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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 15, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. our top stories: russia says it's hit a factory near the ukraine capital kyiv that produces anti—ship and air—defence missiles — and warns it will intensify its missile attacks. it's after the sinking of the flagship of russia's black sea fleet. ukraine claims its missiles destroyed the moskva, but the kremlin says it was damaged by a fire on board. more than 150 palestinians have been injured in clashes with israeli police at the al—aqsa mosque compound injerusalem. three police officers were hurt at the historic site. asylum seekers could be flown from the uk to rwanda within weeks, under new plans from the british government. but some charities and politicians
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say the are proposals "cruel" and "chilling". it's hoped new research, mapping the genetic code of brain tumours, could lead to more accurate diagnoses and potentially better treatments. the russian defence ministry has warned it will intensify attacks around the ukraine capital, kyiv, after accusing ukraine of targeting russian border towns. moscow also claims its sea—based cruise missiles have struck a factory outside kyiv which produces anti—ship missiles, including the type which — according to ukraine — hit russia's flagship, the moskva. russia confirmed the 12,000—tonne cruiser from its black sea fleet had sunk but says it went down in rough seas as it was being towed to port, after a fire caused its ammunition to explode.
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from lviv in western ukraine, danjohnson, sent this report. once again, ukrainians shelter in fear of aerial attack and this was some of the damage on the edge of kyiv after explosions were heard close to the capital. russia says it targeted a military facility. a russian defence spokesman warned there would be more strikes on kyiv and released these pictures of missile launches from the black sea. russia presumably wants to show its firepower is not diminished despite the sinking of its black sea flagship. it says moskva went down in rough seas, being towed to port after a fire on board. there has been no comment on ukrainian claims of a successful missile strike. this is a tremendous victory for ukraine, even if they did not directly contribute to the sinking, and it is an enormous defeat for russia because it indicates the russian armed forces simply aren't up to snuff in terms
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of modern military capabilities. the ship was seen in the black sea only a few days ago. a presidential visit on deck a few years back shows russia's pride in the missile cruiser and the embarrassment of its loss. ukraine's president referred to it in his address on the 50th night of the war. translation: ukraine is defended by our people, all our people, - those who stop the advance of endless columns of russian equipment, those who rebuff constant attacks in donbas, those who have shown that russian ships can go only to the bottom. the moskva already appears on stamps as a symbol of ukrainian defiance. it has become a popular resistance image after ukrainian soldiers on a black sea island refused to surrender and told the ship firmly to go away. now it's propaganda value is even greater. translation: it is a symbol of this war for people who are suffering - and fighting in the battle zones. for them, it is inspiring.
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it is the motto of the war. it is kind of a symbol of ukrainian resistance. russia's biggest military warship and it has the name, moskva, i very symbolic, right? it is a boost to ukrainian morale, but there are fears the thinking —— sinking will have rattled russia and may mean even more aggression. russia is reported to have warned the united states of unpredictable consequences if washington and its nato allies continue to arm ukraine. the washington post says it's seen a diplomatic note in which moscow complains that the deployment of the most sensitive weapons systems is fuelling the conflict. our correspondent jenny hill is in moscow. what do we know about this? there's nothin: i what do we know about this? there's nothing i can — what do we know about this? there's nothing i can confirm _ what do we know about this? there's nothing i can confirm for— what do we know about this? there's nothing i can confirm for you - what do we know about this? there's nothing i can confirm for you but - nothing i can confirm for you but it's certainly true that moscow is very unhappy about the amount of weapons being supplied by the west
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to ukraine. i've been watching some state television talk shows today and presenters and pundits there are raging about that particular issue. it's also worth pointing out ukraine of course is cast as the aggressor in this conflict here in moscow by putin who insists he has only gone into ukraine to defend russian speakers there and against ukraine's aggression but the us and nato is clearly the other enemy here and we hear frequently from the kremlin and from officials throughout this government about the danger which the us represents to russia. for example, a common narrative here is that the us is trying to help ukraine develop biological weapons for use against russia or that it is trying to help ukraine to acquire nuclear weapons. we heard just a few
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days ago from the foreign minister, sarah guy lover of who said one of the aims of this operation was to prevent america from gaining world dominance —— foreign minister sergey lavrov. it doesn't surprise me we are hearing this report but it's not something i can confirm here. white in terms of developments,— in terms of developments, different claims as to — in terms of developments, different claims as to what _ in terms of developments, different claims as to what is _ in terms of developments, different claims as to what is the _ in terms of developments, different claims as to what is the cause - in terms of developments, different claims as to what is the cause of- claims as to what is the cause of the flagship sinking but also attacks overnight in kyiv. what details are you able to tell us on that? a, , . ., , details are you able to tell us on that? ,, ., , that? moscow is sticking to its ori . inal that? moscow is sticking to its original statement _ that? moscow is sticking to its original statement that - that? moscow is sticking to its original statement that there i that? moscow is sticking to its i original statement that there was that? moscow is sticking to its - original statement that there was a fire and an explosion on board which caused significant damage to the hull of the vessel and moscow says it was towing it back to port when in stormy seas it sank. they continue to insist that the crew on board were all safely taken off and
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we've had one report saying that some of them or all of them have now been returned to port in sevastopol. we don't have any more details about that and that's not a confirmed report. i have to say that the language here, it is always belligerent, but i think you can sense a slight escalation in the last couple of days. the ministry of defence has threatened to strike targets in kyiv and other parts of ukraine if, in its words, ukraine doesn't stop targeting russian territory. russia is now openly saying that ukraine has struck a number of times, regions which border ukraine. one report yesterday we could not verify accused ukraine of having targeted at residential area using military helicopters, conducting air strikes and residential buildings. we could not verify that these are the kind of claims the russian government is now talking about. we saw that strike
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overnight on the missile production factoryjust outside of kyiv and moscow says there will be more of that kind of strike action taken if ukraine does not stop targeting russian territory. we ukraine does not stop targeting russian territory.— ukraine does not stop targeting russian territory. we are seeing constant calls _ russian territory. we are seeing constant calls from _ russian territory. we are seeing constant calls from president. constant calls from president zelensky of ukraine for european nations to stop buying russian energy supplies. is there any coverage of that there and any concern or criticism of the kremlin that it concern or criticism of the kremlin thatitis concern or criticism of the kremlin that it is still doing this incredible trade with eu nations that it incredible trade with eu nations thatitis incredible trade with eu nations that it is so completely opposed to? not really. the main narrative here actually, i think putin knows perfectly well that the west isn't going to stop buying his energy anytime soon. you can see the it causes in europe whenever the subject is discussed. i think he uses the back to his advantage here
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—— uses that to his advantage. prices are rising here and it's hard to get electronic items or spare parts for cars, for example, but he says sanctions are not part of an economic war which has been going on against russia four years and isn't specifically connected to ukraine, he tells them they would have taken any excuse to slap on sanctions, but he says those sanctions hurt the west more than russia and so what goes on with these discussions of oil and gas with russia is an extension of that narrative of vladimir putin telling russians that are huge concerns about what would happen with revenues as oil and gas stop being sold to europe, but he knows perfectly well it would put you up in a pretty difficult position and that's what he continues to tell russians. —— put europe in a difficult position.
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anna a n na foster anna foster is in kozarovychi. we are seeing a lot of destruction in the area around the capital. that's riaht, the area around the capital. that's right. there _ the area around the capital. that's right, there are _ the area around the capital. that's right, there are still— the area around the capital. that's right, there are still so _ the area around the capital. that's right, there are still so many - the area around the capital. that's right, there are still so many of. right, there are still so many of these towns and villages around kyiv that were such a part of the fighting that were under russian control and on a beautiful afternoon like this, you see the beginnings of people trying to come back and rebuild their houses, you hear the drifting sound of hammering or broken glass being swept away. many people have fled from these areas, they haven't managed to return just yet. and what we saw in kyiv in the early hours of this morning, these three explosions that people living in the south of the city said they heard and russia's claims they had targeted a facility that was making
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anti—ship and anti—aircraft missiles. people are coming back here, they want to start rebuilding their lives and trying to have some kind of normality know that the fighting has moved further east but there is no doubt that when they hear these reports from russia and these threats coming from the kremlin that it makes them feel nervous and concerned in a they may be haven't been for a of weeks. who be haven't been for a of weeks. who is there to try _ be haven't been for a of weeks. who is there to try and _ be haven't been for a of weeks. who is there to try and do the rebuilding? we know a lot of men have stayed behind, women and children have left to a degree, how is the country able to rebuild itself? �* , . , , is the country able to rebuild itself? �* , ., , , ., ., , itself? it's happening on a very, very small _ itself? it's happening on a very, very small scale _ itself? it's happening on a very, very small scale but _ itself? it's happening on a very, very small scale but the - itself? it's happening on a very, very small scale but the really l very small scale but the really important things they are doing at the moment are things like de—mining. if you think how much ammunition was fired in areas like this, you see bullet casings and remains of rockets in the streets so
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one of the key things they are trying to do is make the area safe. we were driving just outside of kyiv a day or two ago and there was a ditch by the side of the road which had nearly 20 mortars which had detonated —— which had not detonated and had a little barrier to stop people walking into it. they are trying to do essential things first of all. devastating things like recovering bodies in places where buildings have collapsed and people have been hiding in the basement, that's something which is continuing, which is vitally important. one thing you see is that there is a real urge to give those people who have lost their lives so far a proper burial. we've seen those awful pictures of mass graves where people have been hurriedly buried under is a feeling now that they want to try and give people some dignity in death that they maybe didn't get in those first few hours and days. while the rebuilding
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starts and while it continues slowly, it's those key tasks that the people who are still here are focusing on right now. there have been fierce clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem's al—aqsa mosque compound. israeli police used tear gas and stun grenades in repsonse to palestinians throwing firecrackers and stones. reports suggest more than 150 palestinians and three israeli policemen were injured. our middle east correspondent, yolande knell, was in the area this morning. what happened early this morning was just after dawn prayers and that's when israeli police said they entered the compound around al—aqsa to clear away a large demonstration. it was packed for people who were there for ramadan. you can see some of them are holding up flags. police say stones have been thrown at
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jewish worshippers, at officers and fireworks were used by palestinian protesters, then they started using stun grenades, patterns to clear people away —— bat on —— but —— batons. i was able to see muslim worshippers going into al—aqsa because the doors had been reopened allowing them to go for lunchtime prayers. meanwhile, christians were therefore the traditional good friday procession going past and jews are preparing for passover but the concern is whenever there are clashes at this contested site in jerusalem, those can quickly escalate into a wider conflict between israelis and palestinians and so while it has come at the moment, the concern is that calm
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could be short lived. south african authorities say almost 400 people are now known to have died during severe floods in kwazulu—natal province — described as the worst in decades. the provincial premier said almost 41,000 people have been affected around the city of durban. the police, army and volunteer rescuers are widening their search for those still missing. our correspondent, vumani mkhize, has the latest from durban. it seems the people of durban are getting little reprieve. from today, it is worn to the weather is going to be severe. we are going to be experiencing thunder showers accompanied by hail and heavy winds and it seems it is starting now. i'm on the outskirts of a township which we could not enter because it is blockaded by shipping containers and the bridge that leads up to the township is actually blocked. right now i'm part of a convoy which is going to be with the minister of
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police and the minister of transport, we are going to be going into these communities affected by the floods to try and assist, assess the floods to try and assist, assess the damage but unfortunately for many people here who have lost their homes and livelihoods, they are going to be experiencing more bad weather during the course of this weekend. it's quite unfortunate because it's going to impact where they are going to be staying and also the massive mop up operations that had begun after the flags had ravaged parts of durban and kwazulu—natal. let's speak to namritha sivsanker, head of the non—governmental organisation, hope sa. they help underpriveleged communities in south africa. she is in durban in kwazulu—natal province. thank you forjoining us. can you tell us what you are hearing and seeing about the devastation on the ground there?—
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ground there? thank you for having me. i'm ground there? thank you for having me- l'm based _ ground there? thank you for having me. i'm based in _ ground there? thank you for having me. i'm based in kwazulu-natal. me. i'm based in kwazulu—natal currently in the devastation, it is really something that durban and kwazulu—natal has not seen before. we've had unrest before but this devastation is something that people were unprepared for, obviously, and it's on a massive scale where lots of families are left without homes, we've had buildings collapse on them, we've had families die, pets die as a result of the destruction by the floodwaters. mas die as a result of the destruction by the floodwaters.— die as a result of the destruction by the floodwaters. was there any notice given _ by the floodwaters. was there any notice given at _ by the floodwaters. was there any notice given at all? _ by the floodwaters. was there any notice given at all? where - by the floodwaters. was there any notice given at all? where people | notice given at all? where people are able to get out? ida. notice given at all? where people are able to get out?— notice given at all? where people are able to get out? no, it happened in the middle — are able to get out? no, it happened in the middle of _ are able to get out? no, it happened in the middle of the _ are able to get out? no, it happened in the middle of the night _ are able to get out? no, it happened in the middle of the night and - in the middle of the night and people had no notice and animals, families, children were swept away
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on bridges, driving over a bridge the floodwaters came through and washed the entire family away. hagar washed the entire family away. how are ou washed the entire family away. how are you able — washed the entire family away. how are you able to _ washed the entire family away. how are you able to help people at the moment? this that are you able to help people at the moment? thi— are you able to help people at the moment? this at the moment our foundation — moment? this at the moment our foundation has _ moment? this at the moment our foundation has been _ moment? this at the moment our foundation has been providing - moment? this at the moment our l foundation has been providing water because a lot of areas had no resources available so there was no electricity, no water, some areas had no access to food, so we've been providing cooked meals and providing mattresses, blankets, towels, clothing, all the basic necessities to keep people comfortable in community halls. i met a community centre in durban —— i am at a community centre, where there are over 100 flood victims, mothers, fathers, children, and they have been sleeping on the floor on a
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single blanket when the weather has turned as i speak now and the wind is icy and we are out delivering mattresses and necessities that we need just to keep comfortable whilst the government makes more plans to accommodate people. is the government makes more plans to accommodate people.— accommodate people. is the government _ accommodate people. is the government doing _ accommodate people. is the government doing enough i accommodate people. is the| government doing enough in accommodate people. is the - government doing enough in terms accommodate people. is the government doing enough in terms of doing all it can? can other nations help in any way? people other nations? i help in any way? people other nations? ~ ,., ., , nations? i think the government has been slow, nations? i think the government has been slow. may _ nations? i think the government has been slow, may because _ nations? i think the government has been slow, may because they - nations? i think the government has been slow, may because they have l been slow, may because they have never anticipated this as such, and it has been two or three days and we've been assessing what councillors and members of parliament have been calling us and saying, please assist this community, they've got no food for two or three days, they've got no mattresses and blankets, and we've been doing the best that we could do with whatever resources we have. we
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are funded by community members and small businesses so we rely a lot on support from internationalfunding support from international funding if support from internationalfunding if we can get the support. it helps us reach out to more people and the babies who don't have diapers and necessities and families who have lost everything. their entire houses been washed away and they walked out without even shoes on their feet. i know you're used to working with those who are vulnerable. what are the stories that are staying in your mind at the moment about what you've seen and the people you spoken to? i think for me the most heartbreaking story was of the mother and her three children, one was a baby a few months old, and the two kids were washed away over the bridge and their bodies were found and the
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funeral was today. for me, that was really, really heartbreaking. we also write a little boy where he washed away to the floodwaters, he drowned and his funeral was also today. as we drove into this area, you can see visible signs of houses collapsing where the entire structure has fallen down and half the house is hanging on a thread. it's unexplainable. i'm sure people have seen pictures and videos of the damage and destruction that's happened here. being able to witness it first hand is quite surreal to think that people in the middle of night had this happen to them. it is very scary and the overwhelming response we have had calls for help, to help the babies, help families
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with food and basic items, it's quite overwhelming for us as well. we understand. thank you for sharing that with us and hopefully more help will reach you and others.— will reach you and others. thank you so much. plans to send some asylum seekers who arrive in the uk to live in rwanda have been described as "absolutely chilling" by charities and politicians. britain's home secretary priti patel — who travelled to rwandan capital kigali to sign the deal — said the "vast majority" of those arriving in the uk "illegally" would be considered for relocation to rwanda. the government says the system would reduce people—smuggling and discourage people from trying to reach britain in small boats. earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent, jonathan blake, who gave us the latest. this is a clear attempt from the government to attempt to demonstrate that they can do something to limit or indeed stop small boat crossings coming across the english channel and people attempting to get into the uk and claiming
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asylum having taken that very dangerous route. it is something borisjohnson has made a political priority of his own to demonstrate tighter control over immigration after brexit, and this is frankly an embarrassment for him and his government on a daily basis to see in some cases hundreds of people making thatjourney with very little the government has been able to do about it. we have this new policy, a promise to transfer people to rwanda on arrival to the uk after being processed where they then will be able to claim asylum and potentially live and work. we have a few more details about the potential timing and the logistics of this, which were thin on the ground yesterday, it has to be said. but we are told the government's aim is to have it up and running within weeks, if not a small number of months. and in terms of the cost, things are a bit less clear, ministers not putting a figure on how much this will potentially cost in the long run,
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that's one of the criticisms that has come their way, that it will be a particularly costly policy, but nevertheless the home office minister tom pursglove said this morning that the government has to attempt to do something to tackle this problem. we have to get this under control. it is completely unacceptable and unsustainable to have thousands of people making these dangerous crossing, the channel, for example, as we move forward. and that is why doing this in this way will help us to stop that. it is one intervention amongst many but it should mean that not only are people not risking their lives, but we are also getting under control some of these costs. for example, we are spending nearly £5 million a day at the moment accommodating people in hotels. i think your viewers at home would say that's unsustainable and not acceptable. the question of how much this will cost is part of the argument as well as whether it will actually even happen because it is so difficult logistically to sort out. and there is some opposition within the governing conservative party. there is. there was a chorus of criticism,
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as you might expect, from opposition parties when the plans were announced yesterday. but there is some unease, it's fair to say, on the conservatives' own backbenches. while most tory mps have welcomed this policy and are behind it and believe that it will go down well with a lot of voters in their constituencies, there are some conservative mps speaking out. the most vocal of those so far, the former international development secretary, conservative mp andrew mitchell. the problem with the scheme that they have announced is that i don't think it will work, it's impractical, it's been condemned by the churches and by civil society. it's immoral, and above all, for conservative advocates, it's incredibly expensive. i mean, the costs are eye—watering. you're going to send people 6,000 miles into central africa. that's andrew mitchell speaking to the bbc this morning, a couple of hours ago.
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for many of us the weather throughout the easter period is going to be decent indeed with warm, sunny spells. today being the warmest day of the next few. but this headline definitely doesn't tell the whole story. in fact, many western parts of the uk are often cloudy, especially in coastal areas and that is because the weather system is on top of the british isles, even giving spots of rain and murky, drizzly conditions.
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mild to relatively overnight, may be cold spots falling to 4 degrees where the sky is clear overnight in east anglia. tomorrow we do it against so western areas at times will be cloudy but the vast majority of us are in for some warm spells of sunshine so if you are stuck underneath the cloud today and tomorrow, you are among the few. let's have a look at the forecast into sunday. there is a breakdown in the weather happening, you can see the weather happening, you can see the blue here, i weatherfront the weather happening, you can see the blue here, i weather front moves across ireland which means we are in for some wet weather in northern ireland and some western parts england, wales and scotland. easter sunday, outbreaks of rain reaching at least the west of northern
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ireland, eventually reaching western scotland. may nudging into pembrokeshire, possibly cornwall, but the bulk of the uk is in fact enjoying a relatively warm and sunny sunday. then on monday i think most of that rain will have fizzled out but more cloud and rain spreads into the north—west, so breezy conditions here and certainly i think some rain or at least showers there in western parts of scotland. again, the bulk of the uk enjoying sunshine. so a little bit of a mixed bag.
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now on bbc news. 20 years on from its release, bbc sport's miriam walker—khan looks at the impact bend it like beckham had on audiences, its legacy in the world of sport and how its humour and characters still make it relatable today. it's not fair, the boys never have to come home to help. iii it's not fair, the boys never have to come home to help.— it's not fair, the boys never have to come home to help. ifi had an arranred to come home to help. ifi had an arranged marriage _ to come home to help. ifi had an arranged marriage would - to come home to help. ifi had an arranged marriage would i - to come home to help. ifi had an arranged marriage would i get - arranged marriage would i get someone who would let me play football — someone who would let me play football whenever i wanted. who are ou talkin: football whenever i wanted. who are you talking to? _ football whenever i wanted. who are you talking to? bend _ football whenever i wanted. who are you talking to? bend it _ football whenever i wanted. who are you talking to? bend it like - football whenever i wanted. who are | you talking to? bend it like beckham was a hue you talking to? bend it like beckham was a huge success _ you talking to? bend it like beckham was a huge success and _ you talking to? bend it like beckham was a huge success and it _ you talking to? bend it like beckham was a huge success and it made - was a huge success and it made history as the highest grossing film about football. my my mum probably hates the film because we've watched it that many
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times. ., , ., because we've watched it that many times. ., ,., ., ,

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