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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 15, 2022 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. our top stories: russia resumes missile attacks near the ukrainian capital kyiv and claims to have targeted a factory making anti—ship missiles. it follows ukraine's claim that its missiles hit a russian flagship, which sank yesterday. ukraine says not all of the 500 crew were successfully rescued. at least 150 people are injured in clashes with israeli police injerusalem's al—aqsa mosque compound. it's hoped new research, mapping the genetic code of brain tumours, could lead to more accurate diagnoses and potentially better treatments.
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the russian defence ministry has warned it will intensify attacks around the ukraine capital, kyiv, after accusing ukraine of targeting russian border towns. moscow also claims its sea—based cruise missiles have struck a factory outside kyiv which produces anti—ship missiles, including the type which, according to ukraine, hit russia's flagship, the moskva. russia confirmed the 12,000—tonne cruiserfrom its black sea fleet had sunk. ukraine's coastguard now says the russians did not, after all, manage to evacuate all 500 crew. from lviv in western ukraine, danjohnson, sent this report. once again, ukrainians shelter in fear of aerial attack and this was some of the damage on the edge of kyiv
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after explosions were heard close to the capital. russia says it targeted a military facility. a russian defence spokesman warned there would be more strikes on kyiv and released these pictures of missile launches from the black sea. russia presumably wants to show its firepower is not diminished despite the sinking of its black sea flagship. it says moskva went down in rough seas, being towed to port after a fire on board. there has been no comment on ukrainian claims of a successful missile strike. this is a tremendous victory for ukraine, even if they did not directly contribute to the sinking, and it is an enormous defeat for russia because it indicates the russian armed forces simply aren't up to snuff in terms of modern military capabilities. the ship was seen in the black sea only a few days ago. a presidential visit on deck a few years back shows russia's pride in the missile cruiser and the embarrassment of its loss. ukraine's president referred to it in his address on the 50th night of the war.
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translation: ukraine - is defended by our people, all our people, those who stop the advance of endless columns of russian equipment, those who rebuff constant attacks in donbas, those who have shown that russian ships can go only to the bottom. the moskva already appears on stamps as a symbol of ukrainian defiance. it has become a popular resistance image after ukrainian soldiers on a black sea island refused to surrender and told the ship firmly to go away. now its propaganda value is even greater. translation: it is a symbol of this war for people - who are suffering and fighting in the battle zones. for them, it is inspiring. it is the motto of the war. it is kind of a symbol of ukrainian resistance. russia's biggest military- warship and it has the name, moskva, very symbolic, right? it is a boost to ukrainian morale, but there are
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fears sinking could have rattled russia and may mean even more aggression. russia is reported to have warned the united states of unpredictable consequences if washington and its nato allies continue to arm ukraine. the washington post says it's seen a diplomatic note in which moscow complains that the deployment of the most sensitive weapons systems is fuelling the conflict. we asked our correspondent jenny hill in moscow whether she could confirm the report. there is nothing there that i can confirm for you from here, i'm afraid, but it is certainly true that moscow is very unhappy about the amount of weapons being supplied by the west to ukraine and i have been watching some state television talk shows today and presenters and pundits there are raging about that particular issue and i think it's also worth pointing out that ukraine, of course, is cast as the aggressor in this conflict here in moscow by vladimir putin, who insists
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he has only gone into ukraine in order to defend russian speakers there and russia itself against the aggression of ukraine but the us and nato is quite clearly the other enemy too here and we hear frequently from the kremlin and from officials throughout this government about the danger which the us represents to russia, so for example, a very common narrative here is the us is trying to help ukraine develop biological weapons for use against russia or that it is trying to help ukraine to require nuclear weapons. we heard just a few days ago from the foreign minister, sergei lavrov, who actually said that one of the aims of this so—called special military operation was to prevent america from gaining world dominance, so set in that context, it doesn't surprise me at all that we are hearing this report, although as i say, it's not something that we can confirm here.
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south african authorities say almost 400 people are now known to have died during severe floods in kwazulu—natal province, described as the worst in decades. the provincial premier said almost 41 thousand people have been affected around the city of durban. the police, army and volunteer rescuers are widening their search for those still missing. inafew in a few moments we will talk to our correspondent live at the scene and has spent the day following government ministers around durban. there have been fierce clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem's al—aqsa mosque compound. israeli police used tear gas and stun grenades in repsonse to palestinians throwing firecrackers and stones. reports suggest more than 100 and 50 palestinians and three israeli policemen were injured.
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0ur middle east correspondent yolande knell was in the area this morning. what happened early this morning was just after dawn prayers, that's when israeli police say they entered the compound around al—aqsa mosque, to clear away a large demonstration. it was packed for people who were there for ramadan. you can see some of them were holding up flags. the police say that stones had been thrown atjewish worshippers at the western wall below. some were thrown at their officers as well and fireworks were being used by palestinian protesters. then they started using stun grenades, tear gas and batons to clear people away. those clashes went on then for several hours before hundreds of palestinians were arrested. i was able to see muslim worshippers going into al—aqsa mosque because the doors were being reopened, allowing them to go for lunchtime prayers. meanwhile, christians
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were there for the traditional good friday procession going past, and, of course, jews are there preparing for passover. the real concern is that whenever there are clashes at this most contested site injerusalem, known to muslims as haram esh—sharif, tojews as temple mount, those can quickly escalate into a wider conflict between israelis and palestinians, and so while it is, the concern is that calm could be short lived. africa let's return to south africa and talk to our correspondent at the scene. we only have to look behind you to get a sense of how big a deal this has been but you've been following government ministers around during the course of the day. what have they been shown?
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the minister took a helicopter ride around the township and it was disconcerting to see a number of containers which were strewn along the road. that'sjust part containers which were strewn along the road. that's just part of the damage we saw within that township. quite relieving for some people who live here, the ministerfor human settlements said the people who lost their house will receive some form of financial assistance from the state so some people have been rather pleased with that particular development but the rebuilding process in general is going to be monumental now. as you can see behind me, this is an informal settlement that was essentially
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washed away, parts of it were washed away and i was speaking to residents here who were distraught. 0ne away and i was speaking to residents here who were distraught. one woman was showing me her particular house which is just down over there and she was standing there just looking quite destitute and not knowing what to do next. that'sjust quite destitute and not knowing what to do next. that's just a quite destitute and not knowing what to do next. that'sjust a number of the harrowing stories i've been hearing here today. and research are still going on for people who have been reported missing around durban. surely the longer it goes on, the more the death toll figure will keep rising. absolutely. the number of is climbing toward 400. the community said a gentleman whose house was near here is still missing, they don't know where he is and another woman was telling me that a couple of bodies were found earlier today down this particular river. these stories are coming out and it's just an indication of the loss of life that took place here in durban.
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quite worryingly, the weather is not improving. the south african weather service has announced there is going to be a significant amount of rain overnight tonight and from tomorrow as well so it is more bad news for the people of durban. the as well so it is more bad news for the people of durban.— as well so it is more bad news for the people of durban. the last thing --eole the people of durban. the last thing peeple there — the people of durban. the last thing people there need. _ the people of durban. the last thing people there need. thank— the people of durban. the last thing people there need. thank you - the people of durban. the last thing people there need. thank you for i people there need. thank you for that update from durban. the terrible flooding that has affected people for the last five days following the storm earlier in the week. russians have began exhuming bodies buried in residential areas in mariupol, according to those who accuse them of trying to cover work crimes. local officials say russian forces are now operating 30 mobile crematoriums to prevent disposal of
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bodies. 0n crematoriums to prevent disposal of bodies. on wednesday, the organisation for security and co—operation produced a report into russian violations of international law in ukraine. 0ne one of the report's lead authors joins us now from prague. thank you for being with us. can you summarise what the key findings are from your report? what the key findings are from your re ort? , ., what the key findings are from your re ort? ,., , , report? the report is indeed very lona , report? the report is indeed very lona, it report? the report is indeed very long. it is — report? the report is indeed very long, it is almost _ report? the report is indeed very long, it is almost 100 _ report? the report is indeed very long, it is almost 100 pages - report? the report is indeed very long, it is almost 100 pages and| report? the report is indeed very i long, it is almost 100 pages and the main conclusions could be probably, we have scrutinised the first five weeks of the conflict because the time was limited and we found evidence that both violations of international humanitarian law and violations of international human
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rights law are committed predominantly in the areas under the effective control of the russian federation. effective control of the russian federation-— effective control of the russian federation. ,, , ., , federation. ose is a member led organisation _ federation. ose is a member led organisation so _ federation. ose is a member led organisation so you _ federation. ose is a member led organisation so you can - federation. ose is a member led organisation so you can only - federation. ose is a member led organisation so you can only go l federation. ose is a member led| organisation so you can only go as somebody who has been asked to investigate, in the end it can only go as far as the organisation and its members are willing for it to go. russia is a member of the 0sc which it isn't a member of other organisations like the eu. could that have an impact on whether or not this matter is pursued by the osc? ., , ., , ., ,., osc? our rule was an expert role so we produced — osc? our rule was an expert role so we produced it _ osc? our rule was an expert role so we produced it impartially. - osc? our rule was an expert role so we produced it impartially. the - we produced it impartially. the report is public, it is the first report is public, it is the first report of its type and it can be used not only by the 0sce, it is
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also available for other bodies such as the international criminal court or the new commissioner inquiry which has been established by the un human rights council so it is broadly used in the report. given our broadly used in the report. given your professional _ broadly used in the report. given your professional knowledge - broadly used in the report. given your professional knowledge in the subject area and how this law is applied and enforced or the limits of how it is enforced internationally, how would you hope this will advance the cause of pursuing those who may have committed either war crimes or crimes that have endangered civilian populations that the rules of war do not permit? the populations that the rules of war do not permit?— not permit? the report focuses not onl on not permit? the report focuses not only on war — not permit? the report focuses not only on war crimes _ not permit? the report focuses not only on war crimes but _ not permit? the report focuses not only on war crimes but also -
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only on war crimes but also violations of human rights law and that's the responsibility of state so it can be used in not only procedures but negotiations involving states which have been found acting in violation of these bodies but also in criminal procedures and against persons responsible for crimes against humanity or war crimes. since we only have three weeks complete the report, we are not in a position to identify these concrete individuals which require more in—depth investigation that can be carried out by the international criminal court or by criminal courts operating at the national level in different countries across europe. and not only in europe.— different countries across europe. and not only in europe. thank you very much — and not only in europe. thank you very much for— and not only in europe. thank you very much forjoining _ and not only in europe. thank you
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very much forjoining us. - and not only in europe. thank you very much forjoining us. thank. and not only in europe. thank you | very much forjoining us. thank you very much for “oining us. thank you and aood very much forjoining us. thank you and good afternoon. _ good afternoon. joe root has stepped down as england test captain after the team's run of poor performances. england slumped to a io—wicket defeat to the west indies in the third test in grenayda last month as their winless run stretched to nine matches. in the aftermath, root said he wanted to stay on but now says "the timing is right" to step down. he holds the record for the most number of matches and wins as england captain. this is what root had to say.
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eventually you start to realise that however passionate you may be about the job, and it's one of those jobs that does grab you, you never want to give it up no matter how bad things are, you have to look at results and when i talked to him at the end of that test match, you have to say it's a results driven game and if you're not getting enough wins and too many losses, which is what has been happening for the last 12 months, at some stage something has to change. joe is one of these lovely men that everyone from the age of three to 93 loves. we all admire his cricket but eventually as a leader, you realise you can only say so many things so many times. if the messages aren't getting through, it is normally time for someone else to try and get another message through. in football, burnley have sacked their manager, sean dyche, with the club four points from premier league safety.
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there are just eight games remaining in the season with burnley looking to avoid dropping back down to the championship for the first time since 2016. dyche was the league's longest serving manager, having been at the helm for almost 10 years. very surprised by the dismissal of sean. after nine and a half years, he's going down as a legend and has brought the community and the club and the town together over that time and put burnley on the map. i'm very surprised by it but at the same time if you look at the stats and where we are, it's been a difficult season. four wins this year, it has not been good enough so you can see why the chairman has made those changes but you will see a lot of unhappy supporters around at the moment. the ricketts family—led consortium has pulled out of the running to buy chelsea because of what they call "unusual dynamics around the sales process". the family, which owns mlb
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side the chicago cubs, had made the shortlist of bidders. but have now opted not to make a final bid. the consortium included billionaire hedge—fund entrepreneur ken griffin and cleveland cavaliers owner dan gilbert. chelsea fans have protested against the ricketts bid in recent weeks. in tennis, great britain has the chance of qualifying for the finals of the billiejean king cup — they're in action against czech republic on friday and saturday, with the best of five matches across the two days. the czech republic won the opener — marketa vondrousova with a comprehensive win over harriet dart — but world number 12 emma raducanu has battled back, beating tereza martincova. raducanu fought hard to win 7—5, 7—5. bryson dechambeau is set to miss golf�*s next major championship after having wrist surgery. the american fractured a bone in his hand and injured his hip
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when he slipped on a marble floor while playing table tennis in february. he will be out for around two months and is unlikely to feature in the us pga in may. that's all the sport for now. brain tumours are the most common cancer killer in people under 40. brain tumour patients at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge are having their cancer genomes — the entire dna — sequenced. the aim is that tumour mapping will lead to more accurate diagnosis. a warning — this report from our medical editor fergus walsh contains images of brain surgery. i've got a rough idea of what's going to happen. i'm going to be partially awake, but i'm going to be woken up during the surgery. daniel is just 34. he's on his way to theatre for brain surgery. i think that's the most scared about is being awake and having someone rooting around in my head.
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daniel has a large brain tumour, the round white area at the top of this scan. to begin with, daniel is fully anesthetized while surgeons remove part of his skull. but once his brain is exposed, he's woken up and must be kept awake. daniel, how are you feeling? we just need to be a bit careful at the back because that's close to where the part of your brain that moves the right hand side of your body. before removing each piece of tumour surgeons need to be sure it won't affect daniel's speech or his ability to move his body. so at each step, the team checks his responses. part of daniel's tumor
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will be sent for whole genome sequencing. its entire dna will be mapped. what that means is essentially we're looking at the abnormalities in the genes that we think caused the tumor in the first place. so we're really able to drill down into the molecular problems in the tumor. daniel's diagnosis, his future, rests on what they find in these tubes. dna sequencing used to take months. now it can be done in days. at these labs near cambridge of us biotech illumina. not only does it speed up diagnosis, but reveals what is driving the growth of a patient�*s cancer. nothing can prepare a patient or a family for the nuclear- bomb that detonates - at the center of your world when you receive a diagnosis. jess lost her mother, tessa jowell, to brain cancer in 2018. the former labour cabinet minister spent her last months campaigning for more funding and research
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into the condition. brain cancer is the biggest cancer killer of children i and people under40 in the uk, yet treatment options have - not changed in decades. because this is low grade... just two weeks after surgery, daniel returns to addenbrooke's with his brother to receive his results. this is a diagnosis that is treatable, but it's not a curable condition. ok, so this is something that will be life—limiting. about 50% of people survive for 15 years or more. but i think it's important that you understand this isn't something that's going to go away. yeah. wow. i don't know what to say. sure. you don't have to say anything. toward the next 15 years in my life. here with me now is hugh adams from brain tumour research uk.
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for many people it's a devastating diagnosis, not least because the progression of the disease can vary greatly. what difference do you hope this project will make for those who will still get that diagnosis? irate will still get that diagnosis? we are ve will still get that diagnosis? - are very excited about this news, we are very excited about this news, we are very excited about this news, we are very clear at our research group that we want to find a cure for all types of brain tumours and anything that takes us closer to a cure is to be encouraged. this genomic mapping and future of tumour types is a useful technique that i think we would also add in when we talk about access to personalised medicine and where we go next, we need to invest in the basic science research that underpins all progression because we can diagnose better, we can move forward without understanding in some ways but it is part of the jigsaw we have added into the scientific research and that is
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where the progress will be made. has basic knowledge of how cancer affects the brain, the damage it does under way tumours develop changed much in recent years? has that been one of those areas where we are relying on knowledge we gain 40, 50 years we are relying on knowledge we gain 40,50 years ago? we are relying on knowledge we gain 40, 50 years ago? it’s we are relying on knowledge we gain 40. 50 years ago?— 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved — 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved as _ 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved as fast _ 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved as fast as _ 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved as fast as we - 40, 50 years ago? it's an area that hasn't moved as fast as we would i hasn't moved as fast as we would have liked it too which is down to funding issues. 1% of the national cancer spent has been allocated to this disease so in terms of our campaigning, we are clear on what we are looking for. if we can get the sort of funding that has been had by breast cancer research, by leukaemia, if we can get that into our arena, we leukaemia, if we can get that into ourarena, we can leukaemia, if we can get that into our arena, we can progress me there that has been made and brain tumour patients deserve that.— patients deserve that. thank you for talkin: to patients deserve that. thank you for talking to us- _ patients deserve that. thank you for talking to us. apologies _ patients deserve that. thank you for
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talking to us. apologies for - patients deserve that. thank you for talking to us. apologies for the - talking to us. apologies for the picture there, he isn't really that colour! but encouraging news, let's hope for more in future. hello. for many of us, the weather throughout the easter period is actually going to be very decent indeed with warm sunny spells. today being the warmest day of the next few. but this headline definitely doesn't tell the whole story. in fact, many western parts of the uk are often cloudy, especially around coastal areas and that's because there is a weather system pretty much right on top of the british isles, even giving some spits and spots of rain, those murky, drizzly conditions around coasts. only 15 in plymouth whereas inland
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it's in excess of 20 celsius. look how cool it is on the north sea coasts, in aberdeen. in the north—west of the uk, i think thick cloud and a few showers through today and again low cloud around these western coasts, both through today, tonight and into tomorrow. mild, relatively overnight, typically around six, seven, 8 degrees, maybe cold spots falling to 4 degrees where the sky is clear overnight in east anglia. and tomorrow we do it all over again. so western areas at times will be cloudy but the vast majority of us are in for some warm spells of sunshine, so if you're stuck underneath the cloud today and tomorrow you are among the few. many of us are enjoying the fine weather. let's have a look at the forecast as we head into sunday. there is a bit of a breakdown in the weather happening. you can see the blue here, that's rain. a weather front moves across ireland, that means we are in for some wet weather in northern ireland and some western parts of england, wales and scotland.
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here's the forecast, easter sunday, outbreaks of rain reaching at least the west of northern ireland. eventually probably reaching western scotland. maybe nudging into pembrokeshire, possibly cornwall, but look at that, the bulk of the uk is in fact enjoying a relatively warm and sunny sunday. then on monday i think most of that rain will have fizzled out but more cloud and rain spreads into the north—west, so breezy conditions here and certainly i think some rain or at least showers there in western parts of scotland. again, the bulk of the uk enjoying sunshine. so a little bit of a mixed bag.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines... russia says it's attacked a weapons factory in kyiv which produces anti—ship missiles, including the type which, according to ukraine, hit russia's flagship, the moskva. it sunk on thursday as it was being towed to port. the ukrainian coastguard says the russians did not, after all, manage to evacuate all 500 crew from the moskva, despite their claims. calm has returned for now tojerusalem's al aqsa mosque compound after more than 150 palestinians were wounded in clashes with israeli police earlier. some 50,000 worshippers performed the friday prayers peacefully. almost 400 people are confirmed to have died in floods in kwazulu—natal province in south africa. authorities say it's the wost
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flooding in decades, and are widening the search for those still missing.

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