards the russian positions. "the fighting is hard, very hard," says victor, breaking down.
2:03 am
"15 days." he is a pensioner turned defender of ukraine. "overall, it's fine," he says. "we have our children, our wives. "this is our land." anatoly, who is 72, is risking his life to look for petrol. "everything is destroyed," he tells me. "there's no electricity, no gas.
2:04 am
"it's very cold in the house. "i'm sorry," he says politely. "this is life." inside bucha, there is no life. so, today, once again, civilians were fleeing. from russia, this choice — go or be bombed. documents are checked before they head for kyiv. ukrainian forces don't want russian saboteurs getting through. cars brimming with desperation and displaying white ribbons, a plea for safe passage for civilians. many marked "ditey", meaning children. did you see the russian
2:05 am
forces in your area? "we passed three of their checkpoints. "there were tanks there," says alexander. his wife, natalia, also weeps for ukraine. and day by day, the threat is moving closer to kyiv. gunfire. here, ukrainian forces battle the russians in a village in kyiv region. a ferocious firefight in the forest. the ukrainians are defending every inch of territory. but russian troops are now believed to be less than ten miles from the heart of the capital. orla guerin, bbc news, on the outskirts of kyiv.
2:06 am
as you heard earlier, dnipro in the east was attacked for the first time with a shoe factory targeted by the shelling. the city is home to around one million people and our eastern europe correspondent sarah rainsford has been assessing the impact of the attack on the ground. they struck at dawn, and dnipro wasn't expecting it. this was not a military target. russia's missiles have destroyed a shoe factory and they have shattered the idea many had clung to here that this city was safe. amongst the rubble of their workplace were factory staff trying to clean up, dazed and disbelieving. many more could have died here, had the factory not stopped work because of the war. "you see that black bag?", this woman says. "that is where our
2:07 am
"security guard died." "what else can i tell you? "you can see it all." many ignored the wail of the air raid siren because central dnipro had never been hit. this site is one of complete devastation. the smoke is still rising from the ruins of this building hours after the missile struck, and the smell here is really acrid, but the thing that strikes me most, just being here, is that there are so many apartment blocks, residential buildings, all around here. the shock waves swept across the square, smashing windows and shaking buildings for blocks around. we saw irina cleaning up the mess, and she called us in. for her family, the attack was terrifyingly close — right on their doorstep. they are scared, but they are also furious here at russia.
2:08 am
"we didn't ask them to come and save us," irina tells me. "we were living fine in our own country. "we love our country and we'll defend it," she says. across the hallway, alexander is clearing up for his 90—year—old aunt, distraught that she lived through one world war and she is now being caught up in all this. and down the road, we met natalia, demanding to know why russia is firing at them, haunted by the terrified screams of her son. they didn't make it to the bomb shelter — the missiles came in too fast. rescuers have been salvaging scraps from the factory wreckage. but however resilient ukraine is, this kind of attack sows fear and saps morale because when the sirens go now, no—one can feel safe here. sarah rainsford,
2:09 am
bbc news, dnipro. one area where the russian advance on the ground has made progress is in the south of ukraine. they have captured the city of kherson and are pushing west towards the key port of odessa on the black sea. but the city of mykolaiv stands in their way and while ukraine's forces are holding fast, it too has suffered extensive damage. from there, andrew harding sent this. a snowstorm enfolds us as we head for the front lines towards a ukrainian city that is blocking the russian advance. civilians gather on the outskirts of mykolaiv, fleeing the madness. are you worried about the bombs and the artillery? yes, yes. it's also very loud, especially at night. explosions. loud and deadly. the russians are trying to blast a path through this
2:10 am
city in order to seize the whole black sea coast but mykolaiv is proving obstinate. air raid siren wails. 0k, wejust heard some artillery in the distance and then an air raid siren, so we are going to suit up. you, too, joe. in a cellar, volunteers follow the example set by millions of ukrainians nationwide, forming a diy army. it's plates for body arms what we made from our factory. it's really heavy but it's good. that defiance is echoed by the local governor, who tells us the russians are actually in retreat here, for now. we pulled the enemy back from the borders of our city, from about 15—20 kilometres in the southern and western part. for now, they are almost surrounded.
2:11 am
we are attacking them. so, from your perspective, you are winning this war? you know, we are winning this fight, but not this war. not winning the war. at the local morgue, it's a struggle to keep up with the bodies. soldiers and civilians alike out in the cold. some survivors here are still too frail to be moved to safer ground. 250 casualties in under a fortnight. what would you say to the world? to the world? what is your message? close our sky, close our sky. we cannot work under the bombs, under the rockets. it's dangerous. you want a no—fly zone enforced by the west? yes, yes, of course. in the meantime, the russians stick to theirfamiliar routine, shock and horror, almost no weapons too gruesome, no target off limits. the fear in civilian neighbourhoods like this one
2:12 am
is that this is just the start, that because russian ground troops are being blocked from sweeping through this city, they will now do what they have done in so many other parts of ukraine and simply intensify their aerial bombardments. and then what? this woman survived, but her city's fate remains unclear. andrew harding, bbc news, mykolaiv. our reporter mark lobel is with me. we have a couple of new developments to bring you. i know you will talk us through them and some new satellite images? them and some new satellite imaues? �* ., , ., , images? another set, 24 hours since you _ images? another set, 24 hours since you and _ images? another set, 24 hours since you and i _ images? another set, 24 hours since you and i were _ images? another set, 24 hours since you and i were discussingj since you and i were discussing the last set and again, they show russian military forces deploying lessor to give in what appeared to be firing artillery onto residential areas. if we have a look at them to start with, these are, according to the us form —— firma maxar technologies, homes and buildings on fire as part of set and and buildings on fire as part of setand in and buildings on fire as part of set and in the town of
2:13 am
motion 25 kilometres, just 25 kilometres from the capital kyiv, if we show you the except, fires at the nearby antonov airport, it's used for cargo, a large airport and again, closest to the capital. and then i will show you one more satellite photo, 0k? and then i will show you one more satellite photo, ok? this is from aristi anchor and it shows what appears to be a line of rocket launchers trained in the direction of kyiv, around 50 commenters away. we have the latest hologram video posted by resident zelensky, when he kind of gives his nightly address to the nation on social media, published about two hours ago. we will show you that. in that, he said 7144 people have been saved from four cities, evacuated. it's a much lower rate than the past two days of people getting up and none in the besieged southern city of mariupol where, as he puts it,
2:14 am
the enemy continues to torture our people. but he began but address by focusing on what he called a crime against chrissy. which he wanted to go through in detail and which he wanted to go through in detailand he in detail and he thinks this will resonate wildly with an international audience, the alleged abduction of the mayor of miller tuppal, ivan fedorov. if we show you this video, this has been widely shared on social media, it shows ivan fedorov being dragged from a building in the city. it is 200 kilometres west of mariupol and has been occupied for days by russian forces, they have taken over the tv networks and the mayor had refused to play ball —— melitopol. they have moved in somewhere else, his operations somewhere else and apparently, instead of getting this grand welcome from the residence there, they have had to abduct the mayor allegedly and zelensky said these are russian invaders's actions and this kind of action he thinks now equates them to the actions of isis, the so—called islamic state group.
2:15 am
of isis, the so-called islamic state grow-— of isis, the so-called islamic state group. strong words and extraordinary _ state group. strong words and extraordinary events _ state group. strong words and extraordinary events if - state group. strong words and extraordinary events if the - extraordinary events if the allegations are true. moving on now to nuclear power plants, there has been worried as them there has been worried as them the beginning of this, what do you know now? == the beginning of this, what do you know now?— the beginning of this, what do you know now? -- worries about them. you know now? -- worries about them- there _ you know now? -- worries about them. there was _ you know now? -- worries about them. there was a _ you know now? -- worries about them. there was a firefight - you know now? -- worries about them. there was a firefight is . them. there was a firefight is a breach of power plant and we can show you those pictures, but was the shelling there, but in south—east ukraine, and the head of the state nuclear company talks an audacious takeover from company talks an audacious takeoverfrom russian takeover from russian officials, they takeoverfrom russian officials, they tried to enter the control room at this nuclear power plant, the largest in europe, to take full control —— zaporizhzhya. russian forces that it now belong to russia's state nuclear company, according to petra coten, the head of ukraine's state nuclear company, he said ten officials barged in with two senior engineers, they were unsuccessful in taking control of the operations but it's in an area with 500 russian soldiers with automatic weapons soldiers with automatic weapons so it's very threatening that he says all of the and separately, he said chernobyl,
2:16 am
in north kyiv, of course, is disused but spent nuclear fuel is in that nuclear plant, he said that there are —— they are still trying to repair the power lines and still disconnected from the monitoring systems, the international atomic energy agency, but he thinks that some progress is being made in repairing that external power because, of course, the big news there was it had been cut off from external our neville power and eight of the 15 reactors in the country are still working.— reactors in the country are still working. mark, thank you so much for— still working. mark, thank you so much for bringing - still working. mark, thank you so much for bringing us - still working. mark, thank you so much for bringing us all. still working. mark, thank you so much for bringing us all of| so much for bringing us all of the latest out of ukraine. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: travelling to a new life in the uk — we meet the ukrainian orphans waiting to meet their new host families. the numbers of dead and wounded defied belief. this, the worst terrorist atrocity on european soil in modern times.
2:17 am
in less than 24 hours, then, the soviet union lost an elderly, sick leader and replaced him with a dynamic figure 20 years his junior. we heard these gunshots in the gym. _ then he came out| through a fire exit and started firing at our huts and. god, — we were all petrified. james earl ray, aged 41, sentenced to 99 years and due for parole when he's 90, travelled from memphis jail to nashville state prison in an eight—car convoy. reporter: paul, what's it feel like to be married at last? - it feels fine, thank you. what are you going to do now? is it going to change your life much, do you think? i don't know, really — _ i've never been married before.
2:18 am
this is bbc news. the latest headlines: russian troops have regrouped around ukraine's capital kyiv. russia has also expanded its offensive to more cities elsewhere in the country. the central—eastern city of dnipro has been targetted for the first time. a russian air strike killed at least one person and damaged several civilian areas. in recent days, russia has repeatedly been accused of planning so—called false flag operations in its war against ukraine. they're called false flag because it wold involve a deception, mounting some kind of hostile act whilsttrying to pin the blame on someone else. the united states says it believes russia could do something involving chemical weapons in ukraine. there's also fear false flag operations could be used as a pretext to bring russia's ally belarus into the war. here's lyse doucet in kyiv.
2:19 am
—— liam collins is a retired colonel in the us special forces, who has helped ukraine develop its army in recent years. thank you very much for coming on the programme. it is thank you very much for coming on the programme.— on the programme. it is a pleasure _ on the programme. it is a pleasure to _ on the programme. it is a pleasure to be _ on the programme. it is a pleasure to be here. - on the programme. it is al pleasure to be here. given on the programme. it is a - pleasure to be here. given your exuerience _ pleasure to be here. given your exuerience of— pleasure to be here. given your experience of the _ pleasure to be here. given your experience of the ukrainian - experience of the ukrainian forces there, what is your experience? forces there, what is your exuerience?_ forces there, what is your experience? not surprisingly they have — experience? not surprisingly they have been _ experience? not surprisingly they have been doing - experience? not surprisingly they have been doing really. they have been doing really well, they put in massive reforms after 2014, so they made some reforms help from the west to get there as well as being armed with different weapons systems and they fought at the tactical level very well against the russians. taste at the tactical level very well against the russians. we know obviously the _ against the russians. we know obviously the motivation, - obviously the motivation, defending a city, defending your country is going to up your country is going to up your game, but in terms of tech —— tactical details, what are some of the advantages they have had?— some of the advantages they have had? , ., .., have had? one is what we call missin: have had? one is what we call missing command _ have had? one is what we call missing command in - have had? one is what we call missing command in the - have had? one is what we call. missing command in the united states, but really a discipline initiative byjunior officers, think of the laturner and company level where they can
2:20 am
conduct independent action, they are focused on accomplishing the mission, not necessarily on how they do that. russia does not have the capability, they don't have that capability and they do not give the trust of theirjunior officers so they cannot react on the battlefield in the same way. that is one of the key differences that allow them to perform the russians at that level. ~ ., , . perform the russians at that level. ~ ., ' . ., perform the russians at that level. ~ ., , . ., level. what difference do you think, level. what difference do you think. let's — level. what difference do you think, let's get _ level. what difference do you think, let's get onto - level. what difference do you think, let's get onto this - think, let's get onto this issue of false flags. what difference do you think this makes in any kind of exchange on the battlefield, any kind of calculation? is it something ukrainian forces will be prepared for now? i mean, ukraine — prepared for now? i mean, ukraine is _ prepared for now? i mean, ukraine is definitely - prepared for now? i mean, i ukraine is definitely prepared for it. zaporizhzhia was trying to use false flag before the invasion started, trying to say there was some kind of atrocity in dunbar�*s saying they were coming to their offence, thing the international community is aware of it, whatever russia tries it will not be believable ijy tries it will not be believable by anybody. tries it will not be believable by anybody-— by anybody. what about this latest announcement - by anybody. what about this latest announcement of - by anybody. what about this i latest announcement of troops or people, volunteers from the middle east coming to support
2:21 am
the russian side?— the russian side? yeah, think that is showing _ the russian side? yeah, think that is showing a _ the russian side? yeah, think that is showing a sign - the russian side? yeah, think that is showing a sign of - the russian side? yeah, think| that is showing a sign of where russia is at in this, chose russia's weakness, distractable these foreign fighters into support their operation because it has not gone well for them, thatis it has not gone well for them, that is the way they interpret that, it is not going well and they are not going to go well and fired well while they in ukraine, so it is not really surprising but it is an indicator of how russia has not performed up to how they thought they would.- performed up to how they thought they would. that is an interesting _ thought they would. that is an interesting assessment, - thought they would. that is an interesting assessment, does| interesting assessment, does not a great indictment of how well russia is doing, it is how urban welfare could potentially be a difficult opponent.- be a difficult opponent. right. the 're be a difficult opponent. right. they're going _ be a difficult opponent. right. they're going to _ be a difficult opponent. right. they're going to have - they're going to have experience fighting in that. but ukrainians, it is a home turf of them, they are volunteers, their citizens are waging a war of insurgency in these cities, they have the home—field advantage, they know the terrain, the structure of the terrain, the structure of the different than any middle east, the way the cities are
2:22 am
organised, and so it will give russia some capability, but it still doesn't take away that home—field advantage that the volunteers have. home-field advantage that the volunteers have.— volunteers have. ok, retired colonel liam _ volunteers have. ok, retired colonel liam collins, - volunteers have. ok, retired colonel liam collins, thank i volunteers have. ok, retired i colonel liam collins, thank you for being on the programme. thank you. the united nations says more than 2.5 million people have fled ukraine since russia invaded. most of them have entered ukraine's nearest european neighbours, and volunteers are helping to support refugees across eastern europe. the eu says ukrainians will be allowed to work in member states without a visa for three years. here in the uk, the prime minister says plans to allow some refugees to live with host families in the uk will be revealed next week. for ukrainian people waiting to get here, the announcement can't come soon enough. here's our special correspondent, lucy manning. millions are on the move — out of ukraine, inside ukraine. all have lost their homes and are looking for a new one. into the third week of this invasion, and finally british families will get the chance to help. the children of the dnipro orphanage have each other, but little else. everyone caring for someone.
2:23 am
fleeing from the fighting just in time. probably still a couple of hours away from the polish—ukrainian border. heading to meet them in lviv, a scotsman — part of a group of hibernian football fans who've been supporting this orphanage for years. steve and his charity have arranged homes and care for the children in scotland, but they still can't get them to the uk. the only thing that needs to happen for us to be able to bring the kids back, is for the uk government to say that it's ok to bring them in. we've got the support network in place, we've got the funding in place. the children know us and trust us. and that's it, that's all we are asking — just let us in. what's your message to the government on setting up the sponsorship scheme? get it done quickly and make it easy. the longer it takes, the more pain and suffering you are putting those kids through. we've got them away from the initial worry of being stuck in dnipro, but they are still in limbo. the government will eventually
2:24 am
announce next week plans to allow british families to open up their homes to ukrainians, and for companies and communities to sponsor refugees. but millions in poland, hungary, moldova, have already been doing this while british people have only been able to donate. the bus with the children finally crossed into poland last night. most of these children don't have passports, so they and others will still face visa bureaucracy. it's not clear how long they will have to wait to restart their lives — to be children again. for those who have watched the dislocation from the comfort of their homes and want to bring refugees into them, vetting will be required, which could also take time. but as many ukrainians can come to the uk as there are people and organisations willing to houses and support them.
2:25 am
the country is set to show its generosity. lucy manning, bbc news. i want to take you live now to ukraine. we have these live pictures of the capital, kyiv. it is coming up to 4:30 a.m., understandably quiet at that time. it comes at a very disquieting time. we know troops are deploying closer, russian troops, to the capital, kyiv, and we have seen satellite images earlier in this programme showing those troop movements, just 20—25 kilometres also outside the capital, here. we also know that russia has been successful in attacking more areas of ukraine more widely, cities and towns, that it hasn't hit so far have come under attack. stay with us, of course, all the latest developments from ukraine and the rest of the
2:26 am
world. plenty more online. to catch me there as well. i am on twitter. i am lewis vaughan jones. this is bbc news. bye—bye. this weekend, it's going to be a mixed bag. there's certainly some sunshine on the way, but many of us will need our umbrellas as well. right now, a weather front is crossing the british isles, extensive cloud out there. it's rain—bearing cloud. this is how it's going to stay for the next few hours or so. it's very mild out there as well. by early on saturday morning, temperatures will be around 7—8 celsius. it might be a little bit colder across parts of northern ireland in rural spots, maybe down to around two or so if the skies clear and the winds drop out. so, the forecast for the morning shows a lot of cloud and some rain across scotland, parts of northern england, brighter across the rest of england and wales, in fact, some decent sunny spells here through the middle of the afternoon. and i think the best of the weather will be the further east you are, but notice this sort of curl of rain here, this is a low pressure that's swinging into the south—west of the uk —
2:27 am
not only rain, but also some very strong winds. we're talking of gusts of 50—60, maybe even 70 mph, so really quite stormy around some of the coasts for a time, but we are only talking about the tip of cornwall, perhaps devon, maybe southern parts of wales — so not widespread gales, but very, very windy indeed, so take it steady if you are across this part of the world through saturday and saturday night. elsewhere, it won't be quite so windy. now let's have a look at sunday's weather map. low pressure just off the coast of scotland there, but pretty much dominating the weather across the uk. so this is early sunday. you can see a weather front curling into this area of low pressure, outbreaks of rain, sunny spells and a mixture of showers in the afternoon. it's going to be that changeable day, and very gusty winds right across the country, we're talking 30—40, maybe even 50 mph around some exposed coasts. so on saturday, the winds will be strong here, on sunday, it will be blustery right across the uk. temperatures on sunday typically between 10—12 celsius. not as mild as it's been, but, you know, mild enough. monday, a much better day. the winds will be lighter, there will be more sunshine around, still some showers across northern parts of the country, but in the south, it really is an improving picture. and that's how it's going to be over the next few days
2:28 am
into next week. in fact, in the south of the country, temperatures could even peak at around about 17—18 celsius. so a mixed weekend and then better the week ahead. bye— bye.
2:29 am
this is bbc news. the headlines:
2:30 am
russian forces are widening their attacks on areas across ukraine with more intense fighting reported in the countryside. russian troops are also beginning to regroup around the capital kyiv. moscow says it has now hit military airfields in the western cities of lutsk and ivano—frankivsk. the central eastern city of dnipro has been targetted for the first time. a russian air strike killed at least one person and damaged several civilian areas. fire and smoke could be seen rising from the city centre. authorities say apartment blocks and factories were hit. russia has called for foreign volunteers to fight alongside its troops in ukraine, suggesting there were thousands in the middle east ready tojoin. the us state department said any deployment of syrian fighters in ukraine would mark a further escalation of moscow's unjustified aggression. now on bbc news, global questions.

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on