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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  April 13, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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prices rise at their fastest rate for 30 years, driven by a sharp increase in petrol and diesel costs. food prices are also up — the hospitality sector is hit hard. i've never known nothing like this, whether it's the prices of food coming into the country, fuel prices, everything is sort of against you at the minute. vat going back to 20%. we'll have more on today's record inflation figures. also this lunchtime... the prime minister is "mortified", says the transport secretary, after borisjohnson and chancellor rishi sunak were fined for breaking covid rules. in ukraine, fighting
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continues on the streets of the port city of mariupol. a whole—life sentence is handed down to the islamic state sympathiser who murdered the mp sir david amess. china admits it's struggling to feed millions of people who are living under strict covid lockdown in shanghai. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel... the manager of northern ireland women, kenny shiels, is criticised after saying women don't take well to conceding because they're more emotional than men. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the soaring cost of fuel and food has pushed inflation to a 30—year high. and food has pushed it stood at 7% in the year to march,
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up from 6.2% the month before. prices are going up faster than wages, and there's pressure on the government to do more to help people who are struggling. and the cost of living is expected to rise even further because these figures don't include the recent increases in gas and electricity bills for millions of people. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. in this restaurant kitchen in eccles in greater— in this restaurant kitchen in eccles in greater manchester, global - in this restaurant kitchen in eccles. in greater manchester, global prices are feeding — in greater manchester, global prices are feeding through _ in greater manchester, global prices are feeding through to _ in greater manchester, global prices are feeding through to your- in greater manchester, global prices are feeding through to your pizza. i are feeding through to your pizza. two of— are feeding through to your pizza. two of the — are feeding through to your pizza. two of the world's _ are feeding through to your pizza. two of the world's biggest - are feeding through to your pizza. i two of the world's biggest producers of vegetable oil are russia and ukraine, and the price of it has doubled. the price of tomatoes from spain has more than doubled, partly due to brexit. and that is before you even talk about the cost of the energy needed to cook the pizza and keep customers warm, up, due to the war and the surge in demand for fuel as the global economy recovers from the pandemic. i’zre as the global economy recovers from the pandemic— the pandemic. i've never known nothin: the pandemic. i've never known nothing like _ the pandemic. i've never known nothing like this, _ the pandemic. i've never known nothing like this, whether - the pandemic. i've never known
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nothing like this, whether it's . the pandemic. i've never known i nothing like this, whether it's the prices of food coming into the country come fuel prices, everything is sort of against you at the minute. vat going back to 20%. it is stacking up. i think a lot of people will struggle. stacking up. i think a lot of people will struggle-— will struggle. businesses like this one are already _ will struggle. businesses like this one are already facing _ will struggle. businesses like this one are already facing inflation i will struggle. businesses like this one are already facing inflation ati one are already facing inflation at its highest for 30 years, and this month they have got a quadruple whammy, higher interest rates, higher wages, whammy, higher interest rates, higherwages, higher whammy, higher interest rates, higher wages, higher national insurance and soaring energy bills. with that kind of cost pressure, they have got no choice but to pass it their customers. this restaurant is likely to be forced to add to somewhere between 50p in the pound to the pizza price to avoid making losses, but that is nothing compared to other costs.— to other costs. increased petrol is something — to other costs. increased petrol is something we've _ to other costs. increased petrol is something we've noticed. - to other costs. increased petrol is something we've noticed. yes, i something we've noticed. yes, etrol, i something we've noticed. yes, petrol. i take _ something we've noticed. yes, petrol, i take these _ something we've noticed. yes, petrol, i take these everywhere, and my past _ petrol, i take these everywhere, and my past petrol cost has gone up drastically. my past petrol cost has gone up drastically-— drastically. something we didn't used to worry — drastically. something we didn't used to worry about _ drastically. something we didn't used to worry about or - drastically. something we didn't used to worry about or even - drastically. something we didn't. used to worry about or even think about_ used to worry about or even think about but— used to worry about or even think about but going _ used to worry about or even think about but going around making. used to worry about or even think. about but going around making sure lights _ about but going around making sure lights are _ about but going around making sure lights are turned _ about but going around making sure lights are turned off _
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about but going around making sure lights are turned off when _ about but going around making sure lights are turned off when you're - lights are turned off when you're not in _ lights are turned off when you're not in the — lights are turned off when you're not in the room. _ lights are turned off when you're not in the room.— lights are turned off when you're not in the room. some locals have launched a — not in the room. some locals have launched a charity _ not in the room. some locals have launched a charity to _ not in the room. some locals have launched a charity to help - launched a charity to help distribute food to locals who can't afford to eat out or even to shop for food. , ., .. , ., ., for food. historically we have found that peeple — for food. historically we have found that people didn't want _ for food. historically we have found that people didn't want to - for food. historically we have found that people didn't want to come - for food. historically we have found that people didn't want to come to | that people didn't want to come to the charity, because of the stigma attached. now, we are finding that forget the stigma, they need the help. having to swallow pride and accept the help that is on offer. when you break the rising costs of living down, the prices of services rose by 4%, not half as fast as the price of goods, up 9.4%. that underlines a key point. the upward pressure on prices is global. in europe this month they are expecting inflation of 7.5%. in the us, inflation has reached a ao—year high of 8.5%. and the official russian inflation figure is 12.5%, though the us reckons it's far worse than they are owning up to. the april inflation number is likely to be even higher, it could well be
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around 9% when we get the april inflation report next month. so, that points to a further squeeze on standards and it is not going away anytime soon. fin standards and it is not going away anytime soon-— standards and it is not going away anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of — anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of the _ anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of the cost _ anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of the cost of _ anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of the cost of living, - anytime soon. on the old-fashioned measure of the cost of living, the i measure of the cost of living, the retail prices index, it is already at 9%, its highest level since 1991. 0pposition parties are now saying the government must do more than it has two help millions cope with the tightest squeeze on living standards in more than a0 years. andyjoins me now. the bank of england is likely to keep putting interest rates up, can that helped?— keep putting interest rates up, can that heled? ~ ., , , that helped? well, the theory behind raising interest _ that helped? well, the theory behind raising interest rates _ that helped? well, the theory behind raising interest rates is _ that helped? well, the theory behind raising interest rates is that - that helped? well, the theory behind raising interest rates is that you i raising interest rates is that you have got to much demand in the economy, too much money is being spent, and you are trying to slow things down by raising the cost of borrowing, so that for example people with variable rate mortgages don't have is not money to spend, but that job don't have is not money to spend, but thatjob is already being done by energy bills, because they are already taking money that would have been spent on other things away, to been spent on other things away, to be spent on energy, so there is less
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money to be spent on buying things in shops, for example, which will slow the economy down in itself. actually when you look at economic growth now, it isjust actually when you look at economic growth now, it is just a actually when you look at economic growth now, it isjust a 0.1%, so it is not that the domestic economy going like the clappers is causing inflation, farfrom it. you have got something akin to 1970s stagflation here, where the economy is stagnant and we have got inflation at the same time, and really there is not a huge amount the bank of england can do to affect that situation with interest rate rises. perhaps the government could do something, and some people are now saying that rishi sunak missed an opportunity at the last budget, in the spring statement, and he should have done more to help ordinary families, because millions are now struggling with the tightest squeeze on living standards we have had since the middle of the 1970s.— standards we have had since the middle of the 1970s. andy verity, thank you- _ students and graduates in england face a rollercoaster of interest rates on their student loans over the next couple of years. according to the institute for fiscal studies, the interest will rise to 12% this september. the rate will dip in
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march 2023, when a cap on the interest will kick in. for students starting degree courses from next year, the rate will be fixed at a lower level. the transport secretary, grant shapps, has said the prime minister is "completely mortified" at being fined for breaking covid lockdown laws, adding that borisjohnson didn't knowingly break the law but had done wrong and has accepted responsibility. so far, only one conservative mp has publicly said again that boris johnson should resign. the prime minister, the chancellor and the pm's wife carriejohnson, who also received a fixed penalty notice, have all apologised. helen catt reports from westminster. the prime minister and the chancellor have apologised after the police found they broke the law. they've accepted fines for being at an event to mark mrjohnson's birthday, held in the cabinet room in june 2020. mrjohnson said he was only there for nine minutes, but that people had the right to expect better.
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mr sunak said that he deeply regretted the anger and frustration caused. but neither the chancellor nor the prime minister think it's something they need to resign over. he's paid the fine. it's an event of two years ago. i feel the same anger as everybody else that these events could take place, not least because i couldn't see my own dad, who i didn't know whether we'd see again, ever. so i completely get it. i also know that it wasn't done out of malice or with intent. it was a mistake, an error. and ijudge somebody overall for the way that they perform. most of the cabinet have now said they support mrjohnson and mr sunak staying in theirjobs. so, any real immediate risk to the prime minister would come from conservative mps choosing to call a vote of no confidence. now, so far, several dozen of them have come out to back mrjohnson. just one has publicly said he should go. in all conscience, i don't think the prime minister can survive, or should survive, breaking the rules he put in place,
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and he was on the tv every few nights reminding us all that we should observe. i just... we have to have higher standards than that, of people at the top. he's been fined. i don't think his position is tenable, in my view. the liberal democrats and the snp say mrjohnson should resign out of decency and honour. labour says it's not possible for him and mr sunak tojust get on with the job. they are spending more time justifying themselves and the parties they've been going to rather than focusing on the issues that we need them to address as a country. so the idea that we can't change leadership now because of the war in ukraine or because of the economic crisis, i think it's actually the other way around — that actually we need fresh leadership and we need leaders who can concentrate on thejob in hand. the met police haven't finished their investigation into parties in downing street, so it's possible there will be more fines.
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the full, detailed report by the civil servant sue gray is also still to be published. for now, many tory mps are publicly backing the idea that the war in ukraine means it isn't the time to change leader. the question is if that continues to hold. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us from downing street. where does this all go now, nick? jane, i think you will continue to hear opposition parties are saying the prime minister needs to resign, but there doesn't seem to be a great appetite within the conservative party right now for a change of leader. certainly from the conservative mps i have been speaking to over the past day or so, there is a reluctance to go into a leadership election at the moment, in part because of the war in ukraine, in part because it is not clear who the prime minister's successor would be. remember that many of the people who thought boris johnson may be on the way out hope that rishi sunak, who lives next
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door, would be his replacement. the fact that he has had a fine and a pretty torrid couple of weeks because of his own family tax affairs means that looks increasingly unlikely. so, i don't think you're going to see the prime minister removed imminently. but i don't think this story is going away, either. there are a few things that boris johnson away, either. there are a few things that borisjohnson will still be really nervous about. one of them is the fact that there could be more fines to come. we know that the met police investigation is continuing. the other is the fact that we don't know exactly when this will all conclude in parliament. i suspect next week there will be accusations that the prime minister misled mps, something he will have to answer at prime minister's questions. and finally, sue gray, remember her, the civil servant looking into all of this? she has got another report that she plans to publish as soon as the meta has finished its own investigation. sources close to that process have told me they think it
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will be detailed and it will be damaging. so, this story has gone on and on and on for several weeks now, i don't think it's done yet. mick i don't think it's done yet. nick eardley in downing _ i don't think it's done yet. nick eardley in downing street, thank you. for all the latest on the situation in ukraine, let's cross to my colleague clive myrie in the capital, kyiv. president biden says the evidence appears to suggest that russia is committing genocide here in ukraine. he warns it's becoming "clearer and clearer" that vladimir putin wants to "wipe out the idea of even being ukrainian". his comments come as there are growing signs russia could be on the brink of fully capturing the southern port city of mariupol, which has suffered a devastating six—week assault. the defence ministry in moscow says more than 1,000 ukrainian marines have surrendered in the area, although a top ukrainian official says some have joined another battalion.
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as our correspondent, dan johnson, reports from the western city of lviv, ukrainian troops in mariupol have said in recent days that they're running out of ammunition. the ruins of mariupol are bobic of russia's devastating bombardment. and now the city's last defences may finally be about to crumble. russian tv says these are ukrainian marines surrendering. the pictures are not verified, and the ukrainians denied claims that 1000 soldiers had given themselves up. russian soldiers are gaining more ground. these pictures were filled with their troops at the theatre where so many lives were lost. the mayor says it isn't even safe to count the bodies anymore. 21,000 residents have died he estimates. translation: ., ' ., translation: from the 9th of march, russian military _ translation: from the 9th of march, russian military planes _ translation: from the 9th of march, russian military planes were _ russian military planes were
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targeting our city, and since then, they have been doing this, you can see that... kharkiv has also been under bombardment, and it has been stated that it bombardment, and it has been stated thatitis bombardment, and it has been stated that it is not safe to get residents out today. i that it is not safe to get residents out toda . .., that it is not safe to get residents out toda . .. out today. i called it genocide because it _ out today. i called it genocide because it has _ out today. i called it genocide because it has become - out today. i called it genocide | because it has become clearer out today. i called it genocide i because it has become clearer and clearer— because it has become clearer and clearer that putin isjust trying to wipe _ clearer that putin isjust trying to wipe out — clearer that putin isjust trying to wipe out the idea of even being able to be _ wipe out the idea of even being able to be a _ wipe out the idea of even being able to be a ukrainian. and the evidence is mounting. — to be a ukrainian. and the evidence is mounting, it is different than last week, _ is mounting, it is different than last week, more evidence is coming out of— last week, more evidence is coming out of literally the horrible things that the — out of literally the horrible things that the russians have done in ukraine — that the russians have done in ukraine. and we can only learn more and more _ ukraine. and we can only learn more and more about the devastation. there _ and more about the devastation. there is— and more about the devastation. there is more heavy russian military equipment coming over the border into eastern ukraine, along with extra troops. pressure attacks are expected. and these british volunteers have driven from the uk
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over the borderfrom poland to deliver aid and help the resistance. simon has been in touch with a friend in kharkiv. i said, what is going on? and she goes, you don't want to know. she said it is awful, we've been bombed all night. she sent me some videos. i said, i will quit myjob, i want to do something to help you and your friends and your family can help to help you and your friends and yourfamily can help ukraine. these cars have been donated to ukrainian charities, but also military units. the last trip out here, the vehicle i drove out, the next morning, that vehicle we had a photograph of it on the front line being used literally within 12 hours of our arrival, for what they wanted it for. the ukrainians _ what they wanted it for. the ukrainians are _ what they wanted it for. the ukrainians are certainly thankful. we are waiting for you here, please, come _ we are waiting for you here, please, come here _ we are waiting for you here, please, come here to — we are waiting for you here, please, come here to live. we will food you, come _ come here to live. we will food you, come here, — come here to live. we will food you, come here, please. thank you. but before any — come here, please. thank you. emit before any victory parties, it looks like there will be more fighting.
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the siege of mariupol has been grim and deadly, it has been prolonged and deadly, it has been prolonged and destructive. and if russia does take that city, that is a strategic victory for the russians, it is a symbolic defeat for ukrainian resistance. who knows what it means for the estimated 100,000 residents who remain in that city, the people of mariupol have suffered longer than anyone in this conflict. us presidentjoe biden's reference to genocide is significant, it will be welcomed by the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky, welcomed by the ukrainian president, volodymyrzelensky, but welcomed by the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky, but his question will be, what difference does it make in terms of the response now from the usa, from nato or indeed from the usa, from nato or indeed from other nations? thank you, dan johnson. let's speak tojenny hill in moscow. has there been a response to president biden's comments on genocide?
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not yet but we would expect the kremlin to reject those allegations. it has repeatedly said it does not target civilians and continues to insist it has not committed war crimes saying that the ukrainians with their western allies had staged evidence of atrocities in bucha. standard kremlin response to deny everything and point the finger of blame back at the accuser. genocide is a word used a lot by the state media here because one of the baseless pretext that vladimir putin gives for his invasion as he is having to protect the russian speaking population of eastern ukraine against genocide perpetrated against them by the ukrainians. completely baseless. in terms of the comments from president biden there will be water off a ducks back for vladimir putin but what he does do
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with combinations and sanctions is to reframe them and tell russians that they are an example of western aggression against his country. this is vladimir putin's russia in which ukraine and the west are the aggressors and russia is the real victim. , , . ~ aggressors and russia is the real victim. , . ~' ,. 0ur correspondent, anna foster is in suburb of borodyanka, a few miles northwest of our position here. anna, it's places like borodyanka, and bucha of course where you were yesterday, where many civilians have died, that's helped give rise to president biden's genocide comments. that's right. in fact president zelensky has talked about having international banking on that and just in the last 30 minutes or so we had a surprise visit here in borodyanka by the presidents of
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poland, estonia, latvia and lithuania and they came to see this, an apartment building which is completely devastated and what is happening at the moment is an operation to bring down the remains of this residential building and find and recover the bodies that officials tell me are in the basement. the bodies of people who were hiding one apartment blocks like this were shelled. 0bviously genocide is particularly complicated to prove but when you see civilian buildings targeted like this that will add to that presumably upcoming criminal case that will happen at some point. criminal case that will happen at some point-— criminal case that will happen at some oint. . ~ ., some point. thank you. borodyanka, one of the suburbs _ some point. thank you. borodyanka, one of the suburbs just _ some point. thank you. borodyanka, one of the suburbsjust north - some point. thank you. borodyanka, one of the suburbsjust north of- one of the suburbs just north of kiel. that's it from me and the team here in kyiv, now back to you jane, in the studio in london. our top story this lunchtime... the cost of living is at a 30—year high, because of rising food and fuel prices.
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and still to come — thunderbirds are go — accompanied by a live orchestra, for a different kind of trip down memory lane. coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel: we'll have the latest from the monte carlo masters tennis, where the british number one cameron norrie is bidding to reach the last 16 against albert ramos vinolas. 25 million people in shanghai are in the second week of a strict lockdown, after a surge in 0micron cases. people in the city aren't allowed to leave their homes, and most have to order in food and water and wait for government deliveries — and now officials have admitted they're struggling to feed everyone. the bbc has seen inside government quarantine facilities where tens of thousands of people are being forcibly housed, as china tries to maintain its �*zero covid' strategy.
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0ur shanghai correspondent robin brant is himself is locked down — he sent us this report. more than two years after covid first emerged here, china is still trying to keep it out. and this is how it's doing it. tens of thousands of people forced into government run quarantine. in one of china's most advanced cities, the conditions for some are awful. translation: the moment i really broke down was when i entered i the cabin hospital. we spoke to this 26—year—old. she tested positive a few days ago. in china, symptoms or no symptoms, you are forced to quarantine. translation: we were first assigned to the shared area. j the condition was terrible. my roommate and i found two camp beds.
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there was only one restroom and one wash basin on each floor. many sleep next to each other. i was terrified. i broke down and cried. forced quarantine is one of two often brutal measures that china is using to try to beat covid. the other is citywide lockdowns. i'm two weeks into the one here, along with the other 25 million people that live in shanghai. now, for many, that means you can't step out of your gate. for some, it means you can't even go beyond yourfront door. and also daily worries about food. for some, even about water. for some, the plight is now desperate. a battle to place an order on your phone or a fight with the authorities, alljust to get food in. seeing video of communist party officials berated like this is rare here, but the party is digging in. everyone's being repeatedly tested, but this has become less
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about science, it's now a battle between a resurgent virus and communist party credibility. every province in this country has been told to prepare facilities like this, as fears of a nationwide wave spread. 0ld, young, up until a few days ago, babies — all were quarantined on their own. in china, it's the price they pay, the sacrifice they make. the official figures suggest the confirmed cases may have started to fall yesterday, but tipped up again today. those figures also claim there hasn't been a single covid death this time round, not one. no—one has officially died here from covid and zero covid remains the goal. china is still determined to prove it can beat nature. robin brant, bbc news, locked down in shanghai. a judge at the old bailey has
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sentenced ali harbi ali to a whole—life prison term for murdering the consevative mp sir david amess. describing it as �*a murder that struck at the heart of democracy�* judge nigel sweeney said the 26—year—old islamic state group sympathiser had shown no remorse. outside the court, a police officer read a statement on behalf of lady amess and sir david's family. there is no elation in ourfamily today, following this sentencing. 0ur amazing husband and father has been taken from us in an appalling and violent manner. nothing will ever compensate for that. we will wake each day and immediately feel our loss. we will struggle through each day for the rest of our lives. our last thought before sleep will be of david. our home and legal correspondent dominic casciani was in court for the sentencing.
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life with no possibility of parole for ally harbi ally who sat passively to the hearing this morning occasionally smiling. the reason why thejudge morning occasionally smiling. the reason why the judge went for the highest possible sentence that he could give out is because the crime crossed the legal bar is a crime of national significance, a terrorist killing, killing someone while they carried out the public duties for an effectively ideological because for the islamic state group. might dukes who spoke for the family and read a statement from one of the parliamentary assistance to david amess said that she still suffering flashbacks from that day. i think the last words to date should go to his family and one of the other
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things that were said is that it breaks our hearts to know a husband and father greeted a murderer with a smile of friendship. but now he is in a cell for the rest of his life. the government says it has reached a deal with dozens of developers for repairs to be carried out on medium and high rise buildings which have dangerous cladding. the deal comes nearly five years after the grenfell tower fire in london, in which 72 people died. 0ur correspondentjames reynolds is with me. a lot of firms signed up to this but not all? 35 a lot of firms signed up to this but not all? x: ., q; ., ., , , not all? 35 of 53 ma'or firms signed u . not all? 35 of 53 ma'or firms signed u- 18 did not all? 35 of 53 ma'or firms signed up rs did not. _ not all? 35 of 53 ma'or firms signed up 18 did not. and i not all? 35 of 53 major firms signed up 18 did not. and those _ not all? 35 of 53 major firms signed up 18 did not. and those that i not all? 35 of 53 major firms signed | up 18 did not. and those that signed up, the chairman of the homeowners federation said he expected the multi—follow. they've essentially agreed to pay to fix their own buildings, buildings that they put up buildings, buildings that they put up in the last 30 years and also agreed to pay into a fund to fix so—called buildings where the
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original development is not known or cannot be traced or forced to pay. the homeowners federation is not particularly happy about that, having to pay for other buildings on the government has warned that the 18 firms who have not signed up should do so or face consequences. that could be the removal of planning permission. but standing back to look at the overall principle of this there is something important to say, developers will pay for the cost to fix cladding and not leaseholders. in the last few years leaseholders have been very worried about the cost falling to them what they are going now to developers so leaseholders this morning have broadly welcomed the agreement. 0ne campaigning organisation said on social media it was a welcome step in the right direction but needed to be monitored building by building. and they had to be patrols to make sure fires did not break out. sylvia and gerry anderson were a powerhouse couple in british television in the 1960s and �*70s,
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particularly remembered for creating thunderbirds. but there was also stingray, captain scarlet and space: 1999. now, for the first time, all the theme tunes to their shows are going to be performed live by an orchestra in a special concert in birmingham. phil mackie has the story. stand by for action! remember this? we are about to launch stingray. if you do, i bet you're about to start singing along. # stingray, stingray! #. the classic shows were scored by barry gray and created by gerry anderson, seen here with two of his most famous characters. parker's been having a little bit to drink recently, so he's... gerry's son is jamie anderson, and he's brought some of his late father's models to symphony hall ahead of the concert. just the thought that in a few days' time, this place is going to be filled
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with over a thousand fans of anderson productions, and they're just going to relive, you know, six decades of anderson themes all in one night, i mean, i'm equally nervous and excited, i think. the orchestra won't be able to rehearse together until saturday, so they're learning their parts alone. richard harvey composed this theme to the �*80s show terror hawks. and in his studio in south london, is preparing for the concert, which he'll conduct. i think the music was absolutely pivotal. i mean, he was basically giving the world a puppet show. but barry gray's music turned it into a big screen thing. if it had been puppet show scale music, the whole thing would have failed. the music was such an integral part of it.
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he's not wrong. the classic themes composed by barry gray in the �*60s are unforgettable. i think it's going to be a very special thing. personally and rather selfishly. to hear all that stuff. because obviously i'm a very proud son, you know, knowing all that stuff was achieved by one man and that one man was my dad. to have it all performed on one night and all these people coming to enjoy it, will make it very special indeed. what are you particularly looking forward to and what's it been like coming back to it? oh, just looking through the scores, hearing it all again, prepping for the show, it'sjust brought it all back. it's just been fantastic. and when the baton comes down on the thunderbirds march, you know, every little hair on the back of my neck will be standing up. it just carries the best memories for me. so fab, spectrum is green, and stand by for action. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. time for a look at the weather.
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here's tomasz schafernaker.

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